World News
IN SHORT
Saturday, February 24, 2018

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
market news

AD
The Nasal Flu Vaccine Is Set to Come Back Next Year. Here's What to Know About It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Including how well it works
This Floating Space Hotel Could Be Built by 2021
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bigelow Space Operations is betting that the hyper-wealthy will pay millions to float in space from the comfort of their hotel room
The daily business briefing: February 23, 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
N/A
Watch NASA test fire a giant rocket engine for its mighty Space Launch System
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ground at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi trembled this week as NASA conducted the latest booster-engine test for its Space Launch System. Spectacular footage taken at the site demonstrates its awesome power.
English pub scraps snail race as cold makes competitors sluggish
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
An English pub has canceled a charity snail race scheduled to take place on Saturday after unseasonably icy weather made potential competitors too slow to compete. "The cold snap has led to a medical problem with our racing snails - it's called hibernation," the Dartmoor Union Inn in southwest England said on its Facebook page. Temperatures across much of Europe are below normal for the time of year, and British weather forecasters have warned of bitterly cold winds and snow that could disrupt transport and cut off rural communities over the coming week.
Readers write: Reporter’s experiences over the decades in China
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Regarding the Jan. 22 cover story, “My return to China”: Rarely have I read such a remarkable essay as this one. The stories of Ann Scott Tyson’s two visits are filled with keen observation, emotion, and compassionate comparisons of social norms past and present, leaving one with an early warning signal that demonstrates how quickly invasive governmental surveillance can cast a chill on a nation’s populace, silencing natural desires to communicate in even the simplest conversations with others. Recommended: How much do you know about China?
We want to turn the moon into a 'gas station for outer space' — Commerce's Wilbur Ross
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says the future of commercial space projects depends on colonizing the moon.
Norway Crushed the Competition at the Winter Olympics. Here Is the Tiny Country's Secret
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Norway's dominance at the Winter Olympics is about more than talent. It's athletes share the secrets behind their success in PyeongChang
There's an uptick in HIV in these millennial groups. Here's why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) just released a report about HIV trends for people under 30 in the U.S., and the numbers show an increase in one particular group: 25- to 29-year-olds. After collecting data from all over the country on HIV and AIDS diagnoses between 2010 and 2014, the CDC found that overall rates of infection for 13- to 29-year-olds has remained stable overall. And for some of the younger groups, like those aged 15 to 19, rates have actually gone down. But "We can't pat ourselves on the back just yet," said Craig Wilson, a professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, in an interview. SEE ALSO: 3 of 4 kids who've died from flu this year weren't vaccinated, say federal doctors Wilson notes that although we're seeing an overall "flattening" in the number of HIV infections in younger demographics — which is certainly better than an increase — the results shouldn't be taken as too encouraging. "There are good things if you look at it historically, but the bad part is, why aren’t we doing better?" asked Wilson, who was not involved in the CDC report.  Although these are estimations and not exact numbers, rates increased from around 32 to 35 cases per 100,000 people in the 24- to 25-year range and from around 30 to 34 cases in the 26- to 27-year range between 2010 and 2014. (Collectively, these fall under the CDC data collection system for the 25-29 year range.) HIV — a virus that attacks and destroys cells in the body's immune system to the point that it causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS — has existed in the U.S. since the 1970s and was first recognized by medical experts in the early 1980s. Nearly four decades later, tens of thousands of new infections are diagnosed in the U.S. each year. Risk of infection from sex, however, can be reduced by over 90 percent if modern PrEP medications are taken as directed, says the CDC. These drugs are designed to stop HIV from establishing itself or spreading throughout the body. And, of course, a person has to know they're infected to start taking medication. What's worrisome is that the younger demographic of 13- to 29-year-olds makes up a disproportionate number of new HIV infections. The CDC says this group made up 23 percent of the U.S. population in 2014, but accounted for 40 percent of diagnoses that year.  Why aren't the infection numbers going down? The flattening trend in HIV diagnosis among younger teens and millennials isn't bad, in the sense that matters could be worse — and still could get much worse. Wilson cites CDC stats from 2016 that he called "scary"; this government report projected that half of black gay men and a quarter of Latino gay men would be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetimes.  Although there's potential for HIV diagnoses to dramatically increase in some populations, experts still find the recent flattening trend unacceptable. "The status quo isn’t so good — we need to do a better job," said Sharon Nachman, division chief of pediatric infectious diseases and professor of pediatrics at Stony Brook Medicine, who also took no part in the CDC report.  New @CDCMMWR: Study analyzing #HIV among 13-29 year-olds underscores the importance of targeting prevention efforts to persons
President Trump at CPAC Insists Arming Teachers, Not Gun Control, Will Keep Schools Safe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"People that are adept with weaponry and with guns — they teach"
World's Oldest Cave Paintings Show Neanderthals Were Making Art More Than 20,000 Years Before Modern Humans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Modern humans are not the only species to have produced art, according to a new study that has been described as a “major breakthrough” in our understanding of human evolutionary history. Researchers have identified the world’s oldest known cave paintings, revealing that they were created by Neanderthals, not modern humans. An international team of researchers, led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the University of Southampton, dated cave paintings at three sites in Spain to more than 64,000 years ago.
Florida High School Reopens After Deadly Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The school is reopening for teachers Friday
President Trump Issues 'Largest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More than 50 vessels, shipping companies and trade businesses were sanctioned
Heavy Drinking Is the Biggest Risk Factor for Dementia, Study Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
According to a new study, many cases of early-onset dementia before the age of 65 were related to chronic heavy drinking.
Finding alien life probably won't drive us into panic and chaos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On a humid summer's day in 1996, President Bill Clinton appeared on the South Lawn of The White House and announced that NASA had discovered what looked to be fossilized bacteria on a Martian meteorite.  It was unprecedented for a President to publicly address potential evidence of alien life — and on television. But the American public didn't react to the unexpected announcement with panic, fear, or social upheaval. "You didn't see droves of people abandoning their religion, spouses, or jobs," said Michael Varnum, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University, in an interview. SEE ALSO: That 'alien' bacteria on the Space Station? It's probably not aliens. Scientists, however, have never been able to prove that these microbe-like forms on the meteorite, which was found in Antartica, were clear evidence of extraterrestrial life. Those telltale shapes could have simply been bacteria-like shapes on a space rock. A tube-like formation on the Martian meteorite, named Allan Hills 84001, which NASA cited as potential evidence of primitive extraterrestrial life in 1996.Image: NASA"I’m reminded of that quote: An extraordinary claim requires extraordinary evidence," said Rebecca Mickol, an astrobiologist at the Naval Research Laboratory's Center for Biomolecular Science and Engineering, in an interview. "We can’t just go off of what it looks like." But NASA's search for extraterrestrial life continues — specifically with its Mars' rovers and planned future missions. Varnum sought to understand how humanity might react to indisputable evidence of the discovery of alien life. This research, published in Frontiers in Psychology and presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's annual meeting last week, reveals that we would likely respond positively to such a discovery. "If we discover evidence of extra-terrestrial life, we'll be fine with it — we'll be happy," said Varnum.  Varnum's research team asked over 500 study participants to write responses to a hypothetical announcement of an extraterrestrial discovery. Separately, over 250 participants responded in writing to the front-page New York Times article from 1996, which reported President Clinton's announcement of the potential finding of primitive Martian life. Additionally, the team also analyzed the way journalists wrote about 15 news stories involving potential discoveries of alien life or alien planets.  The team ran all of this language through the same text analysis software, and the results were "significantly" more positive than negative. This study, however, focused on the discovery of microbial life — not intelligent lifeforms. Still, Varnum believes the reactions to more advanced, perhaps communicative life would probably be positive, too.   "My hunch is just as long as NASA doesn't detect a hostile fleet of spaceships, it would be the same thing," he said. This research contradicts a somewhat similar study carried out by the U.S. government in 1953. The Robertson Panel, which was convened at the CIA's recommendation, concluded that alien-piloted UFOs probably weren't real. But, the report noted the potential of "mass hysteria" among the public after being exposed to reports of UFO activity.  But there has been no such hysteria despite all that's happened since, including Clinton's televised announcement, NASA's multiple revelations of once habitable conditions on Mars (and beyond), and reports about the potential of alien life in other parts of the galaxy. "If the Robertson Panel were right, then you would expect society to devolve into utter chaos," said Varnum.  The Mars 2020 rover, set for launch in 2020, will be equipped with a high-tech camera that inspects Martian terrain for the places most likely to have once harbored life — or perhaps even harbors life today.Image: NasaMickol, like most astrobiologists, believes we'll find primitive life before learning about or coming in contact with a more intelligent persuasion of extraterrestrial.   "With microbial life everyone might be more excited because it's not threatening," said Mickol.  But, she notes, public reaction to smarter life might not be so enthusiastic.  "If they’re presented with a technologically-advanced civilization that’s trying to contact us, they might have a different approach to that," she said.  Under extreme circumstances — well beyond a Mars rover coming across dead microbes near a once briny Martian spring — Varnum agrees.  "More than likely, I would guess it would be more positive than negative," he said. "Unless a spaceship lands on the White House lawn."  WATCH: Neil DeGrasse Tyson explains the term 'the stars align'
Former Trump Adviser Rick Gates Has Pleaded Guilty in Robert Mueller's Investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The plea comes a day after Gates and Paul Manafort were indicted in a second round of charges
Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi takes up Elon Musk’s challenge on flying cars vs. tunnels
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pop up some more popcorn: Billionaire Elon Musk has gotten himself into another CEO vs. CEO challenge, this time with Uber’s Dara Khosrowshahi over air taxis. Uber and many other companies are working on electric-powered, flying vehicles that could carry passengers autonomously between landing pads, circumventing traffic jams. Uber has said it could start testing what are basically flying cars by 2020 in Los Angeles, Dallas-Fort Worth and Dubai. Khosrowshahi — who left Bellevue, Wash.-based Expedia last year to become Uber’s CEO — is sold on the idea. Musk isn’t. Instead, the CEO of SpaceX and Tesla is partial to… Read More
Florida's Governor Proposes Raising the Age Limit for Buying a Firearm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We must come together and even cross party lines"
The Flu Shot Is More Effective Than We Thought This Year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's been a bad flu season, but this year's vaccine does offer some protection against the nasty bug, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Why Do Humans Love Pointing?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pointing seems to be in our nature: When people want to draw attention to something, we instinctively extend an index finger. But new research shows this may not be human nature after all.
One of two men hired by man who planned his family's murder confesses to cops: Part 4
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As Bart Whitaker fled to Mexico under an alias, cops found evidence he may have planned his family's murder two years earlier.
Inside Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir’s Rise From Olympic Figure Skaters to Beloved Commentators
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lipinski tells TIME how their partnership began
President Trump Still Hasn't Forgiven John McCain for Killing Obamacare Repeal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I don't want to be controversial so I won't use his name"
Flu Killed 13 Children Last Week But May Be Winding Down, CDC Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The end of flu season may be near
Russian Olympian Who Wore an 'I Don't Do Doping' Slogan Shirt Just Failed Her Drug Test
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An Olympic Athlete from Russia failed a drug test after competing in the two-woman bobsled event, and her apparel is raising eyebrows.
Kylie Jenner Tweeted About Snapchat. Then Its Stock Lost $1.3 Billion in Value
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'sooo does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore?'
A Race Against Time to Excavate an Ancient African Civilization
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In 1905, British archaeologists descended on a sliver of eastern Africa, aiming to uncover and extract artifacts from 3,000-year-old temples. They left mostly with photographs, discouraged by the ever-shifting sand dunes that blanketed the land. “We sank up to the knees at every step,” E. A. Wallis Budge, the British Egyptologist and philologist, wrote at the time, adding: “[We] made several trial diggings in other parts of the site, but we found nothing worth carrying away.”
Trump is Telling Foreign Leaders That the U.S. May Rejoin the Paris Climate Agreement, Ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But only if he can get a better deal
Who Created These Strange, Ancient Sculptures Hidden in the Saudi Desert?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There's a place in the desert where the ghosts of camels seem to loom out of ancient rocks. The Camel Site, as researchers call it, is spread across the Sakaka basin in Saudi Arabia's Jawf province. Time, human interference and erosion have worn away all tool marks and other signs of the camel reliefs' creation, making their authors difficult to identify and their origin difficult to date, according to a paper published Feb. 9 in the journal Antiquity.
Some conservatives seek safe spaces as Florida teens fight for gun control
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As survivors of the Parkland, Fla., school shooting have mobilized to pressure public officials on gun control while rebutting the arguments of right-wing commentators, hurt conservatives are suggesting they would like a safe space from the teenagers’ insults.
As Estonia turns 100, a new embrace of its Russian speakers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On Wednesday, Estonian President Kersti Kaljulaid awarded the school choir director a prestigious medal, to honor her contribution to Estonian society. Ever since Estonia regained its independence in 1991, many Russian speakers have felt like second-class citizens.
President Trump Went Way Off Script and Turned His CPAC Speech into a Campaign Rally
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"You don’t mind if I go off script a little bit?"
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Were Sent a Letter Containing White Powder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The letter caused a full security scare
This Martian Crater Has a Weirdly Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Mars rover Opportunity was exploring an uncharted Martian valley last month when it encountered a shockingly familiar sight: Streams of rocks and gravel stretched down the hillside of Perseverance Valley — a roughly 600-foot (183 meters) drop down the inner slope of a crater — in seemingly organized rows. The patterns closely resemble so-called "rock stripes" seen on certain mountains on Earth, NASA said in a statement. Perseverance Valley is thought to have been carved hundreds of thousands of years ago by a combination of water, ice and wind — already making the spot unusual by Martian standards, NASA wrote.
Wild Horses Can't Drag Me Away Because They Don’t Exist, Genetic Analysis Finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Genomic research has dramatically re-written what we know about the history of horses. Most importantly—wild horses no longer exist. Before a study published Thursday in the journal Science, biologists believed that Przewalski's horses were the only purely wild horses left alive in the world, the blood running through their veins untainted by a history of domestication.
Scientists recreate virtual copy of Mexican underwater cave
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists from all over the world will soon be able to dive into a virtual 3-D replica of a vast underwater cave off Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, where the oldest skeleton in the Americas was found seven years ago. Anthropologists, cave experts, archeologists and photographers are working to fashion a virtual copy of the cave known in Spanish as Hoyo Negro, or black hole, where the skeleton of Naia, a young girl, who lived more than 13,000 years ago was found in 2011. The first results of their work were presented Wednesday night by archeologist Alberto Nava, who discovered the cave in 2007.
SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astronomers Capture Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster On Camera One Last Time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomers have caught what could be their final image of Elon Musk’s Tesla Roadster as it sinks deep into space. Look closely for red lines in the center of the image, which mark out SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster sports car. The SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launched its CEO’s cherry red sports car into space on February 6.
North Korea Is Sending Military Hardliner Kim Yong Chol to the Olympic Closing Ceremony. Here's What to Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He might cross paths with Ivanka Trump
Trump Knocks Sheriff's Deputy Who Stayed Outside Florida School Shooting as a 'Coward'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"He certainly did a poor job"
Hospitals Are Overwhelmed After a Government Bombing of the Syrian Capital's Suburbs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said 400,000 people in eastern Ghouta are living "in hell on earth"
French customs officials find stolen Degas in luggage on bus
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PARIS (AP) — French customs officers have found an impressionist painting by Edgar Degas stowed on a bus, more than eight years after it was reported stolen.
After Parkland shooting, Kentucky and other states weigh adding guns to schools
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The urgent drumbeat has swelled since Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Florida became the latest school to be invaded by a shooter armed with an AR-15: We have to do something. Everyone from the students themselves to their parents, the Broward County sheriff, state lawmakers, and the president agree on the need for more measures to ensure confidence that children can make it home safely from class. The students, their parents, and gun-control advocates want a ban on assault-style weapons.
Helping the world’s largest group of homeless
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Despite the media attention on them, neither the Syrian civilians who have fled war in the Middle East nor the Rohingya Muslims who have fled repression in Myanmar are the world’s largest group of displaced people. The little-noticed crisis in the heart of Africa has worsened over the past year to the point that the European Union and the United Nations announced this week that they are seeking to double foreign aid to the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is four times as large as France. An estimated 7 million Congolese are considered to be “food insecure.” Only 1 in 7 earns more than $1.25 a day.
In 1961 a Plane Crash Killed the Entire U.S. Figure Skating Team. Here's How the Tragic Legacy Lives On
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
18 of the sports top skater died while en route to competition
South Korea Rolls Out the Red Carpet for Ivanka Trump as She Arrives for Olympics Closing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She's leading the U.S. delegation at the closing Olympics ceremony
This Las Vegas Airport Is Letting People Dump Their Marijuana Before Flying
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cannabis is legal in Nevada but still banned by the U.S. government
'How dare you': CNN's Camerota clashes with NRA's Loesch over her claim that media 'love' mass shootings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The national spokeswoman for the National Rifle Association on Friday doubled down on her claim that members of the media “love” mass shootings, like last week’s school massacre in Parkland, Fla., because of the bump in television ratings that some networks experience.