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This Ancient Wooden Toe Is A Weird Archaeological Find
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists are using a wooden prosthetic toe from ancient Egypt to learn more about the civilization that once thrived in northern Africa.
World's Ugliest Dog Contest awards underdogs' inner beauty
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PETALUMA, Calif. (AP) — The World's Ugliest Dog Contest is celebrating man's best friend's perfect imperfections in California on Friday.
Nanotubes could monitor your car's tire tread wear for cheap
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Is there anything nanotubes can't do? Aside from pay my student loans, that is.
The Most Common Reason Good Startup Ideas Die
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Most Common Reason Good Startup Ideas Die
Hummer factory gets second life making electric cars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A U.S. auto plant that once made giant gas-guzzlers will now make cars that don't need gas at all. AM General, which previously built the Hummer H2, sold its factory in South Bend, Indiana to the electric carmaker SF Motors, both firms announced  Thursday. SF Motors will pay $110 million to produce "intelligent electric vehicles," according to publicly available filings. It will spend another $30 million to upgrade the 700,000-square-foot commercial assembly plant. SEE ALSO: Electric vehicles are now the cleanest cars in America The company didn't elaborate further on its plans for the factory, such as how many cars it will produce annually or what types of smart driving or electric-powertrain technologies they'll use. But executives said the arrangement will preserve about 430 U.S. auto worker jobs that were at risk of disappearing.  AM General built Hummer H2s from 2002 to 2009.Image: Scott Olson/Getty ImagesSF Motors is a young division of Chongqing Sokon Industry Group, a major Chinese manufacturer of motorcycles and commercial vehicles that's expanding into the U.S. electric car market. SF Motors officially launched earlier this month with a new headquarters in Silicon Valley. The division has hired several former engineers from the leading electric automaker Tesla, Electrek reported. Tesla cofounder and original CEO Martin Eberhard is also reportedly a consultant for SF Motors, according to the news site. SF Motors' move into Indiana is a pretty poignant symbol of the clean energy transformation: a plant that once produced beastly sport-utility vehicles will now churn out cars with virtually no tailpipe emissions. A Kentucky coal mining museum sparked a similar narrative this spring when it installed solar panels on the building's rooftop. 2017: solar panels installed at the coal museum and electric cars being built at the old Hummer factory https://t.co/ZPmpOCypPb — Tom Randall (@tsrandall) June 22, 2017 The deal with AM General also arrives as sales of electric vehicles are surging in the U.S. and globally. About 2 million plug-in hybrid and battery-powered vehicles were on the roads worldwide in 2016, a 60-percent jump from the year before, the International Energy Agency reported this month.  While that's still only 0.2 percent of total light-duty vehicles globally, the agency said it expects sales to keep climbing as car battery prices plunge and governments adopt policies to fight climate change. A Tesla Roadster recharges.Image: Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesTransportation comprises about one-fifth of total greenhouse gas emissions, mainly through the burning of petroleum fuels. AM General originally built the South Bend plant in 2002 to make the Hummer H2, a civilian version of the Humvee (High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle) sold by General Motors. The company produced the H2 under contract to GM until January 2009. The Indiana company said the sale will not affect its military assembly plant, where it supports and upgrades hundreds of thousands of Humvees still serving the U.S. armed forces. WATCH: Faraday Future just unveiled a super fast Tesla competitor — here's what it looks like
Blast from air guns used in hunt for oil killing plankton and threatening marine ecosystems, scientists warn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Air guns used to explore for oil below the seabed appears to kill off vast amounts of plankton and krill – upon which much of the marine food chain depends – up to 1,200m from the site of the blast, according to a new study. The research was published shortly after the US National Marine Fisheries Service announced it was considering allowing oil exploration off America’s Atlantic coast for the first time to the outrage of conservationists. The Southern Environmental Law Centre warned the air guns – compared to “dynamite-like blasts going off every 10 seconds for weeks or months on end” – would do “significant harm” to the fishing industry and endangered whales in the region.
Archaeologist Searching for Amelia Earhart Remains: If We Find Human Bones, We Might Solve Mystery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An expedition to search for the remains of Amelia Earhart is set to begin on Saturday, and archaeologist Fred Hiebert says they are hopeful human bones will be found. Earhart and her co-pilot Fred Noonan went missing on July 2, 1937. “Amelia Earhart caught the attention of the early age of air exploration,” Hiebert tells Newsweek.
Chinese parents alarmed by miniature crossbow craze
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BEIJING (AP) — Powerful mini-crossbows that shoot toothpicks and needles are the new must-have toy for schoolkids across China — and a nightmare for concerned parents and school officials.
4 Key Takeaways From Senate Republicans' Plan to Overhaul Healthcare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Republicans moved closer to their goal of replacing the Affordable Care Act today, with Senate Republicans issuing a pla...
Sunsets don't happen later during the summer — here's why it's so confusing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
June 21 is the longest day of the year in 2017, at least when it comes to northern daylight hours. After the summer solstice, daylight starts fading from the morning and evening, beginning the north's slog toward the cold depths of winter darkness. The summer solstice occurs when sunlight reaches its maximum extent, either in the northern or southern hemisphere.
7 Secrets of People Who Bring Their Lunch to Work Every Day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Watch the video to learn how to become the type of person who packs a lunch.
5 Biggest Salad Mistakes You're Making
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Watch the video to hear thoughts on low-fat dressing, protein overload, and more.
Protect Yourself From Tick
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Ticks may be tiny, but their bite can have a huge impact on your health. During the summer, up to 25 percent of these critters nationwide—and much more in some parts of the U.S.—may carry infecti...
What's the Best Exercise to Lose Weight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Science says that minute per minute, you'll burn more calories doing cardio—but that doesn't mean you should skip strength. Watch the video to learn why.
7 Things You Should Know About Matcha
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
This form of green tea is getting a lot of buzz. Watch the video to find out why you should add it to your repertoire.
Newest USPS Forever Stamp Features Total Solar Eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These special solar eclipse stamps are on sale today.
Downward Dog, Doctor's Order: Yoga Could Ease Back Pain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
To ease low back pain, you may want try a downward dog: A new study suggests that doing yoga may be as effective as physical therapy for reducing low back pain. Some yoga poses could be harmful to the back. About 10 percent of U.S. adults have chronic low back pain, according to the study, published today (June 19) in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine.
Plastic pollution in the ocean is officially everywhere, even Antarctica
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Given Antarctica's extreme location on the bottom of the Earth, scientists long believed the continent was free from the plastic pollution tarnishing the rest of the world. But not even this remote expanse is safe from our crap, a new study shows. Plastic debris was far worse in the Antarctic than expected, researchers from University of Hull in England and British Antarctic Survey said this week. Levels of microplastics in the region were five times higher than what you'd normally expect to find from local sources, such as research stations and ships. SEE ALSO: A 'conveyor belt' of plastic is polluting the Arctic Ocean "Antarctica is thought to be a highly isolated, pristine wilderness," Catherine Waller, the study's lead author and a marine biologist at the University of Hull, said in a statement. "The ecosystem is very fragile." Microplastics are particles smaller than 5 millimeters in diameter that are found in many household items, including shampoo, toothpaste, and polyester clothing. Particles are also created when larger debris — such as soda bottles, toys, and fish netting — breaks down. The study, published this week in the journal Science of the Total Environment, suggests that much of the plastic debris is coming from outside the Antarctic. In the surrounding Southern Ocean, for instance, tourism, fishing, and scientific research activities all contribute to plastic pollution. It could be particles from these plastics are turning up in the pristine polar wilderness via the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which flows clockwise around the continent and was historically thought to be impenetrable, researchers said. Microplastic fibers collected from the Southern Ocean.Image: Catherine Waller/university of hullScientists estimate that up to 1,100 pounds of microplastics from personal care products and up to 25.5 billion clothing fibers enter the Southern Ocean per decade. While that's "negligible" when spread across the ocean's 8.5 million square miles — or 5.4 percent of the world's oceans — it represents a rising threat to local ecosystems. Seals, penguins, and other wildlife can eat plastic debris and choke, or become entangled. Tiny krill and other zooplankton also gobble microplastics, introducing harmful chemicals into the food chain. However, it's still unclear how that plastic diet affects marine animals in the Southern Ocean, said Claire Waluda, a co-author of the study and a biologist at British Antarctic Survey. Researchers said they will continue monitoring plastic pollution in the region, along with other rising threats to the ecosystem, including the effects of human-driven global warming and an influx of non-native species. "This paper represents an excellent first step towards recognizing the presence of microplastics in Antarctica and allows us to call for international effort in monitoring the situation whilst it is still in its earliest stages," Waluda said in a statement. WATCH: These Adidas sneakers are made of plastic garbage found in the ocean
What Are Your Eclipse Plans?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On August 21, a swath of the continental United States will experience one of the strangest and most wondrous phenomena it is possible to witness on Earth. A total solar eclipse will sweep the country from coast to coast. Along the eclipse’s curvaceous path from Oregon to South Carolina, the moon will momentarily block the face of the sun, obscuring all but its wispy, diaphanous atmosphere, and bathing the land below in darkness.
Coal company sues John Oliver for being John Oliver
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A U.S. coal company is firing back at John Oliver after the Last Week Tonight host slammed its CEO in a June 18 show. On Wednesday, Murray Energy filed suit against Oliver, HBO, and Time Warner for defamation. The lawsuit accuses Oliver of hosting a "false and malicious broadcast" and of carrying out a "meticulously planned attempt to assassinate the character and reputation" of Bob Murray, the Ohio company's chief executive. SEE ALSO: Richard Branson: Business leaders are 'baffled' by Trump on climate change Oliver's show also skewered President Trump's pro-coal platform and promises to revive the long-suffering industry. The Trump administration has made a big spectacle in recent months of championing coal while sidelining efforts to address climate change. President Trump and Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, have often invited hardhat-wearing miners on stage to celebrate the rollback of key federal regulations — including orders to reduce carbon emissions and toxic air pollution from coal plants and limit water contamination from surface mining operations. Like Trump and Pruitt, Murray has frequently accused the former Obama administration of waging a "war on coal" that's led to steep losses in mining jobs and waning coal production. The 77-year-old magnate has blamed his industry's troubles — including widespread bankruptcies and mine closures — on President Obama's "evil agenda," though energy experts say coal's misfortunes have more to do with cheap natural gas. On his HBO show, Oliver poked holes in Trump's claims that his administration can erase the coal industry's broader economic problems and revive thousands of jobs. He also stressed the serious, and sometimes fatal, harm that coal miners can face while in the mines — including those owned by Murray Energy. In 2007, safety lapses at Murray Energy's Crandall Canyon mine in Utah resulted in the "needless deaths" of nine miners and rescuers, the U.S. Labor Department found. Federal regulators in 2015 accused Murray Energy of attempting to silence miners who filed confidential safety complaints to regulators.  President Trump signs a resolution in February disapproving  a rule addressing the impacts of surface coal mining operations on "surface water, groundwater, and the productivity of mining operation sites."Image: Ron Sachs-Pool/Getty ImagesThe coal company in recent years also terminated health benefits — including medical, prescription drug, and life insurance — for hundreds of its employees, a decision it largely blamed on Obama-era policies.  Oliver, in his characteristically over the top way, called Murray a "geriatric Dr. Evil" who is "on the same side as black lung."  The talk-show host pointed to a satirical article in the United Mine Workers of America's journal describing a squirrel hopping onto Murray's porch and telling him, "You shouldn't be operating your very own mines." To drive home his point, Oliver brought out a person in a giant squirrel costume. Murray CEO Bob Murray speaks to reporters in 2007 near Huntington, Utah, during the Crandall Canyon mine disaster.Image: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images"Bob Murray, I didn't really plan for so much of this piece to be about you, but you kinda forced my hand on that one," Oliver said.  He clearly anticipated the suit, saying: "And I know you're probably going to sue me over this. But, you know what? I stand by everything I said." Murray Energy took him up on that offer. The lawsuit, filed in a West Virginia circuit court, seeks financial damages and a court order barring rebroadcasts of the Last Week Tonight segment. "The false and defamatory statements in this broadcast severely and destructively impact Mr. Murray, and all of Murray Energy ... as well as coal mining itself," Murray Energy said in a press release. An HBO spokesman told the Associated Press that the show didn't violate Murray Energy's rights or those of Murray. WATCH: This portable charger is powered by energy created with your hand
The USGS sent SoCal a quake alert on Wednesday for a tremor that actually occurred in 1925
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A powerful and deadly earthquake struck the coastal California city of Santa Barbara back on June 29, 1925. More than a dozen people died and $8 million in damage was reported in the historic quake, which had a magnitude of 6.8 on the Richter Scale. Flash-forward almost 92 years and a quake with the same magnitude and with the same epicenter was reported by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on Wednesday.  Only this latest event was a false alarm — a database aftershock to be more precise — of the 1925 event. SEE ALSO: Facebook updates Safety Check to make the tool more personal and informative The USGS sent out the alert about a 6.8-magnitude tremor near Santa Barbara on Wednesday afternoon — but turns out it was a false alarm. Sorry about the USGS tweet about the #earthquake in #California I monitor various alerts. Sorry 4 the false alarm. This is the email sent: pic.twitter.com/v8nUfJTdmx — Aaron Ellis (@aaronellis01) June 22, 2017 The alert went out with a date in the future: June 29, 2025. That's 100 years to the day after the Santa Barbara quake. It went out on Wednesday because of a database error, the USGS said. The USGS quickly explained what had happened, citing a software issue encountered while revising data about the 1925 earthquake. The changes prompted the system to send an alert as if the quake had just struck. Regarding: https://t.co/z8Ykmo6OXX pic.twitter.com/68Q0I2Ix2j — USGS (@USGS) June 22, 2017 The non-quake is reminiscent of a National Weather Service flood warning malfunction in 2014 that made it look like a biblical flood was going to hit the eastern U.S. That wasn't the case, either. Even if the USGS' mistake was only up for about 30 minutes today, it looked like a large and real quake had shook the area — and strangely no one felt it. It also illustrated how connected news organizations and Twitter users in California are to the USGS, given the state's vulnerability to earthquake hazards. You're an @LATimes journalist, your office is in this earthquake zone, you see this #robojourno story on your screen, you feel no quake. pic.twitter.com/wcgRGgaPDD — Darryl Mason (@DarrylMason) June 22, 2017 You know: normal day...with an earthquake in the Channel! (Didn't feel it, but still.) pic.twitter.com/BadZzhlJPV — Geoff Conner Newlan (@geoffcn) June 22, 2017 Anyone in Santa Barbara Cal. feel the 6.8 earthquake?? — Margaret Scott (@serialmom13m) June 22, 2017 The Southern California faux-quake came only a few hours after a (real) noontime earthquake up north in the Bay Area. That was a true quake, but a small one with a magnitude of just magnitude 3.0. But that one people actually felt, and the USGS correctly reported. WATCH: Say goodbye to itchy bug bites with this electric pen
White House concedes Russia meddled in campaign, but denies it changed the result
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The White House Thursday addressed the joint intelligence report that found Russia had attempted to interfere with the 2016 presidential election, more than five months after the report’s conclusions were made public. First, on Twitter, President Trump dismissed the concerns about Russia as a “big Dem HOAX” and suggested that his predecessor, President Barack Obama, did little to confront the problem. White House aides then clarified Trump’s remarks and said he believes there was Russian meddling but is certain it did not affect the outcome of the race.
Obama: ‘The Senate bill, unveiled today, is not a health care bill’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former President Barack Obama decried the Senate Republicans’ health care bill on Thursday in a lengthy Facebook post.
In just a year, Republicans became far more skeptical of claims of racism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Republican attitudes toward African-Americans hardened significantly in 2016, according to an authoritative new study. Only 32 percent of Republican voters in 2016 said they believe that African-Americans face “a lot of discrimination.” That was a significant drop from just a year earlier, when the Public Religion Research Institute asked the same question. In that survey, 46 percent of Republicans responded that blacks experience significant discrimination.
Rolling sequoia: Idaho tree tied to John Muir set for move
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Not very often does a 10-story-tall, 800,000-pound landmark change locations. Especially one that's alive.
Why Medicaid is central to health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Republican senators unveiled their long-anticipated healthcare plan to replace Obamacare on Thursday, and it includes significant changes to Medicaid, the joint federal-state program for the poor, elderly, and disabled. The bill, which does not yet have the support of enough senators to pass, reflects the ongoing tussle of costs vs. social benefits that sharply divides the two parties as well as Republicans themselves. Like the Republican legislation that passed the House in May, the draft bill put forward by Senate Republican leaders aims to rein in federal spending on the burgeoning program – a move they say will strengthen it in the long term.
Venezuela's Maduro confronts perils of his reliance on the military
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro reshuffled duties in his deeply embattled government earlier this week, it wasn’t the changes at the top of the transport and fishing ministries that caused a buzz. Instead, it was the sacking of the heads of several branches of the military, in particular the general overseeing the National Guard, that drew widespread attention. Recommended: Think you know Latin America?
Why You Should Be Worried About The Chemicals In Your Water Bottle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Put the water filter down for a sec and listen up. While putting in the extra effort to purify your water is great, it’s time you paid attention to the bigger culprit here — your water bottle. BPA: if you’ve heard of it, you know that these three little letters can do a lot of damage.
18 Crisp White Sneakers for Summer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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3 Key Takeaways From Senate Republicans' Plan to Overhaul Healthcare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Republicans moved closer to their goal of replacing the Affordable Care Act today, with Senate Republicans issuing a pla...
NASA Official Says Mars Mission Is Space Agency's Top Priority
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Sending humans to orbit Mars is our primary mission now," said Lt. Gen. Larry James.
In wind
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Speaking in one of the top wind-producing states in the country, President Trump on Wednesday attacked wind energy for harming birds and being unreliable.  "I don't want to just hope the wind blows to light up your homes and your factories," Trump said at a rally in Cedar Rapids. After pausing for applause, he said, "As the birds fall to the ground." This alluded to a favorite attack he has aimed at the rapidly growing wind power industry since his campaign, which is that turbines are responsible for harming birds.  The wind energy criticism was odd given that Iowa has policies aimed at encouraging the development of wind power in the state. While Texas generated more wind energy than any other state in 2016, according to the Energy Information Agency, Iowa's wind and solar output had the highest share of the state's total electricity generation.  The two renewable sources accounted for 37 percent of the state's electricity generation last year, the EIA found.  Tom Kiernan, the CEO of the American Wind Energy Association, fired back at Trump on Twitter.  We were confused by some of the President's remarks #TrumpSpeech about #windpower tonight? Here are some industry updates. (1 of 4) — Tom Kiernan (@TomCKiernan) June 22, 2017 Iowa reliably generates >36% of its electricity using #windpower, has over 8K #windpower jobs, and over 2K well-paying factory #jobs. — Tom Kiernan (@TomCKiernan) June 22, 2017 #windpower causes
Paris Air Show: 4 coolest aircraft revealed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Paris Air Show: A look at the four coolest aircraft showcased, including C-130J, Scorpion attack jet, RACER helicopter and the X6 Military Helicopter
Richard Branson: Business leaders are 'baffled' by Trump on climate change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
British billionaire Richard Branson said business leaders were left dumbfounded by President Trump's decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement. But if there's a silver lining, it's that companies are now even more driven to invest in clean energy and cut greenhouse gas emissions. "Whether it's GE, or whether it's the big oil companies... I haven't come across one business person who doesn't want to get out there and do everything they can to try to compensate for the [Trump] administration's very strange stance," Branson said on a Wednesday call with reporters. SEE ALSO: Apple is investing $1 billion in clean energy with this unique approach "A lot of people in the world are baffled by the American administration's comments," the Virgin Group CEO said. Trump and his top officials have made quick work of unraveling not only the former Obama administration's policies to fight climate change, but even longstanding scientific research programs.  A coal-fired power plant in Juliette, Georgia.Image: AP/REX/ShutterstockOn June 1, Trump announced he would withdraw the U.S. from the international climate agreement, which commits countries to reducing emissions to limit global warming. The president has rolled back regulations to reduce emissions and pollution from fossil fuel production, and he's issued orders to expand offshore oil and gas drilling. Trump himself has never acknowledged the overwhelming scientific consensus that the world is warming primarily due to human emissions of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane. His top officials — including Energy Secretary Rick Perry and Scott Pruitt, head of the Environmental Protection Agency — have repeatedly denied the scientific consensus on climate change. The agencies they lead are both facing billions of dollars in budget cuts and steep job losses as the administration curtails funding for climate science, renewable energy, and energy efficiency while doubling down on coal, oil, and natural gas projects. Trump shakes hands with a coal miner after disapproving a rule to reduce water pollution in coal mining operations.Image: Ron Sachs-Pool/Getty ImagesBranson, a business magnate and philanthropist, is an outspoken climate activist (and a friend of former President Obama). His nonprofit organization Carbon War Room, which merged with the Rocky Mountain Institute, works to boost clean energy technologies in the U.S. and globally. On Wednesday, he announced a new initiative, called Run on Less, that aims to promote fuel efficiency in long-haul trucks. In September, seven U.S. trucking fleets will participate in a cross-country roadshow to demonstrate how aerodynamic trailers, smarter driving practices, and other steps can significantly lower a conventional truck's fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions. Branson acknowledged that Class 8 trucks are conceptually far less sexy than, say, glassy solar panels or towering wind turbines. But he noted that trucks, cars, trains, and planes are now the biggest source of U.S. carbon emissions, accounting for about one-third of the total. A truck drives along Interstate 80 in California.Image: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images"If you don't go after transport emissions, you're going to fail" in fighting climate change, he told reporters. "So it's critical that we reduce them." Beyond backing today's technologies, Branson also invests heavily in cutting-edge clean energy innovations. He's put money into Breakthrough Energy Ventures, a $1 billion fund launched by fellow billionaire Bill Gates, to support new forms of clean energy. Branson has also invested in Rise, a $2 billion "social impact" fund to support projects with social and environmental benefits. He pointed to these investments and others as evidence that the world isn't backing down from the climate challenge, despite the U.S. government's about-face under Trump. Branson sits in the driver's seat of a coach bus.Image: Tom Dymond/REX/ShutterstockWhile the world was "disappointed" with Trump's decision to ditch the Paris Climate Agreement, Branson said, "Fortunately, the other [191] countries have stuck with it, most states in America have stuck with it, most companies have stuck with it." "We are all going to get out there and create a green energy revolution," Branson added. WATCH: Obama beat Richard Branson in a kitesurfing face-off
Trump admits he has no tapes of Comey meetings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After threatening to release tapes of conversations with former FBI Director James Comey, President Trump said Thursday he does not have such recordings.
Paul Ryan: It’s ‘premature’ to say whether House would pass Senate health care bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., declined to say Thursday whether the House would take up Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s health care bill if the Republican leader manages to push it through the Senate. “They’re just beginning their process,” Ryan said, adding he believes it will be a “lengthy” one. McConnell declared on the Senate floor Thursday that he believes the Senate could pass the sweeping legislation as soon as next week.
Police drag protesters away from McConnell’s office in ‘die
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Police forcibly removed protesters who had pretended to die in Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's office after he unveiled the Better Care Reconciliation Act on Thursday morning.
‘American democracy is under attack’: Sanders urges vigilance against Trump’s ‘authoritarianism’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Bernie Sanders delivered his scathing critique of the Trump administration in a speech discussing the threat of authoritarianism in the U.S. and elsewhere.
‘Die
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Dramatizing fears that Senate Republican’s Better Care Reconciliation Act’s cuts to Medicaid would prevent millions of low income Americans from accessing life-saving care, activism group ADAPT dramatized what those deaths could look like — in front of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office doors.
Four GOP senators: We won’t vote for new health care bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In a potentially game-changing move, four conservative senators quickly announced Thursday afternoon that they oppose the health care bill rolled out by Republican Senate leadership earlier in the day. Ted Cruz, R-Texas and Ron Johnson, R-Wis. said in a statement that the proposal did not go far enough to overhaul the current system.
Worker bit in tussle with would
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Police in Little Rock say a mall worker wrestled away a stripper pole from a would-be thief who bit the employee during the struggle.
How to Make an Edible Matcha Smoothie Mask
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
This matcha smoothie mask contains powerful antioxidants that can help prevent wrinkles and keep skin smooth and youthful. Watch the video for the recipe that you can slather on your face or sip in a cup. Or both!
20 Companies Hiring For Part
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Time to refresh your resume!
Uber’s next CEO faces 3 big challenges
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Uber's next CEO will have a a lot work cut out for him or her.
Ancient Egyptian Writing: New Symbols Reveal Development Of Hieroglyphics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The elegant pictorial writing system of the ancient Egyptians—known as hieroglyphics—has fascinated generations of archeologists. One ancient Egyptian legend holds that the god Thoth handed the gift of writing to a few chosen scribes. Now, a new discovery may hold some clues as to how carved images evolved into a formal writing system.
Stephen Hawking: ‘I Am Convinced That Humans Need to Leave Earth'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stephen Hawking: ‘I Am Convinced That Humans Need to Leave Earth'
Democratic congressman: Our ‘toxic’ brand under Pelosi makes it hard to win
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rep. Tim Ryan says the party’s “toxic” brand under House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is making it difficult for Dems to connect with voters.
Trump fumes on Twitter after ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson testifies about Russian meddling in the 2016 election before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill June 21, 2017. President Trump fired off a barrage of tweets Thursday morning, hammering away at the “big Dem scam” and “big Dem HOAX!” in the aftermath of former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson’s testimony the day before about Russian efforts to interfere in the 2016 U.S. election. In particular, Trump seized upon Johnson’s comment that the Democratic National Committee was among those who rebuffed his department’s offer for assistance during the Russian attack.
Senate GOP health care bill looks a lot like ‘mean’ House one
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is trailed by reporters as he walks to the Senate floor of the U.S. Capitol after unveiling a draft bill on health care June 22, 2017. WASHINGTON — After weeks of secret negotiations, Senate Republicans on Thursday released their much-anticipated proposal to repeal Obamacare Thursday, unveiling a plan that would cut Medicaid and reduce penalties for not buying insurance. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said the House plan would result in 23 million fewer people covered than under current law.
British schoolboys don skirts amid shorts ban in heatwave
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LONDON (AP) — Boys at a British high school have found a novel way around strict uniform rules banning shorts, as the country swelters through a heatwave.