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Here’s What Every Detail in Meghan Markle’s New Coat of Arms Means
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's filled with symbolism
President Trump Cancels Nuclear Summit With North Korean Leader
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I feel it is inappropriate, at this time, to have this long planned meeting"
Boy Fired 16 Times at Indiana Middle School, Wounding a Teacher and a Student
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The attack comes a week after a shooting in Texas that left 8 dead
'Everything Was Destroyed.' A Bombing at a Restaurant in Ontario Injures 15 People
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
15 people were hurt, three sustaining "critical blast injuries," paramedics said
Indian child dies from mother's 'snake bite' breast milk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 35-year-old woman from Uttar Pradesh state did not realise she had been bitten when she woke and breastfed her daughter. The three-year-old girl and the mother fell ill on Thursday and both died before they could reach hospital, police inspector Vijay Singh told AFP. India is home to some 300 snake species and 60 are highly venomous, including the Indian cobra, krait, Russell's viper and saw-scaled viper.
Man who beat Atlantic Ocean poised to become 1st person to swim across the Pacific
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A historic expedition is scheduled for next week when long-distance swimmer Ben Lecomte begins a roughly 5,500-mile swim across the Pacific Ocean. Lecomte will start in Japan Tuesday and swim to San Francisco. Lecomte and his crew are collaborating with 27 institutions including NASA and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
'Trump’s son should be concerned': Wiretaps show Trump Jr. met with Putin ally
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The FBI has obtained wiretapped conversations involving Alexander Torshin ahead of his meeting with the president's son.
Tiny California cottage on market for just under $1 million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A 595-square-foot (55-square meter) Southern California cottage with one bedroom and one bathroom is on the market for just under $1 million. The Orange County Register reports the price of the tiny abode ...
8 Reasons Probiotics Should Be Part of Your Diet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
Ryan Reynolds Would Abandon His Notoriously Delightful Marriage for Only One Man
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He has something of a comedian crush
Read Jeff Flake's Commencement Speech on the Rule of Law and Trump: 'We May Have Hit Bottom'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Our leadership is not good, but it probably can’t get much worse."
Europe's New Privacy Law Takes Effect Today. Here's How the World Is Handling Digital Rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The European Union's much-vaunted General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force this week.
An Australian Grandmother Has Been Sentenced to Death for Drug Smuggling in Malaysia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Maria Elvira Pinto Exposto says she was duped into smuggling drugs by an online romance scam
Climate victims seek justice, in the courtroom and on the street
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People around the world beset by drought, heatwaves, rising seas and storm surges made worse by global warming are calling for "climate justice," and many are pleading their case in court. Families from eight nations joined their ranks Thursday when they collectively sued the European Union over the impact of rising temperatures on their livelihoods. Taking into account accumulated emissions since 1850, that share rises to a quarter, second only to the United States (27 percent).
Hawaii Evacuation Helicopters on Standby as Third Lava Flow Reaches the Ocean
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.S. Marine Corps has sent two helicopters if more evacuations become necessary
Trump has given us the ultimate Chinese import: American princelings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In China, princelings are privileged relatives of high-level government officials. Princelings benefit from nepotism and cronyism, using their family ties to conduct business and accumulate wealth. Now President Trump has given us the ultimate Chinese import: American princelings.
U.S. Naval Academy graduation; Trump delivers remarks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Donald Trump delivered remarks during the United States Naval Academy's graduation and commissioning ceremony, Friday, May 25, 2018, in Annapolis, Maryland.
Ramadan: a time for fasting, prayer, reflection – and laughs?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
After a long day of fasting, work, and prayer, many Jordanians are gathering each night this Ramadan for one thing: a good laugh. In what is quickly becoming a Ramadan tradition, Jordanians are filling theaters, hotels, and their living rooms for comic relief and satirical social commentary to cap the night during the holy month. Local TV stations have produced no fewer than 12 Jordanian comedic miniseries this Ramadan, marking a break from recent years in which lavish period dramas from the Gulf and Egypt dominated Jordanian airwaves during the Arab world’s biggest television and media season.
Will Europe's new web privacy rules also bring global standards of trust?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
European regulators were once dismissed as pesky, procedural, and preoccupied with privacy. The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) establishes a range of new rules for how companies handle the personal data of customers in the EU. Critics of the law have emphasized the burdens that it imposes on businesses outside the European Union.
Europe gets a grip on graft
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
One of the healthy competitions between Europe and the United States is over which one can set a new global standard. On May 25, the European Union began to win on one standard – digital privacy – with the start of stiff rules on how companies handle personal data. The impact, though limited to firms operating in Europe, is being felt globally.
'It Felt Very Real, Very Honest.' Victoria Beckham Is Your Inside Look at the Royal Wedding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Posh Spice was all about Harry and Meghan's big day
British government sparks new green revolution with £100m investment in 'super
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Britain is helping breed a new generation of “super-crops” not only resistant to climate change, pests and disease but also fortified with vital vitamins and minerals. The initiative could save the lives of hundreds of thousands of children who die each year from poor nutrition in developing countries as well as supplementing diets in the west. The Department for International Development (Dfid) has quietly invested more than £100m into breeding the new generation of super-crops which now stand poised to create what experts are calling a “second green revolution”. The crops include iron-rich beans that can withstand a 4 degree Celsius jump in temperature, “scuba” rice that comes back to life after two weeks underwater in flooded fields and drought-tolerant maize rich in vitamin A. The first green revolution reached at least 1bn people and was a huge success. If we can reach our target of 1bn, then potentially it is the next biggest thingHowarth Bouis, a US economist Importantly, they have been created through traditional breeding techniques rather than being genetically modified which means they can be planted without waiting for regulatory approval. “The first green revolution reached at least one billion people and was a huge success. If we can reach our target of one billion, then potentially it is the next biggest thing,” said Howarth Bouis, a US economist whose organisation HarvestPlus has received £87.4m from Dfid to breed and distribute crop varieties fortified with Vitamin A, Iron and Zinc. About 30 million people – around six million households – have so far benefited from the new crops, primarily in Africa, but the aim is to reach one billion by 2030. A further six million farmers in Asia are using scuba rice but the aim is 18 million by 2028. Scientists believe that if they achieve the one billion target they will effectively halve the world’s estimated two billion suffering from what is known as “hidden hunger” or micronutrient malnutrition. The first green revolution, which occurred in the early to mid 1900s, won its instigator Norman Borlaug a Nobel Peace Prize and spawned disease-resistant, high-yielding wheat strains which are credited with saving 250 million lives worldwide. Agricultural breakthroughs trump medical innovations such as antibiotics and vaccinations for lives saved historically because food is so central to life. It is estimated one million children a year die from micronutrient malnutrition which leaves them prone to stunted growth, poor vision and illnesses and diseases that have the potential to become worldwide epidemics. Agronomist Norman Borlaug was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 in recognition of his contributions to world peace through increasing food supply Credit: Micheline Pelletier/Sygma via Getty Images The new super-crops not only replicate the traits of the first green revolution in having higher yields but also have been – or are being – cross-bred further to incorporate genes that protect from disease, pests, floods, drought and heat. “Our centres are developing climate adaptive crops. Farmers like them not only because they are climate tolerant but also high yielding. We just need to get them into mainstream markets and piggy back on them with our vitamin strains,” said Bouis. For the “heat-beater” beans, a staple in Rwanda where the fortified varieties provide up to half a person’s recommended daily intake of iron, scientists in Colombia trawled a gene bank of 36,000 samples to find a Mexican strain capable of withstanding temperature rises expected over the next century due to climate change. Biofortification | Super-crops heralding the next green revolution It will not only safeguard the 50 per cent of land that would have been lost to farmers due to higher temperatures but could also open up new markets in tropical areas for the beans. “Even if they can only handle a three-degree rise, that would still limit the land lost to climate change to about 5 per cent,” said Steve Beebe, head of bean breeding for the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture. Scuba rice was created after scientists tracked down an Indian rice variety with a gene, SUB1A, which was activated when the plant was submerged. It was crossed with India’s top-selling, high-yielding Swarni rice to counter the annual loss of 4m tonnes of rice to flooding in India and Bangladesh, enough to feed 30m people. Dr Uma Shankar Singh, a director of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), said: “Sustaining productivity is the most important factor and we now have six million farmers cultivating 3 million hectares. At minimum it is adding 3 million tonnes of rice. We have also developed SUB1 varieties with salt, drought and stagnant flooding tolerance.” Biofortified beans in Rwanda Credit: HarvestPlus Dfid is now the biggest funder of HarvestPlus, whose work into fortified crops was started in 2003. Nottingham University professor Martin Broadley, a research fellow with Dfid, said the genesis of the programme came from research showing how expensive and inefficient it was to deliver supplements or fortified processed foods like bread to rural areas. “Upfront investment in breeding iron, vitamin A and zinc dense crops is the most cost-effective way to improve nutrition compared with other approaches,” he said. According to the World Health Organization, every $10-$15 invested in, for example, the vitamin A rich orange sweet potato produces one extra year of good quality life per individual. Upfront investment in breeding iron, vitamin A and zinc dense crops is the most cost-effective way to improve nutrition compared with other approachesProfessor Martin Broadley, Nottingham University HarvestPlus deliberately spurned genetic modification in favour of natural methods. “If we’d invested our money in GM, they could have been left sitting on the shelf. Conventional breeding is not as powerful a science but at least we can do a lot of good with it without the blockages you have with transgenics,” said Bouis. Government agriculture centres and NGOs are supporting the distribution of the seeds. As it seeks to reach 1 billion, Dfid has put in an extra £4 million to get private seed producers to take up the “super-crops” and achieve the necessary increase in uptake. The roll-out of the seeds has been supported by promotions including a radio soap opera, My Children, in Uganda to advance the orange sweet potato, a rap song by Rwandan musicians to encourage use of iron-rich beans and Yellow Cassava, a Nollywood (Nigerian Hollywood) film highlighting the nutritional benefits of the vitamin A rich crop. Women clear wet mud alongside the bank of the river in Satkhira, Bangladesh. Bangladesh is one of the continental countries most vulnerable to climate change. Credit: Zakir/Hossain Chowdhury/Barcroft  At least 14 studies are being carried out to establish whether eating the fortified crops improve the health of the communities consuming them. The early results are encouraging. In Uganda, the orange sweet potato, taken up by 60 per cent of farms in the area studied, saw a significant increase in vitamin A uptake among families, a 9 per cent fall in those with low vitamin A and a drop of up to 19 per cent in diarrhoea among children. Children eating orange maize in Zambia saw improvements in their sight through increased vitamin A. Women given fortified beans in Rwanda reversed their iron deficiency, reducing anaemia. College students in Rwanda aged 17 to 25 who ate the beans scored significantly better in cognitive tests of memory and speed after just 18 weeks. Studies into whether eating fortified crops improves the health of the communities have yielded promising results Credit: HOWARD BURDITT /Reuters A Dfid spokesman said: “Biofortification is highly cost-effective as it provides a single intervention which benefits both this generation and future generations to come. By providing farmers with seeds and planting material, they and their households can grow, sell and consume foods that are already vitamin-rich, with no need for additional supplements. “The crops remain high yielding and vitamin rich for future harvests. This compares with supplements which need to be repeated, or fortification which needs to be continuously added to food products.” More controversially, Dfid is backing one of a potential new generation of GM crops now closing in on market readiness. It is funding work on modifying plants’ photosynthetic efficiency so their water use is cut by 25 per cent by changing the expression of a single gene. Micronutrient malnutrition | The global scale A potential breakthrough has also emerged in Mozambique’s field trials of more water-efficient GM maize (WEMA). Early results suggest it is not only resistant to drought but also the devastating stem borer and fall army worm pests. Ohio State University scientists are working to create a GM “golden potato”, which would provide 42 per cent of a child’s daily vitamin A. By providing farmers with seeds and planting material, they and their households can grow, sell and consume foods that are vitamin-rich Credit: Bloomberg Uganda is trialling a “golden banana” high in vitamin A created by Australia’s Queensland University of Technology by inserting a gene from a Papua New Guinea banana into the commercially-successful Cavendish banana. It is named after William Cavendish, the sixth Duke of Devonshire, a passionate horticulturalist who developed it on his Derbyshire estate in the 19th century. Public and political scepticism, however, remains a major hurdle for GM. The salutary lesson on this is “golden rice”, a GM strain engineered to boost vitamin A. More than a decade after it was hailed as a potential game-changer, its progress to farmers’ fields has stalled in a blizzard of regulation and public opposition. If the next green revolution is to come, harnessing nature rather than genetically modifying it may prove to be quickest and most efficient route.   In-depth | Global Health Security Protect yourself and your family by learning more about Global Health Security 
President Trump Suggests NFL Players Who Kneel During National Anthem 'Shouldn't Be in the Country'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"You should stand proudly for the national anthem — or you shouldn't be playing"
Complete list of every full moon in 2018, including May's Flower Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The beginning of next week will see the next full moon, known as the Flower Moon, brighten our skies the day after the second bank holiday weekend of the month. The first blue moon of the year was a spectacular sight, dubbed the 'super blue blood moon'. Falling on January 31, it was the product of three different phenomena: it was a supermoon, a blue moon and a blood moon. While many said it was the first to be seen in 152 years, other contested the fact, leading to a division among scientists. Stargazers were also treated to two full moons in March: as well as the first full moon on the night of March 1, we saw another full moon on March 31. As it was the second full moon of the month, it was a blue moon – the second of 2018. The moon is the largest and brightest object in our night sky and has enchanted and inspired mankind for centuries. Blue moons are a rare breed, but full moons can be admired every month. Here is everything you need to know about Earth's only natural satellite, from all its different names to how it was formed. Super blue blood moon, in pictures How often does a full moon occur? Afull moon occurs every 29.5 days and is when the Moon is completely illuminated by the Sun's rays. It occurs when Earth is directly aligned between the Sun and the Moon.  Why do full moons have names? The early Native Americans didn't record time using months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Instead tribes gave each full moon a nickname to keep track of the seasons and lunar months. Most of the names relate to an activity or an event that took place at the time in each location. However, it wasn't a uniform system and tribes tended to name and count moons differently. Some, for example, counted four seasons a year while others counted five. Others defined a year as 12 moons, while others said there were 13. Colonial Americans adopted some of the moon names and applied them to their own calendar system which is why they're still in existence today, according to the Farmer’s Almanac. January: Wolf Moon This moon was named because villagers used to hear packs of wolves howling in hunger around this time of the year. Its other name is the Old Moon. This January there are two Wolf Moons - and stargazers will be in for a treat as both will be supermoons. When two moons occur in one month, the second is called a blue moon. While blue moons typically occur only once every two to three years, this year we will be treated to two moons - the second appearing at the end of March. The night following the first full moon of the month saw the Quadrantid meteor shower light up the skies. When? January 2 and January 31 February: Snow Moon Snow moon is named after the white stuff because historically it's always been the snowiest month in America. It's also traditionally referred to as the Hunger Moon, because hunting was very difficult in snowy conditions.  However this year there won't be a Snow Moon - with a full moon occurring at the end of January and another at the beginning of March, we won't see one light up the skies during the year's shortest month. When? There will be no full moon this month The full Snow Moon appears red above London's Albert bridge and Battersea Bridge in 2012 Credit: Anthony Devlin March: Worm Moon As temperatures warm, earthworm casts begin to appear and birds begin finding food. It's also known as Sap Moon, Crow Moon and Lenten Moon. There will be two moons this March, one at the start of the month and one at the end. As in January, the second moon of the month is called a blue moon. The second moon of the month is important because it is used to fix the date of Easter, which is always the Sunday after the first full moon following the spring equinox. This year, that moon appears on Saturday March 31, which means Easter Sunday falls the day after, on April 1. When? March 1 and 31 April: Pink Moon April's full moon is known as the Pink Moon, but don't be fooled into thinking it will turn pink. It's actually named after pink wildflowers, which appear in the US and Canada in early spring.  This moon is also known as Egg Moon, due to spring egg-laying season. Some coastal tribes referred to it as Fish Moon because it appeared at the same time as the shad swimming upstream.  When? April 30 A couple watch the Pink Moon rise beside Hartshead Pike on April 29, 2018 in Manchester, England Credit: Anthony Devlin May: Flower Moon Spring has officially sprung by the time May arrives, and flowers and colourful blooms dot the landscape. This moon is also known as Corn Planting Moon, as crops are sown in time for harvest, or Bright Moon because this full moon is known to be one of the brightest. Some people refer to it as Milk Moon. When? May 29 (it will peak at 15:19) Night sky June: Strawberry Moon This moon is named after the beginning of the strawberry picking season. It's other names are Rose Moon, Hot Moon, or Hay Moon as hay is typically harvested around now. This moon appears in the same month as the summer solstice, the longest day of the year (June 21) in which we can enjoy approximately 17 hours of daylight. When? June 28 The so-called 'Strawberry Moon' rises behind Glastonbury Tor on in June 2016.  Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images July: Thunder Moon Named due to the prevalence of summer thunder storms. It's sometimes referred to as the Full Buck Moon because at this time of the year a buck's antlers are fully grown.  When? July 27 August: Sturgeon Moon Tribes in North America typically caught Sturgeon during this month, but also it is when grain and corn were gathered so is also referred to as Grain Moon.  This moon appears in the same month as the Perseid meteor shower. When? August 26 September: Harvest Moon The Harvest Moon is the name given to the first full moon that takes place closest to the Autumn equinox, which this year will come on September 23. The Harvest Moon arrived late last year, on October 5 - it normally rises in September. It was during September that most of the crops were harvested ahead of the autumn and this moon would give light to farmers so they could carry on working longer in the evening. Some tribes also called it the Barley Moon, the Full Corn Moon or Fruit Moon.  When? September 25 October: Hunter's Moon As people planned ahead for the cold months ahead, the October moon came to signify the ideal time for hunting game, which were becoming fatter from eating falling grains. This moon is also known as the travel moon and the dying grass moon. When? October 24 November: Frost Moon The first of the winter frosts historically begin to take their toll around now and winter begins to bite, leading to this month's moon moniker. It is also known as the Beaver Moon. When?November 23 December: Cold Moon Nights are long and dark and winter's grip tightens, hence this Moon's name. With Christmas just a few weeks away, it's also referred to as Moon before Yule and Long Nights Moon. When? December 22 Clouds clear to allow a view of the final full moon of the year, a so-called 'Cold Moon' on December 13 2016 in Cornwall. Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images Once in a blue moon Does this well-known phrase have anything to do with the moon? Well, yes it does. We use it to refer to something happening very rarely and a blue moon is a rare occurrence. It's the name given to a second full moon that occurs in a single calendar month and this typically occurs only once every two to three years. There's lots of other moons, too: Full moon: We all know what these are. They come around every month and light up the night at night. Harvest moon: The full moon closest to the autumn equinox. Black moon: Most experts agree that this refers to the second new moon in a calendar month. The last black moon was at the start of October 2016 and the next one is expected in 2019. Blue moon: A phenomenon that occurs when there is a second full moon in one calendar month. Joe Rao from space.com explains: "A second full moon in a single calendar month is sometimes called a blue moon. A black moon is supposedly the flip side of a blue moon; the second new moon in a single calendar month." Supermoon is seen behind the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, in May 2012. Credit: AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano The infrequent nature of this lunar event led to the phrase "once in a blue moon" to signify a rare occurrence. It does not actually mean the moon will be blue. Blood moon: Also known as a supermoon lunar eclipse. It's when the shadow of Earth casts a reddish glow on the moon, the result of a rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year.  There was one in the UK in September 2015, and before that in 1982 but the next one won't be until 2033.  Strawberry moon: A rare event when there's a full moon on the same day as the summer solstice. It happened in June 2016 for the first time since 1967 when 17 hours of sunlight gave way to a bright moonlit sky. Despite the name, the moon does appear pink or red. The romantic label was coined by the Algonquin tribes of North America who believed June’s full moon signalled the beginning of the strawberry picking season. What is a supermoon? Ever looked up at the night sky to see a full moon so close you could almost touch it? Well you've probably spotted a supermoon. The impressive sight happens when a full moon is at the point in its orbit that brings it closest to Earth. To us Earth-lings, it appears 30 per cent brighter and 14 per cent bigger to the naked eye.  How a supermoon is generated Supermoon is not an astrological term though. It's scientific name is actually Perigee Full Moon, but supermoon is more catchy and is used by the media to describe our celestial neighbour when it gets up close. Astrologer Richard Nolle first came up with the term supermoon and he defined it as "… a new or full moon which occurs with the moon at or near (within 90 per cent of) its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit", according to earthsky.org. How many supermoons are there in 2018? There are two full moon supermoons this year, both of which took place in the first month of the year. The first appeared on January 2 and the second appeared on January 31. As it was the second moon of the month, the latter moon was also known as a blue moon. There will also be two new moon supermoons in 2018: one on July 13 and another on August 11. Unfortunately, stargazers were unable to see these moons as new moons are generally obscured by the light of the sun. Last year we were lucky enough to have four supermoons. The first three - April 26, May 25, June 24 - were new moons.  The fourth supermoon of 2017 appeared on December 3 and was a full moon supermoon. This will be a full moon supermoon. In fact, it's the first of three full moon supermoons in a row.  Supermoon rises over Auckland, New Zealand in August 2014. Credit: Simon Runting/REX What do I look for? Head outside at sunset when the moon is closest to the horizon and marvel at its size. As well as being closer and brighter, the moon (clouds permitting) should also look orange and red in colour. Why? Well, as moonlight passes through the thicker section of the atmosphere, light particles at the red end of the spectrum don't scatter as easily as light at the blue end of the spectrum. So when the moon looks red, you're just looking at red light that wasn't scattered. As the moon gets higher in the sky, it returns to its normal white/yellow colour.  Will the tides be larger? Yes. When full or new moons are especially close to Earth, it leads to higher tides. Tides are governed by the gravitational pull of the moon and, to a lesser extent, the sun. Because the sun and moon go through different alignments, this affects the size of the tides. Tell me more about the moon The moon is 4.6 billion years old and was formed between 30-50 million years after the solar system. It is smaller than Earth - about the same size as Pluto in fact. Its surface area is less than the surface area of Asia - about 14.6 million square miles according to space.com Gravity on the moon is only 1/6 of that found on Earth. The moon is not round, but is egg-shaped with the large end pointed towards Earth. It would take 135 days to drive by car to the moon at 70 mph (or nine years to walk). The moon has "moonquakes" caused by the gravitational pull of Earth. Experts believe the moon has a molten core, just like Earth.  How was the Moon formed? How the Moon was formed Man on the Moon Only 12 people have ever walked on the moon and they were all American men, including (most famously) Neil Armstrong who was the first in 1969 on the Apollo II mission.  The last time mankind sent someone to the moon was in 1972 when Gene Cernan visited on the Apollo 17 mission. Although Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, Buzz Aldrin was the first man to urinate there. While millions watched the moon landing on live television, Aldrin was forced to go in a tube fitted inside his space suit. Buzz Aldrin Jr. beside the U.S. flag after man reaches the Moon for the first time during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969.  Credit: AP When the astronauts took off their helmets after their moonwalk, they noticed a strong smell, which Armstrong described as “wet ashes in a fireplace” and Aldrin as “spent gunpowder”. It was the smell of moon-dust brought in on their boots. The mineral, armalcolite, discovered during the first moon landing and later found at various locations on Earth, was named after the three Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil ARMstrong, Buzz ALdrin and Michael COLlins. An estimated 600 million people watched the Apollo 11 landing live on television, a world record until 750 million people watched the wedding of the Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981. One of President Nixon’s speechwriters had prepared an address entitled: “In Event of Moon Disaster”. It began: “Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay to rest in peace.” If the launch from the Moon had failed, Houston was to close down communications and leave Armstrong and Aldrin to their death.  How the Daily Telegraph reported Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon in 1969
The World War II Auto Mechanic in This Photo Is Queen Elizabeth II. Here's the Story Behind the Picture
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Queen Elizabeth II was the first woman in the royal family to serve full-time in Britain's women's military during WWII
Armed Citizen Kills a Shooter Who Opened Fire in an Oklahoma Restaurant
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A woman and a young girl were injured but expected to survive, police said
How a Former Guerrilla Leader’s U.S. Extradition Threatens Colombia’s Fragile Peace
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Colombia’s presidential elections on Sunday are the first since the end of the war
'20/20' says farewell to Elizabeth Vargas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ABC News' David Muir looks back on the career of his co-anchor Elizabeth Vargas at ABC News.
Why Ireland Is More Likely than Ever Before to Vote to Change Abortion Laws
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For the first time, Irish women are speaking out about their own experiences
Dershowitz: My friends, family are horrified by my Trump defense
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“The left adored me for my statements about Bill Clinton,” Dershowitz says in a new episode of the Yahoo News podcast “Skullduggery.” “And they despise me for making exactly the same statements about a political figure they despise.”
Amazon sale of facial recognition software causes outrage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 'Cyber Guy' Kurt Knutsson comments in on 'Fox & Friends First.'
Did President Trump Deliberately Sabotage the North Korea Summit to Save Face?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mentioning Libya again is such a shocking mistake to make twice
Princess Charlotte Kept an Eager Bridesmaid in Line Because the Sun Never Sets on a Boss
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Princess Charlotte helped Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding go off without a hitch. Here's how the pro bridesmaid did it
'That’s ridiculous': Key Obama adviser dismisses Trump's 'Spygate' claim
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Avril Haines, who served as President Obama's deputy national security adviser, told the Yahoo News podcast "Skullduggery" that it's "ridiculous" for President Trump to claim that "Spygate" is one of the biggest political scandals in U.S. history.
Taking the hill: As more veterans run for Congress, are they more bipartisan?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Marine Corps veteran Andrew Grant tucks a campaign flier into the hip pocket of his jeans, strides up the front walk, and rings the bell at a Spanish-style stucco home in this manicured suburb of Sacramento, Calif. “I’m Andrew Grant, and I’m running for Congress,” the tall, athletic candidate tells retiree Don Holl, who cracks open the door and tentatively looks out. Across the United States, a growing number of veterans of recent wars – both Democratic and Republican, men and women – are volunteering to serve again by entering congressional races.
This Kind of Diet May Lower the Risk of Dying from Breast Cancer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Can food be medicine?
A 62
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A 62-Ton Tree and Great Ape Are Among the Top 10 New Species
In Moroccan desert, meteorite hunters seek to strike it rich
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Equipped with a "very strong" magnet and magnifying glass, retired physical education teacher Mohamed Bouzgarine says that discoveries "can be more valuable than gold". "Rocks coming from Mars are very expensive, sometimes as much as 10,000 dirhams (around $1,000, 900 euros) per gram," he says. Bouzgarine stops in front of a hollow, hoping it could be a crater formed "very long ago" by extraterrestrial matter.
North Korea Is Still Willing to Talk With U.S. 'At Any Time, At Any Format'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korea says it's willing to talk with the U.S. "at any time, at any format" after the president abruptly canceled the planned summit.
ICE expands controversial partnerships with local law enforcement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
ICE’s 287(g) program, which is being expanded, deputizes local police and sheriffs to enforce immigration law in some localities. Critics say it leads to racial profiling and unjust detentions.
Google and Facebook Are Swaying Ireland’s Abortion Referendum Even When They Tried Not To
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"By the day before the vote, we had captured 1,300 referendum related ads on Facebook alone."
Jet Stream 'Traffic Jams' Drive Extreme Weather: Study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just like thousands of human drivers, planet Earth itself gets caught in a patches of bad traffic, a new study published in Science has revealed. Scientists studying the behavior of Earth’s weird jet streams have discovered the fast flowing currents of air bottleneck like vehicles on a busy road. Traffic jam-style atmospheric blocking can contribute to extreme weather.
The NFL Has Decided to Fine Teams if Players Kneel During the National Anthem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But the policy permits players to stay in the locker room for the anthem
Texas Governor Greg Abbott Meets With Students and Shooting Survivors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Most of the ideas centered on monitoring student mental health and security measures
Emmanuel Macron Turns to Vladimir Putin in an Effort to Salvage the Iran Nuclear Deal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Both men want to salvage the Iranian nuclear deal
1st black female astronaut in space offers advice to young girls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dr. Mae Jemison, the first black woman in outer space, fell in love with science at an early age. Decades later, she's encouraging girls of all ages and backgrounds to engage in STEM education and is sharing insight on how to overcome obstacles.
The GDPR Is Just the Latest Example of Europe's Caution on Privacy Rights. That Outlook Has a Disturbing History
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The GDPR represents an approach to privacy shaped by both the Holocaust and Stasi surveillance in East Germany
FDA Warns That Benzocaine Teething Products Are Not Safe for Children
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The agency also told manufacturers to stop selling the products for children
President Trump Defends Calling MS
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump vowed to withhold assistance from nations whose criminals enter the U.S.