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Mexico highlights in Latin American Astronomy and Astronautics Olympiad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Puebla, Mexico, Oct. 22 (Notimex).- The National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics (INAOE, for its acronym in Spanish), reported that Mexican high school students won gold, silver and an honorable mention when competing in the X Latin American Olympiad of Astronomy and Astronautics (OLAA, for its acronym in Spanish). In a statement, the institute said that this meeting was held from the 14 to the 19 of this month in the city of Ayolas, Paraguay, and in this tenth edition of the Olympiad participated young people from Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Uruguay, Panama, Paraguay and Mexico. It added that the INAOE also carries out activities to prepare those selected, both remotely and during stays made by selected young people in the facilities of Tonantzintla, Puebla. In the OLAA various tests are carried out, among which are a theoretical individual consisting of the resolution of theoretical astronomy exercises; an individual recognition of constellations and celestial objects; a theoretical by teams, and one of elaboration and launching of water rockets. It added that in the tenth edition of the OLAA Nancy Ruiz Dominguez, a student of the high school of the University of La Salle Bajio Juan Alonso campus of Torres de Leon, Guanajuato, obtained honorable mention. On the other hand, Alan Poisot Palacios, from the Wexford School in Queretaro, won a silver medal, and Oscar Angulo Flores, from the Colegio de Bachilleres in the State of Sonora, Reforma de la Ciudad de Hermosillo, won a gold medal and an award for the best individual theoretical test. NTX/JGS/HAR/GVG/BBF
Obama Rails Against Republicans in Fiery Nevada Rally
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Former President Barack Obama delivered a biting critique of Republicans in Washington and President Donald Trump’s administration on Monday but avoided mentioning his successor by name.
UNAM launches electronic catalog of academic services
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Oct. 22 (Notimex).- The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM, for its acronym in Spanish) has launched an electronic platform to promote and publicize its products and services in the academic world. In this platform, interested parties can contract a service or consult a project of researchers from more than 70 entities of the university, as well as search by keyword or through different sections. Clara Lopez Guzman, Director of Special Projects of the Coordination of Innovation and Development, explained that it is COGNOS-UNAM www.cognos.unam.mx, an electronic catalog with access to developments developed in the maximum house of studies. That is, technical and clinical services, as well as training, and adds laboratories, technologies and publications that may be susceptible to transfer, especially patents and software, which contribute to the country's development. "Through a simple search engine, those interested in hiring a service or consult some knowledge of our researchers and their projects, can do a search by keyword or through different sections," she said. COGNOS exists since 2015, but had worked only internally. Now, within the framework of the first decade of the existence of the Coordination of Innovation and Development (CID, for its acronym in Spanish), this platform opens up to the productive, public, private and social sectors. Starting this month, the CID begins its relationship with industry chambers and industries so that they know about it. The system puts the user in contact with a linker, who will attend directly, and then personalized, the initial request that was made online. This network has periodic meetings, workshops and courses where they receive training to meet a profile that allows them to sign agreements, provide services and make economic proposals and advice on how to charge and bid. Lopez Guzman indicated that the linkers have the task of putting in contact and encouraging, where appropriate, new lines of research, and perhaps the creation of a patent, and a company with that patent. "That would be a great success story, where COGNOS would be the seed," she concluded. NTX/ERM/DAP/BBF
Judge slashes award but upholds verdict in Monsanto cancer trial
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A San Francisco judge on Monday upheld a jury verdict that found Monsanto liable for not warning a groundskeeper that its weed killer product Roundup might cause cancer, but slashed the damages award. Judge Suzanne Bolanos denied Monsanto's request for a new trial but cut the $289 million damages award to $78 million to comply with the law regarding how punitive damages awards must be calculated. Jurors in August unanimously found that Monsanto acted with "malice" and that its weed killers Roundup and the professional grade version RangerPro contributed "substantially" to Dewayne Johnson's terminal illness.
New Study Reveals Chocolate Labs Have Shorter Lifespan Than Their Yellow and Black Counterparts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Study Says Chocolate Labs Have Shorter Lifespans Than Other Labs
Trump and Cruz make the best of their forced embrace
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Donald Trump is greeted by Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, as he arrives for a campaign rally at Houston Toyota Center, Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, in Houston. HOUSTON — In a move that would have seemed unthinkable two years ago, President Donald Trump offered a full embrace, literally and figuratively, of Ted Cruz in a massive rally here Monday night, imploring a crowd of tens of thousands of supporters to turn out for his former political rival in Texas’s closely watched Senate race. In what is likely to be one of the most closely analyzed endorsements of this hotly contested midterm election, Trump and Cruz shared the stage at the top of an hour-long rally here, sharing a brief man-hug and a few arm squeezes before an estimated crowd of 18,000 in the heart of downtown Houston.
Julia Roberts on Why She's Done With Romantic Comedies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She's still a fan of the genre
NASA’s incredible water system dumps 450,000 gallons in about a minute
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Once a rocket leaves the launch pad, all eyes turn skyward, but the technology that keeps launch sites working at their peak efficiency is pretty darn interesting in its own right. In a new video posted to YouTube, NASA shows off its insanely powerful water system that will keep things cool during the upcoming launches of the Boeing-built Space Launch System. What you're seeing is roughly 450,000 gallons of water being pumped out in about a minute. It's called the Ignition Overpressure Protection and Sound Suppression system, and NASA uses it to keep the launch pad at a manageable temperature even as its being blasted by a rocket. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNkmwrTjKuo As NASA notes in the video's description, the test was performed at Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center. The water was pushed around 100 feet in the air before spilling back into a large trench where it travels back to holding ponds. In this case, the water spewed upward because the rest of the hardware isn't fully connected yet. When the launcher is in place, the water will actually flow through a network of pipes and nozzles rather than spewing out like a geyser. Along with helping to dissipate the heat generated during the rocket firing, the water also helps absorb some of the intense noise that the rocket will generate. NASA says that this latest test is yet another big step towards the eventual launch of the Space Launch System on its first major test, Exploration Mission-1, which is expected to take place sometime around mid-2020. That's still a long way off, but getting into space takes time, especially when a new launch vehicle is part of the deal.
Man Dies After Falling From Cruise Ship Headed to the Bahamas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A man has was killed after falling on board a ship headed from Florida to the Bahamas, authorities confirm.
Trump Is Hitting the Midterm Campaign Trail Hard. History Shows That Doesn't Always Make a Difference
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"His intervention in the primaries was the most dramatic since the 1938 purge campaign," one expert in presidential history says of President Trump's midterm season
Photos Show Luke Bryan's Mom Returning to Her Home Devastated By Hurricane Michael
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hurricane Michael took its toll
Kamala Harris and Cory Booker campaign for South Carolina's black vote
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Kamala Harris and Cory Booker stumped for South Carolina Democratic candidates on Friday, and their visits offered a preview of a potentially historic presidential primary in 2020 featuring two leading African-American candidates.
Like old times: Hillary Clinton campaigns for Donna Shalala in South Florida
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In an event that seems like a reprise of the 1990s, former first lady Hillary Clinton will join former Clinton Cabinet Secretary Donna Shalala Wednesday at a fundraiser for Shalala’s congressional campaign.
Man whose flatulence ended police interview pleads guilty
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A man whose excessive flatulence forced a police detective to cut shot an interrogation has pleaded guilty to federal gun and drug charges.
Would US quitting the INF treaty rekindle a big
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
An administration with little love for treaties and the limits they place on the exercise of American power is about to scrap another one – this time the Reagan-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. President Trump told a campaign rally over the weekend that he intends to pull the United States out of what is known simply as the INF treaty, and this week he has dispatched his national security adviser, John Bolton, to Moscow to inform Russian President Vladimir Putin of the US decision. Spurred on by Mr. Bolton – the preeminent hawk in the White House and a longtime critic of the treaty signed with Russia in 1987 – Trump says he’ll withdraw from what he considers another bad international deal for the US, one he and arms control experts agree Russia has been violating for years.
He’s no saint – but Roger Stone insists he’s innocent of Russia collusion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Roger Stone has spent a lifetime cultivating a reputation as a political street fighter of the first order – a no-holds-barred conservative campaign operative fluent in the dark arts of electoral persuasion and deception. This is a rough-and-tumble game,” Mr. Stone told the Monitor during a wide-ranging, two-hour interview at his home here. In perhaps his most ambitious project, Stone began working as far back as 1988 to convince a flashy, combative New York City real estate developer and eventual reality TV star to run for president of the United States.
Pale Red Dot: NASA’s MarCO probe snaps first picture of Mars taken by a CubeSat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mars looks like nothing more than a reddish speck in a picture captured by one of NASA’s twin MarCO spacecraft, but it’s the start of something big for small satellites. NASA says the image, released today, is the first view of Mars recorded by a class of satellites known as CubeSats. The briefcase-sized probes are part of a mission whose name is a contraction of “Mars Cube One,” and were launched from California along with NASA’s Mars InSight lander in May. They’re officially known as MarCO-A and MarCO-B — but they’ve been nicknamed WALL-E and EVE because they use propellant… Read More
Mars likely to have enough oxygen to support life: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Salty water just below the surface of Mars could hold enough oxygen to support the kind of microbial life that emerged and flourished on Earth billions of years ago, researchers reported Monday. "We discovered that brines" -- water with high concentrations of salt -- "on Mars can contain enough oxygen for microbes to breathe," said lead author Vlada Stamenkovic, a theoretical physicist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. "This fully revolutionises our understanding of the potential for life on Mars, today and in the past," he told AFP.
'I’m Going for One Boast Post.' Jamie Lee Curtis Celebrates Record
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was the biggest horror movie opening with a female lead of all time
Prince Harry Wants Meghan Markle to Have a Baby Girl and People Couldn't Be More Excited
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are expecting their first child together
Donald Trump’s election was a 'traumatic experience' for many college students
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
To say that the 2016 presidential election had a profound impact on the American psyche might be an understatement.  In fact, new research suggests that for many, the experience was actually traumatic.  In a survey of roughly 800 college students, 25 percent reported such high levels of stress after the election that researchers likened it to symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a new study published in the Journal of American College Health.  Throughout the election, researchers noticed some pretty strong reactions in young adults. But the day after the election, lead researcher Melissa Hagan taught two classes where she saw that students were visibly upset — some were even crying.  Anti-Trump buttons are for sale at a protest against Donald Trump's presidency in 2016.Image: Getty ImagesThat, in combination with some polls in circulation discussing politically-caused “stress” drove her and her colleagues to look into how exactly the election affected certain people, Hagan said via email.  Hagan and her team administered a psychological assessment called the Impact of Event Scale, which is a standard quick measure to gauge how a person responded to trauma, and they tailored the questions to the presidential election.  They found that some college students were reporting that they were impacted by the election “in such a way that it might lead to diagnosable post-traumatic stress disorder,” Hagan said in a statement.  Some common symptoms of that kind of stress are chronic fatigue, physical illness, stomach or chest pain, and feeling overwhelmed. Results of the survey found that certain groups scored higher on the assessment than others.  For example, Black and Hispanic students reported higher levels of stress than their white peers. Women scored about 45 percent higher than men. And Democrats scored two and a half times higher on the assessment. Non-Christians also reported feeling strongly affected by the election results. However Hagan said it's important to note that the presidential election itself does not technically constitute a traumatic event.  Protesters gather outside of the military recruitment center in Time Square to protest Trump's policies.Image: Getty ImagesAccording to the American Psychological Association, in order for an event to be considered traumatic, “it is required that the person was exposed to: death, threatened death, actual or threatened serious injury, or actual or threatened sexual violence,” Hagan said.  That said, media coverage of the new administration's potential policies, some which have already been enacted, were perceived as life-threatening to some Americans. Moreover, many didn’t believe Donald Trump would be elected — especially not after the Access Hollywood tape was released, which might have been triggering for women and men who are survivors of sexual assault. Psychotherapist and author Jonathan Alpert, who is unaffiliated with the study, said the study’s results do not come as a shock to him.  “It wasn’t politics as usual," Alpert, who wasn't involved in the new study, said in an interview.  An officer watches on as protesters in Phoenix, Arizona gather.Image: Getty ImagesIn the months following the election, Alpert — like many other psychologists — noticed widespread young adult upheaval on both sides of the political spectrum.  It's possible that the shared outrage of college students could reinforce their levels of stress, Alpert said. "It’s almost like a contagion effect. You could almost catch stress from one another — like empathy," he said. Barbara Nosal, Chief Clinical Officer at the mental health facility Newport Academy who is also unaffiliated with the study, said in an interview that the degree of impact also might have to do with where young adults are in their lives. The competitive college environment, technology, and an undefined sense of independence already affects young adult development — plus, the election was an additional stressor.  Then presidential-candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Rochester, New York.Image: Getty Images“Their reaction to the election may have just compounded negativity on top of all of the other pieces of their of identity,” Nosal said.  Nosal said the depth of a reaction is also dependent on the individual person or their most salient demographic, not necessarily the stressor itself.  “Maybe a comment or something that occurs afterwards in their personal life brings the trauma up — plus ongoing discussions in the media may also trigger a traumatic response," Nosal said.  And while the survey couldn’t reveal any long-term impacts since the assessment was only administered once — if these symptoms are left unresolved, Nosal said anxiety disorders and depression may follow.  As to whether or not the clinical levels of stress vary based on the overarching political ideology of the school, Hagan thinks "it may be that symptoms are higher in states more 'left-leaning,'" but more research would have to be done to know for sure.  WATCH: Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No. It's an inflatable Trump baby flying around London
Ryanair Under Fire After a Passenger's Racist Tirade Was Caught on Video
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ryanair has faced criticism after a video posted online apparently showed the airline’s crew failing to take action to remove a passenger who launched a racist tirade against a fellow traveler.
Angry Diners Confront Sen. Mitch McConnell at Kentucky Restaurant
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Why don't you get out of here?" a man yelled at McConnell
Stephen Hawking's wheelchair and doctoral thesis are going up for auction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The stars have aligned for physics fans hoping to get their hands on a Stephen Hawking relic. Wheelchairs, scientific papers, and even a script from The Simpsons once belonging to the late physicist will be auctioned off starting Oct. 31, The Associated Press reports. Proceeds from the online sale will benefit Hawking's foundation and the Motor Neurone Disease Association.
Young climate activists say their lawsuit should go to trial
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SEATTLE (AP) — Young activists who are suing the U.S. government in a high-profile climate change lawsuit say the case poses important constitutional questions that should fully be evaluated at trial next week.
Hurricane Michael reshapes Florida Senate race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
U.S. Senate candidate and Florida Gov. Rick Scott is happy to be seen leading the cleanup after Hurricane Michael. But the aftermath may also depress turnout in the heavily Republican Panhandle.
In Florida race, climate change divides DeSantis and Gillum
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The two candidates in the governor's race in Florida are at odds over global warming.
Harris and Booker campaign for South Carolina’s black vote
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Kamala Harris and Cory Booker, both considered top potential 2020 presidential candidates, were only in South Carolina for about two hours last Friday morning, but their individual visits offered a preview of a potentially historic presidential primary featuring two leading African American candidates. If they do decide to enter the race, they are likely to spend even more time in South Carolina, whose Democratic primary is traditionally one of the first on the calendar.
A new candidate class: schoolteachers running for office
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When public school teachers in West Virginia heard last winter that their health insurance premiums would skyrocket, Brianne Solomon wasn’t sure anything could be done about it. The ensuing walkout by nearly 20,000 West Virginia teachers – the first of seven states to see strikes this year – won a 5 percent pay raise and a one-year freeze on healthcare hikes. Solomon has been teaching art and music for 15 years, but today she’s also one of more than 1,400 educators the National Education Association (NEA) says is running for seats in state legislatures this November.
Will increasingly indoorsy Canadians answer the call of the wild?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A recent weekend at Forks of the Credit Provincial Park, 45 minutes north of Toronto, is a picture of autumnal bliss. “I think it becomes more of a hassle to get outside,” says Daniel Kouto, who lives in Toronto.
Why a nuclear
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On Sunday, Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union, asked President Trump to drop his recent call for the United States to leave a nuclear arms treaty that Mr. Gorbachev himself negotiated with President Ronald Reagan in 1987. The pact, which is called the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, has helped keep a relative peace in Europe for more than three decades. It also reflects a growing sentiment among Russians that they can find a home within Europe rather than remain divided over issues such as nuclear threats, the Ukraine conflict, and spy scandals.
Swim team braves pollution to dive into Gaza waters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Coach Amjad Tantish talks through a warm-up before they race from the trash-strewn beach into the sea as he continues to bark instructions. The Mediterranean hugs the entire 40 kilometre (25 mile) western border of the Gaza Strip, but almost no one enters its waters. More than 95 percent of tap water is polluted, and water-related diseases are the primary cause of child morbidity in Gaza, according to the World Health Organization.
Science Says That Dogs with This Color Coat Live the Longest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This means that overall, chocolate labs tend to live 1.2 year less than the average golden retriever lifespan of 12.1 years. “The relationships between coat color and disease may reflect an inadvertent consequence of breeding certain pigmentations,” said Paul McGreevy, the Professor of Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science at the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Veterinary Science and lead author of the study. “Because chocolate color is recessive in dogs, the gene for this color must be present in both parents for their puppies to be chocolate.
This perfectly rectangular iceberg would like to object to your ideas of natural geometry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At some point someone said, “there are no right angles in nature,” and then everyone believed that person. Precise right angles might be hard to come by, but approximate right angles are everywhere. Salt crystals are cubic in nature. Many trees form approximate right angles with the ground. And recently NASA found an Antarctic iceberg…
Reports the Trump Administration Plans to 'Erase' Transgender Definition Sparks Alarm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump administration reportedly wants to narrowly define gender as fixed and determined by birth
Giant mice threaten rare seabirds on remote British island
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mice brought to a remote South Atlantic island by sailors in the 19th century are threatening seabirds including the critically endangered Tristan albatross, a British charity said on Monday. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds said the rodents have proliferated on uninhabited Gough Island, part of a British overseas territory, and are killing two million birds every year. "We knew there were large numbers of chicks and eggs being beaten each year but the actual number being taken by the mice is just staggering," Alex Bond, a researcher from the Natural History Museum in London, said in a statement released by the RSPB.
President Trump Threatens to Cut Off Foreign Aid Over Migrant Caravan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He also claimed without evidence that 'unknown Middle Easterners' are mixed in with the group
4 American Tourists On Bachelor Party Killed in Costa Rica Rafting Tragedy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Four American tourists and a local guide were killed in a rafting incident in Costa Rica on Saturday, authorities said.
Stephen Hawking's Wheelchair and PhD Dissertation Are up for Sale
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Christie's auction will include Stephen Hawking's scientific papers, his iconic wheelchairs and his doctoral thesis
Medtronic co
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Earl Bakken, an electronics repairman who created the first wearable external pacemaker and co-founded one of the world's largest medical device companies, Medtronic, has died. Bakken, who also commercialized the first implantable pacemaker in 1960, died Sunday at his home in Hawaii, Medtronic said in a statement. Bakken and his brother-in-law, Palmer Hermundslie, formed Medtronic in 1949 and turned it from a struggling company they ran out of the Hermundlie family's Minneapolis garage into a multinational medical technology powerhouse.
Mars May Have Enough Oxygen to Sustain Subsurface Life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ingredients for life are richer than we thought.
In Texas Senate race, Betomania confronts Trump’s mega
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Texas Democratic Senate hopeful Beto O’Rourke campaigns near a polling site as early voting kicked off Monday in Houston. HOUSTON—Hours before President Donald Trump was set to arrive in town to campaign for Republican Ted Cruz in Texas’s closely watched Senate race, Democrat Beto O’Rourke was bounding through the parking lot of a shopping center here, mobbed by hundreds of supporters as he made a pre-dawn visit to a polling place on the first day of early voting in the state.
African leadership should speak out at the UN, US commercial embargo of Cuba should end, Fan Bingbing’s tax practices are not unusual, India’s tie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It is ... disheartening to observe that not even one of the African leaders in attendance [at the 73rd General Assembly of the United Nations] plucked up the courage to speak poignant truths to the superpowers...,” writes Afam Nkemdiche.
How Syrian refugees strain – and strengthen – Jordan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Down to one janitor, four administrators, and a handful of teachers for more than 1,000 students, administrator Manal al Adwan says she is fighting “an uphill battle” each day to keep Al Hussein Secondary School running. It now also copes with 500 more – refugees from Syria – and Al Hussein has been forced onto a two-shift system, rotating Jordanian and Syrian students in and out in half-days to relieve the overcrowded classrooms. With only one day off a week to set their syllabus, grade papers, and invent ways to educate Syrian children who have been out of school for years, teachers are exhausted.
Saudi Arabia's King and Crown Prince Call Slain Journalist Jamal Khashoggi's Son
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman called the son of Jamal Khashoggi, the kingdom announced early Monday, to express condolences for the death of the journalist killed at the Saudi Consulate.
Taiwan's President Calls for Investigation After the Worst Train Crash in Decades
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Taiwan's president pressed for a quick, transparent probe into the cause of the island's worst train crash in nearly three decades
Germany Stops Exporting Arms to Saudi Arabia After Killing of Jamal Khashoggi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Germany announced plans to stop exporting arms to Saudi Arabia in the wake of the killing of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi
Eye disorder may have helped Da Vinci's art: journal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A common eye disorder may help explain Leonardo Da Vinci's talent for three-dimensional representation and the sense of perspective in his mountain landscapes, according to research published in an academic journal. People with strabismus often have monocular instead of binocular vision, meaning that both eyes are used separately thereby increasing the field of view and depth perception. "The presence of exotropia, particularly if it was intermittent, may have contributed to da Vinci's exceptional ability to capture space on the flat canvas," according to the research published in the JAMA Opthalmology journal this month.
Honduran migrant caravan pushes north toward the U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A U.S.-bound caravan that once totaled more than 3,000 Central American migrants looked to be about a third that size Saturday morning, when its remaining members woke up on a bridge that divides the borders of Guatemala and Mexico and waited to get past a crossing guarded by hundreds of Mexican federal police.
African leadership should speak out at the UN, US commercial embargo of Cuba should end, Fan Bingbing’s tax practices are not unusual, India’s tie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It is ... disheartening to observe that not even one of the African leaders in attendance [at the 73rd General Assembly of the United Nations] plucked up the courage to speak poignant truths to the superpowers...,” writes Afam Nkemdiche.