World News
IN SHORT
Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
market news

AD
New species of sunfish discovered by scientist in New Zealand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Of all things, Marianne Nyegaard didn't expect to find a new species of sunfish — the heaviest of all bony fishes. The PhD student from Murdoch University in Western Australia made the discovery while researching the population genetics of ocean sunfish off the coast of Bali in Indonesia. SEE ALSO: This video of a fish 'walking' along the ocean floor is making scientists scratch their heads Previously undescribed, it's called the Hoodwinker Sunfish ( Mola tecta). The fish has long eluded recognition from researchers, despite the species weighing in excess of two tonnes, and growing to three metres in length.  "A Japanese research group first found genetic evidence of an unknown sunfish species in Australian waters 10 years ago, but the fish kept eluding the scientific community because we didn't know what it looked like," Ms Nyegaard said in a statement. Image: César Villarroel, ExploraSubNyegaard spent four years searching for the fish, after genetic sequencing of 150 specimens in her research turned up with four different species: Masturus lanceolatus, Mola mola, Mola ramsayi, and a fourth which wasn't known about, she explained in her article on The Conversation. So in her quest to find the missing species, she'd travel thousand of miles to get data, or have kind strangers send samples of sunfish stranded on beaches.  In 2014, Nyegaard was a step closer, when she was sent a photo of a tiny sunfish, with a structure on its back she had never seen before. Then a breakthrough came.  Nyegaard was tipped off to four sunfish stranded on the same beach in New Zealand. She flew down to see it herself, where she spotted her first Hoodwinker Sunfish. "The new species managed to evade discovery for nearly three centuries by ‘hiding’ in a messy history of sunfish taxonomy, partially because they are so difficult to preserve and study, even for natural history museums," Nyegaard said. "That is why we named it Mola tecta (the Hoodwinker Sunfish), derived from the Latin tectus, meaning disguised or hidden." The Hoodwinker Sunfish is the first addition to the Mola genus in 130 years, and differs from other sunfish in that it remains sleek and slender even when large, and it doesn't develop a protruding snout, or huge lumps and bumps. "We retraced the steps of early naturalists and taxonomists to understand how such a large fish could have evaded discovery all this time. Overall we felt science had been repeatedly tricked by this cheeky species, which is why we named it the Hoodwinker," she explained. WATCH: Sam Tarly is the real MVP of 'Stormborn' on 'Game of Thrones'  
Monster iceberg breaks up in NASA satellite's infrared image
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Landsat 8 shows a massive Antarctic iceberg that calved this month is already splitting into pieces.
APNewsBreak: Man charged in igniting massive Utah wildfire
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A man accused of accidentally sparking a massive Utah wildfire that forced some 1,500 people from their homes last month and cost about $34 million to fight was charged Tuesday.
Trump seeks to regain mojo with Ohio campaign rally
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“With the exception of the late, great Abraham Lincoln, I can be more presidential than any president that’s ever held this office,” says Trump at Youngstown, Ohio rally.
Wild New Zealand rabbits surf on sheep to escape floodwaters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Three wild rabbits managed to escape rising floodwaters in New Zealand by clambering aboard a flock of sheep and surfing to safety on their woolly backs.
Healing Crystals for 'Down There'!?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains mature subject matter. Viewer discretion is advised.
Shocking Pet Horror Headlines!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Dr. Edward tells The Doctors about a two-year-old beagle named Rex who chased a rabbit in a park and returned to his owner with a bloody nose. Initially, the owner and vet failed to see the underlying issue and put little Rex on medications. When bleeding persisted, a CT scan revealed the dog had a 5-inch long stick lodged in his nose! Thankfully, they successfully removed the stick and Rex is doing much better.
Farmers are the secret ingredient for Ghana’s most innovative startups
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Accra, Ghana In 2012, Kwami Williams was studying at MIT to become a rocket scientist when he took a trip to his home country of Ghana with some of his classmates. There, he was introduced to the moringa, a sturdy tree dotting impoverished farming communities throughout the country. Williams, 20 at the time, was asked…
California knocks Trump as it extends climate change effort
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Gov. Jerry Brown and his predecessor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, stood side by side Tuesday to cheer the extension of one of the most ambitious programs in the U.S. to reduce fossil fuel pollution, while condemning President Donald Trump's failure to see climate change as a deadly threat.
Lockheed Martin Is Building a Prototype Moon Habitat From Old Space Shuttle Parts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There's no word on when the real thing will be built, but we hope it will be soon.
Elon Musk’s Tunnel Plan Isn’t as Crazy as SpaceX or Tesla
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Verbal approval may not be a thing in the world of infrastructure, but don’t just dismiss this latest wacky pitch.
Get your sous vide machine and a Field Company skillet, all from Anova
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Anova just announced a partnership with Field Company, yet another Kickstarter success story. Anova will be offering an exclusive limited batch of the Field Skillet before it's made available to the general public.
King Tut's Wife May Be Buried in Newly Discovered Tomb
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The archaeologists eventually plan to excavate the new tomb, which is located near the tomb of the pharaoh Ay (1327-1323 B.C.) in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, Hawass told Live Science. "We are sure there is a tomb there, but we do not know for sure to whom it belongs," Hawass told Live Science in an email. On July 7, National Geographic Italia published an article in Italian suggesting that a team led by Hawass had found a new tomb in the Valley of the Kings, and Hawass confirmed that discovery to Live Science.
L.A. man accused of smuggling king cobras in potato chip cans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A Los Angeles man was arrested on Tuesday after federal prosecutors said he arranged to smuggle into the United States three live, highly venomous king cobra snakes hidden in potato chip canisters. Rodrigo Franco, 34, was charged with illegally importing merchandise into the country in connection with a parcel from Hong Kong that was intercepted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents on March 2 containing the 2-foot (0.61 meter)-long snakes concealed inside the canisters. Three albino Chinese soft-shelled turtles were also found in the package, prosecutors said, adding that Franco on that same day mailed a box to Hong Kong with six protected turtles inside.
Man accused of smuggling king cobras in potato chip cans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A man was arrested on federal smuggling charges Tuesday after customs officers intercepted a shipment with three live king cobras hidden inside potato chip canisters that were being mailed to his California home, U.S. prosecutors said.
Senate Votes to Move Forward With Debate on ACA Repeal Bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Editors Note: This article was adapted from a version that was published on consumerist.org. The Senate narrowly voted today to move forward with its still-vague plan to repeal and possibly repl...
Why Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk are fighting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are having a very public spat about artificial intelligence.
Chipotle Outbreak: How Does Norovirus Get into Restaurant Food?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The "stomach bug" norovirus is behind the latest outbreak of foodborne illness linked to Chipotle, according to health officials. This week, a Chipotle restaurant in Sterling, Virginia, temporarily closed down after multiple customers reported falling ill with vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pains after eating there. A spokesman said the restaurant chain suspected that norovirus was to blame because the symptoms of the sick customers were typical of people infected with this virus, according to Reuters.
Water on the Moon Is More Plentiful than Scientists Suspected, Study Shows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have discovered evidence that suggests a significant amount of water is trapped beneath the surface of the moon, raising questions about its origins and potentially bolstering future attempts to explore the Earth’s satellite. A study of data from satellites has found that deposits of volcanic material distributed across the moon’s surface contain very high levels of water, compared with surrounding areas, according to new research published in Nature Geoscience.
Google Street View travels to the final frontier, capturing images from outer space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google has taken its cameras where few cameras have gone before, capturing images aboard the International Space Station.
Total Solar Eclipse 2017: How to Watch Safely and When
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The total solar eclipse being called the “Great American Eclipse” will pass through 14 states from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21. Fortunately, NASA and other experts are here to help. Watching an eclipse can be a mesmerizing, unforgettable event, but it can also cause permanent eye damage without the proper safety precautions.
Don't Believe the Spin: Fidget Spinners Have No Proven Benefits
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fidget spinners may be fun toys, but there is no science behind claims that they help kids with attention and focus, according to a new review article. The review, which was published July 7 in the journal Current Opinion in Pediatrics, found that no research had specifically focused on the impact of these hot new toys on thinking, attention or recall. Furthermore, there are zero peer-reviwed studies on any aspect of fidget spinners, the researchers found.
Trump's EPA enlists controversial think tank to find climate 'experts' to argue with mainstream scientists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ever since Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt and other Trump administration officials raised the idea of putting climate science up for debate, it's been an open question as to where the participants who doubt mainstream climate science would come from.  Now that is becoming clearer, and the answer is sure to further convince many that this entire exercise is a set up to discredit some of the most basic, rigorously studied climate science conclusions.  SEE ALSO: EPA chief wants his useless climate change 'debate' televised, and I need a drink The Washington Examiner reported on Monday that the EPA has reached out to the controversial Heartland Institute for help in casting the so-called "red team" that would try to poke holes in the evidence presented by mainstream climate scientists.  The Heartland Institute is a free market think tank that has received funding from the oil and gas industry and has spent that money to disseminate information to convince the public that the science linking human emissions of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels is flawed.  This fall, the group began mailing 200,000 copies of a report entitled, "Why Scientists Disagree About Global Warming,” to science teachers across the U.S. The report encouraged teachers to tell their students that climate scientists are still debating why the Earth is warming, when in reality the climate science community isn't debating that at all. The group's goal is to get the report in the hands of every single science teacher in the country, according to reporting from PBS's Frontline. The report asserts that even if human activity is contributing to climate change, such a development “would probably not be harmful, because many areas of the world would benefit from or adjust to climate change.” Despite what Heartland's experts might say, the Earth is warming due to increasing amounts of greenhouse gases in the air.Image: nasa/mashable/bob al-greeneThe Heartland Institute is also the same group that has been holding annual meetings for climate deniers, with the most recent one taking place in Washington, D.C., in March.  During the Obama administration, these were viewed as meetings of a desperate, irrelevant group of people who had virtually no influence on the federal government's agenda on climate and energy.  But now, everything has changed under President Donald Trump. Suddenly Heartland is influential, and its experts are being tapped to advise the government. Heartland's president and CEO Joseph Bast opened the post-election D.C. meeting by saying that, “those of us in the room who have been working on this issue for a decade or longer can finally stand up and say hallelujah and welcome to the party,” Frontline reported. Pruitt's outreach to cast the red team marks the clearest sign yet of Heartland's newfound influence. This is worrisome, because the group has ties to some of today's most ardent, and largely discredited, foes of climate science — and in some cases science in general. "The White House and the Environmental Protection Agency have reached out to the Heartland Institute to help identify scientists who could constitute a red team, and we've been happy to oblige," Jim Lakely, the group's communications director, told the Washington Examiner. "This effort is long overdue," he said. "The climate scientists who have dominated the deliberations and the products of the IPCC [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] have gone almost wholly without challenge. That is a violation of the scientific method and the public's trust." Lakely did not respond to Mashable's repeated requests for comment.  His statements to the Examiner, though, are deeply misleading, since the scientific process itself, as well as the methods used by organizations like the National Academy of Sciences and the U.N. IPCC, involve extensive scrutiny and peer review.  In fact, some major climate science reports and most government regulations relying on that science also require public comment periods, which makes the argument that climate scientists have gone unchallenged rather dubious.  Heartland has longstanding ties to well-known climate deniers like Fred Singer, Christopher Monkton, Willie Soon, House Science Committee Chairman Lamar Smith of Texas, Craig Idso, Patrick Michaels, Myron Ebell, William Happer, and others. Many of the speakers at its annual meetings have received funding from the fossil fuel industry, and few if any of them have successfully published studies in scientific journals that deal with climate change issues.  Some of them, including Singer, were involved in efforts to convince the public that there was no clear link between smoking cigarettes and lung cancer a few decades ago.  It's unclear exactly when a red team/blue team climate debate or series of debates will occur. What is known, however, is the general format of such an exercise.  Such a debate would have a "red team" of experts who would challenge consensus findings from scientific reports, and a "blue team" would then have the opportunity to respond. The productivity of this entire exercise would depend entirely on how such a debate were set up, such as the composition of the teams, the questions examined, the stakes and setting involved, and more. Image: Ed HawkinsIn an interview with Reuters on July 11 Pruitt said that he would like these debates to be televised, thereby raising the stakes for both mainstream climate scientists — who have the backing of thousands of peer reviewed climate studies and the conclusions of virtually every major science academy in the world — as well as climate deniers, who until this point had been relegated to the outer fringes of climate policymaking.  Critics of the debates see them as a way for Pruitt and others who are staunchly opposed to cutting greenhouse gas emissions to elevate minority views and make them appear to be just as valid as the consensus conclusions of the vast majority of climate scientists researching the subject.  This concern motivated senior Democrats on the House Science Committee to write to Pruitt on July 21 to express their concerns about the motivations behind the debates.  The letter didn't hold back, either.  "In the face of this overwhelming agreement on the basic fact of human-caused climate change by the world's scientists, your efforts seem to be divorced from reality and reason," the Democrats wrote.  "This only reinforces our skepticism of your motives in engaging in a clearly unnecessary, and quite possibly unscientific, red team-blue team exercise to review climate science." WATCH: An iceberg the size of Delaware broke off Antarctica  
McCain: ‘I will not vote for this bill as it is today’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A week after his brain cancer diagnosis, Sen. John McCain returned to Washington to cast a crucial vote to begin debate on the GOP health care legislation.
Trump: ‘Time will tell’ what happens to Sessions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Tuesday sharply criticized Attorney General Jeff Sessions but refused to say whether he would fire him or wanted him to resign, saying “time will tell” what fate awaits the former senator.
What US response to Jerusalem crisis says about Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Once again, a cycle of deadly violence between Israelis and Palestinians – this time sparked by recent events at Jerusalem’s holiest of religious sites – poisoned already strained relations between the two populations and threatened to drag neighbors into the storm. As tensions spiraled and deaths related to the flare-up mounted, President Trump on Sunday – some say belatedly – dispatched his Middle East envoy Jason Greenblatt to Israel. Recommended: How much do you know about the Palestinians?
22 Healthy and Delicious Chicken Recipes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
12 Surprising Signs of Breast Cancer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
You know their size, level of perkiness, and how good they look in that one shirt with the plunging neckline. For optimal breast health, says Dr. Joshua G. Cohen, a gynecological oncologist at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, you need to have what physicians calls breast self-awareness. While a firm, usually fixed area is the most common presentation of breast cancer, the deadly disease can rear its head in other ways.
7 Tips for Applying Bug Spray Properly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
To fight off mosquitoes and ticks—and avoid the diseases they can spread—you need an effective insect repellent. But even the best bug spray won't help much if you don't apply it properly. And th...
The Hardest Decision a Caregiver Will Ever Make
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Friends told me they would never put their parents in someone else's care.
How to Avoid Dangerous Allergic Reactions at School
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Eight years ago, Pia Hauk, M.D., a pediatric allergist at the National Jewish Health hospital in Denver, received the kind of phone call no parent wants to get: Her young daughter had suffered a ...
Wait — How Do The Stars Affect My Horoscope?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The one thing these two disciplines have in common is the night sky. Since then, advances in astronomy have helped the stars shed some of their mystery, leaving us with pretty little things that light up the night sky.
History's 1st Emoji? Ancient Pitcher Shows a Smiley Face
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The iconic smiley face may seem like a modern squiggle, but the discovery of a smiley face-like painting on an ancient piece of pottery suggests that it may be much older. During an excavation of Karkemish, an ancient Hittite city whose remains are in modern-day Turkey near the Syrian border, archaeologists came across a 3,700-year-old pitcher that has three visible paint strokes on it: a swoosh of a smile and two dots for eyes above it. "The smiling face is undoubtedly there," Nikolo Marchetti, an associate professor in the Department of History and Cultures at the University of Bologna in Italy, told Live Science in an email.
Earth's 2017 resource 'budget' spent by next week: report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humanity will have used up its allowance of planetary resources such as water, soil, and clean air for all of 2017 by next week, said a report Tuesday. Earth Overshoot Day will arrive on August 2 this year, according to environmental groups WWF and Global Footprint Network.
Detecting water leaks in your home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Smart & Safe Tech: All homes are prone to water damage; from plumbing leaks, weather or frozen pipes. Using smart sensors like Fibaro can help prevent damage by alerting you to leaks, so you can take action faster
New High: Nearly Half of Americans Have Tried Pot, Gallup Poll Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a new poll from Gallup, 45 percent of U.S. adults said they had tried marijuana at least once in their lives. This year, 12 percent of American said they currently smoke marijuana, up from 7 percent in 2013. Adults in the poll were more likely to be current marijuana smokers if they were male, under age 29 and had an annual income of less than $30,000 a year, Gallup said.
Surreal, Right? Why Dalí's Preserved Mustache Isn't Weird
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The strange story of Salvador Dalí's exhumation got even stranger last week, as forensic examiners announced that the famous artist's mustache is still intact, 28 years after his death. Dalí's embalmer called the discovery of the mustache "a miracle," according to The New York Times. The Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida, even sells shirts and socks emblazoned with the iconic facial hair.
Sour Note: In Ancient Rome, Lemons Were Only for the Rich
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans — prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean — it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel.
Sen. Collins caught on hot mic swiping back at ‘unattractive’ congressman’s duel challenge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A hot mic captured a conversation between Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and a male senator Tuesday, in which the two discuss Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas.
Imagining Trump’s big, beautiful wall. You might have to.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The ever-evolving vision for the wall President Trump wants to build along the border with Mexico got some new details earlier this month, the latest in the growing list of specifications for meeting Trump’s signature campaign promise — which is still in need of a source of funding.
Clarifying the ‘Goldwater Rule’ for psychotherapists in the age of Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After considerably commotion, the American Psychoanalytic Association was forced to clarify that it had not changed its position regarding “the Goldwater Rule.”
Senate GOP moves forward on health care bill in dramatic procedural vote
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Over the sound of protesters crying “kill the bill,” 50 Republican senators cast their votes to begin to debate repealing Obamacare on a razor-thin margin Tuesday afternoon. John McCain cast a decisive vote.
Ohio fair butter sculpture features athletes, chocolate milk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A butter sculpture at this year's Ohio State Fair includes the traditional cow and calf along with four student-athletes and a 6-foot-tall (1.8-meter-tall) bottle colored to look like chocolate milk.
Cyber staff: Wisconsin company offers to microchip employees
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A Wisconsin company is offering to microchip its employees, enabling them to open doors, log onto their computers and purchase break room snacks with a simple swipe of the hand.
926
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — A 926-pound (420-kilogram) Mako shark caught off the New Jersey coast won't be recognized as a state record because more than one angler helped catch it.
What restores peace for Jerusalem’s Old City
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In most religions, sacred shrines are meant to remind the faithful of the promise of peace. A series of killings, which began at the Temple Mount on July 14, set off the worst violence between Israelis and Palestinians in years. The potential of a major conflict forced emergency intervention by the United Nations Security Council and the United States.
A tipping point for Washington’s investigative culture?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Many members of Congress were furious. It was 1792, and a military campaign led by General Arthur St. Clair against Native Americans in what is today Ohio had ended in complete disaster. President George Washington responded with wary cooperation, aware he was setting precedents for presidents to come.
Scientists Stumbled on a Surprising Thing About Dark Matter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This upends the current theory about dark matter's shape.
How Do You Know When a DNA Test Is B.S.?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Recently, a DNA test appeared with a premise so far-fetched that its fate was profane and merciless ridicule. Soccer Genomics offers personalized, DNA-based training regimens to young players, and its goofy ad went viral amid internet outrage. It is, alas, only the most recent example of the growing field of sometimes-dubious lifestyle DNA tests.
The Mayak Satellite: Why Has Russia Sent a ‘New Star’ Into the Sky?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The crowdfunded Mayak CubeSat was launched along with 72 other satellites aboard a Russian Soyuz Rocket on July 14. Is this the start of advertising in space? In cities and towns across the world, faint stars are hidden from view because the atmosphere reflects artificial light back at us.