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How to Make the Perfect Apology
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Experts share research-backed tips for creating the perfect apology for each and every person in your life.
See the first images snapped by NASA’s observatory hunting alien planets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A satellite observatory launched into space in April has returned its first images of distant galaxies, a promising sign as it begins a search for planets beyond the solar system. Consider this incredible shot of the Large Magellanic Cloud (right) and the bright star R Doradus (left): The mission, called TESS, for Transiting Exoplanet Survey…
It's Officially the First Day of Fall. Here Are 4 Things You Should Know About Autumn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Including what kind of weather to expect
Woman's Swollen Pinkie Finger Was Rare Sign of Tuberculosis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A swollen finger is often the symptom of a simple sprain, but for one woman in California, a puffy pinkie was a rare sign of tuberculosis, according to a new report of the case. The 42-year-old woman went to the doctor after a week of swelling and pain in her pinkie finger. When doctors performed a biopsy of the woman's skin tissue, they found Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis.
Deciphering how memory works in the brain – at the level of individual cells
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study offers an explanation as to how we remember events by forming mental images.
German energy company: saving threatened forest 'illusion'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A German energy executive whose company plans to clear an ancient forest to expand a lignite strip mine says it's an "illusion" to think the woodland can be saved, and halting the project would cost his firm up to 5 billion euros ($5.9 billion). RWE wants to start cutting down half the Hambach forest in western Germany. RWE chief executive Rolf Martin Schmitz told ZDF television late Thursday "the assumption that the forest can be saved is an illusion" and he was "deeply distressed that a person died for such an illusion, such a symbol." He said stopping would make extensive stabilization work necessary.
Octopuses Take Ecstasy for Science and Become More Social Creatures
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers let these solitary creatures try MDMA. For science.
Harsh climate: The struggle to track global sea level rise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over the next half hour, the iceberg cracked into pieces and tumbled into the water — a mesmerizing sighting of the sea level rise that Holland has devoted years to studying. A Reuters photographer captured the event on video as Holland, a New York University oceanographer, took in the “absolutely breathtaking” scene. “We actually saw the process by which sea level rises from glaciers.” Now Holland and other climate scientists just have to figure out how — and how fast — warming oceans are undermining the glaciers of Greenland and Antarctica.
Ancient treasures on show in Germany reveal turbulent past
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BERLIN (AP) — An arrowhead firmly lodged in the skull of an ancient fallen warrior, a voluptuous woman's form carved from ivory and the mask of a Roman river god are among more than 1,000 major archaeological discoveries being brought together for the first time.
Trump Attacked Brett Kavanaugh's Accuser. Now People Are Revealing #WhyIDidntReport
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Approximately two of every three sexual assaults go unreported for a variety of reasons
Google workers consider changes to counter travel ban
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox & Trends with Carley Shimkus.
Researchers say they're closing in on Captain Cook's ship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers are exploring whether a shipwreck could be the vessel that the 18th-century explorer used to sail around the world.
Argentina bets on $600 million satellite to boost agriculture sector
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scheduled to launch on a SpaceX Falcon rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Oct. 6, Argentina's SAOCOM 1a satellite "is going to boost the high quality precision agriculture Argentina relies on," President Mauricio Macri told farmers and industry representatives last week. Scientists say the soil and subsurface mapping data provided by the $600 million dollar project should help increase crop yields. The radar antennae technology will allow Argentina to access a real time 'water map," almost unique in the world, which will allow for prediction of harvest yields, floods, and droughts, the government said.
AI could help drones ride air currents like birds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research shows how smart aircraft can learn to use updrafts of warm air to stay in the sky.
Disaster relief is about more than healing physical trauma. It's about emotional recovery too.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Disaster relief is most commonly thought of as providing food, water, and shelter to those affected by calamitous events beyond their control.  But as communities in places like Texas and Puerto Rico are learning, disaster relief that only alleviates physical wants is not enough to put their communities back on their feet. After first responders have done their jobs to secure personal safety, an emotional recovery has to begin as well.  Organizations like UNICEF are acknowledging that the damage to communities can last long after the repairs to homes are completed. Canned goods and other basic need items are given out in a disaster relief station in southeast Texas.Image: Getty Images“When the reality of the disaster sets in, the emotional and psychological responses that are seen community-wide are tremendous and overwhelming,” Center for School Behavioral Health director Janet Pozmantier said. “People simply don’t have the wherewithal to cope effectively.” That's where organizations like UNICEF are stepping in. Called psychosocial disaster relief, this kind of help comes in the weeks and months after a disaster in order to help people recover emotionally. If UNICEF can help it, these recovery efforts will be implemented after every storm.  Psychosocial relief in the wake of Hurricanes Maria and Harvey are currently ongoing, and UNICEF knows that the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in the Carolinas will also require this kind of help in the near future. Other organizations like the Red Cross have also been championing psychological first aid measures for years, and with good reason. SEE ALSO: Hurricane Maria is the deadliest storm of the 21st century Research suggests that those who have survived catastrophe tend to start showing signs of trauma roughly three months after the event took place. Those signs can look like anything from anxiety and depression to constant irritability and anger or even complete dissociation and inattention in both children and adults.  In order to combat these symptoms, Pozmantier and other staff at the center working under Mental Health America in Greater Houston developed free workshops to teach others how to effectively help people struggling in the aftermath of traumatic disaster-related events.  Damaged furniture and personal belongings sit on a flooded curb in Southeast Texas.Image: Getty ImagesThe workshop focuses on helping educators identify signs and symptoms of trauma in children while also including other useful tools like mindfulness training and how to self-regulate emotions.  After Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas, UNICEF reached out to the center and offered to fund a Harvey-specific trauma training workshop, which the center named Hope for Harvey.  In the months after Harvey made landfall in Texas, Pozmantier would drive through neighborhoods and see the entire contents of homes in a pile on the curb — family photos and clothing laying on top of piles of water damaged furniture — all ready to be collected by waste management.  She said it was easy to understand why people would be traumatized.  So when the center developed Hope for Harvey, aside from training people to deal with trauma in children, they also added some training on how to deal with adults.  “Going through something like this, I realized more than ever that if we can take care of the adults, the kids are going to be okay for the most part too,” Pozmantier said.  Nine months later, when UNICEF approached the center again to help Puerto Rico recover, the message was the same.  The center developed a workshop, completely in Spanish, to help curb the emotional impact Hurricane Maria had on the people of Puerto Rico, focusing again on children — but also providing help to adults.  First, UNICEF sent hygiene kits, water, and helped with shelter. But what UNICEF President Caryl Stern said she’s most proud of is the collaborative work that UNICEF and the Center for School Behavioral Health were able to put into action.  A man and a child stand in front of a destoryed house in Puerto Rico a few days after Hurricane Maria hit the island.Image: unicef usa“Now classrooms are catastrophe stations the every time it rains in Puerto Rico. The children are worried that their home is destroyed. Or they’re wondering 'Is my mother okay?'” Stern said.  Even seeing adults in distress can trigger the children, Stern said.  Once Stern experienced this, she said she know that the training workshops would be incredibly important.  In addition to the workshops, UNICEF sent a few hundred college students from State University of New York and City University of New York to pair up with member of various Puerto Rican communities to help rebuild the Boys and Girls Clubs of Puerto Rico.  Through this, people were able to come together and repair their communities themselves — something that can have a strong positive effect on the psyche.   Stern says everyone who has ever dealt with disaster relief knows that the psychosocial recovery is the most import aspect of relief that is widely ignored by the public.  Pozmantier agreed, adding that if she could, she would mandate that all educators go through training in mental health, trauma, mindfulness, and self-help strategies.  “They are the first line of defense. It’s like any other kind of illness. You wouldn’t wait until you’re on your deathbed to try and strengthen your immune system,” Pozmantier said.  WATCH: Puerto Rico is recovering cell service... with balloons
Sweden’s elections need in
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The rise of the Sweden Democrats – and the obvious parallels to Trump, Le Pen and Brexit – means the attention focused on Sweden is out of all proportion to the country’s size...,” writes James Savage.
McGill University Partners with Xebec to Develop Power
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Xebec Adsorption Inc. (TSXV: XBC) (“Xebec”), a global provider of clean energy solutions announced today that it will co-develop a prototype reactor to produce Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) using a Power-to-Gas (P2G) process with McGill University.  This process combines electricity generated from renewable sources with carbon dioxide (CO2) generated from waste. The project is being funded by Xebec as the Industrial sponsor and by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) through a Collaborative Research and Development grant of $360,000 over a period of three years.
3 Reported Dead After Mass Shooting at Rite Aid Distribution Center in Maryland
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three people have been reported dead after a mass shooting at a distribution center in Maryland, police said.
Trump Delays Releasing Russia Probe Documents After U.S. Allies Raised Concerns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Earlier this week, Trump had ordered the documents declassified
New evidence of political bias at Google?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Internal Google emails reveal employees discussing manipulating search results after Trump's travel ban; insight from Peter Schweizer, producer of 'The Creepy Line.'
Teacher suspended after being reported for kissing a student in classroom: Part 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elizabeth Thomas says she was teased by students and teachers after Tad Cummins was suspended from her school.
Supermassive Black Hole Spotted Sucking in Gas at a Third of Light Speed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Chaotic accretion makes for really fast black holes.
Student's Essay Snafu Is Really One for the Books
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was "a series of unfortunate events"
Something huge nearly hit our galaxy and set millions of stars ‘rippling like a pond’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A galaxy brushed against ours
More than 500 Sexual Assaults Happen in a Single Year at Some Military Installations: Report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A newly released Pentagon study revealed that many military sexual assaults occur at a relatively small number of bases and naval ships.
Robot jellyfish could be used to patrol fragile coral reefs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Could schools of robotic jellyfish soon be patrolling the world’s oceans, monitoring fragile environments such as coral reefs? A team of United States researchers certainly thinks so.
Japan space rovers lowered to asteroid to collect data
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TOKYO (AP) — A Japanese spacecraft released two small rovers on an asteroid on Friday in a mission that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system.
Cruz and O’Rourke face off in testy Texas Senate debate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Seeking to regain the edge in a race that has been surprisingly competitive, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz faced off with his Democratic opponent, Rep. Beto O’Rourke, for the first time Friday evening, in an hour-long debate that was marked by sharp differences on policies like immigration and law enforcement and some pointed personal attacks. The fireworks began almost immediately on stage at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, where the candidates met for the first of three scheduled debates in coming weeks in Texas’s closely watched Senate race in which Cruz, the one-term incumbent, has struggled to stay ahead of O’Rourke, a rising star Democrat whose candidacy has attracted large crowds and celebrity support. Cruz, a champion debater going back to his college years at Princeton, seemed more comfortable at the podium, and more confrontational.
Pet Store Puppies Are Linked to Drug
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Not so cute
Japan space probe drops hopping rovers towards asteroid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Japanese space probe Friday released a pair of exploring rovers towards an egg-shaped asteroid to collect mineral samples that may shed light on the origin of the solar system. The "Hayabusa2" probe jettisoned the round, cookie tin-shaped robots toward the Ryugu astroid, according to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). If the mission is successful, the rovers will conduct the world's first moving, robotic observation of an asteroid surface.
President Trump’s Tweets Show Why Most Sex Assault Victims Never File Police Reports, Advocates Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Victims are worried about whether or not they will be believed"
1.3 Billion People Live in Poverty, a New U.N. Report Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A survey of 104 countries comprising 5.5 billion people that looked at health, education and living standards has found that some 1.3 billion people are living in poverty — including 662 million children.
'We Do Not Support This Conduct.' PayPal Joins the Growing Number of Sites to Ban InfoWars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'We do not support this conduct'
Trump Has Wanted to Fire Rosenstein for Months. Has He Just Been Given a Reason?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The deputy attorney general reportedly suggested secretly recording the President
Significant Digits For Friday, Sept. 21, 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the numbers tucked inside the news. 13 to 21 years longer Large life insurance company John Hancock will begin underwriting only “interactive policies” — those tied to health data harvested from wearable devices and smartphones. Holders of such policies live 13 to 21 years longer than other […]
8 Simple Ways to Be a Better Networker
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It's not what you know, it's who.
Airline Passengers Suffered Bleeding Ears and Headaches After Pilots 'Forgot' to Pressurize Cabin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Several passengers were taken to the hospital
Scientists baffled by neutron star giving off strange light and cannot explain it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's a never-before-seen finding by NASA
Suge Knight Agrees to Serve 28 Years in Prison Over Fatal Hit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The former rap mogul has agreed to serve 28 years in prison
Morning Joe's Mika Brzezinski On Women’s Empowerment Post #MeToo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Morning Joe co-host on updating a women’s empowerment book in the #MeToo era and why women don’t need to be liked
Japan’s Hayabusa 2 probe drops off rovers at an asteroid and snaps a shadowy selfie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Japan’s Hayabusa 2 probe began the climactic phase of its mission overnight by sending out its first two rovers as it hovered less than 200 feet over an half-mile-wide asteroid, more than 180 million miles from Earth. During the drop-off, the 18-foot-wide spacecraft even took a picture of its own shadow, spread out on the asteroid Ryugu’s rocky surface like a black-and-white copy of the Canadian flag. The release of Hayabusa 2’s MINERVA-II-1 rovers occurred at 9:06 p.m. PT Thursday, mission controllers at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency reported in a tweet. Hayabusa 2 dipped as low as 55 meters… Read More
Uh oh, there might be something wrong with NASA’s Curiosity rover now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's rover situation on Mars is, well, complicated. The aging Opportunity rover was swallowed up by the planet-wide dust storm that covered Mars earlier this summer and hasn't woken back up since. The rover's extended mission is currently in limbo while NASA waits to see if it still has some life left in it, so all eyes have been on the newer Curiosity rover as it continues to explore the Martian surface. Now, in a new update by the Curiosity team, it seems the last working robot is coming down with a case of... something. It seems Curiosity is refusing to send back the vital scientific data that it has been gathering, and NASA isn't sure what's wrong. "Over the past few days, engineers here at JPL have been working to address an issue on Curiosity that is preventing it from sending much of the science and engineering data stored in its memory," the Curiosity team explains. "The rover remains in its normal mode and is otherwise healthy and responsive." The rover isn't totally silent, however, and is still relaying certain status information, just not the science data it has stored locally. This strange set of circumstances is leaving Curiosity's engineers scratching their heads. "Besides transmitting data recorded in its memory, the rover can transmit 'real-time' data when it links to a relay orbiter or Deep Space Network antenna," the team writes. "These real-time data are transmitting normally, and include various details about the rover's status. Engineers are expanding the details the rover transmits in these real-time data to better diagnose the issue." Opportunity — that's the one that's currently sleeping off its dust storm hangover — has far surpassed its original mission timeline. Originally intended to last just 90 days on Mars, it has managed to push on for well over a decade. Curiosity is much newer, having landed on the planet in mid 2012, and it's done some fantastic work thus far. Its primary mission stretched for roughly two years, and it has been continuing its work ever since. Whatever is wrong with Curiosity we'll be keeping our fingers crossed that it gets resolved in short order.
Trump Directly Attacks Kavanaugh Accuser By Name
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He said if the attacks were as "bad" as she says, she would have filed charges
U.S. Passports Can't Be Denied Over Refusal to Select a Gender, a Judge Has Ruled
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Advocates hope the ruling leads to greater gender choice on federal documents
Social media saves lives in Syria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The new smartphone and computer app Sentry acts as an early warning alert system using data from human observers and remote sensors to warn of Assad regime attacks.
Sessions's push to speed immigration cases meets resistance from judges union
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Ashley Tabbador, the head of the union that represents federal immigration judges, accused the Department of Justice of prioritizing efficiency over due process Friday, and renewed calls for the creation of an independent immigration court system.
In Peru, Hitler runs for mayor despite threat from Lennin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
In Peru, Hitler hopes to return to power in a small town in the Andes, despite a threat from a detractor named Lennin. Campaign slogans reading "Hitler returns" and "Hitler with the people" have appeared around the highland town of Yungar, where local politician Hitler Alba is seeking a new term as mayor. "I'm the good Hitler," Alba said on local broadcaster RPP.
Kavanaugh hearings: Does panel need 'protocol' for sexual assault allegations?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Republicans and Democrats can agree on at least this much regarding the confirmation process of Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court: It’s a mess. Republicans complain of Democrats’ 11th-hour leaking of a bombshell development and of delay tactics. Democrats complain of Republicans railroading their nominee and of unfair treatment of Prof. Christine Blasey Ford.
President Trump Suggested Spain Build Its Own Border Wall Across the Sahara
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump claimed the desert “can’t be bigger than our border with Mexico”