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Inside the Second Coming of Nest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After some bumps in the road to home-automation nirvana, the maker of smart thermostats tries to level up.
'He Can't Hear You.' Man With Metal Pipe Was Fatally Shot by Police Who Didn't Know He Was Deaf
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The officers were responding to a report of a hit-and-run
Trump Called a U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The first group of refugees are expected to be resettled to the U.S. "in coming weeks"
Switzerland's Getting a Delivery Network for Blood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And it's got some clever new hardware to make it work.
Kohl’s Will Soon Accept Your Amazon Returns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's part of a growing partnership between the companies
President Trump's Pick for Russian Ambassador: 'No Question' Moscow Interfered in Election
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jon Huntsman says the meddling led to the lack of trust
The Latest: Scientists: Quake test of bridge design worked
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
RENO, Nev. (AP) — The Latest on tests for new bridge construction technology intended to withstand strong earthquakes at the University of Nevada, Reno (all times local PDT):
Reports: Hurricane Maria leaves Puerto Rico entirely without power
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Multiple reports on Wednesday afternoon claimed the entire island of Puerto Rico was without power after Hurricane Maria slammed into the island with maximum sustained winds of up to 140 mph. SEE ALSO: Hurricane Maria may be the most destructive storm in Puerto Rico's history Local Spanish language publication El Nuevo Dia reported the outage, citing Abner Gomez, managing director of Puerto Rico's State Agency for Emergency Management and Disaster Management (AEMEAD). SEGUN DIRECTOR DE MANEJO DE EMERGENCIA, PUERTO RICO ESTÁ AL 100℅ SIN ENERGÍA ELÉCTRICA. — RUBEN SERRANO (@GUARETO1) September 20, 2017 Those reports eventually began to trickle in via the office to U.S. and international media outlets, as well. Blackout: 100% of Puerto Rico is without power, Puerto Rico Office of Emergency Management tells @ABC News - @JoshuaHoyos — Dan Linden (@DanLinden) September 20, 2017 According to the most recent U.S. Census, Puerto Rico is home to just over 3.4 million people who will now have to navigate the post-Maria days without power and with no word as to how long it'll take to restore that power. The complete outage isn't a surprise, however. Governor Ricardo Rossello said he expected it just as the storm prepared to make landfall. The reason: a dilapidated and already-failing utility infrastructure.  Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA), the island's sole power company, filed for bankruptcy in July after years of sliding that left it with $9 billion in bond debt.  And according to Reuters, the median age of Puerto Rico's power plants is 44 years old, ancient by industry standards. Just last September, a fire at one of these dilapidated plants knocked out power across the entire island with nearly half the island without power for a week. Image: PREPA internal documentThese old plants power the island by burning imported oil, a drain on the island's economy that has made its rates so expensive that Hawaii is the only U.S. state where energy costs more. And there are tons of other issues, from customer service to safety problems.  It also doesn't help that Hurricane Irma side-swiped the island just one week ago, knocking out power to at least a million people.  And now that Maria has hit, engulfing nearly the entire island with hurricane-force winds, that aging, already-damaged infrastructure is likely completely devastated, meaning the entire island could be without power for days, if not weeks, to come.  This is a developing story... WATCH: This is how hurricanes are named
Bipartisan health care fix dies in Senate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Senate’s rejection of bipartisan health bill is a dispiriting moment for world’s greatest deliberative body.
California suing to block Trump border wall
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
California moved Wednesday to block the Trump administration's construction of a wall on the border with Mexico that would aim to keep out unauthorized immigrants. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra filed suit in federal district court in San Diego, saying the government violated constitutional and environmental laws in moving to launch new wall projects on the state's southern end. "The Trump Administration has once again ignored laws it doesn't like in order to resuscitate a campaign talking point to build a wall on our southern border," Becerra said in a statement.
Polygamist Leader Lyle Jeffs Pleads Guilty in Multimillion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lyle Jeffs was charged in a multi-million dollar food stamp fraud scheme
At Least 12 People Arrested in Spain Amid Catalan Independence Demonstrations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The region is preparing for a secession vote that Spain says is illegal
A 'Most Wanted' Fugitive Posted His Location on Instagram and Police Arrested Him
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He was wanted on suspicion of murder
New Group of Iranian Hackers Linked to Destructive Malware
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A suspected Iranian government hacking team known as APT33 may be planting computer-killing code in networks around the world.
So, Australia just had its warmest winter on record
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Australians have just wrapped up the warmest winter on record, according to a new report. The Climate Council's report, titled Hot and Dry: Australia’s Weird Winter, found that Australia's winter had the highest maximum temperatures on record — reaching nearly 2ºC above average. SEE ALSO: 'Game of Thrones' star on climate change: 'A threat maybe even graver than the White Walkers' But while Australians were able to leave a few layers at home, ecologist Professor Lesley Hughes reminds y'all that it's not a positive thing — how about that climate change? “Without any meaningful action to tackle climate change, we will continue to see many more hot winters, just like this, as global temperatures rise,” she said on the Climate Council website. "We must take meaningful action to strongly reduce Australia’s emissions from fossil fuels." According to the Climate Council, Australia's average winter temperatures have increased by approximately 1ºC since 1910, thanks to the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, a big source for the country. SEE ALSO: How M&M’S is taking a stand against climate change with wind power The report comes at a time when Australia's energy policy is under high scrutiny, especially in regards to the country's ability to meet emission reduction targets set at the Paris climate change conference. The report draws attention to Australia’s energy system, a largely coal-based system, which is described as "ageing, inefficient and polluting, and has proved unable to cope with escalating extreme weather, like heatwaves." Australia's not just warmer in winter, but drier Outside of warming, maximum heat temperatures weren't the only records broken over the winter, according to the report, with over 260 heat and low rainfall records smashed.  It was the driest winter recorded since 2002, and second driest Australian June on record. Bushfire risk is above normal for approximately one third of Australia, and the season will begin earlier in in Australia’s southeast. Here's a neat little infographic from the report's findings that paints a pretty concerning picture: Image: Climate council.According to the report, Australia is on track for a warmer than average spring. Nothing important after that though, just Australia's characteristically blistering hot summer. Bondi's going to be crowded. WATCH: Giant icebergs are a big tourist draw in Newfoundland, and a warning sign
New fight in California water wars: How to update old system
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — In California's long-raging water wars, pitting north against south and farmer against city dweller, the one thing everybody agreed on Wednesday was that the outdated method of shipping water throughout the most populous state needs a serious upgrade.
3 Ways the New Obamacare Repeal Bill Would Change Women's Access to Health Care
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Republicans have a new last-ditch effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act
Rescuers in grim search for survivors of Mexico quake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rescuers dug frantically Wednesday for survivors of a 7.1- magnitude earthquake that killed more than 200 people in Mexico, as the nation watched anxiously for signs of life at a collapsed school in the capital. The death toll stood at 225, the head of the national disaster response agency, Luis Felipe Puente, wrote on Twitter. President Enrique Pena Nieto warned the figure would likely rise.
How President Trump's Iran Criticism Affects North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Morning Must Reads: September 20
Will Barcelona secede from Spain? Catalan independence is up for a vote — and Russia is stirring the pot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Here in Spain’s second-largest city, long a magnet for American tourists, life on the surface appears as festive as ever, from the beach terraces laden with pitchers of sangria to the crowds browsing the kiosks on the pedestrian median of La Rambla, which almost immediately returned to normal after last month’s terror attack. But the tension brewing just below the surface of Catalonia, the wealthy northeast region of 7.5 million of which Barcelona is capital, burst into the open Wednesday morning with a series of raids by national police on the regional ministry of finance, leading to at least a dozen arrests of senior officials, followed by hours of flag-waving marches and demonstrations. At issue is a wave of Catalan nationalism culminating in a referendum on secession, scheduled for October 1.
These Are the 15 Best Hair Colors for Fall 2017
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Ancient Shipwrecks Discovered at Depths of Black Sea's Dead Zone Perfectly Preserved After Thousands of Years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Black Sea Maritime Project (MAP)—a two-year investigation of Bulgaria’s Black Sea waters—involved local and international experts who found 60 previously lost shipwrecks spanning 2,500 years in the history of a coastline that has been port to many of Europe’s major empires. Dozens of old ships lie preserved in low-oxygen waters off the coast of Bulgaria, where ships from the Roman Empire, Byzantium and Ottoman ports once docked. The composition of the Black Sea makes it a perfect environment for preserving relics because its anoxic layer prevents the sort of damage that oxygenated water causes to wood, metals and other materials.
'We Get Out Here and Disrupt.' More Than 140 People Arrested Amid Protests in St. Louis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Protests shut down businesses and large corporate offices
Wildlife pays the price of Kenya's illegal grazing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Months of invasions by sometimes armed semi-nomadic herders, and tens of thousands of their livestock, have had a disastrous impact on the wildlife of a region heralded as a conservation success story. African wild dogs, elephants, buffalo, lions, giraffes, zebra and antelope have all been affected by shooting, starvation and disease, or by being forced out of their usual habitats. Canine distemper, a virus most likely caught from the pastoralists' attendant mongrels, has wiped out scores of endangered wild dogs, including all seven packs studied by Ngatia, an ecologist at Laikipia's Mpala Research Centre.
Bill Gates: More Tech Revolutions Are Coming, And They'll Change Everything We Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An essay by Bill Gates on the revolutionary ideas that will transform the next century.
These Two Black Holes Orbiting Each Other Are Surprisingly Close to Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The pair of supermassive black holes each weighs more than a million times the mass of our sun.
Internal watchdog says EPA mismanaging toxic site cleanups
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cleanups at some U.S. hazardous waste sites have stopped or slowed down because the Environmental Protection Agency does not manage its Superfund staff effectively to match its workload, an internal government watchdog said Tuesday.
Giant antennas in New Mexico search for cosmic discoveries
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomers are using an array of giant antennas in the New Mexico desert for a years-long project aimed at producing the sharpest view ever of such a large portion of the sky using radio waves.
Scenes From Mexico's Devastating Earthquake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Photos show the devastating impact of the deadly 7.1 magnitude earthquake that rattled Mexico City, killing more than 220 people
Pence presses Myanmar, U.N. to end Rohingya violence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Vice President Mike Pence pressed Myanmar’s military to end its violent campaign against the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority and urged the U.N. Security Council to respond forcefully to the resulting humanitarian crisis in Southeast Asia.
Obama blasts 'aggravating' GOP plans to repeal Obamacare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former President Barack Obama mocked Republicans in a speech on Wednesday for repeated efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, his signature health care law also known as Obamacare.
Friend of slain Georgia Tech student: 'If Scout was more gender
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Scout Schultz, a Georgia Tech student, was shot by campus police on Saturday night, and a protest two days later led to arrests. In the aftermath of those events, Yahoo Lifestyle talked to a friend of Schultz’s to gain some perspective on what happened and why.
Woman: I'd rather go to jail than take down pro
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROCKLAND, Maine (AP) — A Maine woman says she'd rather go to jail than take down her pro-Donald Trump signs.
Remembering '85, Mexico City public leaps into quake rescue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Baruch García stood at an intersection Tuesday afternoon after a deadly earthquake, trying to direct traffic away from a road cutting through La Condesa’s lush Parque México. On the other side of the park, hundreds of volunteers – from a young boy in a yellow soccer uniform, to a woman in slacks and ballet flats, and a man wearing an apron from a nearby café – lined the street for blocks, helping to remove rubble from an eight-story collapsed building with an unknown number of people buried inside. Tuesday afternoon, a 7.1 earthquake in nearby Puebla State rocked Mexico City, some 75 miles away.
Lessons in identity from Kurds and Catalans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
One of the defining challenges in the 21st century has been how to balance demands for independence by certain peoples with the sanctity of national borders. Just in the coming days alone, two regions with distinct identities, Catalonia in Spain and the Kurdish area in Iraq, plan to stage referendums on independence. The two votes are an echo of demands by several countries for more sovereignty to protest the perceived effects of global or regional institutions that were set up to purposely impinge on national sovereignty.
Corporate America doing enough to secure your personal data?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New York proposes regulations to require credit bureaus like Equifax to have the same cybersecurity standards as banks and insurance companies; reaction from cybersecurity analyst Morgan Wright
Waymo and Intel Shack Up to Create a Self
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The rich Google self-driving car spinoff and the global chipmaker make excellent dance partners.
Northrop Grumman’s $7.8B deal to acquire Orbital ATK fuels aerospace consolidation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Northrop Grumman’s purchase of Orbital ATK for $7.8 billion will create a company involved in projects ranging from America’s next stealth bomber and ballistic missile system to the International Space Station and the James Webb Space Telescope. The deal, previewed in news reports over the weekend and announced today, is part of a trend toward greater consolidation in the defense and aerospace industry. Virginia-based Orbital ATK itself was part of that trend back in 2014, when it was formed through the merger of Orbital Sciences Corp. and Alliant Techsystems’ aerospace and defense groups. More recently, United Technologies announced its $30 billion… Read More
Here's How the Latest Attempt to Repeal Obamacare Would Work
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Senate has until the end of the month to pass the controversial Graham-Cassidy act
At Least 226 Dead After 7.1
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The quake hit on the same day as another major earthquake in 1985
The Sex Trafficking Fight Could Take Down a Bedrock Tech Law
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new bill would change part of the Communications Decency Act, which protects site operators for content posted by others.
Scramble for survivors as quake flattens Mexico City buildings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When the earthquake hit, it sent panicked people running into the street but many weren't so lucky. The dust settled minutes later to reveal a landscape of flattened buildings and rubble in the heart of Mexico City.
Puerto Rican astronaut affected by double hurricanes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Space station's Joe Acaba had home flooded by one hurricane, family's homeland hit by another
White House says Trump didn't apologize to Turkey's Erdogan for D.C. clash with protesters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
"President Trump … said that he was sorry, and he told me that he was going to follow up on this issue,” Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told PBS in reference to the incident, which resulted in charges against 15 Turkish security officers.
Kimmel: Cassidy 'lied to my face' on health care; Cassidy: 'I'm sorry he does not understand'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., says Jimmy Kimmel “does not understand” the new health care legislation he and Sen. Lindsey Graham are co-sponsoring after the late-night host blasted their proposal and accused Cassidy of lying to his face.
Presidential paranoia: Does Mueller have a mole in the White House?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump has long spoken in conspiratorial terms about a range of topics. It appears this is partly responsible for fostering a culture of distrust and paranoia in the White House.
Tractor trailer makes wrong turn, gets stuck on boardwalk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
VENTNOR, N.J. (AP) — A tractor trailer apparently made a wrong turn and got stuck on a boardwalk at the New Jersey shore.
Chocolate overload: Rig chock
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GORDONSVILLE, Va. (AP) — The scene was a chocoholic's delight: a rig full of candy bars overturned on a road in Virginia.
Kremlin frets as Russia's once restive Islamist region takes up political Islam
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Russia fought two bloody wars in its Caucasus republic of Chechnya, ostensibly to crush an emerging threat of Islamist extremism on its own soil. Mr. Kadyrov is imposing sharia (Islamic law) on his population – and lately, even defying the Kremlin's foreign policy – with an apparent eye on a global, Islamic stage. “He has introduced politicized Islam in Chechnya, and this is definitely a problem for the Kremlin.
Terminator moves step closer to reality as scientists create synthetic muscle that can lift 1,000 times its own weight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An artificial muscle that can lift 1,000 times its own weight has been created, laying the groundwork for Terminator-like humanoid robots. Scientists used a 3D printing technique to create the rubber-like synthetic muscle that expands and contracts like its biological counterpart. Heated by a small electric current, the material was capable of expanding to nine times its normal size. This is a big piece of the puzzleProfessor Hod Lipson, Columbia University In tests it demonstrated enormous strength, having a strain density - the amount of energy stored in each gram of a stretched elastic body - 15 times greater than natural muscle. The device, described as a "soft actuator", was able to lift 1,000 times its own weight, said the researchers whose work is reported in the journal Nature Communications. Professor Hod Lipson, from the Creative Machines laboratory at Columbia University in New York, said: "We've been making great strides toward making robot minds, but robot bodies are still primitive. "This is a big piece of the puzzle and, like biology, the new actuator can be shaped and reshaped a thousand ways. We've overcome one of the final barriers to making lifelike robots." Artificial muscles may not only be used in robots but also sensitive surgical devices and a host of other applications where gripping and manipulation is important.  Co-author Dr Aslan Miriyev, also from the Creative Machines lab, said: "Our soft functional material may serve as robust soft muscle, possibly revolutionising the way that soft robotic solutions are engineered today. "It can push, pull, bend, twist, and lift weight. It's the closest artificial material equivalent we have to a natural muscle." The long-term aim is to accelerate the artificial muscle's response time and link it to an artificially intelligent (AI) control system, said the researchers, who were part-funded by the Israeli defence ministry.