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Ways to Get a Free Workout!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Get in shape without spending a cent! Ob/Gyn Dr. Nita Landry and ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork have tips on how to get a great workout without paying gym fees.
Cartoon Sex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains mature subject matter. Sexual Health Educator Emmalinda MacLean and Sex Therapist Dr. Fran Walfish join The Doctors to discuss a controversial sex education book for young children. Dr. Fran agrees that sex education is important, but feels this book has a mismatch between the childish illustrations and the information it contains.
Is Baby Food the Key to the Perfect Margarita?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Could the secret to a great cocktail be … baby food?
Comedian ANT's Life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
ANT’s career has been stellar – but behind the laughs, he was coping with personal pain. From a stint on “The Last Comic Standing,” ANT progressed to a show of his own: “The US of ANT.” He hosted VH1’s “Celebrity Fit Club” as well. “I was making millions of dollars a year,” ANT says.
A Doctor Who Feels His Patients’ Pain?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Neurologist Dr. Joel Salinas joins The Doctors to explain why, and to tell us about his own extreme reaction to the pain of others. “We all have this system in our brain called the ‘mirror touch system,’ where it combines our vision and touch senses,” he tells The Doctors. “They have what’s called ‘mirror touch synesthesia,’ where that activity is so high that you actually literally feel it on your own body, as if it was happening to you,” explains Dr. Salinas.
How dog DNA could be used to improve the health of our pets — and us
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three Shelties of varying sizes. Photo by Dayna Dreger Hundreds of different dog breeds exist today — one for everyone’s taste. I love big dogs like German Shepherds and Goldendoodles, but I’m not a big fan of Chihuahuas and Shih Tzus. But where did all these breeds come from in the first place? How were they created and when? A new study tries to answer all these questions.Scientists at the National Institutes of Health analyzed the DNA of 1,346 dogs — representing 161 breeds — to assemble an evolutionary tree of man’s best friend. ...
Is Google co
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google co-founder Sergey Brin is said to be secretly building an airship inside Hangar 2 at the Nasa Ames Research Center. People familiar with the project told Bloomberg that Brin has been fascinated by airships. Trending: Google Home review: Can Google's smart speaker topple Amazon Echo and Alexa?
Sobering visualizations reveal how sea level rise could transform cities in your lifetime
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Until recently, it seemed that we would be able to manage global warming-induced sea level rise through the end of the century. It would be problematic, of course, but manageable, particularly in industrialized nations like the U.S. However, troubling indications from the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets show that melting is taking place faster than previously thought and that entire glaciers — if not portions of the ice sheets themselves — are destabilizing. This has scientists increasingly worried that the consensus sea level rise estimates are too conservative. With sea level rise, as with other climate impacts, the uncertainties tend to skew toward the more severe end of the scale. So, it's time to consider some worst-case scenarios. SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming Recently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) published an extreme high-end sea level rise scenario, showing 10 to 12 feet of sea level rise by 2100 around the U.S., compared to the previously published global average — which is closer to 8 feet — in that time period.  The research and journalism group Climate Central took this projection and plotted out the stark ramifications in painstaking, and  terrifying, detail.  The bottom line finding?  "By the end of the century, oceans could submerge land [that's] home to more than 12 million Americans and $2 trillion in property," according to Ben Strauss, who leads the sea level rise program at Climate Central.  Here's what major cities would look like with so much sea level rise: New York CityImage: CLIMATE CENTRAL New Orleans: Gone.Image: CLIMATE CENTRAL San Francisco International AirportImage: CLIMATE CENTRAL Bienvenido a Miami.Image: CLIMATE CENTRALIn an online report, Climate Central states that the impacts of such a high amount of sea level rise "would be devastating."  For example, Cape Canaveral, which is a crown jewel for NASA and now the private sector space industry, would be swallowed up by the Atlantic. Major universities, including MIT, would be underwater, as would President Trump's "southern White House" of Mar-a-Lago. In the West, San Francisco would be hard-hit, with San Francisco International Airport completely submerged. "More than 99 percent of today’s population in 252 coastal towns and cities would have their homes submerged, and property of more than half the population in 479 additional communities would also be underwater," the analysis, which has not been peer-reviewed, found.  Image: climate centralIn New York City, the average high tide would be a staggering 2 feet higher than the flood level experienced during Hurricane Sandy. More than 800,000 people would be flooded out of New York City alone.  Although the findings pertain to sea level rise through the end of the century, in reality sea levels would keep rising long after that, with a total increase of about 30 feet by 2200 for all coastal states, Climate Central found.  As for how likely this extreme scenario really is, here's what the report says:  "The extreme scenario is considered unlikely, but it is plausible. NOAA’s report and Antarctic research suggest that deep and rapid cuts to heat-trapping pollution would greatly reduce its chances."  More specifically, the NOAA projection says this high-end outlook has just a 0.1 percent chance of occurring under a scenario in which we keep emitting greenhouse gases at about the current rate. While a 1-in-1,000 chance outcome might seem nearly impossible to occur, recent events suggest otherwise.  For example, Hurricane Sandy slammed into the Mid-Atlantic in 2012 while following a track that was virtually unprecedented in storm history. In addition, California is estimated to have had just a 1 percent chance of climbing out of its deep drought in a one to two-year period, and it did just that this winter.  Also, Donald Trump is president, people.  Robert Kopp, a sea level rise researcher at Rutgers University, whose projections formed the basis of the NOAA scenarios, said it's difficult to put exact odds on the extreme scenario.  "I would say that our knowledge about marine ice-sheet instability is too deeply uncertain for us to answer that question right now," Kopp said in an email. "We can come up with a physically plausible pathway that gets us to 2.5 meters [or 8.2 feet], we know it is more likely under higher emissions, but we don't have a good way of putting a probability on it." A paper published in the journal Nature in March found that if emissions of global warming pollutants peak in the next few years and are then reduced quickly thereafter, then there is a good chance that the melting of the Antarctic Ice Sheet would be drastically curtailed.  However, with the U.S., which is the second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, backing away from making significant cuts under the Paris Climate Agreement, adhering to such an ambitious timetable is looking less realistic.  Image: climate centralIn order for NOAA's extreme scenario, and therefore Climate Central's maps, to turn into reality, there would need to be decades more of sustained high emissions of greenhouse gases plus more melting from Antarctica than is currently anticipated.  However, recent studies have raised questions about Antarctica's stability, as mild ocean waters eat away at floating ice shelves from below, freeing up glaciers well inland to flow faster into the sea.  "What's new is that we used to think 6- to 7 feet was the max *plausible* or *possible* sea level rise this century, and now we've roughly doubled that," Strauss said in an email. "The new Antarctic science says it's plausible."  "If you were to survey ice sheet experts today, instead of something like 5 to 10 years ago, I suspect you'd get a significantly higher probability than 0.1 percent," he said.  A study published in the journal Nature Climate Change last week found that sea level rise could prompt a wave of internal migration within the U.S., especially as people move from the hardest-hit states such as Florida, Louisiana and New York. It's long been known that Florida is ground zero for sea level rise impacts, but the Climate Central projections are even more pessimistic. The report shows that a whopping 5.6 million Floridians would be at risk before the end of the century under an extreme sea level rise scenario, about double the amount simulated in the study last week. WATCH: Serene underwater footage shows whale's-eye view of Antarctica
Trump looks to lift protections on America's vast nature preserves
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After moving to unstitch climate change rules, US President Donald Trump is turning his sights on America's vast nature preserves, with a view to possibly lifting federal protections brought in over the past two decades. On Wednesday, he is to sign an executive order reviewing decisions by predecessors Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton to designate public land a "national monument" under a 1906 law known as the Antiquities Act.
Spacecraft flies between Saturn and rings in historic 1st
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Cassini spacecraft has ventured into the never-before-explored region between Saturn and its rings
Rice Is a Big Polluter. It Doesn’t Have to Be
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New technique uses half the water, less fertilizer, cuts carbon.
Mayor calls ghostly face seen in Salem streetlamp 'eerie'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SALEM, Mass. (AP) — A Massachusetts city known for celebrating the occult is drawing attention after its mayor snapped a photo that appears to show a scowling face trapped in a streetlamp.
The Tests You Need to Diagnose Infertility
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
When Richard Paulson, M.D., was training to specialize in fertility medicine, he offered a long list of diagnostic tests to couples trying to become parents. Some were allergy tests; others invol...
Why It's Important to Get Rid of Unused Medication
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
When it comes time to dispose of your leftover or expired medicines, you might be tempted to just toss unused pills into the trash—20 percent of people got rid of their meds this way, according t...
New Worries About Energy Drinks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Commercial energy drinks have once again been linked to heart health concerns—this time by a study published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association. And it's not the fault of caff...
These 77,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Precisely honed lethal stone tools have been discovered in the Sibudu Cave in South Africa dating back to the Middle Stone Age in the region. Sophisticated methods to hone sharper and more deadly stone weapons is thought to have come much later. The previous earliest stone tools of this kind at the site were 65,000 years old.
Trump moves to review status of America's nature preserves
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After moving to unstitch climate change rules, US President Donald Trump Wednesday opened the door to undoing the federally protected status of some of America's vast nature preserves. "Today I'm signing a new executive order to end another egregious abuse of federal power and to give that power back to the states and to the people where it belongs," Trump said at the signing ceremony.
Kellyanne Conway dodges questions on Mike Flynn as White House touts 100
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Speaking with Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway dodged questions on the appointment and ouster of Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn.
Military preparations ‘underway’ on North Korea, Trump aide says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A senior administration official who briefed reporters refused to be specific but spoke of possible economic as well as military responses.
White House vows to continue funding Obamacare, averting showdown with Democrats
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The White House has assured Democrats it will continue to fund a key portion of Obamacare, clearing the way for negotiations on a series of spending bills to avoid a government shutdown, according to two sources familiar with the decision. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., had demanded that Congress continue paying for the Affordable Care Act’s subsidies — which lower health care costs for 7 million people — as part of the emerging spending bill.
Giant rabbit dies after United Airlines flight to United States
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A 3-foot-long giant rabbit died at a United Airlines pet holding facility in Chicago following a flight from London, in another embarrassment for the airline as it struggles with a global backlash this month over a passenger dragged from his seat. The 10-month-old Continental Giant breed rabbit named Simon, who was tipped to become one of the world's largest rabbits, had appeared to be in good condition upon arrival at the facility at Chicago's O'Hare airport, an airline spokesman said. Simon was due to be picked up by a celebrity who had bought him.
Berkeley paradox: Birthplace of free speech now offended by it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
What started as a debate over conservative pundit Ann Coulter's scheduled talk at the University of California, Berkeley, has become a nationwide showdown over freedom of expression, with a lawsuit filed and riots in the offing. “We don’t accept the right of immigrant-basher bigots to come to Berkeley and help propel Trump’s deportation machine to make it more hostile for human beings who are here,” says Hoku Jeffrey, a Berkeley graduate and representative of By Any Means Necessary (BAMN), a left-wing group that participated in previous protests that grew violent. In protesting her presence, groups like BAMN are wielding the right to assembly.
Attack on Afghan base a reminder: Taliban pose the greater threat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Disguised perfectly as Afghan soldiers, the 10 attackers launched the Taliban’s spring offensive in spectacular fashion, rolling undetected into one of the most secure army bases in northern Afghanistan, and killing some 170 recruits as they left Friday prayers. The Taliban attack at Mazar-e Sharif’s Camp Shaheen appeared aimed at further undermining Afghanistan’s embattled leaders and security forces. It also served as a reminder that the Taliban, and not the so-called Islamic State (ISIS), still represent the most potent Islamist insurgency threatening the Afghan government.
Hear this, oh those who listen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In a recent skit on “Saturday Night Live,” two actors in a mock TV ad invite Americans to live in a new planned city called The Bubble. A video of this skit might be useful to show before many public events in the United States these days, such as talks by controversial speakers at public universities or at town hall meetings with elected leaders. By and large, civility and free speech remain the norm in academia and politics.
FDA Warns 14 Companies for Selling Unproven Cancer 'Cures'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Treating cancer can be a painful, drawn-out process, and there’s no guarantee of a cure. Unfortunately, there’s no magic pill that can get rid of cancer, or prevent it from occurring in the first...
10 Flattering One
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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3 Core
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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This Mom's Viral Facebook Post Explains Why She Doesn't Teach Her Son to Share
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"MY CHILD IS NOT REQUIRED TO SHARE WITH YOURS."
Serena Williams Says She Accidentally Announced Her Pregnancy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"You press the wrong button and..."
Apparently Dragon Frappuccinos Are a Thing Now, Too
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
When baristas ran out of Unicorn Frappuccino ingredients, they invented their own mythical creation.
This Is Why We Have Bachelor and Bachelorette Parties
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Basically, who do we have to thank for movies like Bachelorette and The Hangover?
What Eliminating ACA Cost
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Trump administration and both parties in Congress are playing a high stakes game of chicken, using a key feature of the Affordable Care Act as a bargaining chip. The White House said today it...
Strange Recall: How Do Golf Balls Get into Hash Browns?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bizarre and unwanted ingredient is prompting a recall of several frozen hash-brown products: The hash browns may contain pieces of golf balls. On Friday, frozen-food maker McCain Foods USA issued a voluntary recall of two hash-brown products because they may be contaminated with "extraneous golf ball materials," the company said in a statement. The golf ball pieces in these products could pose a choking hazard or cause injuries to the mouth if consumed, the company warned.
A “Hunger Games”
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What qualities make a good astronaut? The Canadian Space Agency has offered the public some answers in an unusual semi-public hiring process. Since last summer, the agency has narrowed down the pool of thousands of candidates for two rarely available astronaut slots, keeping the entire country informed about its selections. Apart from the basic qualifications—candidates…
Will vertical farming continue to grow, or has it hit the greenhouse ceiling?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As the world's population continues to balloon, the growing need for an advanced form of food production is needed now more than ever. But does a system of vertical farms solve this crisis or create a different set of problems?
Locals stumble across ancient Mayan god monument while clearing debris in Mexico
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Locals accidentally uncovered an ancient Mayan artefact while clearing debris on privately-owned land in the Mexican state of Chiapas. The monument, believed to be the head of the Mayan god of maize and abundance, dates back to the late classical period between 600 and 900 AD. Archaeologists of the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) identified the authenticity and antiquity of the artefact.
MUTT: Saving military lives and storming beaches
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Allison Barrie gives Fox News the inside scoop on how a new piece of military technology could be used to save countless lives
Neanderthals in California? Maybe so, provocative study says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A startling new report asserts that the first known Americans arrived much, much earlier than scientists thought _ more than 100,000 years ago
White House dodges questions on Mike Flynn while touting 100
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As President Trump’s administration touts its accomplishments and downplays their failures in the chaotic first 100 days, top adviser Kellyanne Conway on Wednesday dodged questions on one of the administrations more significant controversies: the appointment and subsequent ouster of Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn.
To fight domestic violence among Syrian refugees, an outreach to men
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Aaref fled to Lebanon from Syria five years ago to escape the war raging in his homeland. Life as a refugee in Lebanon is grueling. The stress soon led to conflicts between Aaref and his wife, of the type they hadn’t experienced since they were young newlyweds learning to navigate life together.
A middle way forward for a divided France? Macron voters hope so.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
France has a well-earned reputation for being quick to protest over everything from labor laws to Uber to increasing the age of retirement. The pair are convinced that Mr. Macron, who will face Marine Le Pen in France’s May 7 presidential runoff, and his “En Marche” movement will shine a light on a different side of France: a side that pounds the pavement to found startups and seeks a revival in politics. Recommended: More than Bastille, Bonaparte, and brie: Test your knowledge of France with our quiz!
What's left out of Trump tax plan? The 'D' word
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Mr. Trump’s election campaign included both pitches for tax cuts and pledges to tame federal debt. It’s not yet a detailed plan, but Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin set goals and principles Wednesday that include slashing corporate tax rates from 35 percent of profits to 15 percent, and cutting individual taxes as well.
Baby whales 'whisper' to mothers to avoid predators: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Newborn humpback whales and their mothers whisper to each other to escape potential predators, scientists reported Wednesday, revealing the existence of a previously unknown survival technique. "They don't want any unwanted listeners," researcher Simone Videsen, lead author of a study published in Functional Ecology, told AFP. Male humpback whales also emit reverberating sounds to attract females during the mating season.
Heavy Drinkers May Not Handle Alcohol As Well As They Think
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Young adults who are heavy social drinkers may think they have a "tolerance" that lets them drink alcohol without it impairing their coordination, but a new study shows otherwise. The researchers found that after people who had been heavy drinkers for years consumed a high dose of alcohol, they fared no better than light drinkers when performing a complex task, akin to driving a car. Previous studies had found that heavy drinkers may develop a behavioral tolerance to alcohol, so that the more experience they have with drinking heavily, the less impaired they may act on some performance measures because their brain learns some ways to compensate on some tasks.
Ancient people left a frightening message for us, and scientists just found it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
10,000 years from now (assuming humans haven't been wiped out by a plague, space rock, or our own destructive tendencies), it'll probably be fairly easy for the average person to research what life was like in 2017. For us here today, finding out what life was like in 11,000BC is much more challenging, but by studying ancient stone carvings and pairing the somewhat confusing messages with archeological data, researchers believe they've discovered concrete evidence of an apocalyptic event that may have altered the future of mankind: a comet strike. The study, performed by a team of researchers from the University of Edinburgh (PDF), suggests that a potentially cataclysmic comet strike rapidly and dramatically altered the Earth's climate for hundreds of years, sending humanity into a mini ice age with nearly glacial conditions. The time period when this occurred is known as the Younger Dryas, and has been well documented thanks to ample evidence of the cooling found in core samples, but its cause has been theorized and debated for a long while. Now, thanks to stone carvings left by ancient people in modern day Turkey, researchers believe that a comet was the culprit. The carvings are remarkably preserved and appear to have been created to document an apocalyptic event which devastated the land. Figures depicted in the carvings, including apparently deceased, headless human bodies and other wildlife, were made at around the time the Younger Dryas began, suggesting that the event archived in stone could have been the same one that caused the thousand-year cold snap. The carvings were found at what is considered to be one of the oldest and most important temple sites on the planet, and for the images to appear there suggests that they have enormous historical significance. The Younger Dryas is often credited with pushing ancient humans to band together out of pure necessity, forming the foundation of modern agriculture and other huge advancements in civilization. The idea that a comet may have been responsible for pushing humanity forward is an extremely interesting, and potentially frightening possibility. The findings are far from an iron clad confirmation, but the timing matches up shockingly well, and would have to be a fantastic coincidence if the two events are actually unrelated.
Uber plans to test flying cars within three years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ambitious plan may take some consumer convincing; Fox News Headlines' Brett Larson reports
NASA’s latest image of the James Webb Space Telescope is beautiful
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scheduled to launch in 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope will be the most powerful telescope in existence, replacing NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, capturing infrared light from the first galaxies of the ancient universe.
Arrow didn't kill Otzi the Iceman – instead he froze to death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ötzi the Iceman didn't die after being shot with an arrow – it's more likely that he froze to death, scientists have now said. Ötzi, also known as the Tyrolean Iceman, is one of the most famous mummies in the world.