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Just When You Thought They Were Dead, ACA Repeal Talks Are Back
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
After the Republican effort to repeal core elements of the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) was pulled minutes before it was to be considered for a vote by the House of Representatives, both Presid...
The 'Sperminator' Returns with Exciting Baby News!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Last fall, The Doctors met hopeful mother Millye and Ari, the uber sperm donor who has become known as the “Sperminator.” Now Millye has given birth to twins, Max and Grace! The twosome were born prematurely but are doing well. Says Millye, “I couldn’t ask for a better father for my children!” Ari was present for the birth, drove her home afterward, and met her family. Ari has been served with several suits seeking child support for various offspring.
Cancer Survivor Dismayed by Her Breast Reconstruction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Denise survived breast cancer – but is not pleased with her reconstructive surgery. About one in eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Denise discovered that she was among them when she had a routine mammogram at age 41 that revealed a tumor.
Bowel Cancer Crisis among Millennials and Generation X?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains mature subject matter. A growing number of millennials and Generation Xers have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Traditionally this cancer is associated with older people, but three out of 10 diagnoses are now occurring in people younger than 55. Do we need to take a big look in the mirror at lifestyle?” wonders ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork.
New Ways to Fight Allergies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Flight attendant Traci has a high-flying career, but her severe allergies are bringing her down. Traci moved to Los Angeles a year ago hoping for allergy relief, but they’ve only gotten worse since then. “Sleep is such an essential part of our well-being,” adds Plastic Surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon.
Blindness Changes 'Saved by the Bell' Star's View of Life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Isaac had a career as a child actor, culminating when he landed the role of Barton "Weasel" Wyzell on “Saved by the Bell: The New Class” -- he calls it “a lifechanging experience.” He went on to study math and computer science at Harvard, graduating at age 19, then law school, after which he clerked for two Supreme Court justices. At age 13 he was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa. Isaac was terrified.
Congress votes to roll back internet privacy protection
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Update: On Tuesday afternoon, the House approved the bill to stop the FCC from enforcing its internet privacy rules. The bill now goes to President Donald Trump for approval. The House was expected to vote Tuesday on a bill that would stop the Federal Communications Commission from enforcing rules that would stop your internet service provider from tracking your browsing behavior and selling that information to advertisers.
Why One Woman Had Oil in Her Lung for Decades
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An elderly woman in Florida had oil in her lungs — for decades — from a now-outdated procedure she received in her 20s to treat tuberculosis (TB), according to a new report of the woman's case. This cloudy area was concerning to her doctors, because it could have meant that she had fluid buildup in the space between her chest wall and her lung, known as the pleural cavity. However, the woman remembered having oil injected into her lungs decades earlier, as a treatment for tuberculosis.
Corporate Scientists Go to Washington
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Corporate Scientists Go to Washington
Trump, in break from other world leaders, digs in on coal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Declaring an end to what he's called "the war on coal," President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday that eliminates numerous restrictions on fossil fuel production, breaking with ...
The Mexico Tourism Board made a cloud that rains tequila and we're booking our flights now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Grab your rim-salted margarita glass and your galoshes because there is now a cloud that can answer all of your Happy Hour prayers. The Mexico Tourism Board and the creative agency LAPIZ have partnered to create a manmade cloud that produces raindrops of actual tequila.  The first cloud that rains tequila.  #tequilacloud #visitmexico A post shared by VisitMexico (@visitmexico) on Mar 9, 2017 at 5:41am PST SEE ALSO: Drought drives huge, deadly cobra to calmly drink from a villager's water bottle The boozy puff was developed as a promotional stunt to attract German tourists to Mexico and was put on display at an art gallery in Berlin called Urban Spree.  Unfortunately, the cloud can't float freely and meet you at your favorite bar. It's actually formed by a tequila-based mist held together by a plastic container to help it keep its fluffy cloud shape. According to The Huffington Post, the LAPIZ team used ultrasonic humidifiers to "vibrate" the tequila at a rate that turns the alcohol into a visible mist that is filtered into the container.  #tequilacloud Serving free shots of delicious Silver Tequila since 2016. Come to Urban Spree, Revaler Strasse 99 for a taste #mexico #travel #tequila #art #berlin A post shared by Ernesto Adduci (@eadduci) on Mar 10, 2017 at 7:31am PST The vapor of the tequila then condenses inside of the plastic and drops from the cloud. It was also synched with the local weather patterns so when it rained in Berlin, the tequila poured down, too. Drinkers can hold their glasses under the cloud for an alcoholic rain shower shot. If that seems like too much work to get your buzz, there is a spout beneath the cloud for anyone who doesn't want to wait for the storm. A post shared by pøj pøj (@pojpojberlin) on Mar 8, 2017 at 9:07am PST A post shared by Cristina Zambet (@cristinazambet) on Mar 11, 2017 at 1:17pm PST We predict that we'll see this cool cloud trick tried by amateur bartenders everywhere before your next crawl. It's 5 o'clock somewhere and it might just be in the clouds. [H/T: The Huffington Post ] WATCH: The Raindrop Cake is back and this time it's a bright shade of purple
California, NY vow to fill climate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The governors of California and New York said Tuesday that they will push ahead with their aggressive climate change policies despite President Donald Trump's executive order that seeks to boost the coal ...
Exxon Mobil urges Trump to stay in Paris climate accord
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Energy giant Exxon Mobil has asked the Trump administration not to scrap US participation in the landmark Paris climate agreement, running counter to White House moves on carbon emissions. The news came as President Donald Trump on Tuesday unveiled a new executive order that could roll back some of the previous Democratic administration's policies aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. In a March 22 letter to Trump energy advisor G David Banks, Exxon's head of environmental policy and planning, Peter Trelenberg, praised the 2015 Paris Agreement as the first to tackle emissions by both the developed world and developing countries such as China and India.
Pictures of Iraq: Photojournalists bear witness to horror in ISIS
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A man carries his daughter away from an Islamic State-controlled part of Mosul toward Iraqi special forces soldiers during a battle in Mosul, Iraq, March 4, 2017. The lives of countless Iraqis were upended when ISIS seized Mosul in June 2014. As the Iraqi army fights to liberate this key northern city from the terrorist group, photojournalists are on the ground bearing witness to the waking nightmare.
Schiff pressing hard to reschedule Yates testimony ‘soon’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“It’s time to put that hearing back on track,” Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., told Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric on Tuesday. “If we take the White House at its word, it wants Sally Yates to testify now. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., the embattled chairman of the House intelligence committee, canceled the public hearing on Friday.
Ann Romney vows to fight budget cuts to National Institutes of Health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Ann Romney said Tuesday that she would be willing to go to Congress and plead with them to preserve funding for the National Institutes of Health, which President Trump’s proposed budget would slash by about $6 billion, or roughly 20 percent. “I will be the first one lobbying against this,” she said in an interview with Yahoo News and Finance Anchor Bianna Golodryga. “If you don’t have that funding, there will be nothing,” Romney warned.
White House offers muddled message to states considering Medicaid expansion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The White House didn’t have a clear message for states looking to potentially expand Medicaid in the wake of the American Health Care Act’s (AHCA) failure, implying that the bill would have saved the program for low-income and disabled Americans by cutting nearly a trillion dollars from its funding. Press secretary Sean Spicer was asked during Tuesday’s briefing about possible expansions of Medicaid coverage in Kansas, Georgia and Virginia. The three states are in varying stages of moving toward joining the 31 states that have already opted in to Obamacare’s expansion of  the decades-old program, which covers 74 million Americans.
German police: Thieves stole huge gold coin with wheelbarrow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BERLIN (AP) — Berlin police say suspects used a wheelbarrow to make off with a 100-kilogram (221-pound) gold coin worth millions.
Photo op turns into chance encounter with big gator on links
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — Carrie Moores says she'd only seen alligators at the zoo before relocating last year from Connecticut to South Carolina. That changed this week during a chance encounter with a very big gator on the golf links.
Erdogan's tussle with Europe, The shame of the world, Regional support for Venezuela is vital, Scotland's place in the United Kingdom, US reen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It is a matter of grave concern that, according to a UN estimate, twenty million people are facing starvation in Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia and Nigeria...," states an editorial. "It is indeed disturbing to note that man-made disasters like war and famine continue to bleed nations while international politics fails to come to a consensus on how to reach a stasis in parts of the Middle East, Northeast Nigeria and vast swathes of Somalia.... We urge the international community to infuse immediate aid to these four war-torn and famine ravaged countries.... It is indeed appalling that in this era of globalisation and scientific breakthroughs, fellow human beings should die of hunger.... The shame is on us all.
Britain's Royal Mint introduces 12
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Counterfeiting the British pound just got a whole lot harder. The change, which marks the first new coin out of the UK in three decades, comes as officials grapple with threats of fraud and counterfeiting, and the impact such activities can have on businesses and taxpayers. “This is a giant step forward to help stamp out counterfeit coins and save businesses and the taxpayer millions of pounds every year,” Commercial Secretary to the Treasury Baroness Neville-Rolfe said in a statement.
A good defense against terrorist hate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As Islamic State loses its base in Iraq and Syria, its followers are taking territory elsewhere. One place is Egypt, which could provide the militant group with greater access to Africa. Since December, an ISIS-affiliated group in Egypt has adopted a tactic aimed at rallying Egypt’s Muslims to its side: It is killing Christians, which make up 10 percent of the population.
The view of Brexit from a city that voted to ‘Leave’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It’s the UK City of Culture 2017, derelict buildings and dry docks are being refurbished, and a major wind turbine factory is on the rise. “The planets have never been more aligned,” says David Keel, chair of C4DI, a new incubator and co-working space in the waterside Fruit Market district. Going against the dominant narrative that “Brexit” towns are depressed and in deep regret, Hull has turned toward a hopeful future – for some because of Brexit, for others despite it.
Why Trump rollback of Obama climate policies could be a long slog
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With a flourish of his pen Tuesday, President Trump promised a full-scale assault on the Obama administration’s signature climate-change initiative. Mr. Trump's executive order starts the process of scrapping Mr. Obama’s Clean Power Plan, which calls on states to reduce electric-utility emissions that scientists say are changing Earth’s climate. Instead, Trump wants to go all-in on expanding US energy jobs, notably in coal mining and fossil fuels. Recommended: Climate change: Is your opinion informed by science?
In tricky US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Washington was swarming with Russians last week. It is, after all, a relationship that affects the entire planet, regardless of what emerges from an FBI investigation into connections between President Trump’s associates and Russia. Recommended: Sochi, Soviets, and czars: How much do you know about Russia?
What Is Eyebrow Microblading and Is it Safe?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If you over-plucked your eyebrows in the 90s and need a hand getting thicker brows, microblading might be for you. Watch the video to see the new beauty trend that's helping celebs like Lena Dunham get a fuller brow.
Protect Your Cat or Dog From These Common Pet Poisons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Most pet owners have heard they should keep dogs away from chocolate and cats away from lilies. But did you know that just a few sticks of sugar-free gum could cause liver failure in your dog? Or...
Diet Of Humans, Other Primates Led To Their Big Brains: Study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The research from New York University showed it was the diet of primates, and not their sociability, that led to their brains growing to large sizes.
Programme to be axed by Trump saves energy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Voluntary efficiency programmes -- including one targeted for elimination by the Trump administration -- have led to energy savings of up to 30 percent in commercial buildings in Los Angeles, researchers have reported. Describing their study as the first large-scale analysis of green certification schemes for big buildings, a pair of researchers from the University of California at Los Angeles reviewed data on nearly 179,000 properties in the city. "We found that -- with the programmes -- there is a significant improvement in energy efficiency," said co-author Magali Delmas, an environmental economist.
Scientists make breakthrough in synthetic blood, but won’t ditch donations just yet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists from the University of Bristol and NHS Blood and Transplant announced a recent breakthrough that makes it possible to mass produce red blood cells, opening the door for the wide-scale use of manufactured blood.
How WhatsApp encryption works – and why there shouldn't be a backdoor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A way in for government would also allow hackers access.
What I Really Worry About When It Comes to North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Our preventative measures are looking less preventative.
Elon Musk is founding another company and it plans to merge human brains with A.I.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Neuralink is expected to develop the "neural lace" Musk has discussed.
China's secret plan to crush SpaceX and the US space program
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China's government is looking to its burgeoning space sector to rival US companies like Elon Musk's Space X to boost prestige at home and abroad.
Democrats pile on Nunes as intrigue swirls around House Russia probe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House intelligence committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., is resisting growing calls for him to step aside over the revelation he had gone to the White House grounds to receive classified information related to committee’s investigation into Russian interference in last year’s election. “We’ve been investigating Russia for many, many years,” he said.
Bill O’Reilly apologizes after mocking Rep. Maxine Waters’ ‘James Brown wig’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Bill O’Reilly apologized after he joked Tuesday that he couldn’t focus on a speech by Rep. Maxine Waters because he was distracted by her “James Brown wig.”
Green groups denounce Trump’s ‘all
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump signed an executive order Tuesday afternoon, following through on his campaign promise to roll back Obama-era environmental protections intended to combat climate change. The Trump administration’s “Energy Independence” order essentially begins the process of dismantling the Clean Power Plan (CPP), which limits greenhouse gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. It was former President Barack Obama’s signature legislation for restricting the carbon emissions that contribute to global warming.
‘Stop shaking your head’: Spicer scolds reporter who asked how Trump administration plans to revamp its image
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sean Spicer sparred with veteran reporter April Ryan after she asked him how the Trump administration can “revamp” its public image while several controversies swirl around it.
Library patron returns book he took in 1982, plus $200
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GREAT FALLS, Mont. (AP) — A patron who stole a book from a Montana library in 1982 has returned it after reading it at least 25 times, having it restored and having the author sign it.
Erdogan's tussle with Europe, The shame of the world, Regional support for Venezuela is vital, Scotland's place in the United Kingdom, US reen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It is a matter of grave concern that, according to a UN estimate, twenty million people are facing starvation in Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia and Nigeria...," states an editorial. "It is indeed disturbing to note that man-made disasters like war and famine continue to bleed nations while international politics fails to come to a consensus on how to reach a stasis in parts of the Middle East, Northeast Nigeria and vast swathes of Somalia.... We urge the international community to infuse immediate aid to these four war-torn and famine ravaged countries.... It is indeed appalling that in this era of globalisation and scientific breakthroughs, fellow human beings should die of hunger.... The shame is on us all.
White racist accused of fatal NYC stabbing charged with terrorism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A white Army veteran accused of fatally stabbing a 66-year-old bottle collector and recycler on a Manhattan street last week simply because he was black was indicted on Monday on rare state charges of murder as terrorism. James Harris Jackson told the New York Daily News he attacked Timothy Caughman from behind, plunging a sword into his chest, as part of an effort to deter interracial relationships. In an interview from behind bars at Rikers Island, a New York City prison complex, Mr. Jackson told the newspaper he intended to kill numerous black men in order to send a message to white women.
US and other nuclear
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Negotiations for a treaty to rid the world of nuclear weapons began in the United Nations on Monday. Most member states of the United Nations have said they wish for a world without nuclear weapons. Recommended: How much do you know about nuclear weapons?
Podcast: Life as a teenage hacker
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Paul Vann is a chief executive officer and security researcher. The young leader of new cybersecurity company VannTechCyber, who was originally featured in Passcode's 15 under 15 rising stars of cybersecurity project, says other professionals often don't initially think his work is "as accurate or as credible" because he hasn't gone to college or even finished high school – and while that does intimidate him sometimes, he relies on the strength of his research to win them over.
The Internet Is Furious That Kourtney Kardashian Posted a Photo of Her Kids Sitting On a Mercedes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
People *love* getting riled up over what she does.
Christina El Moussa Shut Down Mom Shamers On Instagram With Just One Comment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
She's not about to let that stand.
David Pogue's search for the world's best air
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
This month, Expedia (EXPE) killed off the world’s best app for air travelers: FlightTrack Pro, which it had bought in 2010. Its attractive, tidy screens show you far more detail than the airline generally provides—not just the departure and arrival times, but also the terminals, gates, flight maps, aircraft type, speed and altitude, weather radar, and so on. FlightTrack Pro, dead at ate 8.
The US is facing a choice between the International Space Station and a new deep space rocket
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In one corner, we have an international, orbital laboratory that cost over $150 billion to build and operate. In the other, a $23 billion and growing program to develop a huge new deep-space rocket and spacecraft to carry humans to the moon and beyond. Now, they will face off in a Darwinian struggle for survival,…
Samsung has plan for recalled phones
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox Business Briefs: 3/28/17
It's time to let a robot invasion stop the Lionfish explosion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Undoing man's folly is, sometimes, a robot's work. Unwittingly introduced to the Atlantic Ocean over a quarter of a century ago, the lionfish, which is native to the Pacific, is responsible for an ecological disaster of epic proportions in the Caribbean, Bermuda's, and off the shore of Florida coast, and it's spreading up the coast. A complete lack of predators, voracious appetite and ability to reproduce at an astonishing rate has resulted in a mushrooming lionfish population that is decimating ecosystems, coral reefs and the fishing business.  SEE ALSO: A fish that doesn't belong is wreaking havoc on our ocean Catching and eating lionfish, which are delicious, sounds like a reasonable solution, but the fish can't be netted, and are generally fished one person and one spear at a time. If fisherman can't catch lionfish en masse, they can't sell them at quantities to food stores and restaurants. Supply creates demand, which generates more demand that fisherman can supply. If they can figure out how to catch the fish. RISE, which stands for Robots in Service of the Environment, has come up with a very 21st century solution to the lionfish disaster: robots. "Erika and I love diving and, through diving, became increasingly aware of the crisis," said Colin Angle who co-founded RISE with his wife Erika. Angle is also the co-founder and CEO of iRobot (Roomba robot vacuum, Packbot military robot). On one dive, their boat captain challenged Angle, "Okay, you build robots, build one to go hunt lionfish." This was not as crazy of an idea as it sounds and Angle had already been wondering "if there was still a way to use robot technology to solve larger environmental problems and maybe more proactively than merely sending our defense robots to natural disaster zones." The Lionfish challenge Image: rise Robots for good sounds cheesy, but there were more practical considerations. Could, Angle wondered, a robot even do the job and could it do it at scale? "Spending half a million dollars to build a robot that kill 10 lionfish is absurd," he told me. Angle shared a few details of the robot they built and that will make its public debut next month. They started with fresh-water electro fishing technology and adapted it for salt water. The robot stuns, but doesn't kill the lionfish and then it sucks them into the robot. It does this over and over again, until full of unconscious fish and then rises to the surface where a fisherman can unload the catch and deliver them to waiting restaurants and food stores. "Ultimately, the control of this device is like a PlayStation game: you're looking at screen and using a joystick controller. Zap it, catch it, do it again, said RISE Executive Director John Rizzi who told me that a team of unpaid volunteers have been working on the prototype for over a year. They also got some seed funding from The Angle Family, Schmidt Marine Technology Partners and the Anthropocene Institute. Stunning, eating and feeding brains RISE is a two-pronged effort: slow damaging growth of the lionfish population and create a rich curriculum around this and future RISE work that can be used in American middle schools. Erika Angle, herself a biochemist, has spent a decade working with the non-profit Science from Scientist, which brings real scientists into classrooms where they not only talk about their work, but offer hands-on science demonstrations. "It's such an integral part of RISE mission...We're trying to reach these kids with knowledge. Ultimately, we’re going to be relying on these kids to save planet for next generation," said Erika Angle.  RISE will, she said, build a curriculum around the RISE lionfish robot that can go anywhere in the country. While there's currently no plan for a practical lesson, like going on a boat and piloting one of the robot-catching fish, that could happen in the future. For now, though, the biggest demonstration of the RISE's lionfish hunter will happen in Bermuda on April 19, as part of the America's Cup festivities. There'll even been a celebrity chef lionfish cook-off, the 11th Hour Racing #EatLionfish Chef's Throwdown. All of it designed to help launch RISE's Kickstarter project, which Colin Angle hopes can help raise funds to further developer, build and deliver these robots to commercial fishermen and woman at about $500-to-$1,000 each. What if the robot is so effective, it wipes out the lionfish in the Atlantic? "That's a perverse reality you can worry about, but we're confident that the lionfish can reproduce so quickly [one fish produces 30,000-to-40,000 eggs every few days] that it would be hard to eliminate them," said Rizzi. Colin, though, reminded me that that's still the goal. "This is an invasive species," he said. A significant reduction in lionfish numbers would help the fish and reef ecosystem to recover. There is another benefit to using robots like this to solve ecological problems. "Unlike biological systems that once you deploy are out of your control, this one you can simply turn off," said Angle. WATCH: Invasion of the lionfish - Part 1 - The threat  
Democrats pile on Nunes as intrigue swirls over House Russia probe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House intelligence committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., is resisting growing calls for him to step aside over the revelation he had gone to the White House grounds to receive classified information related to committee’s investigation into Russian interference in last year’s election. “We’ve been investigating Russia for many, many years,” he said.