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Right is wrong: the surprising life benefits of being left
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For years, left-handedness was seen as an affliction to be cured, and it seems probable that there remains an ingrained – if unthinking – bias against left-handed people today. Indeed, even the word 'left' speaks of an Alpha and Omega, deriving as it does from the Anglo-Saxon 'lyft', meaning 'weak'. But being left-handed isn't all bad news. New research has indicated that being left-handed could be a significant bonus – for sports players at least. The study, published by academics at the University of Oldenburg, in northwestern Germany, found that the greater the time pressure in a game, the greater the number of professional players who are left-handed. (Time pressure in this sense is measured as the average time between a ball leaving one player and reaching another.) One in five top-flight cricket bowlers are left-handed, while a third of baseball pitchers use their left arm According to Dr Florian Loffing who led the research, the reason left-handers may do better is because most of their opponents are predominantly accostomed to responding to right-handers. Approximately ten percent of the world's population is left handed, but in sports where Loffing's research applies these odds are slashed dramatically. For example, one in five top-flight cricket bowlers are left-handed, while a third of baseball pitchers use their left arm. If you yourself are left-handed, but don't fancy turning your hand to either of those sports, then fear not: with the aid of some statistics and a splash of imagination, we've come up with five more reasons why being left-handed is brilliant. Lefties become President What do Barack Obama, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton all have in common? They're all lefties of course. Coincidence? Well, maybe. The preponderance of lefties in fields that are traditionally associated with intellect, such as mathematics and politics, has led to conjecture that left-handed people are simply smarter. Theories abound as to why: some claim it's due to left-handers' superior use of the right-hand side of the brain, while others suggest lefties train themselves to think problems through from a young age as they have to find solutions in the right-hand designed world. Whatever the reasoning, lefties do seem to rise to the top. Look at the list of Nobel Prize winners and you're faced with a disproportionate amount of left-handers, while Mensa says that 20 per cent of its members are similarly orientated (that's double the amount you'd expect). Lefties spend less time queuing Seriously. Imagine facing a line of 20 supermarket checkouts. Which one do you choose? Studies show that people tend to veer towards their dominant side: right-handers go right, left-handers go left. As a result, the queues on the left are often shorter - which means lefties spend less time waiting in line. Lefties are better at learning to drive (in the UK at least) Left-handed drivers are ten per cent more likely to pass their driving test, according to the AA Driving School. A significant reason for this could be the use of the gear and clutch, which require precise motor skills. Both are positioned to the left of the driver. Lefties are better at playing video games Between men, nothing secures bragging rights more than sweet victory in the world of video games. And as it is, left-handers are yet again at an advantage, as research from the Australian National University, shows that they outperform right-handers in processing a large amount of information at a fast rate, making them more capable of coping with any flying bullets and rogue zombies. Lefties make natural catwalk models As the best models know, you have to be able to turn left as well as right to reach the top of your game. As a leftie, turning left comes as naturally to you as throwing a left hook in a fight. Not that you ever would, of course - even the most bitter rivals in the modelling world wouldn't dream of harming a colleague’s face...  
The U.S. Military Is Preparing for War in Space: We're Drafting Laws to Be Ready for It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A war in outer space sounds like the stuff of science fiction but it is something we need to consider. Its impact on everybody on Earth and its implications for future human space exploration would be devastating. The aim is to develop a Manual on International Law Applicable to Military uses of Outer Space (MILAMOS) that covers times of tension and outright hostility.
A Former Prisoner of North Korea Has Been Found Burned to Death in California
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Aijalon Mahli Gomes, 38, was imprisoned in North Korea in 2010
Zimbabwe's New President Mnangagwa Makes A Triumphant Return
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Today we are witnessing the beginning of a new, unfolding democracy," said Mnangagwa, formerly the vice president and confidant of ousted leader Robert Mugabe
What To Buy On Black Friday On Amazon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Last week, we shared with you a sneak peek at Amazon’s Black Friday deals that we just couldn’t wait for.
Man who claims Earth is flat says he'll prove his belief by taking flight in a DIY rocket
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Science has long been the target of conspiracy theories, some of which have persisted for centuries.
Tip for accused harassers: Your half
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Another thoroughly inadequate statement from [insert name of once trusted media figure here].
Student Charged With Smearing Body Fluids on Roommate's Belongings Isn't Racist, Lawyer Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brochu, who is white, wrote on Instagram about rubbing used tampons on her black roommate's backpack, police said
How to Prove the Earth is Flat? Launch Yourself Over California in a Homemade Rocket Made From Scrap Metal, Obviously
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For flat-earthers, the Earth is shaped like a disk, with the North Pole at the center and a massive wall of ice holding our oceans back from flowing out into infinity. The theory has gained quite the following on the internet, including famous believer, rapper B.o.B. Mike Hughes—or “Mad” Mike Hughes, as he likes to be called—is a 61-year-old limousine driver who lives in California and is a recent convert to the flat Earth theory.
What Experts Have Learned So Far From the JFK Records Releases
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the months since the document drops began, here's what experts have gleaned from newly released JFK assassination files
Eight Rescued After U.S. Navy Aircraft Crashes Into Pacific Ocean
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A a search and rescue operation has been launched
Apple is using teenagers to make its most expensive iPhone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Apple is facing accusations that the new iPhone X is being manufactures by high school students who are illegally working for 11 hours.
What happens when vegetarians eat meat for the first time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The human body is designed to consume both plants and animals. First, eating meat is harder to digest because it’s fattier and has more protein. Dr. Lisa Ganjhu, an NYU Langone gastroenterologist, explains more about what happens when a vegetarian eats a steak for the first time.
A North Korean Defector's Dramatic Dash Across the Border Was Captured on Video
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korean soldiers fired about 40 rounds at the defector, who remains hospitalized
U.S. Declares Violence Against Rohingya in Myanmar Is 'Ethnic Cleansing'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over 600,000 have fled to Bangladesh
An asteroid from a DIFFERENT SOLAR SYSTEM was just discovered in ours
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pause your game of Asteroids, space fans! Astronomers spotted an interstellar asteroid traveling through the Milky Way. (We’d forgive you for reading that intro…
Scotland Whale Bone Mystery: Were They Beached or Forced Onto Shore?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists working on Scotland’s Island of Sanday made an “amazing and unexpected” discovery: two pits full of the bones of 19th century whales. A team of archaeologists based in Orkney, Scotland, originally traveled to Sanday to excavate a Neolithic site. Historical records told of a pod being stranded and later buried at Cata Sand, the site where the bones were found, but how and why they got there remains a mystery. The whales could have either been “ca’d”—driven into the shallows deliberately—by Sanday’s 19th century human inhabitants, or simply been beached on their own.
Apple might not be making a self
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As one of the most secretive tech companies out there, Apple rarely reveals any details regarding hardware or software products that may be in development. But the company last week quietly disclosed self-driving car research that proves not only that Apple is interested in this field, but that it may have solutions to improve various aspects of it. The paper details technology that can be used by existing self-driving cars equipped with LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology for mapping their surroundings to better detect obstacles, including pedestrians and cyclists. First spotted on arXiv by Reuters, the paper describes a so-called VoxelNet technology for autonomous cars, and appears to be the company’s first disclosed paper on this subject. Apple said a year ago that it will let AI and machine learning researchers to share their research with the world. In July, the company launched the Apple Machine Learning Journal which covers the same topics. However, Apple’s blog did not cover self-driving cars before. What the VoxelNet tech does, is to allow computers to detect moving obstacles with the help of LiDAR information only, without the necessity of additional sensors. Detecting 3D obstacles from a distance is a crucial aspect of self-driving car tech, as autonomous cars will have to interpret in real time, as fast as possible, everything that happens around them. The technology might be even better than what’s currently available out there. Experiments on the KITTI car detection benchmark show that VoxelNet outperforms the state-of-the-art LiDAR-based 3D detection methods by a large margin. Furthermore, our network learns an effective discriminative representation of objects with various geometries, leading to encouraging results in 3D detection of pedestrians and cyclists, based on only LiDAR. It’s unclear at this time what Apple plans to do with self-driving cars in the future, but the paper proves it’s a very hot topic at Apple.
Uber in hot water over handling of customer data breach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Company paid hackers to keep quiet on attack that exposed data of 57 million users; Jonathan Hunt reports on the fallout.
UK aerospace body calls for EU membership beyond 2019
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
UK aerospace and defence trade association ADS is pushing for the UK to remain an EU member state during a post-Brexit transitional period, until the country's future trading relationship with the bloc has been determined.
Uber faces pressure after it tried to cover up data breach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The company is under heavy scrutiny after admitting it failed to disclose the hacking of personal information of 57 million customers and drivers and may have paid a ransom to the thieves.
Gap And Old Navy Have Winter Clothes Half Off Right Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gap and Old Navy are notorious for ridiculously-good year-round sales for wardrobe basics, but their Black Friday discounts blow their everyday sales out of the water.
Meek Mill Is In Jail for a Wheelie While Harvey Weinstein Roams Free
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The writer and lawyer looks at the differences in prosecuting different types of crime — and how the race of a defendant may come into play
60 Percent of Female Voters Say They Have Been Sexually Harassed, Poll Finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sixty percent of female voters have admitted experiencing sexual harassment, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Tuesday.
I Survived 2 Terrorist Attacks on 2 Continents. They Changed Who I Am
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Navy midshipman and author of Left Standing writes about surviving the Brussels airport attack and Boston marathon bombing
Thanksgiving: Early Colonists Ate Turkey... But Also Horses, Rats And Snakes, Archaeologists Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists looking into the diet of colonists at the first English settlement in the Americas have discovered that they enjoyed a Turkey dinner—but that hard times also forced them to eat horses, rats and venemous snakes. Archaeologists at Historic Jamestowne, the site of the early James Fort settlement in what is now Virginia, have been sorting through animal bones found onsite to establish the diet of the colonists who once lived there, the Williamsburg Yorktown Daily reported. By sorting and grouping animal bones found there, the archaeologists hope to discover new information about the way the colonists lived during the 1610s, in which period they believe the well was constructed.
What is net neutrality?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A vote by the Federal Communications Commission on December 14, 2017 will decide the fate of net neutrality. But what is it?
UN Court Sentences Ratko Mladic to Life in Prison for Bosnian War Crimes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Including the massacre of Srebrenica, Europe's worst mass killing since World War II
Russia finds 1,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russia’s meteorological service said on Tuesday it had measured pollution of a radioactive isotope at nearly 1,000 times normal levels in the Ural mountains, the first official Russian data supporting reports that a nuclear incident had taken place. The data appears to back up a report by the French nuclear safety institute IRSN, which said on Nov. 9 a cloud of radioactive pollution over Europe had indicated some kind of leak had taken place at a nuclear facility either in Russia or Kazakhstan in the last week of September. Neither Russia nor Kazakhstan has acknowledged any accident.
High winds topple 9 semitrucks near Wyoming
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Officials say high wind speeds tipped over nine semitrucks on a highway near the border of Wyoming and Colorado.
Violent Feud Between California Shooter and Neighbors Brewed Months Before Deadly Rampage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Months before a shooting rampage that killed five people, a violent feud brewed
The Argentine Navy Says Noises It Detected Are Not From the Missing Submarine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The submarine, with a crew of 44, went missing after reporting a failure in its battery system
Disgusting Picture of Fly's Head Infected with Parasitic Fungus will Fuel Your Nightmares
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
No, that isn’t a leaked image from the upcoming sequel to "The Last of Us." That’s a real close-up of what was left of a fly’s head after it was infected with the Cordyceps fungus. As a macro photographer in Singapore, Faiz Bustamente often has bugs in focus.
An investigation suggests Big Sugar hid evidence of sucrose’s health effects
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The real truth about sugar isn’t very easy to swallow. It’s incredibly difficult to avoid sugar in your diet. Globally, we generate over 170 million metric tons of the sweet stuff every year—most which is added to our food. Despite the fact that it’s everywhere, the nutritional case against sugar is strong, and has been…
Pacific Northwest May Be at Most Risk for the 'Big One' Because of Seafloor Sediments
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The next big earthquake is due in the Pacific Northwest—but now scientists have pinpointed where along the coast a large earthquake is most likely to happen, according to a study published Monday. “We observed very compact sediments offshore of Washington and northern Oregon that could support earthquake rupture over a long distance and close to the trench, which increases both earthquake and tsunami hazards,” lead author of the study Shuoshuo Han, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, said in a statement. Offshore of Washington and northern Oregon, ocean floor sediments are much more compact than in central Oregon—indicating that sediments are less porous and have less water between the grains.
Budget 2017: UK's driverless cars stuck on testing roundabout
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's going to be difficult for UK government-backed autonomous vehicle projects to compete with Silicon Valley – unless they have something neat under the bonnet.
Sutherland Springs church pastor says he's struggling to deal with his grief
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Frank Pomeroy, pastor of the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, talked to the New York Times about dealing with his grief from the attack.
Woman raises money for homeless man who helped her
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A New Jersey woman who was helped by a homeless man when she ran out of gas in Philadelphia is raising money to help him.
Now between two presidents, Zimbabweans dare to imagine ‘an easier life’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recommended: Think you know Africa? In the course of her life, that has proven to be a virtue Ms. Moyo has often needed, as she lived through the transformation of the bright Zimbabwe of her childhood into something far dimmer.
Finding virtue after a war crimes verdict
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A special court set up by the United Nations during the Balkan wars of the 1990s made its final and most important verdict on Nov. 22. It found Ratko Mladić, the former commander of the Bosnian Serb military, guilty of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. While the trial was the most significant since the Nuremberg tribunal, it did not end with any general message about some of Europe’s worst atrocities in the 20th century.
A Massive Gas Line Fire Near Detroit Is Forcing Evacuations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The specific cause of the fire is unknown
The Sexual Misconduct Revelations on Capitol Hill Are Just Beginning
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There's evidence of further cases, we just don't know the lawmakers' names
'Self
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Mad' Mike Hughes is planning to shoot himself into the sky this weekend.
President Trump and Vladimir Putin Just Had an Hour
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Iran and Ukraine were also on the agenda
Uber hack exposes data of 57 million users
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The company is under fire for concealing the hack.
CBS News Fires Charlie Rose After Sexual Misconduct Allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PBS and Bloomberg also suspended Rose's show
Hillary Clinton: 'We are totally unprepared' for the rise of artificial intelligence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said "a lot of really smart people are sounding an alarm that we’re not hearing" when it comes to AI.
Sutherland Springs church pastor says he’s struggling to deal with his grief
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Frank Pomeroy, pastor of the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, talked to the New York Times about dealing with his grief from the attack.
House falls off trailer, blocks North Carolina road
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
STATESVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Some house movers in North Carolina thought they were getting a jump on the day. Instead, their day got longer when the house they were moving fell off a trailer and onto a road.
NASA says goodbye to Saturn with dramatic new photo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA is saying goodbye to Saturn with a newly-processed photo of the ringed planet taken during the last day of the Cassini mission.  The photo shows Saturn in all its sunlit glory, glowing gold against the blackness of space.  Cassini snapped the series of images that were stitched together to create this photo on September 13 before making its plunge into Saturn's atmosphere on September 15, destroying the spacecraft in the process. SEE ALSO: Saturn's strange hexagon stands out in new photo of the ringed planet The space probe had been exploring Saturn and its many moons since 2004, and we have no other spacecraft dedicated to studying the huge world today.  "It was all too easy to get used to receiving new images from the Saturn system on a daily basis, seeing new sights, watching things change," Elizabeth Turtle, Cassini scientist, said in a statement. "It was hard to say goodbye, but how lucky we were to be able to see it all through Cassini's eyes." The new photo shows Saturn in natural color, according to NASA, and the image has some surprises if you know where to look.  An annotated version of the Saturn photo.Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science InstituteAn annotated version of the photo shows the moons Prometheus, Pandora, Epimetheus, Janus, Enceladus, and Mimas. It's only fitting that Cassini's final goodbye would include some of the moons it studied from close range for more than 10 years.  "Cassini's scientific bounty has been truly spectacular — a vast array of new results leading to new insights and surprises, from the tiniest of ring particles to the opening of new landscapes on Titan and Enceladus, to the deep interior of Saturn itself,"  Robert West, Cassini scientist, said in the statement. Researchers will continue to look through data returned to Earth from Cassini for years, hopefully finding even more important information in the decades to come.  But until we have a new robotic eye on Saturn consistently, new, up-close views of the world will be a thing of the past.  So, take this new photo in because it may be one of your last. WATCH: NASA has discovered a water world in our solar system capable of sustaining life