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Ancient Bizarre Sea Monster the Size of a Bus Discovered in Russia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The well-preserved 5 foot-long skull of an extinct reptile was first discovered on the bank of the Volga River in 2002, but until now had not been identified as a new species. The fossil belongs to a group of marine reptiles called plesiosaur.
Plasma Jet Engines: Is Flying At 20Km Per Second Possible?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Plasma engines have long been a staple of sci-fi movies, from Star Wars to The Space Between Us, but a recent breakthrough may soon make them a reality
Gianforte wins Montana special House election despite being charged with assault
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In this March 6, 2017 file photo, Greg Gianforte, right, receives congratulations from a supporter in Helena, Montana after winning the Republican nomination for Montana’s special election for U.S. House. As the May 25 special election nears, critics say he’s been hard to track on the stump because his schedule has not been well publicized by his campaign. Republican Greg Gianforte claimed a narrow victory in Montana’s closely watched special election for the state’s at-large congressional seat, defeating Democrat Rob Quist in a race that is likely to be mined for clues about how the voting electorate feels about the political turbulence of Donald Trump’s young presidency heading into next year’s midterm elections.
Scientists discover a star that exploded 970 million years ago
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomy amateurs have helped Australian scientists find a star that exploded around 970 million years ago – long before the dinosaurs even roamed the Earth. Such exploding stars are known as supernovae. Although they burn only for a short amount of time, they can tell astronomers a lot about the universe.
These science emoji could appear on your keyboard soon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The tool section of the emoji keyboard boasts an array of knives, a syringe, a water gun, a beeper, a battery, and a bomb. But when it comes to objects you might find in a laboratory, the options are slim to none. Scientists are hoping to change that by proposing a slate of science-specific emoji. If approved, items such as lab goggles, a petri dish, a test tube, and a DNA double helix could join the ranks of things you text your friends. SEE ALSO: Your hairstyle may be getting its very own emoji soon Industrial giant GE and the American Chemical Society last month proposed 10 emoji to the Unicode Consortium, the organization that oversees the official list of these icons. Nine emoji were deemed candidates for the next selection process, meaning all or some of these could hit keyboards in summer 2018. Eight of nine proposed science emoji.Image: GE and american chemical societyNancy Briscoe, an audience development manager at GE, said the emoji were part of a broader effort to make STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields more culturally accepted. "Giving people the right tools to express scientific thought is important to keep the subject relevant and accessible in a fast-paced world," she said in an email. "We think it's important that we all be able to communicate about science more clearly, so why not create (emoji) to aid that process?" Efforts like these could influence more than just our texts. A mainstream cultural embrace of scientists and their work may have political ramifications, as well. In the U.S., the Trump administration has indicated that government-backed research is a low priority, while top officials have met mainstream scientific findings with hostility and skepticism. Just this week, the White House proposed cutting billions of dollars for basic and applied research funding. Image: American Association for the Advancement of ScienceTrump's proposed budget for fiscal year 2018 would cut total research funding by 16.8 percent, or $12.6 billion, below the 2017 omnibus spending bill. No administration appears to have proposed research cuts this deep in more than 40 years, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) said in a preliminary analysis. Scientists say they're worried about losing their jobs or running out of funding to conduct crucial research. In April, thousands of people in the U.S. and worldwide joined the March for Science to urge officials and the public to support fact and reason. A handful of science-themed emoji won't change this. But they could at least begin to demystify and destigmatize science in popular culture. Image: ge and american chemical society  Image: ge and american chemical society"Science is definitely having a moment right now, whether it's ensuring access to proper science education, funding of grants, or advancing certain fields like engineering and aeronautics," Briscoe said. "Because of this, the [emoji] proposal covers a wide range of accessible science objects." The nine proposed emoji aren't the only science-themed icons up for consideration. At the first-ever Emojicon in San Francisco last fall, science enthusiasts and designers submitted formal proposals to Unicode for other planets in our solar system besides Earth, including the not-to-be-forgotten dwarf planet Pluto.  Craig Cummings, vice-chair of Unicode's technical committee, said in November that the planet emoji proposal could be fast-tracked for inclusion in the 2017 summer update, Nature reported. The path for other science emoji is a bit longer. If approved, those icons could be included in the 2018 summer update. WATCH: This adorable emoji python will cure your fear of snakes
Failed computer replaced during U.S. astronauts' spacewalk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Two U.S. astronauts completed a hastily planned spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Tuesday to replace a computer that failed on Saturday, NASA said. Station commander Peggy Whitson assembled a new computer from spare parts aboard the station and installed it during a 2.5-hour spacewalk as the orbiting outpost sailed 250 miles (400 km) over Earth. The 50-pound (23-kg) computer, which is about the size of a microwave oven, is one of two that control equipment, including solar power panels, cooling loops, radiators and robotics gear, on the U.S. side of the station.
Saturn’s stunning north pole actually changed colors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Cassini orbiter was the first to deliver a really clear look at the eye-catching, hexagonal storm swirling on Saturn's north pole, so it's only fitting that the craft has now delivered a photo of the peculiar phenomenon that adds a new layer of awe. As part of Cassini's recent photo sweep, the orbiter took a nice long look at Saturn's northernmost point once more and discovered that it has almost completely changed color. How's that for a surprise? Saturn's seasons are really, really long. A single trip around the sun — what we think of as a year here on Earth — takes nearly thirty times as long for Saturn. Like many planets, Saturn's surface undergoes changes as seasons progress and change, and since Cassini has been orbiting the planet since way back in 2004, the craft has had the opportunity to observe a full season, and all the dramatic changes that came with it. http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/BGR_News/pia21611_figa_main.gif?itok=eBkkfjGB One of those changes was the increase in what NASA refers to as "springtime hazes." That haze is what makes the planet look a giant ball of blurry clouds, and an increase in haze at the north pole has caused the bluish-green hue of the massive hexagon to transition into a mix of dull brown and tan, with just a hint of green remaining in the very center of its eye. It's a fantastic observation, and a great example of the kind of amazing material we'll be missing out on when Cassini ends its mission later this year.
Cops put parking lot crack cocaine in 'lost and found'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WILKES-BARRE, Pa. (AP) — Police in northeastern Pennsylvania say they've put about $1,600 worth of crack cocaine in their "lost and found box" in hopes of reuniting the drug with its rightful owner.
How to Treat a Burn From Grilling and Cooking
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Grilling season can also be “burn season.” Maybe the fat on your rib-eye steak caught on fire, singeing your hand, or you touched the grill cover to see whether it was hot—only to discover that, ...
Acute Hepatitis from Energy Drinks?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Doctors investigate! A recent report in the British Medical Journal looked into the case of a man who went to the emergency room complaining of nausea, vomiting and stomach pain thinking he simply had the flu. After ruling out changes in his diet, alcohol intake or drug use, they discovered that the acute hepatitis was linked to his consumption of energy drinks, which consisted for 4 to 5 energy drinks during a 3-week period.
Mom Uses Controversial Word with Down Syndrome Son
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A mom is defending the use of the controversial word “retard” around her 8-year-old who has Down syndrome, as she believes it will help him laugh at himself later in life. “This is your child, this is bullying,” Plastic surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon adds.
Jesse Ventura's Fight to Legalize Marijuana
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains mature subject matter. Viewer discretion is advised.
Drs. Exclusive: Black Eyed Peas Member Taboo Fights Cancer with New Song
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Black Eyed Peas member Taboo, revealed in a Doctors exclusive that he’s now cancer-free following a just-revealed testicular cancer battle, is now using his celebrity to help others. The proceeds from his new song, “The Fight,” will go to the American Cancer Society, which works to end the disease through numerous research programs and initiatives. ER physician Dr. Travis Stork says that the American Cancer Society is currently helping to fund over 800 researchers who are fighting cancer.
Woman with Concave Chest Defect Update
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Angela previously came to The Doctors seeking help for her rare birth defect that caused her chest to cave in and made breathing difficult. The Doctors note that pectus excavatum only occurs in one per every 300 to 400 births and is much more common for boys.
Can Ozone Therapy Turn Back the Hands of Time?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Is the secret to looking and feeling your best ozone therapy? The Doctors are joined by actress and director Alison Eastwood, who is the daughter of Hollywood legend Clint Eastwood, who recently underwent the therapy. After undergoing treatments at AMA Skincare with Dr. Alice Pien and Dr. Asher Milgrom, Alison says she felt improvements with her vision and with that morning fog feeling.
What Your Acne Says About Your Health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A viral Internet message claims that breakouts in different areas on the face may indicate different underlying problems – the forehead is due to poor diet, for example, while chin pimples come from kidney disease, and the cheeks break out from allergies and stress.
Simple Swaps to Shed the Pounds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Reader’s Digest Editor-in-Chief Liz Vaccariello shares ways to make your favorite meals a little leaner, without giving up taste.
The new Samsung Galaxy does 27 things the iPhone doesn't
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
David Pogue has created master list of features that the Samsung Galaxy S8 has and the iPhone 7 doesn’t—along with an assessment of which ones are actually useful.
Zuckerberg to Harvard grads: 'You have to create a sense of purpose for others'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg returned to Harvard University to give the class of 2017's commencement speech.
Mark Zuckerberg: The most important thing I built at Harvard
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says the accomplishment he's most proud of from his days at Harvard University is his relationship with wife and fellow Harvard alum Priscilla Chan.
Will This Miracle Material End All Energy Storage Problems?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When graphene was first isolated, the researchers responsible won The Nobel Prize in physics, and now it is a central candidate for solving global energy storage issues
Biggest exhibit of human
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Ed Stoddard THE CRADLE OF HUMANKIND, South Africa (Reuters) - An exhibit of the largest collection of fossils of close human relatives ever to go on public display opened on Thursday in South Africa, not far from the caves where they were unearthed. Launched on "Africa Day" in an area named "The Cradle of Humankind," the exhibit coincides with the publication of a controversial paper that questions the widely-held view that humanity's evolutionary roots lay in Africa.
Time Travel and Parallel Universes: a Scientist vs a Literature Professor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Literature professor Simon John James and physicist Richard Bower were both involved in the curating the exhibition, Time Machines–the past, the future, and how stories take us there. Simon John James: Richard, what does the term “time travel” mean for a physical scientist? Richard Bower: Time travel is the basis of modern physics, and, for anyone that looks up at the night sky, an everyday experience.
Correction: Snowy Plover Chick story
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — In a story May 24 about the Western snowy plover, The Associated Press reported erroneously that Oregon requires dogs to be kept on leash in snowy plover nesting areas. The state bans dogs from all active nesting areas.
How Regular Exercise May Make Your Body 'Younger'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Getting regular exercise may help slow the aging of your body's cells, a new study finds. Compared with the people in the study who didn't exercise at all, the highly active people had a "biological age" that was about nine years younger, said study author Larry Tucker, a professor of exercise science at Brigham Young University in Utah. To reap these benefits of exercise, you'd need to spend 30 to 40 minutes running, five days a week, according to the study.
Wild horses could be sold for slaughter in Trump budget plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PALOMINO VALLEY, Nev. (AP) — President Donald Trump's budget proposal calls for saving $10 million next year by selling wild horses captured throughout the U.S. West without the requirement that buyers guarantee the animals won't be resold for slaughter.
First results from Juno mission show surprisingly strong magnetic field and huge polar cyclones
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The first scientific results from NASA's mission to Jupiter are already stunning scientists.
‘A big reach’: Rumsfeld dismisses comparisons between Russia investigation and Watergate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“I don’t see any there there,” Rumsfeld, who served in multiple Republican administrations, added in an interview with Yahoo News and Finance Anchor Bianna Golodryga. Rumsfeld, as the chief of staff for President Gerald Ford, was privy to the tumult wrought by and in the immediate aftermath of the Watergate scandal and Richard Nixon’s resignation. Trump sparked a storm of comparisons to Nixon when he abruptly fired FBI Director James Comey earlier this month.
Sen. Portman lauds new Netflix sex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Rob Portman spoke to Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric about his ongoing efforts to combat online sex trafficking ahead of this week’s premiere of the documentary on child sex trafficking.
Brewing company creates beer in honor of baby hippo Fiona
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CINCINNATI (AP) — The Cincinnati Zoo's prematurely born hippo named Fiona is getting a new beer in her honor.
All in the family? NATO newcomers Trump and Macron a study in contrasts.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The “family photo” of leaders attending the NATO meeting in the Belgian capital Thursday included an unusually large number of first-timers to the transatlantic alliance’s premier stage. Among the newcomers pictured in the traditional summit souvenir was the president of tiny Montenegro, whose country only acceded to NATO membership in April. Recommended: How much do you know about NATO?
US patrol sends signal to Beijing's claims in South China Sea – but how strong?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Fifteen years ago, when China and the 10-country Association of Southeast Asian Nations committed to establishing a code of conduct to govern actions in the South China Sea, the Paracel Islands were little more than a collection of rocks 138 miles off the coast of Vietnam. Last year, Beijing deployed anti-aircraft missiles to the archipelago. China’s militarization of the South China Sea, a vast waterway through which more than $5 trillion in trade passes each year, faced sharp criticism from the Obama administration, which regularly ordered freedom-of-navigation patrols to challenge Beijing’s territorial claims in the area.
Paradise found
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It was 6 in the morning, and the only sound I could hear was the rhythmic dip ... dip ... dip of the heart-shaped paddle of our guide, Lasa, into the murky waters of Dal Lake in Kashmir. As a journalist, I was here to learn and write about that conflict.
When hostility to media becomes assault
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Lots of politicians aren’t happy to see reporters. Lots of politicians have demeaned reporters for partisan purposes over the years. It’s been almost five decades since Vice President Spiro Agnew roused GOP voters by calling the media “nattering nabobs of negativism” (words penned, perhaps ironically, by future New York Times columnist William Safire).
Tips to Stay Safe in the Sun!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Save your skin with the right sunscreen applied the right way. Dermatologist Sonia Batra explains how to soak up the rays without endangering your health!
Learn How to Give an All
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Celebrity massage therapist Brit shares her tips for a massage fit for a star!
Learn How the Wrong Peanut Butter Can Kill Your Pet!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Dogs love peanut butter and pet-lovers know it’s an easy way to get pups to take medication. Veterinarian Courtney Campbell explains that one ingredient in some peanut butters can be fatal to Fido. “Peanut butter by itself is totally safe,” explains Dr. Campbell.
Take These Steps for Safe Swimming
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Swimming can be a great way to cool off during the summer. And it’s a healthy, low-impact aerobic exercise. Yet beyond t...
Less Than 1 Drink Per Day May Raise Your Breast Cancer Risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Women who can't wait to have their glass of wine at the end of the day, take note: A new report concludes that even one small drink daily can raise a woman's risk of breast cancer. The report includes data gathered from more than 12 million women worldwide — 260,000 of whom had breast cancer — during nearly 120 studies. In the report, which was published today (May 23), researchers cut through the clutter of breast cancer studies, and offer a clear set of recommendations to help women reduce their risk of the disease.
New Zealand test rocket makes it to space but not to orbit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
California-based company Rocket Lab says it has launched a test rocket into space from its New Zealand launch pad, although the rocket didn't reach orbit as hoped
Montana governor slams alleged Gianforte body
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Montana Gov. Steve Bullock called congressional candidate Greg Gianforte’s alleged assault of a reporter “a real wake-up call” in an exclusive interview with Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric, as voters in his state head to the polls today.
Trump caught on camera – awkward moments at NATO summit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Photographers capture awkward moments of Donald Trump at his first NATO summit.
Wisconsin woman jumps on hood of her SUV to prevent theft
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A Wisconsin woman pumping gas near downtown Milwaukee stopped a thief from stealing her SUV by jumping on its hood and clinging to the windshield wipers as the man tried to drive away in her vehicle.
How Trump and Europe rebonded
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
During his first official trip to Europe this week, President Trump was politely asked to back the defining glue of the Continent and the transatlantic partnership. Both the European Union and NATO – the core of what is called “the West” – have enough issues without the uncertainties of Mr. Trump’s “America First” theme of the past year. Both the EU and NATO are too often defined by what they are against, such as Russian aggression, trade protectionism, terrorism, and anti-democratic forces.
Dairy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Want to fuel up like an athlete? Watch this video to learn how to make these easy and delicious dairy-free energy balls.
Trump's budget screws over climate research, but don't freak out yet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Shots fired.  President Donald Trump may be 6,000 miles away from Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, but that didn't stop him from launching an all-out assault on climate science and related energy research. The weapon of choice? His fiscal year 2018 budget proposal. The cuts are staggering in scope, and the consequences are already starting as federal employees and contractors — spooked by the figures out this week — begin job searching in earnest.  SEE ALSO: Trump might pick a non-scientist to be USDA's 'chief scientist' Every single agency that touches climate change research, from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the Department of Energy, NASA, and especially the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), would see sharp reductions and eliminations of climate research programs. NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice in Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesWhile the proposal is just the start of negotiations with Congress over a final, enacted budget, it represents the clearest statement yet of Trump's priorities for governing the country.  And those priorities do not put climate change — ranked by other major industrialized and developing countries as one of the top threats facing the world today — high on the list.  According to Mick Mulvaney, the head of the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the administration targeted climate funding for sharp reductions, but he rejected the charge that it's anti-science. “I think the National Science Foundation last year used your taxpayer money to fund a climate change musical. Do you think that’s a waste of your money?” he said, citing a well-worn example from 2014 of wasteful research spending often pointed to by Republican lawmakers who deny the link between human-caused greenhouse gas emissions and climate change.  “What I think you saw happen during the previous administration is the pendulum went too far to one side, where we were spending too much of your money on climate change, and not very efficiently,” Mulvaney said at a budget briefing on Tuesday morning.   “We don’t get rid of it here. Do we target it? Sure," he said. "Do a lot of the EPA reductions aimed at reducing the focus on climate science? Yes." "Does it meant that we are anti-science? Absolutely not." Losing our eyes and ears The budget cuts Trump is proposing would leave climate scientists without critical data and would shrivel up the job market for researchers at a time when climate change expertise is more needed than ever.  One budget cut at NASA would hit an instrument meant to improve scientists' ability to monitor the amount of solar radiation entering and exiting the atmosphere, which is a foundational measurement needed for keeping tabs on and projecting climate change.  Tens of thousands of protestors gathered on April 22, 2017  to protest the Trump administration's anti-science moves.Image: LO SCALZO/EPA/REX/ShutterstockAnother would eliminate a mission known as CLARREO-PF, which is a satellite instrument aimed at increasing our understanding of how clouds and particles known as aerosols affect the climate.  This would address one of the biggest uncertainties in climate science, but hey, Trump and his cabinet members do like citing uncertainty as a reason not to act on global warming, so...  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ NASA's overall Earth Science Mission, which helps provide research and observations of our planet, would be cut by nearly 9 percent, including the elimination of five Earth observation missions and an education program aimed at supporting the next generation of space science researchers. At the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the office responsible for helping restore and protect our coasts in a time of sea level rise would be completely eliminated. The agency's climate research programs, considered to be among the best in the world, would also take a funding cut on the order of 30 percent. The NOAA budget also contains some bizarre cuts that the meteorology community will likely strongly object to, including getting rid of the array of Pacific Ocean buoys that enable forecasters to detect El Niño events, as well as a network of specially-designed ocean instruments to detect destructive tsunamis in the Pacific Ocean before they hit land.  In addition, the NOAA budget would slow the National Weather Service's implementation of more accurate computer models, increasing the gap between U.S. capabilities and those in Europe and elsewhere, which have surpassed this country. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey, would be cut by more than 10 percent. Even before these cuts, the agency has been having trouble maintaining its network of river gauges that the National Weather Service relies on for triggering flood warnings. So just as heavy rains are becoming more common in a warming climate, the number of functioning gauges is declining.  The Energy Department's Office of Science, which funds research in physical sciences and cutting edge computer modeling, would also see a funding decrease of 17 percent.  None of these decreases are small, and all would reverberate across labs scattered across the country and throughout universities that depend on government grants for research funding. Picking the losers as winners The cuts could also fundamentally change the energy landscape, eliminating the government program that helped launch innovative renewable energy companies such as Tesla.   Under former president Barack Obama, the Energy Department turned into a massive venture capital firm dedicated to funding potentially transformational energy technologies. Now Trump is proposing to eliminate that program, known as the Advanced Research Projects Agency: Energy, or ARPA-E. If the current administration has its way, the office would see its budget plunge from $290 million in Fiscal Year 2017 to just $20 million as it is put to rest completely, along with hopes that the next Tesla will crop up in the U.S., and not, say, in China or another economic competitor. But the shift in priorities doesn't end there.  The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy would be cut by 70 percent compared to Fiscal Year 2017 levels, a staggering decrease that sets the government up against market trends as solar, wind and battery technologies comprise more and more newly-built electric facilities.  Last one: select S&T agencies and programs, requested changes from omnibus levels. #sciencebudget pic.twitter.com/6HoswXd42R — Matt Hourihan (@MattHourihan) May 23, 2017 Don't worry though, fossil fuels like coal and oil would fare just fine under the budget request. And nuclear power, which has stagnated due to regulatory hurdles and lower natural gas, wind, and solar prices, would get a boost in funds. Here comes the brain drain Major science groups that are normally inclined to avoid partisan combat have already come out and slammed the budget as misguided at best.  Rush Holt, a physicist and former congressman who is the director of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), said the budget would have a near-term impact on public health and overall science and technology capabilities in America.  "What we see is not just a reduction in government programs, what we see is a failure to invest in America," Holt said on a conference call with reporters. "We’re not just talking about the long-term future either. The harm to public health and to other areas would start to be felt really very soon." @AAAS_GR R&D by character, as a share of GDP. Research funding would hit a 40-year low in 2018. #Science @AAAS_GR pic.twitter.com/btVEj3RxMQ — Matt Hourihan (@MattHourihan) May 23, 2017 According to one AAAS analyst, the only science and technology-related government agency to see a funding increase under Trump's budget is the secretive Defense Advance Research Projects Agency, better known as DARPA.  The funding cuts, if they get through Congress as proposed, which is doubtful, would also discourage those seeking to go into science and engineering careers from doing so, as it would eliminate thousands of post-doctoral and career positions.  One contractor who works with the federal government on environmental issues, but asked not to be identified since he is not authorized to speak to the press, told Mashable that he and "many others" he knows have already begun "changing their career plans" as they brace for job cuts. "The ramifications of these cuts – which are below the FY17 omnibus levels – will have significant impacts on the health and welfare of the nation," Chris McEntee, the executive director and CEO of the American Geophysical Union, which is the world's largest organization of Earth scientists, said in a statement. Joanne Carney, director of government relations at AAAS, said the budget cuts will hurt the U.S. by impeding our ability to anticipate the ramifications of climate change.  "...This is about dealing with reality at all levels of government," she said.  "So defunding the very programs that seek to allow us to better understand the Earth and our changing environment isn’t helping the U.S. to address climate-related changes. It’s not allowing us to make informed decisions on how to adapt or to mitigate, and it has long-term consequences." There is some good news It is virtually certain that Congress will restore some of the funding for climate science. Many members of Congress of both parties were declaring the budget request dead on arrival on Tuesday.  However, even a fraction of the proposed cuts would still hit the science community hard and potentially erode America's leadership position in global climate research. Maria Gallucci contributed reporting for this story. WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record
Brain scans show how fathers are more attentive to daughters than sons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dads not only act differently in their daily interactions with the children, but scans of their brains also revealed different patterns of activity depending on whether they have a boy or a girl. In recent years, a number of studies has shown that fathers treat girls and boys differently – suggesting in some cases that their behaviours could reinforce gender stereotypes in their children. For instance, studies often rely on parents' self-reports of their interactions with their children.
Everest rescuers retrieve bodies of two Indian climbers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rescuers have retrieved the bodies of two Indian climbers who died on Mount Everest last year but whose remains could not be moved due to bad weather, an official said Thursday. A team of Nepali climbers retrieved the bodies of Goutam Ghosh and Paresh Nath from the balcony, an area just below the summit of the 8,848-metre (29,029-foot) mountain. Ghosh's remains were only located this year by other climbers on the mountain.
Obama in Berlin: ‘We can’t hide behind a wall’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former President Barack Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel attend a discussion at the German Protestant Kirchentag in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on May 25. Former President Barack Obama seemed to take a subtle swipe at his successor Thursday, telling a Berlin audience that the world cannot “hide behind a wall” — an apparent reference to President Trump’s signature campaign promise to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. Obama was in Germany for Kirchentag, a conference affiliated with the Protestant church that he attended at the invitation of German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
Who is Greg Gianforte, the Montana House candidate who allegedly attacked a reporter?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The GOP candidate in Montana’s special congressional election is facing a new challenge: a misdemeanor assault charge issued Wednesday night.