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Russia as a sort of cyber
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Since becoming Russia's top leader almost two decades ago, Vladimir Putin has developed various methods of talking to the Russian public over the heads of other institutions and authorities, with the aim of establishing a problem-solving dialogue directly with the people. In response, it is intensifying its embrace of digital innovations that claim to fix the problems.
Heroin Vaccine Could Turn Body's Defenses Against the Drug
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As heroin-related deaths soar in the United States, a group of researchers said they may be one step closer to developing a vaccine that could block the drug's addictive high. The vaccine is the first of its kind shown to be effective in monkeys, paving the way to human clinical trials, said the researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) who developed the treatment. "The vaccine sequesters the psychoactive molecules that heroin produces and prevents distribution to the brain," said Paul Bremer, a graduate student at TSRI and first author of a study about the vaccine.
Nano Dimension, in Collaboration with Semplastics, Receives Grant to Develop Unique Materials to Build 3D Low Density and High Thickness Ceramic Objec
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NESS ZIONA, ISRAEL / ACCESSWIRE / June 15, 2017 / Nano Dimension Ltd., a leader in the field of 3D printed electronics (NASDAQ: NNDM, TASE: NNDM) , announced today that its wholly owned subsidiary, Nano ...
Outcrop of 19.65 g/t Gold Leads to Newly Exposed Vein Over 80 Meters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Historic Gold Camp Greenwood BC VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / June 15, 2017 / GGX Gold Corp. (TSXV: GGX) (the "Company" or "GGX") is pleased to announce that its excavator trenching ...
KFC Is Sending Fried Chicken Into Outer Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Space: the final fried-tier. KFC is boldly going where no sandwich has gone before by sending their new spicy Zinger chicken sandwich into outer space, courtesy of World View, a high-altitude space balloon company. The multi-day mission will be the first-ever for the World View Stratollite flight...
Off on holiday? Here's the best time to book flights and hotels
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers are investigating pricing strategies so you can get the best deal.
Trump lashes out after report says he’s being investigated for possible obstruction of justice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president tweeted his response to the bombshell Washington Post report that special counsel Robert Mueller is investigating him for obstruction of justice in the federal investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.
GOP Rep. Sanford on Va. shooting: Trump partially responsible ‘for the demons that have been unleashed’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s rhetoric is “partially” to blame ratcheting up political tensions in the U.S., Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., said Thursday, connecting the commander in chief to Wednesday’s shooting.
Pennsylvania family rebuilding after skunk spray ruins home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LATROBE, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania family is slowly rebuilding their life and their home seven months after a skunk sneaked into their home and ruined it.
No 1. courthouse problem: People urinating in the elevator
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) — Officials in an Arkansas county have a plea for courthouse visitors: Please stop urinating in our elevator.
Attacked while running, woman drowns rabid raccoon in puddle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HOPE, Maine (AP) — A Maine woman says a rabid raccoon attacked her while she was out for a run, so she drowned it in a puddle.
Report: Woman stole city money to get butt lift
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida city says a former employee stole money to get a butt lift.
Massachusetts mayor sends man $1 to settle parking dispute
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NORTHAMPTON, Mass. (AP) — A Massachusetts mayor has paid $1 out of his own pocket to settle a dispute with a man who complained after unnecessarily paying for parking.
Liquid Laundry Detergent Pods Pose Lethal Risk for Adults With Dementia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. One day last May, an 87-year-old woman named Edith was rushed to the hospital in a small Texas town after she was found ...
Nano Dimension, in Collaboration with Semplastics, Receives Grant to Develop Unique Materials to Build 3D Low Density and High Thickness Ceramic Objec
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NESS ZIONA, ISRAEL / ACCESSWIRE / June 15, 2017 / Nano Dimension Ltd., a leader in the field of 3D printed electronics (NASDAQ: NNDM, TASE: NNDM) , announced today that its wholly owned subsidiary, Nano ...
Searching for conscience in Trump’s Cabinet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Here's the central mystery of President Trump’s enablers in Washington: When does integrity kick in?
The 'space nation' Asgardia will attempt its first launch this summer — with help from a Russian billionaire
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A non-profit organization called Asgardia is trying to form the first nation in space. Asgardia...
NASA will try again to make fake clouds on the East Coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The previous launches didn't happen because of weather and wayward boats. But NASA's trying again.
China probes academic fraud by cancer researchers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China is investigating claims of academic fraud involving mostly Chinese cancer researchers after more than 100 articles were withdrawn from a foreign medical journal. German publisher Springer announced in April the retraction of 107 articles from Tumor Biology after finding evidence the "peer review process was compromised". The papers had been produced by Chinese medical institutions and universities and published between 2012 and 2016.
EU's Juncker says no Paris climate deal renegotiation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker on Wednesday rejected US President Donald Trump's suggestion that the Paris climate pact could be renegotiated. Trump's decision two weeks ago to pull out of the landmark pact was "a sign of abdication from common action", Juncker told the European Parliament. "The European Union will not renegotiate the Paris Agreement," Juncker told the assembly in Strasbourg, France.
This Simulator Will Give You An Idea Of What The Solar Eclipse Will Look Like In Your Backyard
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google created a simulator that models what the 2017 August eclipse will look like in any location in the United States.
The Smartphone Psychiatrist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Frustrated by the failures in his field, Tom Insel, a former director of the National Institute of Mental Health, is now trying to reduce the world’s anguish through the devices in people’s pockets.
Zesty Zucchini? Indulgently Named Veggies More Appealing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If the first choice sounds more appealing, you're not alone: A new study finds that people are more likely to choose vegetable dishes with tantalizing names. The study involved a six-week experiment staged in a Stanford University dining hall. Each weekday, the dining hall served up one of eight vegetable dishes during lunch.
This new info about tornadoes on Mars is *so* fascinating
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you’re an Earthling who plans on acquiring a Martian citizenship in the sorta kinda near future, bon voyage! Also, you’re going…
Astronomers Keep Finding More Moons Around Jupiter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The planet has the most known moons of any other in our solar system.
Dr. Phil's Secrets to a Happy Marriage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Dr. Phil McGraw and wife Robin celebrated their 40 year anniversary this year and he joins The Doctors to share his secrets to a happy marriage.
Daredevil Jonathan Goodwin's Tips to Overcome Fear & Pain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If there is anyone who knows how to deal with fear, it’s Jonathan Goodwin. The daredevil joins The Doctors to share how he’s made a career by learning how to overcome his fears and endure extreme pain. Jonathan, who is one of the stars of “The Illusionists – Turn of the Century” on Broadway, makes a living doing things most of would never think of attempting.
Celebrating the Holiday Season with Diabetes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Doctors are joined by Dr. Phil McGraw to help people with diabetes get a better understanding on how they can partake in the holiday season without compromising their health. Dr. Phil, who has been a type 2 diabetic for 25 years, tells ER physician Dr. Travis Stork that his approach to the holidays is the same as any other day. Dr. Phil and Dr. Stork answer some viewer questions about diabetes and the holiday season.
The Machine of Tomorrow Today: Quantum Computing on the Verge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Teams at startups, universities,  government labs, and companies like IBM are racing to build computers that could potentially solve some problems that are now intractable.
Why Some Galaxy Clusters Have Massive Radio Emissions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
About 30 known galaxy clusters have a radio structure within their centers, caused by superfast particles emitting radio waves. This structure is called a “mini-halo.”
Drones with defibrillators could save lives before the ambulance arrives
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the perhaps not-so-distant future, drones could be first responders. That's the conclusion from a report published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) following a simulated study involving drones carrying defibrillators in Sweden. SEE ALSO: Scientists are creating drones that fly in sync with each other Researchers for the study equipped an eight-rotor drone from the Swedish Transportation Agency with a GPS system, a camera and a defibrillator for several out-of-sight test flights in October 2016.  Their aim: to find out if life-saving equipment like the defibrillator could be dispatched to a person in cardiac arrest outside a hospital more quickly with a drone than with a traditional emergency response unit. They made some hopeful discoveries. Though the study admits that "whether [drones] reduce response times in a real-life situation is unknown," the researchers tested simulated emergency response times of both drones and typical emergency medical services and found the drones to be much faster.  First, the drones were much quicker to get going. It took dispatchers an average of three seconds to send a drone into the sky, whereas it took dispatchers an average of three minutes to get an EMS team out the door.  Drones also reached their destinations in an average time of less than 5.5 minutes, compared with the average EMS time of 22 minutes. The fastest EMS arrival wasn't even 30 seconds faster than the average drone arrival time, and, according to the study, "the drone arrived more quickly than EMS in all cases." Drones were on average more than 16 minutes faster per trip.  The drones, in case you were wondering, won't be able to apply the defibrillators. Someone else will have to be on hand to grab them and help the person in cardiac arrest. In the United States, 55 people in 100,000 go into cardiac arrest outside of a hospital every year, according to the report. Only 8-10 percent of people who experience that kind of heart trauma survive, but these new findings suggest that drones might be able to boost that percentage.  "We believe that the technology is pretty much available," Andreas Claesson, a coauthor of the study, wrote in an email. "Aviation legislations are strict and may be an obstacle for introduction of drone services as for now. However this will probably change significantly over the next coming years." A clinical study is in the works for 2018. WATCH: Drone brings abortion pills to Northern Ireland
U.S. swings from world leader on the environment to a tiny footnote
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over the course of just the past few weeks, the United States has gone from the world leader on fighting global warming to its biggest holdout.  The main trigger for this sudden role reversal was President Donald Trump's June 1 announcement that the U.S. would withdraw from the landmark Paris Agreement on climate change, and now we're starting to see the ripple effects of that decision. Take, for example, what happened at a meeting of the environment ministers from the Group of 7 industrialized nations on Sunday and Monday.  SEE ALSO: An astronaut who just returned from space trolled Trump with the Paris Agreement The ministers issued a non-binding climate and environment statement attesting to the "irreversibility" of the landmark Paris Agreement and committing to taking a variety of actions to slash greenhouse gas emissions that are warming the planet. The communiqué reads in part:  Under former President Barack Obama, the U.S. would surely have signed onto such a statement, and it would've made little news. However, Trump's representative at the meeting, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt, instead relegated the U.S. to a footnote that doesn't include the words "climate change." Thank you @glgalletti for the Italian-style welcome to @G7Italy2017. The prosciutto and pasta were delicious! #G7ItalyUS pic.twitter.com/4JBT5hKYL9 — Administrator Pruitt (@EPAScottPruitt) June 10, 2017 The footnote, which is at the bottom of one of the pages in the statement, says that the U.S. will kinda, sorta continue working with international partners on climate change: "The United States will continue to engage with key international partners in a manner that is consistent with our domestic priorities, preserving both a strong economy and a healthy environment," the footnote reads. The communique includes this item on climate science that the U.S. also refused to sign onto: “We support an interactive evidence-based dialogue drawing on the best available science, including reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change...” Instead of that, Pruitt has advocated for establishing opposing teams of experts to debate climate science before the American people, which mainstream climate researchers have called deeply troubling. Today at the #G7Environment, I was honored to deliver a statement on behalf of all Canadians. My main message to the world: Canada will be a climate leader. We will find innovative solutions to the world’s greatest challenge. We will engage with other countries. We need to act together to ensure a sustainable and livable planet for our kids and grandkids. We welcome global partnerships and as a country we are committed to the #ParisAgreement  Aujourd'hui, au #G7, j'ai eu l'honneur de faire une déclaration au nom de tous les Canadiens. Mon message principal au monde: le Canada sera un leader en matière de climat. Nous trouverons des solutions innovantes au plus grand défi du monde et travaillerons avec d’autres pays pour le faire. Nous devons agir ensemble pour assurer une planète durable et habitable pour nos enfants et nos petits-enfants. Nous encourageons les partenariats internationaux et nous sommes dévoués à l’ #AccorddeParis. A post shared by Catherine McKenna (@cathmckennaottcen) on Jun 12, 2017 at 7:05am PDT To cap off the clear abandonment of the traditional American role at these meetings, Pruitt flew home a day early to attend one of the most bizarre presidential cabinet meetings in modern memory. During that  meeting on Monday, cabinet secretaries, including Pruitt, went around the table praising Trump for his leadership and accomplishments to date. Pruitt, for his part, is a longtime critic of the agency he now leads. He has used his short tenure at the helm of the EPA to dismantle environmental regulations put in place under Obama, while also seeking to drastically shrink the EPA's workforce and mission.  He has denied the widely accepted climate science findings that human activities, mainly the burning of fossil fuels for energy, are causing the climate to warm, with a slew of harmful effects.  WATCH: Scientists are creating drones that fly in sync with each other
Could Purple Bread Be Good for You?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
We all know that white bread isn’t the best nutritional choice – but could PURPLE bread be better? The Doctors investigate.
Eyeliner Technique Could Be Hazardous to Your Sight!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Are you putting your vision at risk when you beautify your eyes? See which popular makeup technique could be dangerous.
This Snack Could Cut Your Risk for Major Diseases!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Want to lower your chances of contracting heart disease, diabetes, and cancer!? The answer doesn’t lie in a pill – and it could help you lose a little weight as well.
You Can Learn to Live Happy!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Psychotherapist Stacy Kaiser shares some tips that can help you live a happier life. Stacy explains that she is one of the contributors to the book “Live Happy,” which is full of recommendations for adding happiness to your life. Contributors include celebrities like Alanis Morisette – “And then somehow they ended up including me!” she adds.
How clean energy is transforming the world, in 5 charts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Take it straight from a major fossil fuel supplier: The world's energy mix is changing, and it's shifting toward lower-carbon fuels. BP, the British oil and gas giant, said global efforts to slash greenhouse gas emissions and boost efficiency are having a tangible effect on global energy markets, with two main narratives playing out: the decline of coal, and the rapid rise of wind and solar power. SEE ALSO: Apple is investing $1 billion in clean energy with this unique approach This week, BP released its Statistical Review of World Energy on 2016 data. For 66 years, this annual report has served as an energy industry statistical bible of sorts, painting the broad picture of global energy development.  In an opening letter, BP CEO Bob Dudley stressed the need to "keep our focus and efforts on reducing carbon emissions." He also voiced support for the Paris Climate Agreement, an international pact that commits nearly all countries to fighting global warming. This puts BP in opposition to President Donald Trump, who on June 1 announced he would withdraw the U.S. from the agreement.  Here are some of the biggest takeaways from BP's annual report: Renewable energy is the "leading light of the energy transition" Image: BP statistical review of world energyRenewable power generation grew by 14.1 percent last year, according to BP, which doesn't include hydropower in this group. While that's slightly below the 10-year average, it's the still the largest annual addition yet. Solar power in particular jumped 29.6 percent, while wind power grew by 15.6 percent. Renewables' share of the global energy mix is still fairly small — about 3.2 percent — but last year's strong growth meant that solar, wind, and other sources accounted for nearly one-third of the increase in energy supplies. Image: BP statistical review of world energyChina was the biggest force in this sector. The world's most populous country and top greenhouse gas emitter contributed more than 40 percent of global renewable energy growth in 2016, which helped it surpass the United States as the largest renewable power producer. The U.S. isn't likely to reclaim the top spot anytime soon. China is vowing to invest $361 billion in renewables by 2020, yet the Trump administration is doubling down on fossil fuel production, all while criticizing China for not doing enough to control its emissions. Coal's fortunes have taken "a decisive break from the past" Image: BP Statistical Review of World EnergyAs these charts show, coal has hardly disappeared, and it won't anytime soon. But the coal industry is facing pressure from many sides that are contributing to its long-term decline, BP said. Natural gas and, to a lesser extent, renewables are replacing coal in the power sector as both become more widely available and cost-competitive. Stronger government limits on carbon emissions in many countries, as well as air and water pollution rules, are also fueling the broader shift away from coal. However, the biggest near-term factor is, once again, China. The country last year said it would cancel or postpone plans for 200 coal power plants, and it restricted the number of days that coal mines can operate. The measures are meant to not only reduce toxic urban air pollution and carbon emissions, but also shrink excess capacity in China's coal sector. Image: BP Statistical Review of World EnergyIn 2016, Chinese coal production fell by 7.9 percent — a record drop — while coal consumption declined for the third consecutive year, falling 1.6 percent. Coal prices shot up in response, by 60 percent for thermal coal (the kind used in power plants). As China is the world's largest coal user, these dynamics spilled over into the global market. Higher global coal prices further depressed coal demand in the power sector, to the benefit of natural gas and renewables. Global coal consumption slipped by 1.7 percent while production fell by a "whopping" 6.2 percent, BP said. In the U.K., coal supply and demand plummeted to levels not seen since the start of the Industrial Revolution, nearly 200 years ago.  Carbon emissions, and energy demand, are essentially flat Image: BP statistical review of world energyWe're becoming more efficient in using energy. Global energy markets saw weak growth for the third consecutive year, with energy demand notching up by just 1 percent in 2016. BP credited the "relentless drive to improve energy efficiency" for the deceleration.  Relatively slow economic growth was another factor, including a slowdown in industrial production. All this meant that carbon emissions were essentially flat in 2016, BP said. It's the third consecutive year in which carbon emissions have barely budged from the previous year. BP's economists said it's unclear whether the past three years signal a "decisive break from the past" that means we're on track to limit global warming — or if the flat emissions are largely driven by cyclical factors that could unwind over time, putting our climate at an even higher risk. WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record
NASA Plans To Reveal New Kepler Findings On Exoplanets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA has a briefing scheduled for Monday about the exoplanet findings from the Kepler mission.
New Amazon dams would be 'massively' destructive: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Building the 428 hydroelectric dams proposed for Brazil's Amazon basin -- three times the existing number -- would devastate the environment and could even disrupt regional weather, an international team of researchers warned Wednesday. Writing in the journal Nature, the scientists unveiled a Dam Environmental Vulnerability Index (DEVI) to score the impact of these future dams across a broad range of criteria and help policy planners decide which ones to leave on the drawing board. "We have to put the risks of the table and change the way people are looking at the problem," said lead author Edgardo Latrubesse, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin.
Scientists may have found a way to tan skin without exposing it to UV rays
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have discovered a small molecule that may be able to stimulate the darkening of human skin, without exposing it to potentially harmful UV radiation in the process. Here's how it works.
Correction: Shipwreck Discovery story
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In a story and photo captions June 13 about the discovery of a shipwreck, The Associated Press reported erroneously the rank of Todd Sokalzuk. He is a Rear Admiral, not a Commander. Also, the story should have made it clear that the Coast Guard could not assign blame to the crash that caused the ship to sink.
Donald Trump, 71, through the years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
His name is on skyscrapers, casinos, country clubs, neckties, jewelry, cologne, a shelf-full of books, a self-proclaimed “university,” a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame — and official portraits throughout the Oval Office.
Alexandria shooting: Videos capture harrowing scene
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who was wounded in the shooting, can be seen lying motionless on the field in one clip.
Dem and GOP baseball managers announce game will go on, call for change in national ‘mood’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Barton and Doyle, the managers of the Republican and Democratic baseball teams, also said they added a fund for the families of fallen police officers to the list of charities the baseball game will benefit, to recognize the U.S. Capitol Police officers who saved lives Wednesday. Barton was on the field when a gunman shot and wounded Majority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, R-Calif., and four others: a congressional staffer, a lobbyist and two police officers. Barton said it appeared the man identified as the shooter, James T. Hodgkinson, was motivated by political animosity toward Republicans. “Members are not looked at as people anymore, we’re kind of looked at — I don’t want to say as targets, but people think they can come to our town hall meetings and say just the most obnoxious things and think we won’t feel it personally,” Barton said.
Soup Nazi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — A company that sells soup from the recipes of the chef who was the real-life model of the Soup Nazi on "Seinfeld" has filed for bankruptcy less than a month after its chief financial officer was arrested on charges he cheated the government out of employment-related taxes.
After ballpark shooting, a call for civility, courage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Rep. Ryan Costello, shortstop on the Republican congressional baseball team, was two minutes late this morning, and so he missed his ride to a practice that turned into a shoot-out as a gunman wounded five people before he was shot and later died. “We’re all good people” in Congress – Democrats and Republicans trying to help the country in their own way. Although the motives of gunman James T. Hodgkinson III, from Belleville, Ill., are unknown, he was a virulent anti-Trumper.
How to Get Generic Viagra
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. If you’re looking for a less costly Viagra, you might want to ask your doctor about sildenafil. It's the active ingredie...
Over 65 Million People Have Watched This Little Boy Help His Brother Escape His Crib
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Siblings—there's no better partner in crime, right?!
This Dad Photoshops His Toddler Into "Marginally Dangerous" Situations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
This is officially the funniest way to troll your family members.
13 Million Would Lose Healthcare Coverage Under GOP Plan, New Analysis Estimates
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. A new analysis of the House Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act finds that 13 million people w...