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SpaceX gets first private passenger for moon trip
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He or she will be the first human to fly around the moon since 1972.
Japan's commercial whaling bid blocked at IWC
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Japan's determined bid to return to commercial whale hunting was blocked by anti-whaling nations in a tense vote Friday at the International Whaling Commission meeting in Brazil. Anti-whaling nations led by Australia, the European Union and the United States, defeated Japan's "Way Forward" proposal in a 41 to 27 vote.
Manafort’s capitulation leaves a wide
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The collapse of Paul Manafort's defensive line appears to leave exposed flanks even at the White House.
NASA shows new image of cyclonic region in southern Jupiter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Sep. 14 (Notimex).- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has released a new photograph of the cyclone region known as "brown barge" in the southern Equatorial Belt of Jupiter. In the snapshot taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft, this area is observed as a long, brown oval, usually found within the dark equatorial belt north of Jupiter. These types of phenomena, according to NASA, are often difficult to identify visually, because their color mixes with the dark environment. However, at other times, as in this image, the dark belt material recedes to create a lighter colored background against which the brown barge is more striking. The US space agency explained that brown barges usually dissipate after the entire cloud belt is disrupted and reorganized. The image was captured by Juno on September 6, while the spacecraft made its fifteenth close flight to Jupiter, in it, offers the first detailed data of the structure within that barge. NTX/ICB/LCH/ASTRO16/BBF
Barack Obama Says Not Voting in the 2018 Midterm Elections Is 'Dangerous'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"On November 6th, we have a chance to restore some sanity to our politics"
Full coverage: Tropical Storm Florence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The deadly storm hit the Carolina coast early Friday, bringing with it heavy winds, drenching rain and massive floodwaters.
Paris, Brussels call for car
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Europe should hold an annual car-free day in a bid to ease air pollution, the mayors of Paris and Brussels said Saturday on the eve of a vehicle-free day in their cities. The call came in a joint statement by Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo and her counterpart in Brussels, Philippe Close, in which the two pointed to "the urgency of climate issues and the health impact of pollution". In Paris, City Hall had on Friday said six areas at the heart of the capital would remain traffic-free on the first Sunday of every month, including Ile de la Cite and Ile Saint-Louis, Louvre, Opera, Chatelet and the Marais.
Domestic Violence May Have Been Motive in California Rampage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A gunman shot and killed his ex-wife before killing himself and four other people
How football star's friends helped police expose him in ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alex McCarty and Noah Walton saw the gun allegedly used to kill Emma Walker in Riley Gaul's possession.
NASA's New Space Laser Will Measure Polar Ice 60,000 Times A Second
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's called the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2 for short, and NASA says it's the "most advanced laser instrument of its kind."
An Ailing Killer Whale Has Been Declared Dead off the Pacific Northwest Coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 4-year-old whale, known as J50, has not been seen in a week
Brazil space station open for small satellite business
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brazil is ready to launch small commercial rockets from its space base near the equator as soon as it agrees to safeguard U.S. technology that is dominant in the industry, the Brazilian Air Force officer managing the space program said on Friday. Brig. Major Luiz Fernando Aguiar said Brazil wants to get a piece of the $300 billion-a-year space launch business by drawing U.S. companies interested in launching small satellites at a lower cost from the Alcantara base on its north coast. "The microsatellite market is most attractive today and we are interested in the 50 to 500-kilo niche," Aguiar told Reuters at the base's main launch pad.
Giant NASA space laser satellite will gauge climate change’s impact on ice sheets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA is set to launch its most advanced space laser satellite as part of a $1 billion mission to reveal how climate change has been affecting the Earth’s ice sheet surface elevation.
Lockheed wins contract for U.S. Air Force GPS satellites
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.S. Air Force said on Friday it had chosen Lockheed Martin to build 22 next-generation Global Positioning System satellites worth up to $7.2 billion, part of a major effort to modernize the GPS constellation of satellites. The so-called GPS III follow-on satellites are expected to be available for launch into space beginning in 2026, the Air Force said.
We’re going to the Red Planet! All the past, present, and future missions to Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX isn't the only organization pining to visit the Red Planet. Here's a detailed list of all operational and planned missions to Mars, along with explanations of their objectives, spacecraft details, and mission proposals.
Incumbent Andrew Cuomo Defeats Cynthia Nixon in New York Gubernatorial Primary
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cuomo is the automatic front-runner in November's race
Scenes From The Carolinas As Hurricane Florence Makes Landfall
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scenes From The Carolinas As Hurricane Florence Makes Landfall
Weatherman Forced to Evacuate Mid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We are staying here to keep you up to date"
14 New Books to Read in September
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From Bob Woodward's 'Fear,' Robert Galbraith's (a.k.a. J.K Rowling)'s latest and memoirs from Lisa Brennan-Jobs and Sally Field, all the best new books.
Hurricane stokes talk of extending college football season
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With an eye toward player safety and scheduling flexibility, the NCAA last year considered ways to lengthen the college football season so every team would have 14 weeks to play 12 games every year.
Michelle Obama Is Planning a Rock Star Book Tour of 10 Areas Across America
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The tour will will inspire others to reflect upon and share their own stories
The Top 5 Street
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These were the best street style trends from NYFW 2018 in photos.
Cancer Will Kill About 10 Million People This Year, Experts Predict
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And there will be 18.1 million new diagnoses
That hole drilled in Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft may have done more damage than initially thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The tale of the mysterious hole that turned up on a spacecraft attached to the International Space Station continues to get stranger. In a new report from Russian news group TASS, whoever drilled the hole might have damaged more than just hull itself. Citing unnamed sources, TASS reports that when the hole was found the crew aboard the ISS conducted a detailed analysis of the damage. One of the tools they used was an endoscope, which they used to see what was on the other side of the hole. When they sent the images and video back to Earth, the Russian space agency discovered damage to a component lying on the other side of the hole. Big yikes. So, what exactly is damaged besides the hull? Oh, you know, nothing much. Just the anti-meteorite shield that, as its name implies, protects against friggin' space rocks. "Traces of drilling have been found not only inside the spacecraft’s living compartment, but also on the screen of the anti-meteorite shield that covers the spacecraft from the outside and is installed 15 millimeters away from the pressure hull," the source told TASS. "The top of the drill came through the pressure hull and hit the non-gastight outer shell." That's just fantastic, and I'm sure (if true) this is all very comforting for the crew members who have to actually ride this thing back down to Earth in the not-so-distant future. The spacecraft is essentially the crew's "lifeboat" aboard the space station should anything go catastrophically wrong. Having a hole in the hull of your lifeboat — even a patched hole — is not a great feeling. The TASS report offers a few other new details about the investigation into where and when the hole was drilled. According to the source, all the components of the spacecraft were photographed during the final assembly process, and no damage is present in those photos. That means the hole was drilled either just before work on the spacecraft was finished or during its lengthy inspection period. Russia still hasn't revealed whether it has a suspect in the investigation or any further details as to who might have been responsible. Early reports suggested that the culprit might have already been found internally, but nothing has surfaced since those rumors began to swirl.
Suppressor upgrade to make US Special Ops even more deadly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Defense Specialist Allison Barrie on how the United States' elite Special Operations warriors are set to become even more deadly when upgraded cutting-edge suppressor become a new addition to their arsenal.
'You Can't Even See the Sky.' Series of Explosions Sets Dozens of Homes Ablaze Near Boston
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Police believe the explosions are coming from a problematic gas line
How you can help victims of tropical storm Florence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hurricane Florence, a massive storm that had been on course to strike North and South Carolina, finally made landfall Friday morning. The slow-moving hurricane pounded the Atlantic coast with 90 mph winds, widespread coastal flooding, and sheets of rain.  By Friday evening, Florence was downgraded to a tropical storm, according to the National Hurricane Center. While that means the former hurricane's winds have lessened, the worst impacts from the storm are likely to be flooding rains that are still a threat to anyone in its path. SEE ALSO: Hurricane Florence could dump 17 trillion gallons of rain. Yeah, you read that right. While we won't know the full scope of Florence's toll for days, the hurricane has already forced evacuations for millions of people along the coast and knocked out power for hundreds of thousands. If you want to help those affected by Florence, Charity Navigator, a nonprofit that evaluates charities, has compiled a list of "highly-rated organizations" planning to aid with recovery.  There are also other ways you can help people who will be rebuilding their lives in the wake of the hurricane, including donating to community groups that assist the most vulnerable populations and supporting verified GoFundMe fundraisers.  Here's our list of ways you can help, which will be updated to reflect the ultimate scale of Florence's devastation:  1. Donate to reputable nonprofits and charities.  Charity Navigator's comprehensive list highlights organizations that focus on general aid and relief; medical services; animal care and services; financial relief for families; and, food hunger and relief.  Here's a list of highly-rated, trustworthy organizations who will be helping communities affected by #HurricaneFlorence: https://t.co/N2vYfisEqV *RT & Favorite to share with your friends and family pic.twitter.com/VYTlwVtWQP — Charity Navigator (@CharityNav) September 12, 2018 Charity Navigator notes that, at this time, it's unclear whether the featured organizations will spend donations made during Hurricane Florence specifically on storm relief. If you want to ensure your money will go toward aiding Florence survivors, contact the organization directly or look for an option to make that designation when you donate online.  Here's an abbreviated list of some of the organizations working on Florence recovery: North Carolina Community Foundation, Brother's Brother Foundation, Friends of Disabled Adults and Children, Save the Children, United Way of Alamance County, American Kidney Fund, Samaritan's Purse, ForKids, Charleston Animal Society, Americares, World Hope International, Habitat for Humanity Wake County, World Vision, and Rural Advancement Foundation International-USA.  Though not featured on Charity Navigator's list, the Salvation Army and Habitat for Humanity are national organizations already on the ground or preparing to help victims. On Friday, Google launched a $2 million matching campaign fundraiser for the Red Cross, which is operating shelters and providing aid to those affected.  2. Consider ways to help the most vulnerable communities.  The most vulnerable communities are often the most overlooked during a natural disaster. Expect for people with disabilities, senior citizens, and people with low incomes or experiencing homelessness to be the hardest hit by Florence.  Portlight Strategies, a nonprofit that focuses on disaster relief for older adults and people with disabilities, runs a hotline for those who have limited mobility yet need urgent or immediate assistance. The number is 1-800-626-4959. You can read more about the group's Florence response here, and you can donate to their efforts here.  Organization run by disabled people focused on inclusive disaster planning: Portlight Inclusive Disaster Strategies Disaster Hotline: (800) 626-4959info@disasterstrategies.orghttps://t.co/1tLrftGLWB Facebook page: https://t.co/Bdpj1hcc7m#HurricaneFlorence #CripTheVote — Alice Wong (@SFdirewolf) September 13, 2018 In addition to the local and regional organizations listed by Charity Navigator that help people in dire financial straits, you can consider donating to diaper and food banks that provide victims with day-to-day essentials. The Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina and Harvest Hope Food Bank are both recommended by Charity Navigator. The Diaper Bank of North Carolina is collecting diapers, wipes, and donations for Florence. The South Carolina Diaper Bank is accepting cash donations so that it can create disaster relief kits.  You can also make contributions to Army Emergency Relief, Air Force Aid Society, and the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Those organizations are included on Charity Navigator's list and are providing Florence-related financial relief to current or former members of the military and their immediate family members.  3. Support GoFundMe campaigns. You can support the official GoFundMe Hurricane Florence Relief fund here. GoFundMe has also created a hub where you can find verified campaigns or individual fundraisers for victims. The number and type of fundraisers will grow as Florence's damage becomes clear.  #HurricaneFlorence is making its way toward the coast & those in its path are making preparations for potentially catastrophic rain. In anticipation of this historic storm, we've created a centralized hub for the verified GoFundMes helping those impacted. https://t.co/vsG5q76HKj — GoFundMe (@gofundme) September 13, 2018 Finally, if you need guidance on deciding which cause to support amongst so many worthy aid and recovery efforts, consult Charity Navigator's tips for how to give in a crisis. Those include giving money instead of material items, making long-term donations, and "reacting with intention."  UPDATE: Sept. 14, 2018, 2:33 p.m. PDT This story was updated to reflect Florence being downgraded to a tropical storm. Additional nonprofit organizations and campaigns have also been added.  WATCH: View of Hurricane Florence from space
SpaceX To Announce Name Of First Tourist It's Sending Around The Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's one small announcement for SpaceX, one potentially giant leap for space
People Think Apple Missed Out on the Music Collaboration of a Lifetime
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Apple enthusiasts took to the Internet to sound off on what they believed was a missed collab for the new iPhone with INXS.
Why President Trump Is a Threat to GOP Senate Prospects
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Whatever the effect of Trump’s campaigning, there will be more of it. The President plans to spend more time on the road for the midterms.
SpaceX books its first passenger to fly around the moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Although SpaceX has a number of successful launches to its name, it's still yet to reach that ultimate goal of sending a human to space. As per a tweet on Thursday, the company has signed its first private passenger to fly on its BFR launch vehicle, in what would be "an important step toward enabling access for everyday people who dream of traveling to space." SEE ALSO: Take a look at the first space suit that let Americans walk in space The BFR, which Elon Musk said can carry up to 100 people when it was first touted last year, will fly around the moon as part of the personal trip.  SpaceX has signed the world’s first private passenger to fly around the Moon aboard our BFR launch vehicle—an important step toward enabling access for everyday people who dream of traveling to space. Find out who’s flying and why on Monday, September 17. pic.twitter.com/64z4rygYhk — SpaceX (@SpaceX) September 14, 2018 No details have been revealed about who the passenger is and why they're flying, but SpaceX said it would reveal all on Monday. Musk left a clue possibly regarding the flyer's nationality, tweeting the flag of Japan when asked if it was him that would be going on the trip. He also revealed in another tweet that the rendering of the BFR spacecraft was new. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) September 14, 2018 In June, it was revealed by the Wall Street Journal that SpaceX wouldn't be sending a couple around the moon on its Dragon spacecraft later this year, a promise that was touted in early-2017. While SpaceX is still planning to take the two tourists, who paid a "significant deposit" for the opportunity, the trip will be "postponed until at least mid-2019 and likely longer." Earlier this year, Musk said the company would be able to focus its investment on the BFR, following the successful launch of the Falcon Heavy.  The 31-engine BFR is part of the company's grand plan for travelling between planets, and will replace its current suite of rockets like the Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy. WATCH: View of Hurricane Florence from space
Video Shows Harvey Weinstein Repeatedly Touching a Woman Who Later Accused Him of Rape
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The video shows Weinstein propositioning and touching a woman who later accused him of rape
Brett Kavanaugh Denies Sexual Misconduct Allegation From High School
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I did not do this back in high school or at any time"
'The Kindest, Sweetest Soul.' Ariana Grande Remembers Mac Miller With Emotional Tribute
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Miller and Grande dated from August 2016 to May 2018
EU firm on Russia sanctions over Ukraine: Merkel  
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Friday that the European Union would maintain sanctions against Russia until Moscow makes progress on fulfilling its commitments under a peace plan for east Ukraine. "Before the Minsk agreement has been implemented or progress has been made in that regard, we will not consider lifting sanctions on Russia," Merkel told reporters in the Lithuanian capital Vilnius. Berlin and Moscow, along with Paris, signed peace agreements in the Belarussian capital Minsk in 2015 intended to put an end to a conflict that has left more than 10,000 dead since it began in April 2014.
Scientists will release genetically
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the winter of 2016, a plane carrying an unusual shipment made its way from Italy to Africa. Inside were the eggs of 5,000 genetically modified mosquitoes. The eggs brought from Italy reached a research laboratory in the sub-Saharan African nation of Burkina Faso, where, locked securely behind double metal doors, they hatched, one by one, into tiny wriggling larvae.
SpaceX To Announce Name Of World's First Space Tourist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's one small announcement for SpaceX, one potentially giant leap for space
Live coverage: Tropical Storm Florence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The deadly storm hit the Carolina coast early Friday, bringing with it heavy winds, drenching rain and massive floodwaters.
How to help Florence victims
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Five ways you can contribute to storm relief efforts right now.
Careless whiskers: Train commuter caught on video shaving
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — A man caught on video lathering up and giving himself a shave while riding on a New Jersey train was violating the agency's rules.
Endangered Lemur Newborn Is So Ugly It's Cute
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tonks the baby aye-aye may answer that question. Born at the Denver Zoo on Aug. 8, Tonks is one of only 24 of the nocturnal lemurs in captivity in the United States. Aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) are native to Madagascar.
Officials shed little light on closure of solar observatory
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — An observatory in the mountains of southern New Mexico that is dedicated unlocking the mysteries of the sun has found itself at the center of a mystery that is creating a buzz here on earth.
Ex Trump Campaign Chair Paul Manafort Reaches Plea Deal With Robert Mueller
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort appears to have reached a plea agreement with Robert Mueller
SpaceX signs first private passenger for moon voyage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX announces it has signed up the world’s first private passenger to fly around the moon aboard its Big Falcon Rocket, which the company says will be their largest and most powerful rocket. Jillian Kitchener reports.
The Bacteria in Your Gut Produce Electricity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some types of bacteria that are either commonly consumed or already found in our guts can create electricity, according to a new study published Wednesday (Sept. 12) in the Journal Nature. Electricity-generating, or "electrogenic," bacteria aren't something new — they can be found in places far away from us, like at the bottom of lakes, said senior author Daniel Portnoy, a microbiologist at the University of California, Berkeley. But until now, scientists had no idea that bacteria found in decaying plants or in mammals, especially farm animals, could also generate electricity — and in a much simpler manner, Portnoy said.
1 Dead, 25 Injured in Massachusetts Gas Explosions. Here's What to Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Emergency officials responded to 60 to 80 structure fires Thursday
How you can help victims of Hurricane Florence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hurricane Florence, a massive storm on course to strike North and South Carolina, finally made landfall Friday morning. The slow-moving hurricane is currently pounding the Atlantic coast with 90 mph winds, widespread coastal flooding, and sheets of rain.  While we won't know the full scope of Florence's toll for days, the hurricane has already forced evacuations for millions of people along the coast and knocked out power for thousands. If you want to help those affected by Florence, Charity Navigator, a nonprofit that evaluates charities, has compiled a list of "highly-rated organizations" planning to aid with recovery.  SEE ALSO: Hurricane Florence could dump 17 trillion gallons of rain. Yeah, you read that right. There are also other ways you can help people who will be rebuilding their lives in the wake of the hurricane, including donating to community groups that assist the most vulnerable populations and supporting verified GoFundMe fundraisers.  Here's our list of ways you can help, which will be updated to reflect the ultimate scale of Florence's devastation:  1. Donate to reputable nonprofits and charities.  Charity Navigator's comprehensive list highlights organizations that focus on general aid and relief; medical services; animal care and services; financial relief for families; and, food hunger and relief.  Here's a list of highly-rated, trustworthy organizations who will be helping communities affected by #HurricaneFlorence: https://t.co/N2vYfisEqV *RT & Favorite to share with your friends and family pic.twitter.com/VYTlwVtWQP — Charity Navigator (@CharityNav) September 12, 2018 Charity Navigator notes that, at this time, it's unclear whether the featured organizations will spend donations made during Hurricane Florence specifically on storm relief. If you want to ensure your money will go toward aiding Florence survivors, contact the organization directly or look for an option to make that designation when you donate online.  Here's an abbreviated list of some of the organizations working on Florence recovery: North Carolina Community Foundation, Brother's Brother Foundation, Friends of Disabled Adults and Children, Save the Children, United Way of Alamance County, American Kidney Fund, Samaritan's Purse, ForKids, Charleston Animal Society, and Rural Advancement Foundation International-USA.  2. Consider ways to help the most vulnerable communities.  The most vulnerable communities are often the most overlooked during a natural disaster. Expect for people with disabilities, senior citizens, and people with low incomes or experiencing homelessness to be the hardest hit by Florence.  Portlight Strategies, a nonprofit that focuses on disaster relief for older adults and people with disabilities, runs a hotline for those who have limited mobility yet need urgent or immediate assistance. The number is 1-800-626-4959. You can read more about the group's Florence response here, and you can donate to their efforts here.  Organization run by disabled people focused on inclusive disaster planning: Portlight Inclusive Disaster Strategies Disaster Hotline: (800) 626-4959info@disasterstrategies.orghttps://t.co/1tLrftGLWB Facebook page: https://t.co/Bdpj1hcc7m#HurricaneFlorence #CripTheVote — Alice Wong (@SFdirewolf) September 13, 2018 In addition to the local and regional organizations listed by Charity Navigator that help people in dire financial straits, you can consider donating to diaper and food banks that provide victims with day-to-day essentials. The Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina and Harvest Hope Food Bank are both recommended by Charity Navigator. The Diaper Bank of North Carolina is collecting diapers, wipes, and donations for Florence. The South Carolina Diaper Bank is accepting cash donations so that it can create disaster relief kits.  You can also make contributions to Army Emergency Relief, Air Force Aid Society, and the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Those organizations are included on Charity Navigator's list and are providing Florence-related financial relief to current or former members of the military and their immediate family members.  3. Support GoFundMe campaigns. You can support the official GoFundMe Hurricane Florence Relief fund here. GoFundMe has also created a hub where you can find verified campaigns or individual fundraisers for victims. The number and type of fundraisers will grow as Florence's damage becomes clear.  #HurricaneFlorence is making its way toward the coast & those in its path are making preparations for potentially catastrophic rain. In anticipation of this historic storm, we've created a centralized hub for the verified GoFundMes helping those impacted. https://t.co/vsG5q76HKj — GoFundMe (@gofundme) September 13, 2018 Finally, if you need guidance on deciding which cause to support amongst so many worthy aid and recovery efforts, consult Charity Navigator's tips for how to give in a crisis. Those include giving money instead of material items, making long-term donations, and "reacting with intention."  WATCH: View of Hurricane Florence from space
SpaceX has its first paying moon passenger. No, it probably isn't Elon Musk.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In February 2017, Elon Musk announced that his SpaceX rockets would take two unidentified space tourists on a trip around the moon by the end of 2018. SpaceX has signed the world’s first private passenger to fly around the Moon aboard our BFR launch vehicle—an important step toward enabling access for everyday people who dream of traveling to space. Probably not Musk, who dropped a clue — a Japanese flag emoji — on Twitter when asked about the space tourist.