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The Google engineer’s memo shows the stereotypes that keep women out of STEM
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google engineer James Damore wrote his now-infamous memo criticizing the company’s diversity programs in response to a big question Silicon Valley is grappling with: Why aren’t there more women in technology and leadership jobs? Damore’s memo claims to be making an evidence-based argument about men and women’s representation in fields like computer engineering, which makes it notable that he ignores literally hundreds of studies that link gender stereotypes and biases to girls' negative views of their own abilities in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) — stereotypes that it reinforces. The messaging that girls are not good at math and science has a powerful effect on them starting in middle school, research shows.
Global warming alters timing of floods in Europe: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Global warming is altering the timing of floods in Europe, making some rivers swell early and others later than usual, a phenomenon that impacts farming and daily life across the region, researchers said Thursday. "In the north-east of Europe, Sweden, Finland and the Baltic States, floods now tend to occur one month earlier than in the 1960s and 1970s," said lead author Guenter Bloeschl, a professor at the Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management at the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien). Winter floods along the Atlantic coast of western Europe tend to occur earlier, almost in the autumn, because maximum soil moisture levels are now reached earlier in the year.
Russian Launch Services Operator Eyes Lunar Mission in Early 2020s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Glavkosmos wants to hitch rides upon the powerful Soyuz rocket.
The Milky Way’s Supermassive Black Hole is Proving Einstein Correct
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As if he needs it.
When Was The Last Total Solar Eclipse in America?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It hasn't happened here for nearly 40 years.
Former FBI agent, daughter recall night of her husband's murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thomas Martens and his daughter Molly Martens Corbett were found guilty of second-degree murder in the death of her husband Jason Corbett.
Trump defends 'fire and fury' North Korea threat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump defended his threat to rain “fire and fury” on North Korea, as his team struggles to resolve the most serious crisis of his 200-day-old administration.
CNN fires pro
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“Nazi salutes are indefensible,” a CNN spokesperson said. “Jeffrey Lord is no longer with the network.”
St. Louis Cardinals ask for help in finding the rally cat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The St. Louis Cardinals are looking for their rally cat.
Behind North Korea's dash to the nuclear finish line, a cold war push
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Tensions arcing across the Pacific Ocean between North Korea and the United States have scaled fresh heights in recent days, with President Trump threatening “fire and fury like the world has never seen,” and Pyongyang responding by declaring its intent to prepare a missile assault on the waters around Guam. Precipitating the verbal showdown was North Korea’s latest apparent breakthrough in its nuclear weapons program, which was just the most recent in a string of rapid advances that appear to have taken experts and analysts by surprise. According to media reports Tuesday, the Defense Intelligence Agency has assessed that Pyongyang is now capable of sufficiently miniaturizing nuclear warheads so they can be affixed to intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs).
15 Strong Women Quotes by Women We Admire the Most
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
Poached Salmon and Watercress Salad with DillYogurt Dressing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Watch the video to learn how to make poached salmon and watercress salad.
What 100 Calories of Movie Theater Candy Looks Like
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It’s hot outside, and it’s blockbuster season. That means heading to the movie theater might be the perfect way to spend a summer afternoon. But if you think the cinematic experience isn’t comple...
Motorola's Moto Z2 Force has an unbreakable screen, but it isn't flawless
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Motorola's Moto Z2 Force has an unbreakable screen, but it's got its drawbacks.
How the iPhone 8 and iOS 11 could make you a better photographer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Apple's upcoming iPhone 8 and iOS 11 should take your iPhone photography to the next level with these new features.
The Cassini Spacecraft Will Conduct Its First Of Five Deep Dives Into Saturn's Atmosphere Early Monday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Cassini spacecraft is nearing the end of it's nearly 20 year mission, it will begin with a dive through Saturn's atmosphere Monday.
Archaeologists discover evidence of a vanished civilisation from 1300s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists may have discovered evidence of an ancient civilisation that disappeared from a corner of the southwestern US over seven centuries ago. The exodus of the Ancestral Puebloans has baffled scientists for years after they vanished without a trace from Colorado's Mesa Verde National Park in the 13th Century. Now scientists may have found the evidence to prove that theory by studying the genetic composition of ancient animal bones buried in the region.
Infant ape fossil skull illuminates humankind's remote past
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The lemon-sized fossil skull of an infant ape nicknamed Alesi that inhabited a Kenyan forest about 13 million years ago is offering a peek at what the long-ago common ancestor of people and all modern apes may have looked like. Scientists on Wednesday announced the discovery of the most complete extinct ape skull fossil ever found, allowing them to study such characteristics as its brain cavity, inner-ear structure and unerupted adult teeth beneath the roots of its baby teeth. The skull may answer a long-standing question about the origin of the lineage that led to people and modern apes such as chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans and gibbons, indicating their common ancestor evolved in Africa, not Eurasia, the scientists said.
What we can learn from the 2017 solar eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The eclipse will be one of the most digitally recorded events ever. Here's how to be part of it.
Chinese quantum satellite sends 'unbreakable' code
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China has sent an "unbreakable" code from a satellite to the Earth, marking the first time space-to-ground quantum key distribution technology has been realized, state media said on Thursday. China launched the world's first quantum satellite last August, to help establish "hack proof" communications, a development the Pentagon has called a "notable advance". The official Xinhua news agency said the latest experiment was published in the journal Nature on Thursday, where reviewers called it a "milestone".
Fossils Push Back Time of Human Arrival in Indonesia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fossil evidence forces major rethink of how and when humans arrived in Southeast Asia.
Science report: Who gets hotter, wetter with climate change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — A draft federal science report on the effects of global warming breaks down how climate change has already hit different regions of the United States. It also projects expected changes by region.
Crocodile rock: ancient beast named after Motörhead band's Lemmy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A ferocious sea-going crocodile that menaced coastal waters about 164 million years ago during the Jurassic Period has been given a name honoring the similarly ferocious heavy-metal rocker Lemmy, the late front man for the British band Motörhead. Scientists said on Wednesday they have named the 19-foot-long (5.8 meters) reptile Lemmysuchus, meaning "Lemmy's crocodile." Its fossils were unearthed near the eastern English city of Peterborough in 1909 and were recently re-examined and determined to be a distinct genus in need of a name. It boasted large, blunt teeth perfect for crushing turtle shells or other hard-bodied prey like hard-scaled fish, said University of Edinburgh paleontologist Michela Johnson, lead author of the study published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society.
Meet the new heavyweight champion of dinosaurs: Patagotitan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study describes the biggest dinosaur ever, a plant-eater that made T. Rex look like a munchkin
'Mitch, get back to work': Trump knocks McConnell again on health care
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president lashed out at the Senate majority leader for the second time in as many days, mocking the Kentucky Republican’s failure to pass new health care legislation.
Climate scientists continue to sound the alarm: Global warming fueled record temperatures in 2016
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The latest international climate report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirms that 2016 was third consecutive year of record global heat.
Rally Cat: Feline on field sets up Cardinals' grand slam
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The Cardinals have a friendly feline to thank for their rally against the Royals.
The lesson of the Google firing for innovation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Just days after Google fired an engineer for writing a memo that stereotypes women for traits that allegedly hinder innovation, Americans received a federal report about their pace of innovation reflected in the workplace. The United States must do better in boosting its inventiveness, efficiency, and investment in ideas. Here’s why: “If labor productivity grows an average of 2 percent per year, average living standards for our children’s generation will be twice what we experienced,” Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer said in a July speech.
Coming home again: What brings people back to a dying town?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The settling quiet of Main Street in small-town America – so few cars now, shops closed, not so many people – is like a seashell held to the ear: It sounds different to each one who listens. To a stranger coming to this central Indiana town, it is the silence of empty storefronts, of the stoplight blinking at the main crossroad with no traffic in sight, of a far-off lawn mower snarl echoing down empty avenues. To Sandy Ploss, it is a quiet that rings with the history of circuses that once filled this town with performers and trainers and riggers at their winter quarters – a history she helps preserve with the kids of Peru, who put on an annual Amateur Circus.
Famed horse fest spotlights Tibetan culture, with politics in the wings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The opening ceremony of the annual Tibetan horse festival here officially begins by lighting a bundle of mulberry branches at the north end of the stadium, which sits in a treeless valley ringed by rolling hills. As the fire begins to smolder, 20 People’s Liberation Army soldiers march onto the field in tight formation.
Why Poland's crisis may come down to a president and a puppet master
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The Chairman’s Ear,” a popular online satirical video series in Poland about the country's ruling party, leaves little doubt over who wields the power in Polish political life. Episode after episode, he eagerly waits to get into the chairman's office to speak with the true kingmaker in Polish politics. The chairman is an obvious stand-in for the leader of the ruling, ultraconservative Law & Justice (PiS) party, Jaroslaw Kaczynski.
What Does Namaste Really Mean?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Many yoga classes end with everyone saying "namaste" to each other. Find out what this phrase really means and how it has been used to spread inner peace throughout history.
Moon to spoil meteor show: astronomers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bright Moon will outshine the annual Perseids meteor shower, which will peak Saturday with only a fifth the usual number of shooting stars visible to Earthlings, astronomers say. The Moon will be more than half-full, in a so-called gibbous phase, which means its light will spoil stargazers' view in a similar way to that of urban light pollution. "To be honest, it's not a good year" for the Perseids, said Robert Massey, acting executive director of the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) in London.
Chinese quantum satellite sends 'unbreakable' code
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China has sent an "unbreakable" code from a satellite to the Earth, marking the first time space-to-ground quantum key distribution technology has been realized, state media said on Thursday. China launched the world's first quantum satellite last August, to help establish "hack proof" communications, a development the Pentagon has called a "notable advance". The official Xinhua news agency said the latest experiment was published in the journal Nature on Thursday, where reviewers called it a "milestone".
Air Quality Has More To Do With Climate Change Than We May Have Thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Poor air quality might actually keep parts of the Earth from warming due to aerosol levels.
Biggest dinosaur ever found gets a suitably epic name
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers announced the fitting formal name for a honking huge titanosaur that dwarfs the T. rex.
Yellowstone Supervolcano: Map Shows Ground Deformation Around Caldera Over Last Two Years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A map showing how the ground around the Yellowstone supervolcano has deformed over the last two years has been released by the U.S. Geological Survey. In this time, the ground around the Norris Geyser Basin rose by just under 3 inches, while there was a downdropping of the earth within the Yellowstone caldera. “The uplift and subsidence is usually interpreted as due to addition or withdrawal of deep magma and related gases and water at depths five to 15 km [3 to 9 miles] beneath the ground surface,” the USGS said.
Trump knocks McConnell again on health care: 'Couldn't get it done'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president lashed out at the Senate majority leader for the second time in as many days, mocking the Kentucky Republican’s failure to pass new health care legislation.
Trump shares dubious Twitter poll saying he's better than Obama
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump has shared a dubious Twitter poll that rates him “a better president” than Barack Obama. Mainstream polls have given Trump low ratings.
It's not delivery. It's DiGiorno Pizza ... spilled on I
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas highway officials shut down westbound lanes of a cross-country interstate for four hours so crews could pick up pizza.
Channing Tatum dances with cashier at gas station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
STATESVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Channing Tatum has hosted an impromptu dance party in a convenience store at a North Carolina gas station.
Why I Stopped Waiting for a Partner & Started Traveling the World
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
No better time than now.
What Are Skin Tags?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Skin Tags can be alarming when first noticed, so learn everything you need to know about this skin condition and what causes them to appear.
What Is Brain Freeze?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
What exactly is brain freeze and how can you prevent it from ruining your ice cream snack time?
World's first hack using DNA? Malware in genetic code could wreck police CSI work
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists say they've encoded DNA to hack a computer for the first time.
Why Are These Water Buffaloes Covered with Tiny Frogs?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Water buffaloes wallowing in the wetlands of northern Turkey are carrying some unlikely passengers on their backs — tiny frogs. Researchers spotted the buffalo-riding amphibians — marsh frogs Pelophylax ridibundus — in the Kizilirmak Delta along the coast of the Black Sea, a region with freshwater and brackish lakes, and plentiful marsh vegetation alongside farmlands and pastures. From April to November, domesticated Anatolian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) are released from their pastures to roam the marshes.