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Sheriff: 2 briefly escape Oklahoma jail to visit girlfriends
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HUGO, Okla. (AP) — An Oklahoma sheriff says two inmates briefly escaped to visit their girlfriends and smoke marijuana and then walked back to the jail.
Teacher who works at supermarket to vie for US bagging prize
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire woman is heading to Las Vegas to compete for the title of America's fastest grocery bagger.
Surfing Robots Are Now Patrolling the Great Barrier Reef
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Robots can do many things, including surfing. Computer World Australia reports that the Wave Glider, as the machine is called, just finished a week-long, 200-mile journey to check on the reef and report back to the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS).The Great Barrier Reef’s enormous size makes it difficult for scientists to collect important data.  
People on Social Security Will See Their Checks Go Up in 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's the largest increase since 2012
Is this the sound of US diplomats under 'sonic attack' in Cuba?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Listen carefully and you can make out slight undulations in a high-pitched whine, like the output of of a swarm of electronic crickets, perhaps. Believe it or not this is the sound that some American officials believe is to blame for the mysterious illness striking down US diplomats stationed in Cuba. These alien noises were reported by some embassy staff before they were taken ill with a variety of symptoms, from hearing loss to concussions, leading investigators to suspect that some kind of sonic weapon was being used. The Associated Press obtained the recording, which is one of several to have been sent for analysis to the US Navy and intelligence agencies. However, officials say they are no closer to understanding who or what is behind the illnesses. The US embassy in Havana Credit: AFP So far 22 Americans have been diagnosed with related symptoms of tinnitus, dizziness and headaches, according to the State Department, which says the cases were first spotted at the end of last year with the latest occurring as recently as August. Acoustic experts are skeptical that a sonic weapon could cause the problems. The AP used a spectrum analyser to examine the sound’s frequency and amplitude, and found a range of different pitches contained in the noise which lasted for seven to 12 seconds at a time, before pausing and then resuming. On a graph, the Havana sound forms a series of "peaks" that jump up from a baseline, like spikes or fingers on a hand. "What it is telling us is the sound is located between about 7,000 kHz and 8,000 kHz. There are about 20 peaks, and they seem to be equally spaced. All these peaks correspond to a different frequency," said Kausik Sarkar, an acoustics expert and engineering professor at The George Washington University who reviewed the recording with the AP. The US has stopped short of accusing Cuba of carrying out the attacks but has said that the host government has fallen short of its obligations to protect visiting diplomats. Last week Washington expelled 15 Cuban diplomats after earlier withdrawing staff from Havana as relations plunged to the lowest point since being reinstated less than three years ago.    
'We Always Rise.' California Winemakers Are Determined to Rebuild After Fires
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It's not what you expect during harvest - to be on the run"
Ancient Egyptian Pyramidion Found Next to Largest Obelisk Hints at Existence of Queen’s Lost Chamber
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The discovery of a 4,000-year-old pyramidion found near the excavation of the largest Old Kingdom obelisk fragment may be the first evidence of the existence of satellite pyramids for Queen Ankhnespepy II, the most important Egyptian queen of the sixth dynasty. The pyramidion itself is a striking archaeological find, but its location is even more intriguing. The pyramidion was found very close to where French-Swiss archaeologists, led by Philippe Collombert of the University of Geneva, recently uncovered a 4,300-year-old obelisk last week.
North Korea May Have Damaged Its Nuclear Testing Site, Experts Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A small quake was detected early on Friday near North Korea's nuclear test site, the latest shock since the Sept 3 test.
Donald Trump: We Will Deny Iran All Paths to a Nuclear Weapon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump says the administration will seek to counter Iran's destabilizing activities and will impose additional sanctions
Las Vegas sheriff, in emotional press conference, admits he's still searching for answers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In the nearly two weeks since Stephen Paddock rained gunfire on concertgoers in Las Vegas, Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo has become the face of the ongoing investigation.
Breaking mad: 'Breaking Bad' house gets fence to block fans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The real Albuquerque house made famous by the methamphetamine-making character Walter White in the AMC-TV hit series "Breaking Bad" is getting a fence.
Trump's move on Iran deal? At its core, a compromise with his cabinet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Under President Abraham Lincoln, it meant bringing former political foes from his own party into the cabinet. Under President Franklin Roosevelt, it meant forming a diverse, bipartisan cabinet that would present conflicting points of view, allowing the president to draw his own informed conclusions on policy. For President Trump, it has meant – at least on international relations – cabinet and other top advisers at odds with the boss, pitting a more stay-the-course foreign policy against some of the president’s more dramatic, and often nationalist, impulses.
Maine's Susan Collins: Duty, bipartisan outlook drove decision to stay in Senate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Republicans and Democrats – to give her a standing ovation, including a sharp whistle of approval. For many, Senator Collins is a voice of reason and civility in today’s highly charged political atmosphere. Indeed, she’s been ranked the most bipartisan member of the Senate four-years running.
This Family Got Kicked Off a Southwest Flight. Then the Father Was Arrested
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"A one year old's not allowed to walk five seats down the aisle by herself? That's a problem?"
U.S. to Withdraw From UNESCO Amid Divisions Over Palestinian Membership
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Washington sees some of the organization's resolutions as anti-Israel
There’s a giant egg floating in our solar system with a ring around it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some of the most exciting new discoveries in space come from far, far away, thanks to telescopes capable of detecting exoplanets that are so distant we'd likely never be able to actually visit them, but that doesn't mean there isn't still some pretty interesting stuff here in our own Solar System. Take, for example, the dwarf planet Haumea, a large egg-shaped body that hangs out beyond Neptune in the far reaches of our little planetary neighborhood, which researchers just discovered also happens to have a ring around it. Man, space is weird. The research, which was published in the journal Nature, reveals that the oddly-shaped object is a real oddity, even among dwarf planets. Haumea's oblong shape isn't the only weird thing about it, as it also has an extremely fast rotational speed, leading to a full revolution once every 3.9 hours. Haumea is one of only five officially recognized dwarf planets, with the others being Ceres, Eris, Makemake, and of course the onetime planet Pluto. Along with its egg shape and rapid rotation, it sets itself apart thanks to its pair of moons and of course it's newly-discovered debris ring. Rings around planets like Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are well-studied and, for the most part, understood. But a dwarf planet boasting a ring of its own is definitely pretty weird, if only because it's the first with a confirmed ring. Interestingly, the many oddities that make Haumea such a strange dwarf planet might be related. Past research suggested that the dwarf planet experienced a collision with another object in the Kuiper Belt — the thick circle of debris that lies past Neptune — and it's entirely possible that the impact not only caused the dwarf to spin wildly, sending debris into its orbit. That debris could have been the material that eventually formed its moons, with the rest of the dust falling into orbit and creating its ring.
Chinese space station set to crash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Launched in 2011, the 8.5-ton Tiangong-1 space laboratory had originally been a symbol of Beijing's ambitious scientific bid to become a space superpower.
FBI document cache sheds light on inner workings of Russia’s U.S. news (and propaganda) network
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Yahoo News has obtained thousands of emails and documents from the Russian news agency Sputnik. The FBI is scrutinizing the documents in its investigation into whether the company is actually an agent of the Russian government.
Trump calls for changing, or killing, Iran nuclear deal. What’s next?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump threatened Friday to walk away from the Iran nuclear deal unless Congress and America’s partners in the agreement agree to a package of changes to ramp up pressure on the Islamic republic. Here's what could happen next.
Democrats scramble to prop up Obamacare amid Trump 'sabotage'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As the Trump administration takes blow after blow at the Affordable Care Act, congressional Democrats are planning to take steps on their own to try to prevent or delay the demise of individual marketplaces where 12 million Americans buy insurance.
Mike Diamond rescues fiancee's trashed engagement ring
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) — A New York City woman who accidentally threw her 3-carat diamond engagement ring in the trash has been reunited with it, thanks in large part to her soon-to-be-husband — Mike Diamond.
The high way to heaven? Man who hid drugs in Bible gets jail
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NORWALK, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut man who was caught hiding heroin in a Bible while on parole will spend another six months in jail.
Drugs in prayer card with Jesus' image mailed to inmate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CONCORD, Mass. (AP) — Prison officials in Massachusetts say someone tried to send drugs to an inmate by mailing a laminated prayer card that contained wafer-thin strips of a prescription narcotic.
The big hope behind the Iranian nuclear pact
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In what Tehran’s leaders might call an act of heroic flexibility, President Trump has decided not to blow up a 2015 deal – as he once promised – that has so far curbed Iran’s nuclear program. Mr. Trump now seems persuaded of the strategic reasons to honor the international pact. Under the pact, Iran can resume processing uranium in 2031.
Sinister 'Secrets' of Easter Island’s Doomed Civilization Begin to Unravel With Rapa Nui Genetic Discovery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.
The College of New Jersey celebrates new STEM complex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The College of New Jersey is celebrating its new STEM complex focusing on science, technology, engineering and math.
President Trump's Interior Secretary Makes His Staff Raise a Special Flag When He's Around
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The flag ritual comes comes from military history
New York Police Are Investigating Sexual Assault Claims Against Harvey Weinstein
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Investigators are reviewing "any additional complaints" relating to Weinstein
President Trump Plans a Friday Speech Slamming Iran
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But he'll stop short of calling for new sanctions
Flying Dutch win world solar car race in Australia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dutch team "Nuon" Thursday won an epic 3,000-kilometre (1,860-mile) solar car race across Australia's outback for the third-straight year, continuing its dominance of an innovative contest showcasing new vehicle technology. The World Solar Challenge, first run in 1987 and last held in 2015, began in the northern city of Darwin on Sunday morning, with 41 competing cars heading to the final destination of Adelaide in South Australia. "Welcome to #Adelaide @NuonSolarTeam, winner of the @bridgestone #BWSC17 Schneider Electric Challenger Class," race organisers tweeted.
Donald Trump threatens to take aid from Puerto Rico and, seriously, WTF
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
UPDATED ( 1:50 p.m. ET) to include comments from San Juan mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz. Just when you think Donald Trump could not make more plain how much he doesn't care about Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, which hit 3 weeks ago, he threatened to pull aid from the island territory in a Thursday morning tweet spasm. SEE ALSO: The 5 most inappropriate things Donald Trump said at a Puerto Rico disaster briefing In a trio of tweets, Trump implied there's a limit to how much he's willing to spend on aid for the U.S. territory while taking an opportunity to still lob a couple of insults at the island because, I don't know, that's what leaders do, I guess? "Puerto Rico survived the Hurricanes, now a financial crisis looms largely of their own making." says Sharyl Attkisson. A total lack of..... — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 12, 2017 ...accountability say the Governor. Electric and all infrastructure was disaster before hurricanes. Congress to decide how much to spend.... — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 12, 2017 ...We cannot keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders, who have been amazing (under the most difficult circumstances) in P.R. forever! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 12, 2017 The idea of an American president limiting the amount of aid to a U.S. territory and then turning his back to say, "You're on your own," is, like so much of this Trump presidency, unfathomable. Like thinking that throwing paper towels at a crowd of hurricane victims is good relief. And, yet, here we are.  The attack comes as Congress weighs a White House request for an additional $5 billion in loans for Puerto Rico, to address the island's liquidity crisis. It seems Trump sees a finite limit to what he's willing to spend, another sign that perhaps Trump doesn't understand Puerto Ricans are American citizens. In late August, FEMA director Brock Long told CNN that the agency would be in Texas "for years" to help the area recover from Hurricane Harvey.  It seems Puerto Rico will not get the same courtesy, even though a humanitarian crisis continues to spiral. More than 80 percent of the island is still without power and food and water remains scarce. Reminder: 84% of Puerto Rico is still without power.1/3 still do not have access to clean drinking water. https://t.co/dbcxhmZsgL — Kyle Griffin (@kylegriffin1) October 12, 2017 The situation is so dire, the U.S. felt compelled to issue a warning to Puerto Ricans telling them not to drink water from "industrial waste sites" after reports that some residents were doing so in the face of severe water shortages. EPA says people are drinking water from toxic waste sites, 1 million+ still don’t have clean water.You want to pull out? No. Unacceptable. https://t.co/kdrinY4Ky3 — Rep. Don Beyer (@RepDonBeyer) October 12, 2017 And the crisis is particularly particularly bad in regards to health care for the week and infirm as food, necessary medications, and proper care are wholly unavailable. America. (via NYT) pic.twitter.com/57MKlSxG7n — Alec MacGillis (@AlecMacGillis) October 11, 2017 Even more galling: The president's threat comes weeks after his promise to stay in Texas and Louisiana as long as it takes to help them recover from Harvey.  Texas & Louisiana: We are w/ you today, we are w/ you tomorrow, & we will be w/ you EVERY SINGLE DAY AFTER, to restore, recover, & REBUILD! pic.twitter.com/YQb82K2VSB — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 30, 2017 As the president's ridonkulous tweets reverberated around the country, the reaction was swift and critical, starting with Sen. Chuck Schumer. FEMA needs to stay until the job is done and right now, it's not even close to done. — Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer) October 12, 2017 Why do you continue to treat Puerto Ricans differently than other Americans when it comes to natural disasters? — Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer) October 12, 2017 But perhaps most notable was the Mayor of San Juan Carmen Yulín Cruz, who has been previously critical of the federal response to Hurricane Mari San Juan Mayor @CarmenYulinCruz responds to @realdonaldtrump tweets, with: “HELP US. WITHOUT ROBUST and CONSISTENT HELP WE WILL DIE” pic.twitter.com/SHBnJw3QsN — David Begnaud (@DavidBegnaud) October 12, 2017 In a letter posted online following Trump's tweets on Thursday, Cruz said, "Your tweets and comments just show desperation and underscore the inadequacy of your government's response to this humanitarian crisis. It is not that you do not get it, it is that you are incapable of empathy and frankly simply cannot get the job done." Others weighed in, as well, to criticize Trump's comments. Trump on Afghanistan: Our enemies must never believe they can wait us out.Trump on Puerto Rico: We can't do this forever!#AmericaFirst https://t.co/nDjgEfyTqA — Keith Boykin (@keithboykin) October 12, 2017 President #Trump going in on #PuertoRico's economy, leadership, and infrastructure as the island continues to recover from #hurricanemaria https://t.co/gCOfxWV111 — Chris Stewart (@CStewartWPTV) October 12, 2017 Trump is actually mad at Puerto Rico for how much it’s suffering after the hurricane... because it makes him look bad. — John SCAREavosis (@aravosis) October 12, 2017 It is almost as if Trump thinks Puerto Rico deserves this — Dani Bostick (@danibostick) October 12, 2017 So as Puerto Ricans sit, dying in the dark, Trump continues to tweet his dismay about having to deal with the island at all, as well as things like NFL anthem protests and insults about Bob Corker's height. It's not exactly Nero fiddling while Rome burned, but it's not very far off, either. WATCH: Pitbull sends his private jet to Puerto Rico cancer patients
Democrats condemn Trump's 'spiteful act' of ending Obamacare payments
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer accused President Trump of punishing the American people for his own inability to improve the U.S. health care system.
Friday the 13th: Flight 666 makes it safely to HEL
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — The Helsinki airport says Flight 666 has arrived safety in HEL — the airport code for the Finnish capital — for the last time.
Swiss Alpine Pass Yields 4,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pieces of a 4,000-year-old bow, arrows and a wooden food container that belonged to a Bronze Age mountaineer have been found in a high alpine pass in Switzerland. The artifacts are among several items found in what appears to have been a rock shelter beside a glacier near the top of the nearly 8,800-foot (2,700 meters) Lötschberg Pass, or Lötschenpass, in the Bernese Alps. The bow and arrows, food box and other items are thought to have belonged to Bronze Age hunters or animal herders who took shelter beneath a large rock near the top of the pass around 4,000 years ago, said Regula Gubler, an archaeologist for the Canton of Bern government, which announced the finds this week.
President Trump's Awkward Comment on Puerto Rico
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Morning Must Reads: October 12
You can now pay £800 to have your ashes scattered in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Forget having your ashes thrown off a cliff or made into a ring
EPA warns Puerto Ricans to stop drinking from Superfund sites (but everything's fine!)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's been three weeks since Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, and conditions are deteriorating due to a pervasive lack of access to food, water, and electricity. The governor of the territory has reported several deaths from leptospirosis, a treatable bacterial illness contracted from consuming contaminated water.  Despite the presence of 19,000 U.S. personnel responding to the disaster in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, many cities outside San Juan remain cut off from the rest of the island, with no access to basic services.  On Wednesday, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), quietly issued a startling warning that indicates the seriousness of the situation.  In other words, some in Puerto Rico have little recourse left than to seek out water supplies at wells located on the island's Superfund sites. Such locations are heavily polluted industrial areas, often contaminated with cancer-causing chemicals such at PCBs or DDT.  ...We cannot keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders, who have been amazing (under the most difficult circumstances) in P.R. forever! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 12, 2017 According to FEMA's website, at least 36 percent of Puerto Ricans still lack access to drinking water. That means more than a million people are resorting to obtaining water any way they can, including from contaminated creeks, sewers, and Superfund sites.  A staggering 90 percent of island residents still have no electricity, either. The same press statement did tout the fact that the EPA has taken the time to collaborate with FEMA and the Defense Department "on a video documenting our drinking water assessment teams’ work." At least we've accomplished that. President Trump added to Puerto Rico's woes on Thursday by threatening to withdraw U.S. assistance. In a series of tweets the president said, "We cannot keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders, who have been amazing (under the most difficult circumstances) in P.R. forever!"  In reality, recovering from the damage that the Category 4 hurricane wrought will take a long, sustained effort from federal, state, and local governments, and the trajectory we're on right now is not good.  WATCH: Pitbull sends his private jet to Puerto Rico cancer patients
Another El Nino problem: More carbon dioxide in air
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new NASA satellite details how the whopper of an El Nino a couple years ago added more heat-trapping carbon dioxide to the air
Democrats rip Trump’s ‘spiteful act’ of ending Obamacare payments
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer accused President Trump of punishing the American people for his own inability to improve the U.S. healthcare system.
Man cited for painting over mural designed by children
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LONDONDERRY, Vt. (AP) — A Vermont man has been cited for unlawful mischief after he painted over a public mural designed by students in the town of Londonderry.
German man in hot water for running taps non
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BERLIN (AP) — A man in the northern German city of Salzgitter is in hot water after police allege that he left his bath and sink faucets running for at least a year, causing "massive damage" to his apartment building.
Crowd scrambles as man tosses cash into the air (on purpose)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NORTHAMPTON, Mass. (AP) — Some people are a few dollars richer thanks to a Massachusetts carpenter who intentionally tossed cash from his paycheck into the wind.
Deer lassoed, rescued from Pittsburgh reservoir
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PITTSBURGH (AP) — A paramedic and an animal control officer have rescued a deer that had waded into a Pittsburgh reservoir.
Wall Street is making the same mistake about investing in space as it did with self
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Space: the final investment opportunity. It sounds like science fiction, but Morgan Stanley is...
North Korea Says It Will 'Settle the Final Score' Against President Trump With a 'Hail of Fire'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korea's foreign minister reportedly said President Trump "lit the wick of war"
The Mediterranean’s Megacycle of ‘Tsunamis’ and Storms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As frightening as they are, real tsunamis do much less damage than storms—and they may be less common than scientists realized.
NASA Has A Better Idea How Humans, Weather Shift The Carbon Cycle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A natural cycle helps regulate the carbon in our atmosphere, but humans are knocking it off balance with emissions, according to NASA.
The wildfires have made air quality in San Francisco scary bad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As California's wine country burns, the surrounding area in the San Francisco Bay Area is filling with smoke.  Even 60 miles south of the deadly fires, San Francisco and nearby cities are dealing with terrible air quality. The polluted air is more than noticeable with the hazy views, orange-filtered sunlight, and a gauzy layer of opaque air hovering on the horizon. A slight burnt smell lingers.  SEE ALSO: The science behind the fast-moving wildfires that are devastating California This situation is one of the worst the region has seen with weather experts noting air quality has never reached these levels. Wow. Thanks to the wildfires, yesterday was the worst air quality ever measured in the Bay Area (PM2.5 monitoring began recently, in 2009). https://t.co/ajglBb5Cvt — Eric Holthaus (@EricHolthaus) October 11, 2017 A rare hazardous level warning even went out. And the polluted air is expected to persist for days. The fires started Sunday. 1:11 pm #GOES16 ️imagery shows smoke from the #NorthBayFires continuing to impact the San Francisco Bay Area. Visibility at many #BayArea airports are less than 6 miles. #CAwx pic.twitter.com/QUVX8CxEZ6 — NWS Bay Area (@NWSBayArea) October 11, 2017 On Wednesday afternoon, the Environmental Protection Agency index bumped up the San Francisco area to an orange level, meaning it's considered unhealthy to sensitive groups like children, the elderly, and those with respiratory conditions such as asthma, COPD, emphysema, and heart disease. As of 6 p.m. PT, the city was put in the yellow, or "moderate," zone. Closer to the fire epicenters, air quality reached hazardous levels — a rare occurrence. Image: airnow/epaWith elevated levels of fine particulate matter in the entire region, everyone in the area needs to be careful about spending time outdoors, especially exercising.  Smoke covers the Bay Area and NorCal with a rare hazardous level rating for PM 2.5/smoke in Napa/Solano counties at 10am. #CAwx #wildfires pic.twitter.com/eOxO4YrSAS — Rob Mayeda (@RobMayeda) October 11, 2017 The Bay Area Air Quality Management District issued a health advisory Tuesday and is keeping it in effect through the weekend. It's recommending that those sensitive groups be the most cautious. For those closer to the flames, residents are advised to stay inside and find filtered air. In more extreme cases, people are advised to leave the area altogether. If people stick around, the air district advised putting on an N95 mask to filter out fine particles in the air.  People sported their mask looks online. The forecast for the next week is mild and warm, dry, and not very windy. Not helpful for quelling the multiple wildfires. Commute - be sure to get a N95 certified resistor mask to handle PM2.5 particulates. Hope the wind is favorable for fighting #northbayfires pic.twitter.com/mgfnObiwqL — Nick Wade (@wadenick) October 10, 2017 Neighborhood postman wears a mask to deliver mail because of all the smoke #NorthBayFires #NorCalFires pic.twitter.com/zbetozOvYw — Veronica De La Cruz (@VeronicaDLCruz) October 11, 2017 Air quality officials are warning everyone in the region to think about the air they are breathing. School districts made plans to hold indoor recesses, PE classes, and sports practices. If you are experiencing smoky conditions in your area, here are some recommendations:- Stay indoors- Avoid outdoor activities and any strenuous exercises- Keep doors and windows closed- Run air conditioners on recycled air so that smoke is not drawn in — NWS Bay Area (@NWSBayArea) October 11, 2017 The fires have been horrific, killing people and destroying homes, neighborhoods, businesses, farms, and vineyards. WATCH: A police officer recorded this dash footage as he drove through the California wildfire
Why the Fight With North Korea Is Really About China
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"China’s strategic goal is to frustrate the U.S."
Laying on hands: When Trump needs support, he calls on pastors, and they call on him
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump has been eager to harness the powerful emotional energy of evangelical Christianity on his own behalf, especially at low points in his presidency. But is he really a believer?