World News
IN SHORT
Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
No more water stains – we found a new way to control evaporation using maths
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Microscopically engineering surfaces could stop water leaving behind rings of residue as it dries.
Satellite Images Show a Research Center in Syria Before and After Airstrikes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three sites were targeted by a launch of more than 100 missiles
Elon Musk's new plan involves a rocket and a party balloon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Guess what: Elon Musk has a new crazy idea.  This time, thankfully, it doesn't have to do anything with boring tunnels. The SpaceX CEO now wants to "bring rocket upper stage back from orbital velocity using a giant party balloon". SEE ALSO: SpaceX gains approval for largest satellite internet service, ever Musk said this in a tweet late Sunday, and if it came from anyone else, we'd disregard it — heck, even Musk himself said that the idea sounds "crazy". But Musk has a track record of following through and delivering on seemingly insane ideas, sometimes even turning them into successful business endeavours.  SpaceX will try to bring rocket upper stage back from orbital velocity using a giant party balloon — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 15, 2018 Still we have lots of questions. What happens to a party balloon in the vacuum of space? How does it withstand the forces that happen during atmospheric re-entry? Can the balloon be shaped like an animal? Is this going to be the reverse of the balloon scene in Pixar's Up? Well, Musk has answers, but not answers we can understand.  Yeah, but great for creating a giant object that retains its shape across all Mach regimes & drops ballistic coefficient by 2 orders of magnitude — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 15, 2018 We already do targeted retro burn to a specific point in Pacific w no islands or ships, so upper stage doesn’t become a dead satellite. Need to retarget closer to shore & position catcher ship like Mr Steven. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 16, 2018 After all this, we're still not sure whether this is going to work or even whether it can work — though something similar has been tried before.  In any case, if Musk and SpaceX do follow through with this plan, we're certain it will be glorious to watch. Also, can the balloon be red? Thanks.  WATCH: Man carried off into the clouds in 'UP'-style stunt
Space War Is "Absolutely Inevitable," Researchers Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The technology is there, but regulation isn't.
Painkillers in pregnancy may affect babies' future fertility
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Edinburgh University found the drugs may also affect the fertility of future generations, by leaving marks on DNA.
The way you see colour depends on what language you speak
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
How our life experiences change the way we perceive colours.
The Thai Government Suggested 'Sexy' Clothes Lead to Harassment. The Country's Women Disagree
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The hashtag campaign has generated more of a buzz in Thailand than #MeToo did
Boy unearths legendary Danish king's trove in Germany
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A 13-year-old boy and an amateur archaeologist have unearthed a "significant" treasure trove in Germany which may have belonged to the legendary Danish king Harald Bluetooth who brought Christianity to Denmark. Rene Schoen and his student Luca Malaschnitschenko were looking for treasure using metal detectors in January on northern Ruegen island when they chanced upon what they initially thought was a worthless piece of aluminium. A dig covering 400 square metres (4,300 square feet) that finally started over the weekend by the regional archaeology service has since uncovered a trove believed linked to the Danish king who reigned from around 958 to 986.
Starbucks CEO Wants to Apologize Personally to Black Men Arrested in Philadelphia Store
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kevin Johnson called the situation 'disheartening' and 'reprehensible'
Minnesota firehouse opens doors during blizzard for prom
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FOREST LAKE, Minn. (AP) — Firefighters came to the rescue for a group of Minnesota high school students when a blizzard struck during their prom.
Carrie Underwood Delivers an Emotional First Performance Since Her Face Injury
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She's been offstage since a fall late last year
President Trump Lashes Out Again at 'Slimeball' James Comey on Twitter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump's tweets come ahead of Comey's ABC interview
Why Comey wants America to vote Trump out of office
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former F.B.I. director James Comey revealed Sunday night that he was advised by his chief counsel that President Trump could wind up a target of the bureau’s investigation into suspected links between Trump campaign operatives and the Kremlin.
Louis Moinet’s Skylink Contains Fragments from the Apollo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The new timepiece celebrates a groundbreaking historical event by preserving it in a time capsule.
Darren Aronofsky Promises ‘One Strange Rock’ Will Blow Your Mind – The Contenders Emmys
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Darren Aronofsky signed on to the docuseries One Strange Rock to give viewers a glimpse of planet Earth like they've never seen before. The ten-part National Geographic series, which is produced by Aronofsky and hosted by Will Smith, tells the story of Earth and explores the fragility of Earth and explores how everyone on the planet has something in common, with the help of astronauts who have traveled to outer space. "I've always loved these kinds of portraits of our…
‘Lost in Space': Would Will Robinson’s Magnesium Idea Really Work to Melt Ice?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Netflix’s reimagining of the classic 1960s sci-fi TV show “Lost in Space” sees the Robinson family marooned on a distant alien planet and encountering all kinds of dangerous hazards. In the first episode, the Robinsons confront one such life-threatening space problem when they crash-land on an alien planet and their ship, the Jupiter 2, melts its way into a glacier. Judy (Taylor Russell) dives in, hoping to retrieve a battery from the crash, but it’s so cold that the water quickly freezes, and Judy is trapped in the ice in her space suit.
'I Am Still Old and Still in Love.' Barbara Bush Gave Light
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She also said: "I’m not sure God will recognize me; I have so many new body parts!"
Bon Jovi, Simone, Dire Straits to Be Inducted Into Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bon Jovi, the Cars, Nina Simone, and others make up the 2018 class
There’s only so much time left to look for life on Mars before life arrives from Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
STANFORD, Calif. — NASA has been looking for life on Mars for more than 40 years, but the quest could get a lot more complicated when earthly life arrives en masse, perhaps within the next decade. “There is a ticking clock now,” Princeton astrobiologist Chris Chyba said at last week’s Breakthrough Discuss conference, conducted at Stanford University. The issue has the potential to pit scientists like Chyba against rocketeers like SpaceX billionaire Elon Musk, who wants to start sending settlers to Mars by the mid-2020s. When humans and all the supplies they need start arriving by the tons, there’s a risk… Read More
Rampage Takes Box Office No. 1 Spot from A Quiet Place
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Eestimates said it grossed $34.5 million in its first weekend
Binary Stars in 'Lost In Space' Ending Could Be a Real Place In Our Galaxy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Robinsons maybe ended up somewhere real.
Prominent Gay Rights Lawyer and Environmental Advocate Burns Himself to Death in Ecology Protest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He immolated himself in a protest against ecological destruction
NASA spacecraft aims to put mystery planets on galactic map
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's newest spacecraft is about to embark on a two-year quest to find and identify mystery worlds thought to be lurking in our cosmic backyard
No, Kanye West Doesn't Like 'Normal TV.' Here's What He Will Watch.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Real recognize real
Look Up At The Sky Day: 5 Celestial Wonders to See in April
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The sky is about to be lit with fireballs.
The girls who took over a town in rural India
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Girl power is blooming across India. Clubs intended to boost adolescent girls’ sense of worth are sprouting in remote villages. In Thennamadevi, a village sheltered by banana trees and nestled amid rice paddies and sugar cane fields in India’s southern Tamil Nadu state, girls have moved beyond discussions of the challenges they face in India.
Japan 'rare earth' haul sparks hopes of cutting China reliance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The discovery of potentially millions of tons of valuable "rare earth" elements in sea sludge off Japan has raised hopes that Asia's number-two economy can reduce its dependence on Chinese supply. A Japanese study published last week revealed an estimated 16 million tons of rare earths, enough to feed global demand on a "semi-infinite" basis, with deposits to last hundreds of years. The news made headlines internationally and in Japan, which is the world's second-largest consumer of these minerals but relies heavily on imports from China, which controls 90 percent of the highly strategic market.
Hawaii board delays decision on location for giant telescope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
HONOLULU (AP) — A key decision on whether to place a $1.4 billion telescope in Hawaii to further astronomy research has been delayed, leaving open the possibility the project may be moved to Spain, a panel said Friday.
Chernobyl in Pictures: Signs of Life After Nuclear Devastation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More than 30 years after the world’s worst nuclear accident, the area around Chernobyl has evolved from a disaster zone into a nature reserve, teeming with bison, moose and wolves. The remarkable turnaround in the area, which was declared a permanent no-go zone for people after the accident in 1986, suggests radiation contamination is not hindering wildlife from breeding and thriving, but underscores the negative impact humans have on populations of wild mammals. “When humans are removed, nature flourishes—even in the wake of the world’s worst nuclear accident,” Jim Smith, a specialist in earth and environmental sciences at Britain’s University of Portsmouth, told Reuters.
NASA's new planet hunter explores universe, searches for 'signatures of life'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, will scan the universe to find exoplanets and whether there is life on any of those planets.
'I hardly even knew this guy': Trump lashes out at Comey in Sunday morning tweetstorm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Excerpts from former FBI Director James Comey’s upcoming memoir, and from an interview Comey gave to ABC News, set off a Sunday-morning tweetstorm of accusations, corrections and annotations from President Trump, including the bizarre assertion that “I hardly even knew this guy.”
Elon Musk's SpaceX Could Soon Be Worth $25 Billion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk's SpaceX Could Soon Be Worth $25 Billion
Diamond & Silk on the Facebook censorship fallout
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Social media stars sound off about being deemed 'unsafe.'
Spaceplane which will take tourists into orbit at five times speed of sound could fly by 2025
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It takes off direct from a runway and blasts into space
With Bravado, the Syrian Government Responds to U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“Morning of steadfastness”
Founder of Kenya's iconic 'elephant orphanage' dies aged 83
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dame Daphne Sheldrick, a conservationist famous for her work rearing baby elephants in Kenya and fighting for the protection of the species, has died aged 83, her family said Friday. "Daphne passed away the evening of the 12th April after a long battle with breast cancer, a battle she finally lost," her daughter Angela wrote in a statement. Sheldrick was born in Kenya in 1934, and spent nearly 30 years working with her husband David who founded Kenya's biggest National Park, Tsavo East.
Here Comes the Connected Cow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
IDA uses a motion-sensing device attached to a cow's neck to transmit its movements to a program driven by AI.
NATO Allies Back U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"But since this was blocked by Russia, there was no other alternative."
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Just Announced Alexi Lubomirski Will Photograph Their Royal Wedding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You've probably seen his work before
Enceladus: How We Might Detect Alien Life on Saturn's Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Enceladus,Saturn’s sixth largest moon, is increasingly being recognized by scientists as the most promising place in the Solar System to search for life. Furthermore, the presence of hydrothermal activity and organic materials may provide the warmth and materials needed for organisms, as we understand them, to evolve. Carolyn Porco, one of the world’s foremost planetary scientists, is among those who thinks Enceladus should be our top priority in the search for extraterrestrial life.
NASA Hopes to Have Boeing Delivering Astronauts to the Space Station Sooner Than Planned
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A planned test flight might instead carry an astronaut to the International Space Station, a sign of both NASA's hurry and Boeing's emergence as the space agency's preferred carrier option.
Faithful storks keep long
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A faithful male flying thousands of miles each year to join his handicapped female who cannot fly -- the story of two storks in Croatia, Klepetan and Malena, is one of love and devotion beating the odds. By late March, Klepetan was back in the tiny village of Brodski Varos in eastern Croatia for the 16th year in a row, after leaving his winter home in southern Africa. There he again met the love of his life, white stork Malena -- "Little One" in Croatian -- who was waiting to start having more babies, to add to the 62 the pair already have.
Nibiru: Conspiracy Theorists Think Planet X Will Kill Us All Soon—here's Why They're Wrong
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The apocalypse is upon us. If conspiracy theorists are to be believed, a giant mysterious planet is set to wreak destruction across Earth, the UK's Daily Express reports. Predicted to appear in the skies on April 23, it should set off earthquakes and volcanic eruptions with its massive gravitational pull.
Nearly 1,400 Sharks Spotted In Mysterious Gathering Off East Coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nearly 1,400 basking sharks were spotted in aerial photos in a puzzling
The Human Brain Can Get Confused About What's Real and Imagined, Says New Study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study into a phenomenon known as the ventriloquist illusion has shown that simply imagining an object while you hear a sound can change how you later perceive that sound. The brain must constantly process the sensory information it is bombarded with in order to present us with a picture of reality. Instead, the brain sometimes creates something that psychologists call the ventriloquist illusion.
Sam Altman’s simple advice on being productive—and not freaking out when you aren’t
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why are we so obsessed with productivity? It’s a question Sam Altman is well-fit to answer. The 32-year-old Stanford dropout is president of Y Combinator, arguably the most successful startup incubator in the world. Altman is also the co-chairman, along with Elon Musk, of OpenAi, a nonprofit research company intended to advance artificial intelligence, and…
Will a deal to slash shipping emissions help save the Marshall Islands from rising seas?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Environmental Minister of the Marshall Islands, David Paul, left the low-lying tropical islands last week and flew to London. He journeyed all that way to stand in front of a packed room at the United Nations International Marine Organization (IMO) and emphasize that Marshallese children may have to one day desert their ancestral islands and "set sail across the oceans to an uncertain future." The reason, Paul noted, is the "scientific fact" that rising sea levels stoked by human-caused global warming could put the Marshall Islands underwater sometime later this century.   SEE ALSO: Locals call it 'The Tomb': What's in the Marshall Islands' concrete dome? Many of the inhabited Marshall Islands don't even reach 6 feet above the ocean. The airport sits 6 feet above sea level; the highest point in the capital is 10 feet above the water. After a week of negotiations, the IMO decided Friday on a plan to significantly slash the amount of carbon dioxide — a potent greenhouse gas — emitted from the world's shipping sector. Most large ships burn a notoriously thick, dirty fuel, known as "heavy fuel oil." In fact, if the shipping sector was its own country, it would be the sixth largest carbon emitter in the world — contributing around the same amount of emissions into the atmosphere as industrial Germany. The broad plan is to slash carbon emissions from ships to at least 50 percent of 2008 levels by the year 2050. The carbon-reduction strategy will be truly finalized by the IMO in 2023. Of the plans on the table, this was considered one of the more ambitious options, though Minister Paul had been pushing for even more aggressive cuts. Satellite imagery of Mili Atoll in the Marshall Islands, taken in 2016.Image: DigitalGlobe/Getty Images"We must leave here in no doubt. History has been made in the IMO," Paul said in a statement Friday. Though, he noted that the "job is far from over," as nothing has yet to actually be implemented.  “IMO took a big step this week by agreeing to a mid-century emissions cap,” Dan Rutherford, the International Council on Clean Transportation's (ICCT) program director for marine and aviation, said via email. How will dirty shipping emissions be cleaned up? The IMO's lofty emissions targets might be three decades away, but achieving these ambitious cuts requires prompt action.  “Next up is to start decarbonizing shipping by tightening energy efficiency requirements for ships this fall," said Rutherford. There are a few ways to begin slashing the carbon emitted from massive shipping vessels. A quick solution that doesn't require new technology is requiring all ships to slow down as they voyage across the oceans.  "Speed factor has a strong influence on how much fuel burns and how much carbon ships emit," said Rutherford. A concrete dome, called 'The Tomb' by locals, caps radioactive waste from 1940s nuclear testing on low-lying Renit Island in the Marshall Islands.Image: GIFF JOHNSON/AFP/Getty ImagesOther solutions, which could be implemented on ships by around 2025, involve adding innovative technologies to newly built vessels. This includes "wind assists" aboard ships, which essentially act as modern sails. Another option is "air lubrication," which involves blowing air bubbles below ships to reduce friction, lessening the amount of dirty fuel needed for cross-world voyages.  Longer-term efficiency changes mean completely decarbonizing ships, so they're not running on oil at all, but fuels of the future, like hydrogen.  Previously, 196 nations met in Paris in 2015 and agreed to a global effort to combat climate change, agreeing to cap future warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial temperatures. But global leaders did not include the marine, or shipping, sector in these climate plans. "Marine is the last group that doesn’t have a climate framework," said Rutherford, before the IMO's Friday agreement.  How big of a threat is sea-level rise to the Marshall Islands? Right now, sea levels are rising by between three and 3.5 centimeters (over an inch) per decade, Josh Willis, an oceanographer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in an interview.  "We also know that this rate is accelerating," said Willis.  Depending on how emissions are limited and how the world's massive ice sheets melt, this could mean 2 or 3 feet by century's end, said Willis. Or it could mean a devastating 6 feet. The Thwaites Glacier, a rapidly melting portion of the West Antarctic ice sheet.Image: nasa"That’s a difference between existing as a nation and evacuating to go live somewhere else," said Willis.  He noted that the science here is indisputable. "We know it's caused by global warming and human emissions of these greenhouse gases. The basic physics of the warming planet have been known for over a century," said Willis.  But precisely estimating how much the world's ice sheets will melt into the ocean — specifically those on Greenland and Antarctica — is difficult to precisely predict.  "We’re watching them melt for the first time in scientific history," said Willis. "We’ve never watched something like this happen before.  NASA is already seeing a rapid melting of Antarctic ice at its precarious edges. Here, ocean water beneath glaciers, like the Thwaites and Pine Island glaciers, can amplify melting. "They're melting like gangbusters," said Willis. "These are massive rivers of ice that are dumping just huge amounts of ice into the oceans." Big ships mean big emissions.Image: AFP/Getty ImagesLow-lying Pacific Island nations are especially vulnerable to this added water. The Marshall Islands are relatively thin rings of coral reef that once surrounded volcanic mounts — mounts that have long since eroded away. It's not hard to see why Paul pushed for such ambitious emission targets. "Climate change is an existential threat for them, and they have been pressing the case strongly," said Rutherford. Sea level rise itself isn't yet drowning the islands in water — though this may very well be the case on many islands by the century's end. However, the rising seas cause damaging floods during recurrent storms and high tides. "The storms are getting more intensive, we’re getting more cyclones," Jimmy Nuake, the Under Secretary Technical of the Solomon Islands' Ministry of Infrastructure Development, said in a statement at the IMO.  "We’re going to lose more islands," he said, citing the fact that almost five Solomon Islands have been lost since 1980.  If global emissions aren't controlled, Willis said low-lying Pacific Islands will no longer be safe from storms that once weren't a threat. The impact to the islands won't be gradual, he said. It will come suddenly, when the right merging of sea level rise and storm whop the islands.  "Eventually, they’re going to get you," said Willis. WATCH: NASA needs you to send them pictures of clouds
Scientists have just worked out the real reason why human beings have eyebrows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Weirdly, our eyebrows may have been key to our survival
Insect farms gear up to feed soaring global protein demand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Layers of squirming black soldier fly larvae fill large aluminum bins stacked 10-high in a warehouse outside of Vancouver. Enterra Feed, one of an emerging crop of insect growers, will process the bugs into protein-rich food for fish, poultry - even pets. After being fattened up, the fly larvae will be roasted, dried and bagged or pressed to extract oils, then milled into a brown powder that smells like roasted peanuts.
15 Ways That China’s Military Is Quite Powerful in 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These are X ways China's military has a strategic advantage over Russia and America.