World News
IN SHORT
Friday, May 26, 2017

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
Video: Erdogan watches security guards beat protesters in Washington
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
New footage surfaced showing Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan looking on stoically as members of his security detail beat civilians.
Debate prep video is a lesson in how to avoid a hug from Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Responding to reports that former FBI Director James Comey specifically avoided embracing President Trump at a White House event, a former Hillary Clinton staffer revealed the Democratic candidate had anticipated a potential embrace during debate preparation. Phillippe Reines, a political consultant and former State Department advisor to Clinton, tweeted out a video of a September practice session where Reines portrayed Trump.
Police department names new K
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ATHOL, Mass. (AP) — Gronk will soon be tracking down criminals, sniffing for drugs and acting as the furry face of a Massachusetts police department.
Downward
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Eight people dressed in bright-colored athletic tops and soft pants sat on foam mats and stretched until five tiny Nigerian Dwarf goats, the size of small dogs, pranced into the studio and their goat yoga class began. Tucked away in a wooded corner of southern New Hampshire, Jenness Farm is the latest small U.S. agricultural operation to cash in on the social media-driven trend, in which yoga enthusiasts practice moves like the cat pose and bridge pose while goats climb around and sometimes on them. Peter Corriveau, who owns the 5-acre (2 hectare) farm in Nottingham, New Hampshire, about 60 miles (100 km) north of Boston, said he had toyed with the idea for several months before launching his first class in April.
China, Japan extract combustible ice from seafloor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BEIJING (AP) — Commercial development of the globe's huge reserves of a frozen fossil fuel known as "combustible ice" has moved closer to reality after Japan and China successfully extracted the material from the seafloor off their coastlines.
Is North Korea launching a spacecraft? Satellite images reveal upgrades to main space facility
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korea's main space launch facility, the Sohae Satellite Launching Station, is undergoing major upgrades, recent satellite images reveal. The hermit kingdom's space launch facility has been undergoing "low-level" construction since 2014. Experts said that the recent upgrades noted at the facility indicate North Korea's "long-term commitment" to its space launch programmes.
Japanese man held for wildlife smuggling in Indonesia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Japanese man has been arrested in Indonesia for allegedly trying to smuggle hundreds of reptiles out of the archipelago, including snakes, lizards and turtles, authorities and environmentalists said Friday. Katsuhide Naito, believed to be a major player in the wildlife-smuggling trade, was detained at Jakarta's main airport as he was about to board a flight to Tokyo with over 250 animals hidden in his bags. "Officials became suspicious seeing him with so many suitcases," Tisna Nando, spokeswoman for NGO the Wildlife Conservation Society, which was involved in the investigation, told AFP.
Everything You Need to Know About the Green Flash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What is it? What does it mean? Where can you see it? All that, and more, answered.
Comey tried to hide in curtains at White House gathering to avoid Trump: Report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
According to a friend, former FBI Director James Comey tried to hide in the curtains at a White House ceremony to avoid an awkward interaction with President Trump.
Pennsylvania woman makes dress from Starburst candy wrappers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ELIZABETHTOWN, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania woman has made a dress from more than 10,000 Starburst candy wrappers given to her by her high school sweetheart-turned-husband.
Ebola vaccine? Antibodies in survivor's blood offer best protection against deadly disease
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have identified natural human antibodies that offer protection against three virulent ebolaviruses – those that cause outbreaks in humans. The largest Ebola outbreak in history – the 2013-16 Western African epidemic – killed more than 11,000 people and infected more than 29,000. Although the disease has now largely vanished from the spotlight, researchers are still working hard to come up with the most efficient vaccines and treatments possible, preparing for any potential future outbreak.
Stretchy Holograms Could Power 3D, Morphing Projections
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Holograms are a staple of science fiction, but the kinds of 3D, multicolored moving images floating in midair from movies like "Star Wars" are still a long way from reality. Now, though, researchers have developed the world’s first stretchable hologram, which could one day enable holographic animation, according to a new study. Almost all holograms contain a recording of just a single image, but now scientists at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, have built a hologram on flexible polymer material that can hold several images.
The Antikythera mechanism is a 2,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One hundred fifteen years ago, an archeologist was sifting through objects found in the wreck of a 2,000-year-old vessel off the Greek island Antikythera. Among the wreck’s treasures — beautiful vases and pots, jewelry, a bronze statue of an ancient philosopher — was the most peculiar thing: a series of brass gears and dials mounted in a case the size of a mantel clock. Archeologists dubbed the instrument the Antikythera mechanism.
Trump should follow the Bill Clinton scandal playbook
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump has an unlikely model for how to survive an existential threat to his presidency: Bill Clinton.
Is John Kasich finishing the tour, or just getting started?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Ohio Gov. John Kasich has pointedly refused to rule out a primary run against President Trump in 2020. “Do I have a base?” he asks.
A neuroscientist explains the radical theory that our free will is just an illusion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dean Buonomano, a professor at UCLA and author of "Your Brain Is a Time Machine: The Neuroscience...
'Milestone' in quest to make blood cells: studies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists on Wednesday unveiled two methods for coaxing stem cells into blood cells, a long-sought goal that could lead to new treatments for blood disease, including leukaemia. In separate experiments reported in Nature -- one with mice, the other transplanting human stem cells into mouse bone marrow -- researchers demonstrated techniques with the potential to produce all types of blood cells. "This step opens up an opportunity to take cells from patients with genetic blood disorders, use gene editing to correct their genetic defect, and make functional blood cells," said Ryohichi Sugimura, a doctor at Boston Children's Hospital and lead author of one of the studies.
These game
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Despite places like Australia being bathed in sun, the cost of traditional silicon-based solar cells hasn't inspired people to buy, buy, buy. But what if you could make the technology cheaper and produce it at a higher scale? Some believe that printed solar is the way forward.  SEE ALSO: Meet the company vying to take on Tesla in clean energy Leading the charge is Paul Dastoor from the University of Newcastle in Australia and his team of researchers, who are in the final stage of testing his printed solar solution. Image: UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLEThe University of Newcastle is one of only three sites in the world testing printed solar, which uses electronic inks to conduct electricity. These can be printed at "massive scale" by machines, meaning they could be used for speedy rollout across large areas. Handy, especially in times of disaster. "It's completely different from a traditional solar cell. They tend to be large, heavy, encased in glass — tens of millimetres thick," Dastoor explained. "We're printing them on plastic film that's less than 0.1 of a millimetre thick." Image: university of newcastleDastoor said the printed solar panels outperform solar photovoltaics panels in low light, and could prove to be more cost-efficient than fossil fuels. "One of the advantages of these materials is they generate more electricity at low light levels than conventional PVs [photovoltaics], so that means I don't really care where the roof is pointing, I just put it on there," he said. "And what we've shown through a series of economic models is that we can get these devices printing such that they're readily comparable with PV devices. In fact, we expect in a short period of time the energy we generate will be cheaper than that generated via coal-based fire stations." Dastoor hopes the tiles will eventually be printed at less than A$10 (US$7.42) per square metre, considerably less than Tesla's PV Solar Roof at A$315 (US$235). But before you rush out with your money in hand, the tiles' performance and durability is still being tested. "We've put in the first 100 square metres of printed solar cells up on roofs, and now we're testing that durability in real weather conditions," he said. These printed solar panels are primarily made out of "extraordinarily robust" PET, the same material used for Coke bottles. Importantly, they're recyclable. "All you do is melt it up and reform it," he said. The printed solar panels will be demonstrated in Melbourne next week at a printing convention called Pacprint, the first public display of the technology, then Dastoor will work with a number of industrial partners to make it reality. Soon enough, you'll have a cheaper choice when it comes to putting solar panels on your roof.  WATCH: This bioprinter is able to create almost anything in a giant tub of goo
Thailand's chunky monkey on diet after gorging on junk food
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BANGKOK (AP) — A morbidly obese wild monkey who gorged himself on junk food and soda from tourists has been rescued and placed on a strict diet.
The Middle East Just Got its First Particle Accelerator
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The new research center aims to substitute habitual regional clashes with a subatomic variety.
The Physics of Fidget Spinners
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why do fidget spinners seem to spin forever? It's all about the angular velocity and negative angular acceleration. You know, basic rotational kinematics.
Trump escaping chaos in Washington to turmoil abroad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The besieged, tumultuous White House has packed an entire first term’s worth of policy into a frenetic eight-day tour.
Are You Hiding Your Feelings Behind a Smile?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
May brings National Women’s Health Week, and Women’s Health magazine editor-in-chief Amy Keller Laird joins The Doctors to talk about mental health. Amy wants to address what she calls “Smiling depression.” In partnership with the National Alliance on Mental Illness, Women’s Health has done a survey that found that 89 percent of people who suffered from anxiety or depression hid their symptoms. “It affects very high-functioning, very ambitious women,” she tells ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork, “because they want to put out this front that everything is fine.” But people who hide the problem aren’t getting help.
Cheryl Burke of 'Dancing with the Stars' Reveals Struggle with Body Image
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Dancer and model Cheryl Burke joins The Doctors to discuss her long association with “Dancing with the Stars,” and how public scrutiny as young woman affected her relationship with her body. “I’ve done 19 seasons of ‘Dancing with the Stars,’” Cheryl says.
How Taryn Stopped Hating Her Body and Created 'Embrace'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Studies suggest that 91 percent of women hate some aspect of their own bodies. A new documentary aims to challenge the messages women receive about themselves and the importance of beauty.
Driving Drunk Cost Me My Legs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A single bad decision changed LaTisha’s life forever – can she forgive herself and accept help? During her divorce, LaTisha says, “My whole world turned upside-down. My way of coping with it was drinking.” One Sunday, LaTisha went out with friends.
Hope or Hype: Delicious Beauty Trends!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Chocolate is fabulous on strawberries, ice cream, cookies … and on our bodies too!? Reality TV stars Natalie and Olivia from “WAGS L.A.” volunteer to try a trendy chocolate massage at Creative Chakra, then weigh in on other edible foodie beauty treatments. “The obvious question here is, is it edible?” asks Natalie – and the answer yes! The organic massage ingredients include coconut, coconut butter, and cacao powder.
Nazi myths of pure ancestry and master race debunked by genetics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As research into ancient human origins progresses, scientists are showing that there is no such thing as 'pure ancestry'. In an article published in a special issue of Science focusing on migration, author Ann Gibbons discusses how scientific research is currently debunking the myths that shape ideas of origin and ancestry, using innovative DNA analyses techniques. In recent years, studies have shown that nearly all Europeans descend from different waves of migrations that occurred over the past 15,000 years.
Could Fake News Fight Fake News?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As a psychologist researching misinformation, I focus on reducing its influence. Misinformation, fake news and “alternative facts” are more prominent than ever. Fortunately, science does have a means to protect itself, and it comes from a branch of psychological research known as inoculation theory.
What Caused Earth’s First Mass Extinction?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Of the five mass extinction events in the last 450 million years, we know the cause of the third, fourth and the fifth, and now also possibly of the first.
The rise of the world’s next great superpower
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's entrepreneurs, not nations, that are poised to solve the world's biggest problems, unlimited by boundaries.
In climate talks, it's always been America first
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The shadow of Donald Trump looms large over the climate-rescue Paris Agreement, thrashed out by nearly 200 countries over years of painstaking, often belligerent, bartering in which the United States has a chequered history. As power has changed hands between Republicans and Democrats, the country has alternatively played an inspirational or obstructionist role over two decades of negotiations for a UN pact to avoid the worst ravages of global warming, observers say. Ultimately, the US president, in the person of Barack Obama, played a critical role in getting even the most reticent of parties to sign on to the 2015 Paris Agreement that requires everyone to cut back on coal, oil and gas emissions.
Pence’s role as loyal soldier risks long
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Vice President Mike Pence speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., on May 10, 2017. WASHINGTON – On Capitol Hill, Republican members of Congress are telling friends with increasing exasperation that they wish Mike Pence were president. It’s premature talk for now, even if Pence did take the unprecedented step (for a vice president) of creating a political action committee in which he can stash campaign funds.
Unsuspecting Walmart customer takes down startled deer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WADENA, Minn. (AP) — A confused white-tailed deer that wandered into a Walmart store in Minnesota ran into a startled customer who tackled the animal to the ground.
He’s led a transformation among Roma villagers: crime down, productivity up
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
László Bogdán doesn’t enjoy his fame much. Journalists, politicians, and even foreign diplomats have been flocking to see Mr. Bogdán in Cserdi, a village in southern Hungary where he’s the mayor. The “Cserdi miracle,” as it’s been dubbed, has made the mayor famous nationwide.
Women's Health, Men's Health: Why Gender Matters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Given the differences in anatomy, it’s not really a surprise that many common diseases look different in men and women. “They often present with different symptoms, and require different workups...
Enigmatic ancient human sacrifice unearthed in Korean palace
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The remains of an ancient human sacrifice have been unearthed in South Korea, in the ruins of a palace. Seoul's Cultural Heritage Administration announced the discovery, saying that skeletal remains had been found under the walls of the Wolseong, or Moon Castle. This was the royal palace compound of the Korean Silla monarchy, and it was located in Gyeongju, their capital.
Charles Murray is once again peddling junk science about race and IQ
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Middlebury College students turn their backs to author Charles Murray during a lecture in March. The talk had to be moved, and a professor hosting Murray was injured in a scuffle. Podcaster and author Sam Harris is the latest to fall for it.
Fossils Of Flat Marine Animals Tell Us About Ocean Evolution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bunch of flat, rug-like sea creatures were pretty complex for their time, and their fossils can tell us a lot about the evolution of ocean animals and even human ancestors.
Pests and pathogens could cost agriculture billions: report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The spread of pests and pathogens that damage plant life could cost global agriculture $540 billion a year, according to a report published on Thursday. The report, released by the Royal Botanic Gardens (RBG) at Kew in London, said that an increase in international trade and travel had left flora facing rising threats from invasive pests and pathogens, and called for greater biosecurity measures. "Plants underpin all aspects of life on Earth from the air we breathe right through to our food, our crops, our medicines," said Professor Kathy Willis, RBG Kew's director of science.
In the U.S., trees are on the move because of climate change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Climate change is uprooting trees across the eastern United States. Dozens of species are shifting west and north of their usual locations as average temperatures and rainfall patterns change, researchers found. Oak, maple, and other deciduous trees are primarily heading westward as they follow changes in moisture availability, according to a new study in the journal Science Advances. Evergreens like firs and pines are shifting northward in search of cooler climes. SEE ALSO: Climate change is messing with all your favorite birds "It is not future predictions," Songlin Fei, the study's lead author and a Purdue University professor, said in a press release.  "Empirical data reveals the impact of climate change is happening on the ground now," he said. "It's in action." Image: Songlin FeiTree movement can have a profound impact on forest ecosystems. Soil, insects, animals, and other plants all depend on trees for shelter and sustenance. Trees themselves rely on this complex web for nutrition and seed-spreading. If these woody wonders pack up and move, the delicate system can be thrown off balance. For birds, such shifts add insult to injury. Springtime conditions have grown more variable and unpredictable in North America, making it harder for songbirds to time their migrations and secure the best nests and food supplies for their chicks, a separate report found this week. The tree study is based on an analysis of U.S. Forest Service data gathered between 1980 and 2015. It encompasses 86 tree species between Maine and Minnesota, and as far south as Florida. Image: Songlin FeiOver the 35-year period, the mean annual temperature in the eastern U.S. increased by about 0.16 degrees Celsius on average, or 0.29 degrees Fahrenheit. Northern areas saw the greatest temperature increases, researchers said. Precipitation patterns also changed, particularly in the southern region, where increasing temperatures helped lead to widespread droughts, according to the Palmer Drought Severity Index. Climate scientists attribute such changes at least partly to human-caused global warming.  As greenhouse gas concentrations in the air reach new highs, land and sea temperatures are ticking up, affecting weather patterns and spurring extreme events such as heat waves, floods, and droughts. All of these can overwhelm the ability of plants and animals to cope. Image: Songlin FeiPrevious studies on how climate change affects trees have generally shown a strong correlation between changes in temperature and shifting tree ranges. But this new study revealed that precipitation also plays a significant role in tree movement. Fei said the westward shift of deciduous trees was among researchers' most surprising findings. "When analyzing the impact of climate change, precipitation had a much stronger near-term impacts on forests instead of temperatures," he said. What's less clear is how these changes will affect the sustainability and biodiversity of forest ecosystems, though Fei said further research will focus on this area. "We want to know if there is a community breakdown among groups of species resulting from climate changes," he said. WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record
Live Long and Prognosticate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
GV founder Bill Maris is venturing out on his own with an ode to Star Trek to source investments in frontier technology. Bill Maris, the founder and first CEO of Alphabet Inc.’s GV, launched venture capital fund Section 32 with $150 million. When he left the unit formerly known as Google Ventures, Maris reportedly planned to raise $100 million as recently as March and target investments in healthcare and biotech.
Google's balloon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
During natural disasters, the ability to communicate with loved ones and get basic information is vital. But communication infrastructure is often one of the first things to be knocked out by high winds, massive rain, and flooding — especially in remote and rural regions. Massive jellyfish-like balloons traveling at the edge of space, however, are making that problem a thing of the past.  SEE ALSO: 9 incredible ways we're using drones for social good Over the past two months, Peruvians affected by extreme rain and severe flooding since January have had basic internet access, thanks to Project Loon, an initiative from Google's parent company Alphabet to bring internet to developing nations. The efforts in Peru show that Project Loon could be a model for relief during future natural disasters, with the potential to increase connectivity and communication when it's needed most. A map of Peru's flooding, and the areas where Project Loon is active in the region.Image: Alphabet / Project LoonHundreds of thousands of people have been displaced by heavy rains in Peru over the past several months, and the Peruvian government has declared a state of emergency in more than 800 provinces in the country. X — Alphabet's research division for "moonshot technologies" to make the world a better place — has used Project Loon to connect tens of thousands of Peruvians in flooded regions around Lima, Chimbote, and Piura. Project Loon head Alastair Westgarth announced the success of the effort in a blog post on Wednesday. "Loon balloons float 20 km up in the stratosphere, and so have the potential to extend connectivity to where it's needed regardless of what's happening below," Westgarth wrote. "We've been flying balloons over Latin America and running connectivity tests with our telecommunications partner Telefonica in Peru for the last few months. So when we saw what was happening, we reached out to Telefonica and the government to see how we could help." High-speed internet is transmitted up to these balloons, which float twice as high as airplanes and above weather, from a telecommunications partner on the ground. In the case of the Peru floods, this partner was Telefonica. The transmission is then sprinkled back down, giving users on the ground access to reliable internet on their phones in emergency situations. "More than 160 GB of data has been sent to people over a combined area of 40,000 square kilometers — that's roughly the size of Switzerland, and enough data to send and receive around 30 million WhatsApp messages, or 2 million emails," Westgarth wrote. About 57 percent of the world's population — or 4.2 billion people — still live without internet access, especially those living in remote and rural regions. Connectivity during disasters like the flooding in Peru is essential, helping citizens reach loved ones and medical aid. Relief workers also benefit from the balloon-powered internet access, which enables them to better communicate with each other to distribute aid more effectively. The ongoing success of the project in Peru highlights how the use of X's balloons could revolutionize the future of disaster relief.  Other tech companies are experimenting with similar efforts, like Facebook's Aquila drone program, to connect the developing world. Google announced earlier this year that it would be abandoning its Titan project, which was working to develop internet-connected drones. WATCH: Google glass may be uncool, but the product is irreplaceable for autistic kids
Joe Lieberman: 5 things to know about Trump’s possible pick for FBI director
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president is expected to announce his pick to replace fired FBI Director James Comey as early as this week, and according to multiple reports, former Sen. Joseph Lieberman has emerged as the leading candidate for the position.
Trump denies any collusion between his campaign and Russia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump strongly denied that he or members of his campaign colluded with the Russian government in order to influence the 2016 election.
Harvard student submits rap album as his senior thesis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOSTON (AP) — While other Harvard University students were writing papers for their senior theses, Obasi Shaw was busy rapping his.
Taboo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
From the lecterns of mass rally stages, and during live television debates, Iran’s presidential candidates have crossed multiple regime red lines in their bids to cast opponents as dangerously unfit for office. Energized by the electoral fisticuffs, thousands of Iranians have taken to the streets each night, with activists from both sides – either seeking change, or fearing it – expressing their views in noisy traffic jams. Recommended: How much do you know about Iran?
How Mueller appointment may calm a roiled Washington
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The appointment of former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special counsel overseeing the agency’s Russia investigation adds a measure of integrity and calm during a time of tumult in Washington. It cools the nascent – and premature – talk of impeachment that had started to build following President Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey, and reports that Mr. Trump had asked Mr. Comey to drop an investigation into the president’s former national security adviser, Michael Flynn.