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A Plane Carrying 189 People Crashed in Indonesia. Here's What We Know So Far
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The plane was brand new and the pilot didn't signal an emergency
Fears for Amazon after Bolsonaro wins Brazil presidency
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Environmentalists and rights groups reacted with dismay Monday to the victory in Brazil of president-elect Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right champion of agribusiness who has threatened to pull his country from the Paris climate accord. Bolsonaro, who won 55 percent of the vote in a run-off on Sunday, issued a series of campaign pledges that left many fearing for the future of the Amazon, known as "the lungs of the planet". "It's all about downsizing government so investors and big agribusiness landowners and companies can come in and have a freer hand for more trashing of resources and indigenous rights," Victor Menotti, a former director of the International Forum on Globalization, told AFP.
Heitkamp sails against the wind in North Dakota
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Seeking reelection as a Democrat in a firmly red state, Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota has sought to rise above the nation’s hardened political partisanship, campaigning as a “true common-sense independent,” but she faces an uphill battle.
When migration means fleeing home, but not your country
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“My [teenage] children all sleep in my bed with me now,” says Maritza, whose partner and two eldest sons were killed in the span of three years by gang violence. Maritza is on her way to becoming an internally displaced person (IDP): someone who is forced to flee her home, but remains within her country’s borders. Within the Northern Triangle, meanwhile – a region made up of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras – an estimated 432,000 people became IDPs in 2017, according to the Internal Displacement Monitoring Center.
This Danish Band Plays Music Underwater. The Results Are Eerily Spectacular
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This is a sound unlike anything you've heard before
Boys Rescued From Thai Cave Attend a Manchester United Match
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The team was invited after their miraculous rescue from a cave in northern Thailand
6 Common Open Enrollment Mistakes and How to Avoid Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Picking the wrong plan, or missing enrollment entirely, could be devastating
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Met With Mental
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex spoke with people working in the mental-health field on the last leg of a 16-day tour of the South Pacific
Baby Seahorses Struggle to Float Near Plastic Bag
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Several baby seahorses were seen struggling to avoid a plastic bag floating near Blaigowrie, Victoria, as captured in this video posted on October 27.Freediver Jules Casey called for an end to marine and plastic pollution, writing “these tiny baby seahorses have enough trouble trying to survive in the wild… don’t make it more difficult for them. It’s easy… put your rubbish in a bin.” Credit: onebreathdiver via Storyful
A Group of Scientists Want to Launch a Satellite to Make an Artificial Aurora
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The proposed satellite would probe the connections between Earth's upper atmosphere and its magnetic field.
EU lists air pollution hotspots as UN warns on child health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Air quality across Europe is slowly improving, but harmful emissions remain stubbornly high in some countries, according to a study released Monday by the European Environment Agency.
Sri Lanka Is Engulfed in a 'Constitutional Crisis.' Here's What to Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sri Lanka was plunged into a political crisis over the weekend with two different leaders claiming to legitimately head the country
Former President Jimmy Carter Wades Into the Georgia Governor's Race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Carter asked Republican Brian Kemp to resign to protect public confidence
Trump blames media, 'the true enemy of the people,' for inspiring hate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Monday lashed out at the press for criticism of his response to the massacre at a Pittsburgh synagogue and mail bomb plot targeting Democrats.
Supreme Court turns away Pennsylvania electoral map dispute
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A new state electoral map, devised by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court after it invalidated the Republican-drawn districts in January, is seen as giving Democrats a better shot at gaining seats in the U.S. House of Representatives in the Nov. 6 congressional elections in which President Donald Trump's fellow Republicans are seeking to retain control of Congress. The case involves a practice called partisan gerrymandering in which electoral maps are drafted in a manner that helps one party tighten its grip on power by undermining the clout of voters that tend to favor the other party. The high court in June failed to determine whether partisan gerrymandering violates the U.S. Constitution after hearing high-profile cases from Wisconsin and Maryland.
Eating on Mars Will Be Complicated and Cold
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Michele Perchonok has, like nearly all of us, spent her whole life on Earth. A food scientist by trade and the current president of the Institute of Food Technologies, Perchonok previously spent 17 years at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston as the Advanced Food Technology Project Manager and the Shuttle Food System Manager, overseeing the direction of the agency’s food program and the development of what it chooses to feed astronauts living and working in low Earth orbit. “We can’t develop a food system as a silo, for any mission for NASA,” said Perchonok.
The 3rd most powerful supercomputer in the world was turned on at a classified government lab in California — Here’s what the 7,000 square foot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The third most powerful supercomputer in the world has been completed and unveiled: the Sierra. This supercomputer, which can do 125 quadrillion calculations in a second, will be used to create simulations that can test how safe and reliable nuclear weapons in the government stockpile is. The Sierra is currently being used for scientific work, such as predicting the effects of cancer and mapping traumatic brain injury.
Donald Trump's incredible, amazing, world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Here's what it would have sounded like if Trump had delivered the Gettysburg Address.
Leading for
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A company whose medical care of immigrant detainees was criticized in a Department of Homeland Security report has been sued a staggering 1,395 times in federal courts over the last decade, a Project on Government Oversight investigation shows.
In an Indiana river cleanup, businesses and environmentalists cooperate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Gary is an industrial city, not known for its natural beauty. The Nature Conservancy, Mr. Labus’s employer, has worked for the past 30 years to preserve the dune and swale habitat surrounding the nearby Grand Calumet River. In the 1950s and ’60s, the Grand Calumet River was identified as one of the most polluted waterways that flowed into Lake Michigan.
Community, Religious Leaders Say Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting 'Will Not Break Us' At Vigil
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Religious leaders across faiths, elected officials and community members filled a memorial hall late Sunday to honor the victims of a mass shooting a Pittsburgh synagogue one day prior.
Red Sox Beat Dodgers 5
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Boston Red Sox won their fourth World Series championship in 15 years, beating the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 5 Sunday night
PepsiCo’s spending $5 million to bring innovation to Indian farms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Snacks and beverages giant PepsiCo has time and again been accused of over-exploiting water resources in India. Bottling plants of the fizzy-drink maker are said to be water guzzlers. Last year, the company, along with rival Coca-Cola, faced public protests in the southern state of Tamil Nadu over the issue. But as consumers across the…
The 3rd most powerful supercomputer in the world was turned on at a classified government lab in California — Here’s what the 7,000 square foot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The third most powerful supercomputer in the world has been completed and unveiled: the Sierra. This supercomputer, which can do 125 quadrillion calculations in a second, will be used to create simulations that can test how safe and reliable nuclear weapons in the government stockpile is. The Sierra is currently being used for scientific work, such as predicting the effects of cancer and mapping traumatic brain injury.
Migrant Caravan Rests as a Second Group Tries to Enter Mexico
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A second caravan clashed with Guatemalan and Mexican forces, with one killed
Sri Lanka's Prime Minister Sacked Over Alleged Assassination Plot as the Nation Edges Toward Crisis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sri Lanka’s president said Sunday he sacked his prime minister mainly because of the alleged involvement of a Cabinet minister in a plot to assassinate him.
The NYPD Commissioner Apologized for a Mishandled 1994 Rape Case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Police sources reportedly thought the victim had made up the attack
Budapest's underwater wonderland draws divers from far and wide
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For Laura Tuominen, the ultimate diving experience is not to be found in the Red Sea or the Caribbean, but in a labyrinth of spectacular underwater caves beneath the pavements of Budapest. The Hungarian capital is already famous worldwide for its steaming hot spas and thermal baths. Around seven kilometres (4.4 miles) in length and previously open only to scientific expeditions, the cave became accessible to the public -- that is, qualified divers -- when a diving centre was opened here in 2015.
Violence In Mexico
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thousands of Central American migrants took a break Sunday on their caravan’s long journey through southern Mexico. Hundreds more migrants tried to force their way into Mexico at the Guatemala border, and one was reported killed.
The 3rd most powerful supercomputer in the world was turned on at a classified government lab in California — Here’s what the 7,000 square foot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The third most powerful supercomputer in the world has been completed and unveiled: the Sierra. This supercomputer, which can do 125 quadrillion calculations in a second, will be used to create simulations that can test how safe and reliable nuclear weapons in the government stockpile is. The Sierra is currently being used for scientific work, such as predicting the effects of cancer and mapping traumatic brain injury.
Community, Religious Leaders Say Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting 'Will Not Break Us' At Vigil
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"What happened yesterday will not break us," Rabbi Jonathan Perlman said
Iowa and New York Are Home to the Winning $688M Powerball Tickets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The chance of winning the Powerball jackpot is 1 in 292.2 million
China’s first private orbital launch attempt fails
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China’s private space industry saw a setback in its development over the weekend after a Chinese rocket firm failed to send a satellite into orbit. The three-stage solid-fueled rocket, developed by Beijing-based private firm LandSpace, took off from the national launching site in Jiuquan in north-central China on Saturday (Oct. 27) around 4pm local time.…
Syria Reopens Its National Museum After It Was Closed 6 Years Amid Civil War
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Syria's National Museum reopened on Sunday, more than six years after the institution was shut down amid civil war
8 days until the midterm elections: Where things stand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rep. Ted Budd, R-N.C., has one big advantage over his opponent, Democratic challenger Kathy Manning: The 13th District’s map was intentionally drawn to privilege Republicans. Budd defended gerrymandering, saying that unless the Supreme Court says otherwise, “it is constitutional to politically gerrymander.” Gerrymandering, which has helped Democrats in the past, is more likely to help Republicans this time because the GOP controlled the redistricting process in more states after the 2010 census. Two-term Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., is spending much of her reelection campaign’s final stretch stumping in and around heavily Republican Webster County, which President Trump won by nearly 80 percent of the vote two years ago.
Brazil Elects Far
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Far-right congressman Jair Bolsonaro won the presidency of Latin America’s largest nation Sunday as voters looked past warnings that the brash former army captain would erode democracy and embraced a chance for radical change after years of turmoil.
Alan Turing Enigma
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The method devised by Second World War codebreaker Alan Turing to crack Enigma could be used to detect cancer earlier, experts have said. Researchers at Edinburgh University believe his mathematical techniques could be used to help measure the effectiveness of existing diagnostic tools. Currently the accuracy of diagnostic tests is assessed using statistical techniques developed in the 1980s, with these unable to gauge how useful a test could be in determining an people risk of developing a disease. But now experts at the University's Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics believe Turing's methods could improve these. Working at Bletchley Park in 1941, Turing came up with the method used to break the German forces' Enigma code. His approach investigated the distribution of so-called weights of evidence - which establish the likely outcomes in a given situation - to help him decide the best strategy for cracking Enigma. Researchers think applying the same principle could potentially aid the development of personalised treatments, a study published in Statistical Methods in Medical research has revealed. Turing worked out how the weight of evidence was expected to vary over repeated experiments, with these ideas developed further in 1968 and published by his former assistant Jack Good. Professor Paul McKeigue, of the university's Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, said the same principle of how the weight of evidence varies can be applied to evaluate the diagnostic tests used for personalised treatments. In this way, the performance of a test can be quantified. He stated: "Most existing diagnostic tests for identifying people at high risk of cancer or heart disease do not come anywhere near the standards we could hope to see. "The new era of precision medicine is emerging, and this method should make it easier for researchers and regulatory agencies to decide when a new diagnostic test should be used."
The 3rd most powerful supercomputer in the world was turned on at a classified government lab in California — Here’s what the 7,000 square foot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The third most powerful supercomputer in the world has been completed and unveiled: the Sierra. This supercomputer, which can do 125 quadrillion calculations in a second, will be used to create simulations that can test how safe and reliable nuclear weapons in the government stockpile is. The Sierra is currently being used for scientific work, such as predicting the effects of cancer and mapping traumatic brain injury.
How Gab Became the Social Media Site Where the Pittsburgh Suspect's Alleged Anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gab was founded as a "free speech" alternative to Twitter
What to Know About the Victims of Pittsburgh's Synagogue Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The victims ages ranged from 54 to 97 years old
The 3rd most powerful supercomputer in the world was turned on at a classified government lab in California — Here’s what the 7,000 square foot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The third most powerful supercomputer in the world has been completed and unveiled: the Sierra. This supercomputer, which can do 125 quadrillion calculations in a second, will be used to create simulations that can test how safe and reliable nuclear weapons in the government stockpile is. The Sierra is currently being used for scientific work, such as predicting the effects of cancer and mapping traumatic brain injury.
China's Private Attempt to Send a Satellite
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China's Private Attempt to Send a Satellite-Carrying Rocket Into Space Fails
Trump falsely claims NYSE reopened the day after 9/11 to justify holding rally
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump falsely told supporters that the New York Stock Exchange reopened the day after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks to justify holding a campaign rally.
Mexico headquarters of the fifth International Festival of Planetariums
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Oct. 28 (Notimex).- The exchange of ideas, materials, improvements in the service to the public that the planetariums visit will be the topics to be discussed at the International Planetarium Festival, which will be held from tomorrow 29 until the next October 31. The meeting will be hosted by the Luis Enrique Erro Planetarium (PLEE, for its acronym in Spanish), where 60 representatives of 38 national and international planetariums will participate. Organized by the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt, for its acronym in Spanish), the festival reaches its fifth edition this year and, for the second consecutive time, will host the PLEE of the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN, for its acronym in Spanish). The deputy director of the Planetarium Luis Enrique Erro, Antonio Romero Hernandez, informed that the first day of activities is scheduled for the conference "The Star Harvester", given by the Mexican astronaut, retired from the National Administration of Aeronautics and Space (NASA), Jose Hernandez. On Tuesday, the new screening produced by the PLEE will be presented, called "The unexpected gift", which is based on a history of astronomy. "The origins of time are told to this day, but in a very pleasant conversation of a child and his sister, production made by staff of the planetarium," said the official. Among the guests will be the Planetarium of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Planetarium in Beijing, China; Planetarium of the University of Santiago de Chile; Planetarium of the Library of Alexandria, Egypt. In an interview with Notimex, Antonio Romero indicated that the closing of the activities will be in charge of the Planetarium of Alexandria and Beijing, who will talk about the implementation of the cultural part, as well as artistic in the dissemination of space science in their countries. Although the planetarium is designed for planetarists, the fifth edition will be open to the entire polytechnic community.  NTX/ICB/MSG/ASTRO16/BBF
The 3rd most powerful supercomputer in the world was turned on at a classified government lab in California — Here’s what the 7,000 square foot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The third most powerful supercomputer in the world has been completed and unveiled: the Sierra. This supercomputer, which can do 125 quadrillion calculations in a second, will be used to create simulations that can test how safe and reliable nuclear weapons in the government stockpile is. The Sierra is currently being used for scientific work, such as predicting the effects of cancer and mapping traumatic brain injury.
18 American volcanoes get a 'very high' threat rating from the USGS
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Of the 161 volcanoes found in the United States, 18 of them are considered a "very high" threat in any eruption scenario. That's a stat from the "2018 update to the U.S. Geological Survey national volcanic threat assessment." As the mouthful of a title suggests, the report lays out which volcanoes in the U.S. have the greatest chance of erupting. The last such report from the USGS was issued in 2005. SEE ALSO: Volcanoes, ranked At the top of the list, unsurprisingly, is Hawaii's Kilauea, which caused so much damage and devastation over the summer. The next two after that, both found in Washington state, are Mt. Saint Helens and Mt. Ranier, respectively. Of the 18 volcanoes to receive the maximum "very high" threat rating, 11 are found inside the continental U.S., spanning the states of Washington, Oregon, and California. Only two are found in Hawaii: Kilauea, and the 16th-ranked Mauna Loa. The other five are located in Alaska. Which #volcanoes are the most threatening in the U.S.? Hot off the Press - 2018 update to @USGS Volcanic Threat Assessment. https://t.co/eAzJyRzP6dGuess what, #Kilauea is #1. pic.twitter.com/5upgfQwwz2 — USGS Volcanoes (@USGSVolcanoes) October 24, 2018 To be clear: A "very high" rating doesn't necessarily mean a volcano is more likely to erupt. It's simply an indication of the threat such an eruption represents. Proximity to population centers and — more in the case of the Alaskan volcanoes — air traffic routes, then, is perhaps one of the biggest considerations in this threat assessment. The level of threat is also influenced by what would happen during an eruption event. As we saw over the summer, Kilauea's eruption was characterized largely by the heavy flow of lava. Alternatively, an eruption at Mt. Saint Helens is more likely to explode, sending rock, snow, and ice outwards and potentially in the direction of nearby population centers. Given the way these ratings work, it's not too surprising that the 18 volcanoes to rate as "very high" threats are holdovers from the 2005 report. It's not like the cities situated in close proximity to each one up and moved in the 13 years since the last report. It's a lengthy report and it can get a little dense at times. But the whole thing is available online for amateur volcanologists to read at their leisure. [h/t The Verge] WATCH: Get lost watching this mesmerizing lava gush and cool
Brothers, Husband and Wife Among 11 Victims: The Latest on the Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Police said three officers were also shot without giving details on their condition
The 3rd most powerful supercomputer in the world was turned on at a classified government lab in California — Here’s what the 7,000 square foot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The third most powerful supercomputer in the world has been completed and unveiled: the Sierra. This supercomputer, which can do 125 quadrillion calculations in a second, will be used to create simulations that can test how safe and reliable nuclear weapons in the government stockpile is. The Sierra is currently being used for scientific work, such as predicting the effects of cancer and mapping traumatic brain injury.
NBC News Cancels Megyn Kelly Today Following Blackface Controversy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kelly's future at the network is uncertain