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Wedding dress returned 32 years after dry cleaner mix
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WILLOWICK, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio woman has been reunited with her wedding dress 32 years after a dry cleaner mix-up.
At winter Olympics, science wins the day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Chris Mazdzer of the United States shook up the luge world order Sunday night, becoming the first non-European to podium in the Olympic men’s singles event. Recommended: Test your knowledge of the Winter Olympics! Laboring behind the scenes are hundreds of mechanics and technicians preparing skis, snowboards, and sleds.
Sesame Seed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But all water is not equal. What kind was there?
The Rise And Rise Of IBM, Technology Hype, And Fascination With Artificial Intelligence (AI)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A number of this week’s milestones in the history of technology link the rise of IBM, the introduction of the ENIAC, and the renewed fascination with so-called artificial intelligence.
Newly Discovered Super
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a constellation not that far away...
Do we want to live in a world where our ‘best friends' are AI chatbots?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We should be worried about the development of social skills in a world where everyone can have their 'perfect' AI friend.
The 'Mandela Effect' and how your mind is playing tricks on you
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Proof of time travel, false memories or a parallel universe? A look at the wacky world of the 'Mandela Effect'.
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Says the #MeToo Movement Is Here to Stay
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It’s amazing to me that, for the first time, women are really listened to," the Supreme Court Justice said
Surging US output 'a concern' for oil market: OPEC
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Oil prices, long battered by a global glut in supply, have been rising recently as the market returns to balance on the back of a landmark deal between producers to throttle output, but surging shale production in the United States could throw a spanner in the works, OPEC said on Monday. Crude prices fell as low as $35 per barrel at the start of 2016, but they have been rising since, reaching a three-year high of more than $70 per barrel last month, "on signs that production adjustments by OPEC and non-OPEC participating countries are balancing the market," the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries wrote in its latest monthly market report. OPEC countries and other oil-producing countries, such as Russia, agreed at the end of 2016 to cut back production to combat the global glut in oil.
'Mystery' ecosystem under huge Antarctic iceberg set for exploration
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists are travelling to Antarctica to investigate a mysterious marine ecosystem hidden under an iceberg four times the size of London. The team, led by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), leave the Falklands on 21 February to collect samples from a newly exposed seabed beneath an iceberg dubbed A68, which calved off from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in July. It is considered an urgent mission, with the 5,818 sq km ecosystem susceptible to change as it becomes exposed to sunlight for the first time in thousands of years.
Vice President Mike Pence Says the U.S. Is Ready For Talks With North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.S. is ready to engage in talks about North Korea’s nuclear program according to an interview with Vice President Mike Pence
The hallelujah cure: Trump campaign adviser says pray away the flu
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump campaign adviser Gloria Copeland says to "inoculate yourself with the word of God" in order to protect against the flu. That's dangerous advice.
SpaceX set to launch first prototype Starlink satellites for global internet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The first test satellites for SpaceX’s global internet constellation are being prepped for launch as early as this week — three years after SpaceX CEO Elon Musk unveiled the project in Seattle. The prototype spacecraft, known as Microsat 2a and 2b, are reportedly to be included as secondary payloads on a Falcon 9 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, due for launch on Saturday. The primary payload is a 3,000-pound Spanish radar observation satellite called Paz. SpaceX conducted a static-fire test of the Falcon 9, which makes use of a previously flown first-stage booster, at Vandenberg today. The… Read More
These Photos Were Taken a Record
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They show a cluster of stars
3 Reasons Trump's Plan to Privatize the International Space Station Won't (and Shouldn't) Happen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Talk about bad real estate deals
New York Attorney General Files a Lawsuit Against Harvey Weinstein
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The lawsuit follows an investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Reveal More Details of Upcoming Royal Wedding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The royal couple are planning a carriage ride through Windsor so they can share the big day with the public
7 women in science who will inspire you to get serious about STEM
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Women have long contributed to and transformed scientific knowledge, but they aren't always widely recognized for their hard, brilliant work.  Now that the International Day of Women and Girls in Science (#WomenInScience) is upon us, take a moment to meet some young women just starting out in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), and women who, through their research and discoveries, changed the course of history.  SEE ALSO: The accidental library: Why Elon Musk launched books to space that could last 14 billion years These seven talented girls and women will inspire you to get serious about STEM.   1. Shurouq Al Hamaideh Shurouq Al Hamaideh, who is from Tafila, Jordan, launched a social business in 2016 to teach teenagers computer programming. When UN Women profiled her work last year, the then-22-year-old had already provided training to dozens of young people — and nearly half of the participants were teenage girls. Shurouq is from Tafila, Jordan where most think that the field of tech is for men & the home is for women. Here's how she's working to break these #WomenInScience stereotypes: https://t.co/ty30cyX1YR pic.twitter.com/lL1pysAHMI — UN Women (@UN_Women) February 11, 2018 Hamaideh told the UN that it wasn't difficult to teach the teens how to code. The more difficult challenge was making do with limited resources — just one computer lab with 30 computers. That didn't stop Hamaideh. "We wanted to create an enabling environment for girls and young women to learn technology near their homes, since they do not have a lot of mobility without the consent of their parents or husband," Hamaideh said.  "I want to teach computer programming to as many girls as possible so that we can break these stereotypes and give girls the chance they deserve." 2. Lamija Gutić In the past few years, Lamija Gutić has participated in several coding camps, including IT Girls, a UN and UN Women initiative. Gutić, a teenager from Sarajevo, developed the skills to create websites and apps through that training, and she hopes to one day develop tech solutions to help improve people's lives.  Meet Lamija Gutić: at 16 yrs old, she is on her way to building tech solutions for a better : https://t.co/QiRXa7oEyt #WomenInScience pic.twitter.com/0coWmXcjiX — UN Women (@UN_Women) February 10, 2018 "For me, [information communication technology] is a world full of opportunities in which anyone can find their place, regardless of affinities, abilities and gender," she told UN Women, in October 2017. "One person cannot change the entire world alone, but we can influence the people around us, our friends, family and peers." 3. Elizabeth H. Blackburn   In 2009, Elizabeth H. Blackburn made history when she received the first Nobel Prize awarded to two women. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider (see #4), and Jack W. Szostak discovered how the enzyme telomerase and telomeres — a component of human cells — protect chromosomes.  When the Medicine Prize was announced in 2009, it was the first time in #NobelPrize history that a scientific prize was awarded to two women.Here, one of that year's Laureates - Elizabeth Blackburn - shares the four virtues of successful scientists.#WomenInScience pic.twitter.com/YjBjRu9vPA — The Nobel Prize (@NobelPrize) February 10, 2018 Long before she received the Nobel Prize in Medicine, Blackburn discovered, in 1980, that telomeres, which "cap" a chromosome, have a particular DNA.  Blackburn is a professor emeritus at the University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine.  4. Carol W. Greider Carol W. Greider was doing laundry when she received a call informing her that she'd received a Nobel Prize in 2009. More than a decade before, she and Blackburn discovered the enzyme telomerase — an enzyme that was ultimately recognized by scientists as critical to understanding how cancers and other human genetic diseases develop.  "I never planned a career ... I just went forward," Greider told the New York Times after receiving the Nobel Prize. "I loved doing experiments and I had fun with them." Greider, a professor at Johns Hopkins University, runs her own lab and continues to research telomeres and telomerase.  5. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi Barré-Sinoussi was one of three people who received the Nobel Prize in Medicine, in 2008. She and and researcher Luc Montagnier were recognized for their work discovering the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In 1983, Barré-Sinoussi and Montagnier identified the retrovirus, which attacks blood cells critical to the body's immune system.  "We have to show them what women can do in science!" Françoise Barré-Sinoussi received the #NobelPrize in Physiology or Medicine in 2008 for her role in the discovery of human immunodeficiency (AIDS) virus. #WomenInScience pic.twitter.com/Qb1CbHng4m — The Nobel Prize (@NobelPrize) February 11, 2018 "For me, I was very much interested in science from a young age," Barré-Sinoussi said in 2017. "During my vacations, when I was a child, I could spend hours looking at animals, comparing the behaviour of one animal to another, trying to understand, for example, why one was not running as fast as the other. I then realized at school that I was very good at science." She is a professor at the Institut Pasteur in France.  6. Mae Jemison Jemison became the first African-American woman to travel into space when she flew on the Endeavor as a science mission specialist in 1992. Jemison's background is in engineering and medical research, and she worked in public health prior to joining NASA in 1987.  "More women should demand to be involved. It's our right.” — Dr. @maejemison, the 1st black woman to travel in space. ‍ #WomenInScience #BlackHistoryMonth pic.twitter.com/LHqpZ34tNh — UN Women (@UN_Women) February 11, 2018 Her eight-day mission to space focused on experiments in weightlessness and motion sickness. She spent 190 hours, 30 minutes, and 23 seconds in space. Jemison left NASA in 1993 and founded a private research company.  "When people talk about the space program, they ask me, 'Was it the toughest job I ever had; was it the most difficult?' and it wasn't," Jemison said in an interview in 2003. "Probably being a Peace Corps doctor was the most difficult job, because I was on call seven days a week, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and I was responsible for people's lives and their health. I was the person that was there. Period." 7. Katherine Johnson If you've seen the movie Hidden Figures, then you know Katherine Johnson. Played by the actress Taraji P. Henson, Johnson was the brilliant mathematician who faced discrimination at NASA in the '50s and '60s and still made invaluable contributions to the U.S. space program. Her calculations helped the U.S. send a man to the moon.   “Girls are capable of doing everything men are capable of doing.” — Katherine Johnson, whose calculations helped send a ‍ to the moon. #WomenInScience #BlackHistoryMonth pic.twitter.com/AdM9MPOxWA — UN Women (@UN_Women) February 10, 2018 "There’s nothing to it — I was just doing my job,” she told the Washington Post, in 2017, about her work at NASA. “They needed information and I had it, and it didn’t matter that I found it. At the time, it was just a question and an answer." Johnson received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2015 — and Hidden Figures screenings at U.S. embassies in 2017 inspired a program for women in STEM. WATCH: Here’s how NASA is preparing the largest telescope ever built for space
Could you give up your smartphone?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'The Next Revolution' panel discusses our culture's technology addiction.
Kim Jong Un's Sister Ends Her Olympics Visit After Delivering Hopes For a Summit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kim Yo Jong extended her brother's offer to hold a summit with South Korean President Moon Jae-in
Fifty Shades Freed Tops Box Office In Opening Weekend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Fifty Shades" and other newcomers breathed some fresh life into the box office
7 Exotic technologies that were once science fiction, but now exist in reality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s no big surprise that engineers and scientists working in cutting edge tech are often inspired by science fiction. Here are seven examples of sci-fi gadgets engineers helped bring to life.
OxyContin Maker Will Stop Promoting Opioids to Doctors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The maker of the powerful painkiller OxyContin said it will stop marketing opioid drugs to doctors, bowing to a key demand of lawsuits
The Jet Engine is a Futuristic Technology Stuck in the Past
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“Falcon Heavy, in a Roar of Thunder, Carries SpaceX’s Ambition Into Orbit.” So reads a New York Times headline on the biggest spectacle of the week. Elon Musk’s latest rocket blasted into the atmosphere with David Bowie’s iconic “Space Oddity” playing on auto-repeat, listened to by no one. Crowds cheered as the rocket roared upon takeoff—carrying a Tesla Roadster as payload, no less—and roared again as the boosters delivered themselves safely back to Earth.
Scientists discover planets outside Milky Way for the first time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomers knew planets weren't confined to just the Milky Way galaxy, but for the first time, scientists from the University of Oklahoma discovered planets located at a distant galaxy 3.8 billion light-years away.
Google tracking phones even when they are disconnected?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox News Headlines 24/7 anchor Brett Larson investigated Google's tracking capabilities.
NASA Is Making an Olympic Sport Out of Studying Snow in Pyeongchang
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What sets the Winter Olympics apart from the summer games? Snow, of course, which is why NASA is using this year's competitions to practice observing and predicting snow. It's all part of a project called the International Collaborative Experiments for Pyeongchang 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, or ICE-POP, which will run through the end of the Paralympic Games on March 18.
Mars Attacks! Life on the Red Planet Would Be Horrific: Here’s How
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Despite the efforts of Elon Musk and SpaceX, living on Mars would be pretty awful.
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JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Snowboarder Red Gerard nabbed Team USA's first gold medal of the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea on Sunday. We watched his winning run with his entire family, on hand at the event
Man Tried to Kill Priest He Thought Sexually Assaulted His Girlfriend, Police Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A man charged with trying to kill a priest was suspicious about sexual assault
SpaceX Now Has the World's Biggest Rocketship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
That's more than just bragging rights. It could mean a monopoly on large space launches.
Brain injuries can cause some people to become violent criminals and pedophiles — here's what scientists know so far about why that is
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Chelsea started physically attacking her parents after suffering brain damage in an accident at college. There are well-documented cases of people with brain injuries, tumours, and lesions behaving out of character. Studies show that criminals are more likely to have suffered a brain injury than the rest of the population.
White House Aides Rally Around John Kelly and Defend Trump's Comments on Women
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
White House staffers took to Sunday morning shows
Dozens of nude models brave cold, rain for Polar Bear Paint
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Cold feet can't stop naked models from parading around New York City. Dozens of body-painted models walked through the chilly streets and posed for photos in a drizzle on Saturday as part of the Polar ...
Industry bosses urge Britain to get back in the space race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The UK’s space industry has called on the Government  to set up a national programme under its industrial strategy to boost business. Companies in Britain’s £14bn a year space industry are pushing hard for the programme to form a key plank of the sector deal, which could be announced as soon as next month. Richard Peckham, chairman of trade body UK Space, said setting up a national space programme would give an extra push to the sector, which aims to expand to £40bn a year by 2030. “The sector deal would inject more life into the industry, especially by setting up a national programme,” he said. “This is not a Brexit reaction but we could form partnerships with other countries such as India and work on programmes with them.” Britain is currently a prominent member of the European Space Agency (ESA), and will likely remain part of the body once the UK leaves the European Union. However, unless a trade deal can be worked out, British companies are almost certain to be excluded from working on two of ESA’s biggest projects – the Earth observation system Copernicus and the Galileo GPS programme – because they are funded by EU money. Development work on the Mars ExoRover was done in the UK at Airbus' Stevenage base Credit: Airbus British companies are currently heavily involved not just in building satellites for these systems, but also managing the data they generate, work which could be jeopardised by Brexit. The 2016 Queen’s Speech made space a priority, opening up the prospect of Britain regaining the ability to launch into orbit with the Government backing the construction of a spaceport in Britain and the regulation shake-up to make this possible. This could result in “spaceplanes” taking off from a conventional runway and then blasting satellites into space from rockets they carry to altitude, as well as conventional “vertical” launches. In November the Government announced £50m of funding for spaceports, building on £99m announced earlier last year to develop a national satellite test facility at Harwell, and £4m to test a UK-designed new form of air-breathing rocket for spaceplanes. British companies could be shut out of the European Space Agency's Galileo programe Credit: Getty   One senior industry source said: “It’s been a point of anger for years that we can’t launch our own satellites and there’s been a feeling that Britain needs to beef up its programme for years. The French contribute heavily to their own space programme as well as ESA – we need to do the same.” Despite not being able to launch its own spacecraft, Britain currently builds about a quarter of all large communications satellites. The UK is also a world leader in smaller satellites – producing about 40pc of them – and the market is expected to see huge growth as the data they produce finds new commercial uses. SpaceX’s launch of its Falcon Heavy rocket last week has been seen as a signal that the space sector is at a tipping point, with the successful launch cutting the cost of getting into orbit. “We need a commitment from the Government that it really does support space,” said one industry source. “This is the time for them to step forward as we aren’t getting the detail of what Brexit will mean for us.” A stronger UK space industry was welcomed by Dame Ann Dowling, president of the Royal Academy of Engineering. She said: “Space is already a growth area for engineering innovation and it has been identified as an important area for both research and commercial development through the industrial strategy.” Sam Gyimah, the science minister, said: “The UK is perfectly placed to benefit from the new commercial space age exemplified by Tuesday’s successful launch. Our space sector is going from strength to strength and we are a global leader in satellite manufacturing, with one in four of the world’s telecommunications satellites made in Britain.  “The Government is working with industry to build on the UK’s excellence and strengths in the space sector to enable small satellite launch and sub-orbital flight from UK spaceports for the first time. We have a country full of exciting new space companies, talented people and pioneering technology, all supported by an industrial strategy that backs businesses of the future.”
The True Story Behind the Movie The 15:17 to Paris
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Separating fact from fiction in Clint Eastwood's tribute to ordinary American heroes
Second asteroid in a week to pass close to Earth on Friday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
(Reuters) - A recently discovered asteroid was due to zip within 39,000 thousand miles (64,000 km) of Earth on Friday, marking the second space rock to pass within the orbit of the moon this week, according to NASA scientists. Measuring between 50 and 130 feet (15 and 40 meters) across, the asteroid's trajectory will carry it safely past the Earth with no chance of an impact, said Paul Chodas, manager of the Center for Near-Earth Object Studies at the National Aeronautic and Space Administration’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Dubbed 2018-CB, the asteroid was scheduled to make its closest encounter with Earth at around 5:30 p.m. EST (2230 GMT), at a range that is less than one-fifth of the approximate 240,000-mile (386,000-km) distance to the moon, Chodas said in a statement.
Asma Jehangir, Leading Pakistani Rights Activist, Dies at 66
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jehangir, one of Pakistan's most prominent activists, died of a heart attack
At last minute, Russia scrubs cargo launch to space station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MOSCOW (AP) — Russia has scrubbed the planned launch of an unmanned cargo spacecraft that was to have delivered tons of supplies to the International Space Station.
Jennie Willoughby: 'President Trump Will Not Diminish My Truth'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rob Porter's ex-wife writes about President Trump calling her a liar, and about society's deep problem with believing victims of abuse
When Life Gets Tough, Escape Reality With These Amazing Tricks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Between social media, work stress, relationships, and Donald Trump tweets, we all need to escape reality now and then. These hot tips will help you live your best life.
Trump administration proposes 'privatising' International Space Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump administration is planning to end funding for the International Space Station (ISS) and turn it into a self-supporting commercial venture, according to a Nasa document obtained by the Washington Post. Reports have circulated for several weeks that the US government was planning to halt Nasa spending on the programme after 2024 and save up to $4 billion each year. Supporters fear the rumours and leaks risk deterring other nations from continuing their support for a collaborative effort that launched in 1998 and has welcomed astronauts, cosmonauts and space tourists from 17 countries. The internal Nasa document suggests that although direct federal money could end, the White House is not planning to abandon the orbiting laboratory altogether but will essentially privatise the effort. “The decision to end direct federal support for the ISS in 2025 does not imply that the platform itself will be de-orbited at that time – it is possible that industry could continue to operate certain elements or capabilities of the ISS as part of a future commercial platform,” the document states. “Nasa will expand international and commercial partnerships over the next seven years in order to ensure continued human access to and presence in low Earth orbit.” Some plans to generate income are already under way. An expandable, inflatable pod has been attached to the space station for testing to see whether a “space hotel” might one day be connected to the orbiting craft. The federal budget is due to be published on Monday, and is expected to include $150 million in 2019 “to enable the development and maturation of commercial entities and capabilities which will ensure that commercial successors to the ISS —potentially including elements of the ISS — are operational when they are needed”. In numbers | International Space Station The ISS has been crewed continually since 2000. Nasa is currently investigating whether the life of the space station could be extended to 2028. Its role and upkeep have evolved ever since the first components blasted into space almost 20 years ago. Boeing currently operates the station for Nasa, while Elon Musk’s SpaceX began regular cargo supply flights using its Dragon spacecraft in 2012. For its part Nasa has refused to comment on the leaks before the president publishes his budget.
Reg E. Cathey of 'House of Cards' and 'The Wire' Dies at 59
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The actor's cause of death has not yet been released