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What is Fibonacci retracement, and where do the ratios that are used come from?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fibonacci retracement is a very popular tool among technical traders and is based on the key numbers identified by mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci in the thirteenth century. However, Fibonacci's sequence ...
India's rural solar revolution hasn't delivered on its promise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Solar power is bringing light to remote villages across India. Rural residents, long disconnected from the grid, are increasingly using solar panels and battery banks to charge mobile phones, illuminate light bulbs, and keep refrigerators humming. Advocates for rural electrification say solar "microgrids" can do much more. They'll boost a village's socioeconomic development by allowing kids to study at night, for instance, or by enabling residents to open local shops and use time-saving tools like electric water pumps and mills. However, that scenario is still only a dream in many places, researchers said in a paper published Wednesday in Science Advances. SEE ALSO: Surprising developments in China, India could blunt Trump's climate rollbacks Solar microgrids in India's northern Uttar Pradesh state did little to improve household incomes, encourage business ownership, or reduce the long hours that people spend on daily household work, the new study found. Villagers did buy less kerosene for their lamps, since they could flip on light bulbs at night. But their lives were otherwise unchanged, according to a yearlong, randomized survey of nearly 1,300 households in 81 non-electrified rural communities. Rooftop solar panels in the Barabanki district in Uttar Pradesh, India.Image: Johannes Urpelainen"For the most part, we found overwhelmingly little socioeconomic effect," Michaël Aklin, the study's lead author and a political science professor at the University of Pittsburgh, said in an interview. That doesn't mean solar microgrids aren't worth the investment or won't deliver the promised results one day, he said. But it does show that local officials, energy companies, and NGOs alike need to address other pressing issues — such as underfunded schools or dismal job prospects — before rural electrification can really lift people out of poverty. "We're moving away from a slightly naive sense of this magical solution to having a more robust discussion," Aklin said. "Putting up a solar panel is not going to be enough. So what else do we need?" Rural electrification is a key part of the Indian government's plan to boost the economy in the nation of 1.3 billion people. About a quarter of the population, or more than 300 million people, still aren't connected to a reliable power source. A simple solar set-up in Uttar Pradesh, India.Image: Michaël AklinIndian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has pledged to meet these electrification goals by installing record amounts of renewable energy. In 2014, he set a target to increase India's solar power capacity to 100 gigawatts by 2022, about an eight-fold increase from today's 12.3 gigawatts.  India's Remote Village Electrification Program has helped install thousands of subsidized solar panel systems and solar microgrids throughout rural India. But these, too, have had an underwhelming performance in many places, according to a 2016 study from India's central Chhattisgarh state. Without battery backups, solar panels provide little use to communities at night. If villagers aren't adequately trained to maintain them, systems can fall into disrepair. Residents who want more than just a light bulb's worth of power can easily overload the system if they plug in too many appliances at once, the study found. Even where systems work well, a few big chicken-and-egg problems remain, Aklin and other experts said. For instance, if rural residents can't afford a refrigerator or sewing machine, their electricity use will remain extremely low. With low demand, banks and investors won't want to finance a larger, more expensive microgrid that might not deliver a profit. So residents are left with a smaller set-up that only allows for a few hours' worth of phone or light bulb use. Smartphones connect to a solar-charged battery in the Barabanki district in Uttar Pradesh, India.Image: Johannes UrpelainenIn another scenario, residents might have enough clean electricity to open a woodworking shop or a small textile business. But if the area has few job opportunities, the entrepreneurs will have few customers. A student could spend all night poring over her books, but if her school is failing, her education might not advance after all. "Electrification is important, but it's not necessarily sufficient. It's only one part of the puzzle," said Josh Agenbroad, who is a manager of the Rocky Mountain Institute's Sustainable Energy for Economic Development program. Agenbroad works primarily on energy access issues in African countries, though he has toured microgrids in India's Uttar Pradesh state.  He said he believed that providing electricity through microgrids and other sources could boost rural development — it just might not happen immediately. "It takes time from when you provide light to when people are able to drive economic growth and change things," he said. "Some of these grids have been around for two to three years, and economies don't pop up overnight." WATCH: This blooming solar system harvests energy from the sun like a flower
A Creationist Sues the Grand Canyon for Religious Discrimination
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“How did the Grand Canyon form?” is a question so commonly pondered that YouTube is rife with explanations. Go down into the long tail of Grand Canyon videos, and you’ll eventually find at a two-part, 35-minute lecture by Andrew Snelling. The first sign this isn’t a typical geology lecture comes comes about a minute in, when Snelling proclaims, “The Grand Canyon does provide a testament to the biblical account of Earth’s history.”
Nuclear weapons tests during Cold War created radiation that altered space weather, says Nasa
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Several nuclear explosion tests during the Cold War are responsible for altering space weather, including the Earth's magnetic environment, according to a Nasa study that examined newly-declassified data. The study concludes that Cold War-era nuclear tests created layers of artificial radiation belts typically generated by the sun. Not surprisingly, the erstwhile Soviet Union and the US caused most of man-made space weather disturbance between 1958 and 1962 while conducting high-altitude tests.
10 things to know about Robert Mueller
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Robert Mueller was just named special counsel to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Here are 10 things you should know about him.
A look back at Robert Mueller
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Robert Swan Mueller III, 72, who was just named special counsel to investigate Russian interference in the presidential election, is a jut-jawed former Marine with a bone-dry wit who retains traces of his Main Line Pennsylvania upbringing. At the Justice Department he was known as Bobby Three Sticks, a playful allusion to his patrician name, and, some say, to the three-fingered Boy Scout salute. He started as FBI director a week before 9/11, and oversaw the remaking of the bureau into an intelligence and counter-terrorism organization, charged with preventing new attacks as well as arresting the perpetrators.
Trump on Russia probe: ‘This is the single greatest witch hunt of a politician in American history!’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president reportedly took the news that special counsel had been appointed to independently investigate his campaign's ties to the Kremlin well on Wednesday night. Then came the morning.
Love bite? Snake bites Florida man who tries to kiss it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOSTWICK, Fla. (AP) — Authorities say a Florida man leaned in to kiss a rattlesnake — but got bitten instead.
Shining a Light on 'Natural' Sunscreen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. In past years, we’ve had disappointing results when testing “natural” sunscreens (also called mineral sunscreens), those...
Get the Best Sun Protection
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If you think all sunscreens touting high SPFs—like those with 50s on their labels, for example—are equally effective, here’s a surprise: Consumer Reports has found that those SPF numbers aren’t a...
The Curse of Econ 101, Cont’d
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In January, James Kwak wrote about how basic economic principles can be applied to public policy in misleading ways. A letter to the editor, followed by James’s reply, is below.
Mysterious flashes of light above Earth have a less
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You can see a lot from 1 million miles away. The blues, greens and browns of Earth's oceans and land masses stand out against the blackness of space as clouds move above the planet's surface. And sometimes you see something you may not expect.  SEE ALSO: The planet Donald Trump doesn't want you to see Scientists working with NASA's EPIC camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft (DSCOVR), located about 1 million miles from Earth, have caught sight of hundreds of mysterious flashes of light reflecting off our planet over the course of a year. What could they be? Reflections of sunlight glinting off oceans? A really, really annoying guy with a flashlight? Aliens?  In reality, the flashes are likely coming from ice crystals high up in Earth's atmosphere, but it took scientists a fair bit of observation to figure that out. To solve the mystery, researchers started digging through old DSCOVR photos to try to figure out what the flashes could be, and they came across something interesting in the process: This isn't the first time a spacecraft has spotted these flashes of light. Famed astronomer and science communicator Carl Sagan actually saw bright flashes like those seen by DSCOVR in photos taken of Earth by the Galileo spacecraft, which explored Jupiter in the 1990s.  Initially, Sagan thought those flashes were reflective bits of the ocean, but the team of DSCOVR researchers saw the flashes over land as well, meaning that it couldn't just be a water-based phenomenon.  The scientists landed on the ice crystal explanation after realizing that the flashes were coming from a high altitude and couldn't be caused by lightning due to the limited spots on the globe where they appeared. A full view of the Earth with sun glint.Image: NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterDSCOVR launched to space in 2015, and since that time, the spacecraft has taken hundreds of photos of the full sunlit side of the Earth, allowing researchers to see more than 800 of these flashes of light. “The source of the flashes is definitely not on the ground,"  Alexander Marshak, DSCOVR scientist and co-author of a new study about the flashes in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, said in a statement. "It’s definitely ice, and most likely solar reflection off of horizontally oriented particles." One day, these glints could be used to detect ice crystals and other atmospheric phenomenon on alien worlds hundreds of light-years from Earth. For now, though, scientists are going to keep using DSCOVR and other tools to study the glints at close-range.  WATCH: Google Earth Timelapse shows how man has altered the planet in 32 years
Detecting radon is as easy as detecting smoke with the Airthings Wave
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thanks to the Airthings Wave, homeowners can now protect themselves from radon, a toxic gas that unfortunately, is present in most households. But with the Wave, you don't have to live in fear.
Photographer captures time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Skyglow Project photographers may be known for their astrophotography, but this time lapse of cloud inversion is pretty incredible, too. Watch as hot air traps clouds inside the Grand Canyon.
Is Intelligence Linked To Disbelief In God?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Yes, according to historical and modern data, and new research suggests it is because intelligence provides us the ability to rise above our instincts.
Dear White House aides: Save yourselves. Save us.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Every day President Trump's aides spend at the White House now, trying to keep this thing on the tracks, is a disservice to themselves and the rest of us.
Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer Are Surviving Longer, Study Finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. There are about 3.5 million women living with breast cancer in the U.S., including those newly diagnosed, long-term surv...
'Hunchback of Torrenueva' unearthed in Roman cemetery in southern Spain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In an ancient Roman Necropolis located near Granada (southern Spain), archaeologists have unearthed the remains of a young man who had been suffering from a rare condition known as Scheuermann's disease, which would have given him a hunched back. The skeleton was discovered during excavation work in the late Roman Necropolis of Torrenueva in 2008. The site had long been used as a quay, but as the economic crisis at the end of 3rd century CE hit the Romans hard, it was abandoned and turned into a cemetery.
Murphy’s Law is totally misunderstood and is in fact a call to excellence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You have likely at some point heard the saying known as Murphy’s Law: Everything that can go wrong will. The phrase has a dour fatalism to it—if everything’s bound to fail, why bother trying? But time has distorted the law’s intended meaning entirely. There really was a Murphy, and the law that bears his name…
This swarm of drones uses virtual force fields to avoid crashing into each other
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have come up with a method for allowing swarms of quadcopters to fly in formation without accidentally crashing into one another in the process.
California tortoises died trying to reproduce during drought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists examining the deaths of female desert tortoises near Joshua Tree National Park say it appears the animals died while exhausting their water and energy to lay eggs during California's drought
Ten things to know about Robert Mueller
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
 Robert Swan Mueller III, 72, who was just named special counsel to investigate Russian interference in the presidential election, is a jut-jawed former Marine with a bone-dry wit who retains traces of his Main Line Pennsylvania upbringing. At the Justice Department he was known as Bobby Three Sticks, a playful allusion to his patrician name, and, some say, to the three-fingered Boy Scout salute. 4.  When President Bill Clinton took office he left the department and went to work for a law firm in Boston, focusing on white-collar crime.
Mueller choice for special counsel brings relief to some, though worries remain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
FBI Director Robert Mueller speaks before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee at an oversight hearing about the Federal Bureau of Investigation on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 19, 2013. It was a win for the rule of law, and for the stability of the country, in the eyes of many and Democratic and Republican lawmakers alike expressed support for the move.
Come fly with me: Dutch king was guest pilot for 21 years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Some Dutch passengers on KLM flights might have recognized the co-pilot's voice when he introduced himself on the airline's Cityhopper services.
Strep Throat Led to This Man's Devastating Health Crisis!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains graphic images that may be disturbing. Parents are advised that these images may not be suitable for young children.
Woman Who Eats Clay Pots Returns!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
When Tamika first visited The Doctors, she was eating two to three clay pots a day. Has she beaten the bizarre habit?
Courtney Stodden’s Battle with Depression and Anxiety
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Reality star and model Courtney Stodden speaks out about the decisions she’s made and her struggles with mental health and substance abuse. “I feel like I’ve lived so many lives at such a young age!” says Courtney. ‘It’s exhausting.” She explains that she fell in love with actor Doug Hutchison while taking acting classes from him and married him eight months they started communicating – she was 16 and he was 50. Adding to the stress, Courtney suffered a miscarriage.
Dr. Edward Donates Stem Cells to Save His Brother
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Veterinarian Dr. Arvid Edward, star of Amazon’s “Pet Doctors of Atlanta,” is a frequent guest of The Doctors, commenting on pet dilemmas great and small. Now Dr. Edward is here to tell his story. “No matter how healthy you are, cancer doesn’t discriminate,” says Dr. Edward, “And it can affect anybody at any time.” His own brother Sylvan is a case in point – Sylvan exercised regularly, but noticed he was becoming more and more fatigued.
Do You Know the Biggest Threats to Your Smile?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
See how much you REALLY know about keeping your teeth healthy – take The Doctors’ Which Is Worse challenge, special dental edition!
A massive solar storm could wipe out almost all of our modern technology without warning
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Manhattanhenge is coming. On May 30, the sun's rays will stream dramatically down the avenues of...
How 450
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A dangerous bacteria found in hospitals might have originated from an ancestor that lived in the guts of the first animals to walk on land, according to a new study. The bacteria, called Enterococcus, is a so-called superbug, meaning it is resistant to antibiotics and cleaning products. By analyzing the genomes and growing patterns of Enterococcus, the researchers "were able to rewind the clock back to their earliest existence and piece together a picture of how these organisms were shaped into what they are today," study co-author Ashlee Earl, group leader for the Bacterial Genomics Group at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, said in a statement.
Mouse with 3D
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A mouse that was born from the bioprosthetic ovary lays next to its mother mouse. A mouse with 3D-printed ovaries has successfully given birth to healthy pups, according to a new study. For the study, published today in the journal Nature Communications, the team replaced a mouse’s ovaries with 3D-printed ones.
Conservative legal scholars debate: Can the president obstruct justice?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As impeachment enters the American political conversation, a leading conservative legal group convenes its annual meeting just blocks from the White House.
Rising expectations of chief executives
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A new global survey about the firing of corporate leaders, which is quite positive about changes in public thought, may help explain some of the heightened scrutiny of President Trump for his recent actions. It analyzed successions of chief executive officers at 2,500 of the world’s largest public companies over the past 10 years. The forced turnovers rose from 1.6 percent of all successions in 2007-11 to 3.3 percent in 2012-16.
Cannibal 'T. Rex' Ants Seen Live for 1st Time Ever (and They're Shy)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Because the study is the first of its kind, everything the researchers discovered is new, Wong told Live Science. In March 2016, Wong found the first known live colony of T. rex ants in a piece of rotting wood stuck in the ground in Singapore's Mandai area, just south of Malaysia and north of the Singapore Zoo.
Greenpeace says Canadian forestry lawsuit aims to silence critics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Greenpeace launched a campaign Tuesday to denounce a major Canadian forestry company's lawsuit against the group -- the latest shot in a longstanding dispute between them. The multimillion dollar lawsuit that Resolute Forest Products filed against Greenpeace last year is "aimed at muzzling civil society" and "intimidating critics," the environmental activist group said. As part of its campaign Greenpeace appealed to publishers to honor their commitments not to buy paper sourced from old, endangered boreal forests in Canada.
Scientists invent world's first 100% biodegradable sanitary pad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Around 20 million sanitary pads, tampons and applicators are dumped in landfills across the United States every year – and it takes hundreds of years for the products to biodegrade inside plastic bags. A group of students at the University of Utah have invented an answer to this problem – the world's first totally biodegradable sanitary towel. Called the SHERO pad, it is made from all-natural materials and it's thinner than other similar sustainable products, making it more comfortable.
Are public sector organisations more at risk from cyber
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Small businesses are the forgotten casualties of the recent WannaCry ransomware attack.
You can send your loved one's ashes into space on Elon Musk's SpaceX rocket for $2,500
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The capsule containing the ashes will orbit the Earth for two years before re-entering the atmosphere "as as shooting star".
Democracy’s darkest moment: the Watergate scandal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It was famously described by the White House press secretary as a “third-rate burglary,” but it brought down a presidency. On the night of June 17, 1972, five men were arrested for breaking in to the Democratic National Committee headquarters in an office and hotel complex whose name has become synonymous with political scandal: the Watergate.
Controversial Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke says he is joining Trump administration
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Clarke met with President Trump back in November and was considered a potential candidate to run the department, but the post went to Gen. John Kelly.
Rep. Maxine Waters: Paul Ryan has ‘not done his job’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., slammed House Speaker Paul Ryan Wednesday, saying he “has not provided any real leadership.”
Alex Jones of Infowars retracts slurs against Chobani and an Idaho city
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Infowars host and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones has settled a lawsuit with yogurt company Chobani after spreading false information about the company and the city of Twin Falls, Idaho. Chobani filed a defamation suit against Jones last month after he posted stories about a wave of refugee-fueled crime and disease in Twin Falls, the Idaho city where Chobani opened a factory in 2012.
What is the 25th Amendment, and could it be used to remove Trump?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Critics of President Trump are invoking the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution as means for removing him from office. But for law scholar Brian C. Kalt, it’s doubtful that this would actually work.
House majority leader in 2016: 'I think Putin pays Trump'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., right, speaks with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016, following a House Republican leadership meeting. As Donald Trump was laying waste to a field of 18 Republican challengers en route to claiming his party’s presidential nomination, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy was caught making a quip about about his relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin.
In Iran election, lackluster economy opens door to a populist push
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Perched just off Revolution Square in central Tehran, Mehdi’s tiny fast-food joint is doing brisk-enough business selling burgers and pizzas – because everyone has to eat.
Lucrative project tantalizes builders – except that it's Trump's wall
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This week, a nascent national movement takes to the streets to protest the building of a border wall with Mexico. Many of the largest and best-known design, engineering, and construction firms – even those with decades of experience overseeing controversial projects in the Middle East and Africa – have decided not to bid on the border wall. Many in the contracting world worry that partisan politics will spill over into other work.
Democracy experts to Trump: Just because you can, doesn't mean you should
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Here’s a bit of advice for President Trump from experts who study the processes of democracy: Just because you can do something, doesn’t mean you should. It can prevent partisans from locking into fights so bitter they risk tearing democracies apart. In recent years, norms have withered in countries such as Hungary and Turkey where democratic structures have started to deteriorate.
14 of the Most Dramatic Celeb Makeunders
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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12 Celebrity Couples Who Couldn't Resist Twinning
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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