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Boracay Islanders Feel the Pinch After the Philippines Shuts Down a Top Tourist Destination
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Boracay islanders are scrambling to deal with the closure of their island after it was closed due to sewage and environmental issues
North Korea Threatens to Cancel Kim
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korea also abruptly canceled a high-level meeting with South Korea
In the U.S. Senate, talk of a splinter caucus to force compromise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A former adviser to Evan McMullin’s independent presidential campaign in 2016 is now in talks with a small group of U.S. senators to form a new caucus that would influence who is chosen as majority leader in 2019.
Police praise Wisconsin students for prank that was illusion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CUMBERLAND, Wis. (AP) — Police had praise for students who created an illusion for a senior class prank that appeared to show a car had crashed into the principal's office.
Indonesia Suffers Its Worst Terrorist Attack in a Decade. Here's What to Know About the Latest Wave of Violence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A child as young as nine reportedly took part in the suicide mission
An Asteroid the Size of the Statue of Liberty Will Whiz Past Earth Tomorrow. Here's How to See It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The last asteroid to crash into Earth was in 2013
Chinese tourists spark anger in Vietnam over map on shirts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — A group of Chinese tourists wearing T-shirts depicting the country's territorial claims in the disputed South China Sea has sparked anger in Vietnam.
Cannes Reviews: Two Films from Directors in Exile, Jafar Panahi's 3 Faces and Kirill Serebrennikov's Leto
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One from a Russian director on house arrest, another from an Iranian filmmaker barred from making films
Meghan Markle's Half
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Samantha Markle also made an apparent comparison to the death of Princess Diana
Gaza Border Becomes Scene of Death as U.S. Opens Embassy in Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cable TV told the story on a split screen: Israeli decorum on one side, and violent confrontation on the Gaza border on the other.
Red alert raised after ash bursts from Hawaii volcano
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Hawaiian County Civil Defense Agency said rock falls and gas explosions from one of the craters on Kilauea had caused the ash plume which was drifting downwind to the southwest. Authorities said the ash cloud was as high as 10,000 to 12,000 feet (3,000 to 3,600 meters) and had prompted a code red aviation alert.
Extremely Powerful X
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An international team of researchers has used a powerful X-ray laser to heat room-temperature water to 100,000 degrees Celsius (180,032 Fahrenheit) in less than a trillionth of a second. The team’s experiments—which are described in a paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences—produced an exotic state of water, which may provide new insights into perhaps the most important substance on Earth. Scientists from the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) and Uppsala University in Sweden used a laser known as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to shoot extremely intense but incredibly brief pulses of X-rays at a jet of water.
Your Complete Guide to Ramadan, Including the Proper Greeting and When It Starts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What you need to know about Islam's holiest month
This Massive Cruise Ship Just Became the Biggest Ever to Cross the Panama Canal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's over 1,000 feet long and has room for about 4,000 passengers
New toxic gas volcano warnings issued in Hawaii
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A look at how new warnings about toxic gas stemming from Hawaii’s volcano are prompting more evacuations and creating greater health hazards.
As lava destroys Hawaii homes, owners ask: Am I covered?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
HONOLULU (AP) — Patricia Deter moved from Oregon to Hawaii to be closer to her two daughters, but the Kilauea volcano burned down her home only a month after she bought it.
Meghan Markle's About to Get a New Royal Title. Here's Everything We Know So Far.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The royal-to-be is likely to receive a title on her wedding day
Why the Mathematician Maria Reiche Guarded Peru's Mysterious Nazca Lines
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There's more to know than meets the eye with Peru's puzzling Nazca Lines.
President Trump Gives Health Update on First Lady Melania After Visiting Her in Hospital
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Our great First Lady is doing really well. Will be leaving hospital in 2 or 3 days"
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Request 'Understanding and Respect' for Thomas Markle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"This is a deeply personal moment for Ms. Markle"
Here's What the Hawaii Volcano Eruption Looks Like From Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From two astronauts aboard the ISS
Kilauea's Eruption Is Big, but Not Big Enough to Cool the Planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano has ruptured the Earth in at least 17 places, burning homes with super-hot lava. More than 2,000 Hawaiians have evacuated, and the U.S. Geological Survey has issued warnings that “potentially lethal concentrations of sulfur dioxide gas” may leak downwind as far as a kilometer (0.6 mile) from the lava vents. President Donald Trump has declared a state of emergency.
To thwart Trump, progressives and mainstream Democrats show willingness to bury the hatchet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
At the 2018 Ideas Conference, the party seemed focussed on stopping the Republican president and his agenda.
Gaza and Jerusalem: Assessing the real costs of 'low
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump has boasted to spirited applause at political rallies over recent weeks that his good sense as a businessman allowed him to move the US Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem for a fraction of the billion-dollar cost diplomats predicted. As if to underscore the low cost of the move, the 800 invitees to Monday’s dedication ceremony at what until now was the US consulate in Jerusalem were served pretzels and water – nothing more. Of course when the United States gets around to constructing a new embassy building in Jerusalem to replace the old one in Tel Aviv, the price tag will no doubt approximate the $1 billion experts have ball-parked since Mr. Trump announced the controversial move in December.
Are octopuses aliens? New study argues ‘frozen eggs’ came from space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Octopuses are very, very strange creatures
20 of the Tastiest, Fanciest and Most Bizarre Royal Wedding Souvenirs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Every Prince Harry and Meghan Markle item you never knew you wanted... until now
Air conditioner use will triple by 2050. That's bad news for a warming planet.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
During sweltering New York City summers, the local power utility warns that for every degree you lower the thermostat, your energy bill goes up by 6 percent.  Air conditioners in every form — from window units to central air — gulp energy. There are some 1.6 billion A.C. units worldwide, accounting for around 10 percent of the world's electricity consumption. And a new report from the International Energy Agency predicts that over the course of the next 30 years, this number will triple globally, to 5.6 billion buzzing, cooling appliances. For perspective, the agency says this amounts to "10 new ACs sold every second for the next 30 years." SEE ALSO: California says new homes must have solar panels, in push to go all-renewable The looming surge in air conditioning can't be stopped, as billions more people in improving economic circumstances will want to purchase the units. Plus, they'll have increased motivation to use them.  "We know we can expect heating over the next decades, and this will require billions of people who will need access to livable conditions," Jeff Deyette, the director of state policy and energy analysis for the Union of Concerned Scientists, said in an interview. Deyette had no involvement with the report. As the potent heat-trapping gas carbon dioxide continues to accumulate in Earth's atmosphere, emitted by human industry and activity, scientists expect that the Earth will continue to warm. Seventeen of the last 18 years have been the warmest on record.  “With rising incomes, air conditioner ownership will skyrocket, especially in the emerging world," Fatih Birol, Executive Director of the International Energy Agency, said in a statement. "While this will bring extra comfort and improve daily lives, it is essential that efficiency performance for ACs be prioritized." The agency hopes that the 92-page report will not discourage the use of air conditioners — everyone has the right to use one — but will emphasize the need to make them more efficient.  Today, air conditioners in Japan and Europe are about 25 percent more efficient than those sold in the U.S. and China, the report says. Plus, many people aren't buying the most energy efficient air conditioners available, according to the report. Lots of AC units in Shanghai, China.Image: Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images"We have the technology available today to produce incredibly efficient-energy units," said Deyette. "The challenge is it's not required in most parts of the world." Although many nations are transitioning to renewable energy like solar and wind, globally, cities will largely still run on coal and natural gas to meet a surging energy demand. China, for example, plans to build 700 coal-powered plants around the world, many of which are being constructed for developing countries in need of energy.  But if there's a global standard requiring the appliances to be more efficient, the total energy usage of these appliances could be slashed by close to 50 percent, argue the report's authors. This plan, which the report calls the "Efficient Cooling Scenario," would require a global mandate, similar to the Paris Climate Agreement or the more recent plans to dramatically clean up the shipping sector.  Requiring that wasteful appliances like refrigerators be more efficient has had considerable societal effect in the past. Michael Picker, the president of the California Public Utilities Commission, called the state's 1970s-era standards on appliances "brilliant." Picker credited these standards for keeping the state's energy demand "flat," while the rest of the nation's demand doubled.  By 2050, however, California expects that it will be powered almost entirely on renewable energies, and in two years, half of the state's energy usage may come from renewables.  The primary need is getting efficient AC units into places that don't already have them, and that may run mostly on fossil fuel-generated energy. Many of these areas, it appears, happen to be some of the hottest on Earth. "Most homes in hot countries have not yet purchased their first AC," the report says. In India, where an asphalt crosswalk melted during a May 2016 heatwave, only 5 percent of households currently have AC units, something that will soon change. Newer, more energy-efficient AC units may be more expensive than antiquated models, which could discourage emerging countries from committing to such a standard. But this shouldn't be a deal-breaker, said Deyette. "This really comes down to affordability. The more that’s invested in efficient units, the less expensive they become — it's as simple as economies of scale," he said. "It's incumbent upon the developed world to drive the cost down and provide incentives for these [developing] countries." WATCH: We could see a decline in King Penguins thanks to — you guessed it — climate change
A Mysterious Group Is Threatening to Publicly Shame Pennsylvanians Who Don’t Vote
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"What if your friends, your neighbors, and your community knew whether you voted?"
Jerusalem Embassy, Gaza Bloodshed Puts Trump's Mideast Promise at Risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's the latest U.S. decision that may set off a domino effect of unpredictable consequences
Sherrod Brown lays out an agenda for 'the little guy' at conference of progressives
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, a possible 2020 presidential contender, urges progressives to make economic issues, such as health care and wages, a priority.
PHOTOS: Gaza protests: Fire on the wind. In border clash it’s soldiers vs. kites
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Israeli media are reporting significant damage to farms due to kite-flown Molotov cocktails, AFP reports. Demonstrators are demanding the right to return to their homes seized by Israel in 1948. No Israelis have been hurt in the weeks of protests and the military has faced international criticism for its use of live ammunition. Most of the 60 Gazans killed Monday were shot by Israeli snipers, Gaza’s health ministry said. The toll included a baby who died from tear gas inhalation. AFP reports that at least 2,400 others were wounded in the bloodiest day in the conflict since 2014.
A new push on immigration roils the midterms – and House Republicans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Two months ago, after passing an enormous spending bill to fund the government, Congress seemed all but done for the year – ready to wrap things up in Washington and focus on winning reelection at home. To supporters of the maneuver, it represents a boost for small-d democracy – and the potential to save the GOP’s House majority. At center stage are the Dreamers, young unauthorized immigrants who came to the US as children.
A worker strike puts Nigeria’s health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When the presidential jet roared down the runway at the international airport in Nigeria’s capital last week, it was leaving on a familiar mission. The country’s president, Muhammadu Buhari, was bound for London, where he regularly travels for medical treatment. Since taking office in 2015, in fact, Mr. Buhari, who is 75, has spent about six months in Britain for visits with his doctors.
The peace in learning to discern the news
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In recent years, more American high schools have begun to teach “media literacy,” especially during an era of “fake news.” More news outlets now offer truth checks on public statements. One 2003 study of an 11th-grade class on media literacy found students were better able to recognize “the complex blurring” of information and entertainment in nonfiction media. Media literacy is still a work in progress.
What Is the Multiverse? Parallel Universes Could Be Hospitable to Life, Scientists Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The idea that our universe is just one of many—part of a multiverse—has long fascinated scientists, fiction writers and philosophical thinkers alike. “Only a tiny fraction of the baby universes are born such that they have the right amount of dark energy—the mysterious force that is accelerating the expansion of the universe—to be hospitable for life.
Sally Yates warns of Trump 'tearing down the legitimacy' of the Justice Department
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former acting Attorney General Sally Yates said she had something to get off her chest about President Trump at the 2018 Ideas Conference hosted by the Center for American Progress on Tuesday: Don’t ignore his attacks on the rule of law.
Sherrod Brown lays out an agenda for ‘the little guy’ at conference of progressives
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, a possible 2020 presidential contender, urges progressives to make economic issues, such as health care and wages, a priority.
Woman fired after cops seize laxative
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SALINE, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan engineering company employee has been fired after police determined she baked laxatives into brownies intended for a departing colleague's send-off.
Greece and Turkey's tense rivalry swells over land and sea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Relations between Greece and Turkey have deteriorated markedly over a series of incidents in the Aegean Sea and on their land border just since March. There are concerns that one false move could lead to a military confrontation, despite the two neighbors being members of NATO. WHAT IS HAPPENING BETWEEN GREECE AND TURKEY?
STDs Reached a Record High in California Last Year, According to State Health Authorities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Health professionals blame budget shortfall and other factors for the spike
The average graduate salaries across the UK
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
How does yours compare?
Gap Has Apologized for Selling T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The map appeared to exclude southern Tibet, the South China Sea and Taiwan
The White House Blamed Hamas After Israeli Troops Shot and Killed Palestinians
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Israel has the right to defend itself"
Buried treasure found in NYC; pirates nowhere in sight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — A couple of urban island-dwellers have found buried treasure in their backyard — but so far the pirates are nowhere in sight.
Domestic dispute in Germany: Man arguing with a parrot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BERLIN (AP) — Police were called to investigate a domestic disturbance in a southern German town — and found a man arguing with a parrot.
For women in law, 'RBG' is their superhero movie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A long line at a movie theater on a Friday night tends be a sign of the latest superhero movie. “Everyone loves a hero story,” says Justice Rebecca Martinez, who serves on the Texas Fourth Court of Appeals here and organized the screening. Some 30 percent of the tickets went to high school students, so they could see the documentary for free.
No time to waste: Moscow urged to recycle, not burn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Protests have been growing in recent months over the stench from landfill sites around Moscow, overflowing with millions of tonnes of rubbish. Authorities have now decided on a plan to tackle the problem -- generating energy by burning the waste instead. Russia produces almost 70 million tonnes of rubbish per year, according to Greenpeace's estimates.
Noisy Hawaiian volcano lava fissure prompts more evacuations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PAHOA, Hawaii (AP) — A new fissure in Hawaii's Puna District sent gases and lava exploding into the air on Sunday, spurring officials to call for more evacuations as residents waited for a possible major eruption at Kilauea volcano's summit.
'It Will Always Be Our Capital': A Day of Victory for Israel Is a Day of Rage in Gaza
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As Israelis celebrated the relocation of the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, dozens of Palestinians were killed at the border