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Caitlyn Jenner Says Her Support for President Trump Was 'a Mistake'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She accused him of "relentlessly" attacking transgender rights
The Real Reason People Carve Jack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The etymology of "jack-o'-lantern" is almost unrelated to its modern meaning and tradition
Mysterious Russian missile identified as anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A mysterious missile photographed last month on a Russian jet is believed to be a mock-up of an anti-satellite weapon, three sources with direct knowledge of a U.S. intelligence report say. The Russian anti-satellite weapon, which is attached to a space launch vehicle, is expected to target communication and imagery satellites in low Earth orbit, according to one source, who spoke on the condition of anonymity. WASHINGTON — A never-before-seen missile photographed last month on a Russian MiG-31 interceptor is believed to be a mock-up of an anti-satellite weapon that will be ready for warfare by 2022, three sources with direct knowledge of a U.S. intelligence report say.
Should You Be Afraid of Election Hacking? Here's What Experts Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Assessing the threat — and what public fear can lead to
Poor Ivory Coast pupils' ray of hope: solar backpacks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The equatorial sun has been up for about an hour as a gaggle of children set off from the Ivorian village of Allepilla on their hour-long trek to school. Back home in the evening, eight-year-old Marie-France Amoandji Ngbessoo does her homework by the light of her backpack's LED -- captured by solar panels on her way to and from school. Allepilla, some 100 kilometres (60 miles) north of the West African country's economic capital Abidjan, is a rural community centred on cocoa and coffee production.
Frankenstein: the real experiments that inspired the fictional science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Frankenstein might look like fantasy to modern eyes, but to its author and original readers there was nothing fantastic about it.
NASA solar Parker probe captures image of Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Oct. 26 (Notimex).- NASA's Parker Probe solar probe took a photograph of Earth, while the spacecraft was about 27 million miles from the planet. The snapshot taken by the WISPR object, unique in the solar probe to take images, shows the "blue planet" as a bright and round object. The Parker Solar Probe captured the image, as it headed towards the first serious Venus assistance of the mission, on September 25. The two panels of the WISPR description come from the instrument's two telescopes, which point in slightly different directions and have different fields of view. The internal telescope produced the image on the left, while the external telescope on the right. In the photo you can also see the Moon, as a light bulge on the right side that looks out from behind the Earth, explained the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Also, in the snapshot broadcast by the US space agency, we can observe the star cluster of the Pleiades or seven sisters, located in the constellation of Taurus. In addition to the red supergiant star Betelgeuse, and Bellatrix the third brightest star of the Orion constellation. The Parker Probe is the first mission in history towards the Sun, in order to explore the atmosphere of the brightest star in the galaxy, whose first scientific data is expected in December. NTX/ICB/LCH/ASTRO16/JCG
Closing in on the brutal killer in DC mansion murders: Part 3
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Authorities used DNA off a charred pizza crust, then led 48-hour manhunt to arrest Daron Wint.
London's earliest settlers to be uncovered in Britain's biggest archaeological dig ahead of HS2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A prehistoric encampment which housed London’s earliest inhabitants will be excavated as part of a major archaeological project ahead of the building of HS2. Archaeologists have already found flint tools from a site in the eastern Colne Valley, in the London borough of Hillingdon, showing hunter gatherers were living along the flood plains in the early Mesolithic, between 9,000 and 7,000BC. Now they want to learn more about the lives of people who inhabited Britain at the end of the last ice age, thousands of years before the building of Stonehenge. Humans habitation in the area continued from the Mesolithic right through to the Medieval Period and archaeologists are planning to lay down trenches and drill boreholes in areas where settlements were most likely. Until now, the earliest evidence of habitation in London has come from the south shore of the Thames, near Vauxhall Bridge where Mesolithic timber structures dating between 4,800BC and 4,500BC were found. Stone tools made by early hunters gatherers  Duncan Wilson, Chief Executive of Historic England said: “With the building of HS2 comes a once-in-a-generation opportunity to improve our understanding of how people have shaped England’s landscapes over thousands of years, from the first prehistoric farmers through Roman and Saxon and Viking incomers to the more recent past. "Historic England is working closely with HS2 archaeologists so we can make sure that this opportunity is seized and we are advising on how we can get the best possible results from the discoveries.” More than 1,000 archaeologists are set to explore 10,000 years of British history across more than 60 sites, spanning the 150 mile route of HS2 between London and the West Midlands. Among the projects, the teams will be investigating Romano-British town in Fleet Marston, Aylesbury,  a medieval manor in Warwickshire, and a 1,000 year old medieval church and burial ground in Buckinghamshire village. It is the biggest archaeological programme ever to take place in Britain and  must be carried out ahead of the building of phase one of the project, from London to Birmingham. Some work is already underway and early finds include prehistoric tools in Buckinghamshire, medieval pottery in Stoke Mandeville and two Victorian time capsules with more discoveries to come as archaeologists begin the exploration of our past. Thousands of bodies are also to be exhumed and reburied at St James’s Gardens, a former burial ground next to Euston station, which will be the London terminus for HS2. Research of the burial records has revealed that a number of notable people were buried at the site including  Captain Matthew Flinders, the first English navigator to circumnavigate Australia, who mapped and named the country. Bill ‘the Terror’ Richmond, a slave born in New York but became a free Londoner and a celebrated bare knuckle boxer who was favoured by King George IV and taught Lord Byron to spar is also buried a the site as well as James Christie who founded the auction house in 1766. Captain Matthew Flinders Credit: Alamy Helen Wass, HS2 Head of Heritage, said: “The sheer scale of possible discoveries, the geographical span and the vast range of our history to be unearthed makes HS2’s archaeology programme a unique opportunity to tell the story of Britain. “From Prehistoric remnants and Roman settlements to deserted medieval villages, Wars of the Roses battlefields and Victorian innovation, HS2’s archaeology programme has it all. “This is a very exciting time for archaeology in Britain.”
Saudi investments influence reactions to Khashoggi affair, Climate change brings security risks, Countries will have to choose a side in US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The new global economy is addicted to Saudi wealth,” writes John McDuling. It has forced Jamie Dimon, the chief executive of giant American bank JPMorgan, to cancel an appearance at an upcoming event in the country.... Other key figures from Silicon Valley ... have remained silent. “A milestone report [from the United Nations] has warned the global community of the expository risks our planet faces...,” writes Mir Aftabuddin Ahmed.
Readers write: Thoughts on new Heart of the News section
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Thoughts on new Heart of the News section
There’s Nothing Virtuous About Finding Common Ground
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The middle is a point equidistant from two poles. That’s it. There is nothing inherently virtuous about being neither here nor there."
A $3.5 million mansion, a beautiful family's future up in flames: Part 1
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It started with a house fire -- then the bodies of three adults and a child are found in the sprawling home.
Give Merriam Webster the Year You Were Born and They'll Give You the Hot New Words From Then
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
History is always being written
Robert Durst, Subject of HBO's 'The Jinx,' Has Been Ordered to Stand Trial for Murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Prosecutors say he killed his friend Susan Berman because she could implicate him in his wife's 1982 disappearance
Can’t figure out your Ikea furniture? Call a crow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We already know crows are clever enough to construct tools from memory and can be trained to pick up trash. However, a new study shows that they’re more skilled than scientists previously imagined. These resourceful birds, it turns out, can also innovate, making compound tools out of parts, a skill previously only demonstrated in a…
10 days until the midterm elections: Where things stand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Beto O'Rourke raises more than Ted Cruz as their Senate race tops $100 million in combined donations.
GM proposes nationwide zero
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DETROIT (AP) — General Motors says it will ask the federal government for one national gas mileage standard, including a requirement that a percentage of auto companies' sales be zero-emissions vehicles.
Mail Bombs Rocked American Politics a Century Ago. Here's What a Historian Thinks That Moment Has to Teach Us
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In 1919, three dozen prominent figures were the targets of a coordinated mail-bomb campaign
Trump Wants to Leave a Nuclear
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Twice in the 20th century, the great powers tried to create a peaceful world for the long run by limiting armaments. And, with recent developments, it appears as if those efforts have twice failed
Trump bemoans political incivility, then goes after the media and Democrats
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president gives a mixed message at a North Carolina rally on Friday evening.
Millions with high blood sugar face TB risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Millions of people with high blood sugar may be at greater risk of tuberculosis than previously thought, scientists said Friday, warning that diabetes and TB could combine to create the "perfect storm" of disease. Tuberculosis, a severe infection caused by bacteria in the lungs, kills almost as many people each year as HIV/AIDS and malaria combined. In 2017 nearly 10 million people developed TB, according to the World Health Organization, and experts are concerned that a global explosion in diabetes will put millions more at risk.
US says no radiation released in steam leak at nuclear site
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — No airborne radiation was detected after steam escaped Friday from a tunnel containing radioactive waste at a former nuclear weapons production site in Washington state, U.S. officials said, the second problem with aging tunnels at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in a year.
President Trump Condemns Political Violence Hours After Saying 'Bomb Stuff' Was Distracting From Midterms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"These terrorizing acts are despicable and have no place in our country."
Border Patrol Has No Intention 'Right Now' to Shoot at Caravan Migrants If They Approach U.S. Border
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said there were no plans to open fire on a migrant caravan currently heading through Mexico.
Mail bomb suspect displayed rage — and love for Trump — on social media pages
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Facebook accounts, a LinkedIn account, and a Twitter page appear to belong to mail-bomb suspect Cesar Altieri Sayoc, and the postings appear to be from an ardent supporter of President Donald Trump.
Migrant caravan gives Kobach fresh ammunition in deadlocked Kansas governor's race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Though the capital of Kansas is about 1,000 miles from the southwest border, Kris Kobach has seized on the immigrant caravan story to make illegal immigration a key issue in his incredibly close governor’s race with Democrat Laura Kelly.
Plane Carrying Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Forced to Abort Landing in Sydney
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A plane carrying the Duke and Duchess of Sussex had to abort its landing at Sydney airport because there was another aircraft on the runway
Mystery ozone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mysterious emissions which are preventing the hole in the ozone layer from closing are coming from China, scientists have discovered. Researchers from the University of Bristol have found significant ongoing fumes of a potent ozone-depleting substance have their origin eastern China. The compound, carbon tetrachloride, contributes to the destruction of the Earth’s ozone layer, which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation.  As a result, the production of carbon tetrachloride has been banned throughout the world since 2010 for uses that will result in its release to the atmosphere. However, recent studies have shown that global emissions have not declined as expected, with about 40,000 tonnes still being emitted each year. But until now, nobody knew where they were coming from.  Alongside collaborators from South Korea, Switzerland, Australia and the USA, researchers at Bristol  used ground-based and airborne atmospheric concentration data from near the Korean peninsula and computer modelling to work out the direction of the emissions.  Their results, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, show that around half of the ‘missing’ global emissions of carbon tetrachloride originated from eastern China between 2009 and 2016. Lead author, Dr Mark Lunt, from the University of Bristol’s School of Chemistry, said: “Our results show that emissions of carbon tetrachloride from the eastern Asia region account for a large proportion of global emissions and are significantly larger than some previous studies have suggested. “Not only that, but despite the phase out of carbon tetrachloride production for emissive use in 2010, we found no evidence for a subsequent decrease in emissions.” The ozone hole was first discovered using ground-based data that began in the 1950s and in  the mid-1980s, scientists from the British Antarctic survey noticed that the October total ozone was dropping. The hole has continued to widen ever since, peaking in 2000 at 15 million square miles and remaining fairly constant over the past 15 years, except for a few spikes. However new modelling by Nasa in Janaury showed that most recent spikes in ozone depletion were caused by volcanic eruptions rather than chlorine in the atmosphere and the hole is actually closing. But it would be closing more quickly if all countries stuck to the ban, researchers believe. The results from the new study shows emissions are now actually increasing again and a new source of emissions from the Shandong province of China began after 2012. Recent reports have suggested that very large amounts of this gas may be emitted inadvertently during the production of other chemicals such as chlorine. Emissions which damage the ozone later were banned under the Montreal Protocol  Dr Matt Rigby, Reader in Atmospheric Chemistry at the University of Bristol and co-author, said: “Our work shows the location of carbon tetrachloride emissions. However, we don’t yet know the processes or industries that are responsible. "This is important because we don’t know if it is being produced intentionally or inadvertently. “There are areas of the world such as India, South America and other parts of Asia, where emissions of ozone-depleting gases may be ongoing, but detailed atmospheric measurements are lacking. "The recovery of the ozone layer will have been delayed by these emissions, compared to our expectations. " It is hoped that this work can now be used by scientists and regulators to identify the cause of these emissions from eastern Asia.  Dr Lunt said: “Studies such as this show the importance of continued monitoring of ozone-depleting gases. There is a temptation to see ozone depletion as a problem that has been solved. "But the monitoring of man-made ozone-depleting gases in the atmosphere is essential to ensure the continued success of the phase-out of these compounds.”
Guns Have Divided America. Here’s What Happens When 245 People Try to Meet in the Middle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The search for common ground begins with listening—to everyone
Mexico votes in referendum on controversial new airport
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico's incoming leftist government of President-Elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador on Thursday opened polls for a referendum on whether or not to keep building a controversial new airport for the capital area. The 64-year-old Lopez Obrador, who succeeds Enrique Pena Nieto on December 1, had threatened to cancel the multi-billion-dollar project, charging it was a waste of taxpayer money. The soon-to-be president, a former Mexico City mayor, has also criticized the environmental impact of the project -- whose estimated cost is more than $13 billion -- and said it is marred by corruption.
Housekeeper remembers family, friend killed in DC mansion murders: 'It's very hard'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Sometimes people don't realize how hard it is when you care for a person," Nelitza Gutierrez, who was a housekeeper for the Savopoulos family, told "20/20" in 2015.
Nuclear waste site workers ordered inside after steam leak
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Some workers at a nuclear weapons production site in Washington state were ordered to stay inside Friday because steam escaped from a tunnel with radioactive waste as it was being filled with cement, officials said.
Oregon governor joins other states in offshore drilling ban
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Oregon Gov. Kate Brown issued an executive order Thursday blocking offshore drilling, joining several other states trying to shield themselves from the Trump administration's plan to drill for oil and gas off the U.S. coast.
Cesar Sayoc charged with 5 federal crimes in mail bomb plot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Cesar Sayoc was arrested in Florida and charged with five federal crimes in connection with the mailing of pipe bombs, the U.S. Department of Justice said on Friday.
Kamala Harris is the latest 2020 Dem hopeful to lend Bill Nelson a hand in Florida
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The California senator becomes the latest potential hopeful to head to the Sunshine State.
Look what we found: Tiny female lion cub in French garage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PARIS (AP) — France's customs agency says it's made an extremely surprising discovery in a garage in Marseille: a lion cub.
A better way to view the migrant caravan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Viewing them as predators, Mr. Trump seeks stronger border security and aggressive immigration restrictions, perhaps with an eye on the November elections for Congress. Based on recent evidence, more people in those countries may be viewing themselves as capable agents of progress.
Amid 2018 rancor, O’Rourke’s optimism stood out. But can he keep it civil?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It took less than 48 hours last week for Beto O’Rourke to express regret over attacking Ted Cruz, the United States senator he hopes to unseat this year. Grassroots energy, record fundraising hauls, and a Democrat actually being competitive statewide in ruby-red Texas have combined to make this one of the most closely-watched contests in the country. In the months he has campaigned across the state he has rarely criticized Senator Cruz, saying he instead wants to focus on issues, inclusion, and optimism.
Brazil's Presidential Frontrunner Bolsonaro Says He Won't Pull Out of Paris Climate Agreement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Brazil stays in the Paris Agreement'
Utah State Senator Tries Marijuana on Camera to Show Why State Should Support Legalization
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Recognize that this is nothing to be afraid of"
Live updates: Man taken into custody in connection with mail bomb plot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Two new suspicious packages addressed to Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., another to former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, were intercepted by authorities on Friday amid a nationwide manhunt for a possible serial mail bomber.
President Trump blames mail bombs for hurting Republicans in midterm elections
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump suggested Friday morning that the dangerous packages sent to prominent Democrats and critics of his administration were hurting the GOP’s chances in the midterms.
Democrats could still flip the Senate. Republicans could still keep the House. Here’s how.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It’s unlikely that the GOP will retain the House or that the Democrats will retake the Senate. That doesn’t mean those improbable things can’t happen.
'Corpse flower' that smells like dirty diapers to bloom
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HANOVER, N.H. (AP) — Just in time for Halloween, a rare "corpse flower" that gets its nickname from its putrid smell is expected to bloom next week at Dartmouth College's greenhouse.
As Brazil votes, Bolsonaro fans are hungry for a hero
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The country needs someone who values family, who values measures against corruption, and who has a clean record,” says Vania de Alencar, a middle-aged lawyer wearing a Brazilian soccer jersey. In the past, Ms. Alencar supported former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and the PT, which ran Brazil from 2003 to 2016. Earlier this year, Lula, as he is known, led the polls.
Oops! Civilian Satellite Data Inadvertently Pinpoints Military Radars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
X literally marks the spot for U.S.-made Patriot missile batteries.
Police Identify David Schwimmer Lookalike Who Went Viral for Theft
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Police in the U.K. searching for a man resembling David Schwimmer, who played Ross from Friends, said the suspect has been identified.
Defense Secretary Expected to Send 800 Troops to U.S. Border After Request From President Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is expected to sign an order as early as Thursday sending 800 or more troops to the southern border to support the Border Patrol, a U.S. official said.
Bitter Rivals Blast Off as Pakistan Enters Space Race With India
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“The first Pakistani will be sent to space in 2022,” Information Minister Fawad Chaudhry said Thursday, the same year that India is planning its first manned mission. Pakistan’s space agency, the Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission, has “an agreement for this venture” with China’s Manned Space Agency, Chaudhry said.