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Oregon water scare: Algae blooms happening more often
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The words blasted to cellphones around Salem, Oregon were ominous: "Civil emergency. prepare for action."
What's Happening to the 2,300 Children Already Separated From Their Parents? Here's Everything We Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There is still no clear process for reuniting them with their families
Japan’s Hayabusa 2 probe closes in on asteroid Ryugu – and captures close
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Look! Up in the sky! It’s a dumpling … It’s a “Star Trek” Borg cube … It’s the asteroid Ryugu! Our view of Ryugu, a half-mile-wide space rock nearly 180 million miles from Earth, is coming into sharper focus with the approach of the Japanese probe Hayabusa 2. Three and a half years after its launch, the spacecraft is now within 35 miles of the asteroid, closing in on what’s expected to be a standoff orbital distance of 12 miles. The pictures that it’s been sending back throughout the approach provide enough detail to reveal Ryugu’s blocky shape. “It looks… Read More
Key Democrat: Trump advisers 'lied through their teeth' when testifying about Russia contacts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee says he believes longtime Donald Trump adviser Roger Stone and an associate “lied through their teeth” when they testified before his panel and they both should be investigated for perjury. Swalwell focused on recent revelations that, at Caputo’s instigation, Stone met during the 2016 campaign in Florida with a Russian immigrant and sometime FBI informant named Henry Greenberg who offered “dirt” on Hillary Clinton.
Three Men Face Hate Crimes Charges in Minnesota Mosque Bombing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The explosion damaged the imam's office but nobody was hurt
Exclusive: Thailand PM Prayuth Chan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's just over four years since Prayuth, 64, launched a coup d’etat after six months of street protests
In India, rats have a $19,000 meal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GUWAHATI, India (AP) — It was a cash machine heist with a difference: The attackers were hungry rodents.
Bank robbery suspect gives ID, easily tracked by police
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Police say a quick-thinking bank teller in Ohio convinced a suspected robber to hand over his own license.
Immigration Votes Cap a Rough Week for the GOP
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As they head into an already difficult midterm election cycle, GOP lawmakers have found themselves playing defense.
Giant telescope project before Hawaii Supreme Court again
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
HONOLULU (AP) — The Hawaii Supreme Court heard arguments Thursday in an appeal that could determine whether an embattled multi-nation telescope project can be built on a mountain Native Hawaiians consider sacred or have to move to a backup site in Spain's Canary Islands that's less desirable to scientists hoping to use the instrument for groundbreaking discoveries.
Charles Krauthammer, Conservative Political Commentator, Dies at 68
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He wrote in early June that he had terminal cancer
For Trump Supporters, the End of Unlawful Immigration Justifies 'Zero Tolerance's' Means
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'I think President Trump is getting exactly what he wants'
Hawaiians Blame Misunderstanding of Volcano and 'Doomsday' Headlines for Big Drop in Tourism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kilauea's lava flow encompasses only 9.5 square miles on an island the size of Rhode Island and Delaware combined
Mars Dust Storm Goes Global, Covers Curiosity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
While bad news for the Opportunity rover, this gives NASA a great chance to study the storm up close.
Facebook testing subscription fees for membership groups
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Company to let some groups starting charging monthly fees for access to content.
'He Might Change His Mind in Minutes or Hours.' Migrant Mothers React to Trump Ending Border Separations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One woman hadn't seen her son in more than a month.
Melania Trump Wore a Jacket That Said 'I Really Don't Care' on It Ahead of Visit to Child Detention Center
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It's a jacket. There was no hidden message," her spokesperson said
Bear researcher attacked by grizzly to stay on career path
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — A grizzly bear researcher who was attacked by a grizzly bear last month said Thursday that her recovery has been slow, but the encounter has done nothing to change her mind about her career path.
Marijuana Will Be Legal in Canada on Oct. 17, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Canada is only the second country in the world to make marijuana legal across the country
President Trump Will Meet Queen Elizabeth Next Month
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The last time Trump was invited to the U.K., over 1.8 million Britons signed a petition against his visit
Japan Is Canceling Evacuation Drills Meant to Prepare Civilians for North Korean Missiles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Officials said recent diplomatic developments had reduced the threat of missile strikes
Unfiltered: 'The activism that started Pride is being left behind.'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
On the 49th anniversary of the Stonewall riots a group of activists are fighting for better representation of the LGBTQ community within the NYC Pride festivities.
Virginia detention facility for young migrants received over $4.6 million in government grants after abuse allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The federal government continued to provide million-dollar grants to a juvenile detention center in Virginia to hold child migrants even after a lawsuit was filed against the facility alleging the young immigrants there were subjected to “brutal, inhumane conditions.”
Wife credited with returning husband to jail following error
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (AP) — Court records say a Colorado inmate, mistakenly released from jail, enjoyed less than two hours of freedom before his wife realized the error and made him turn himself in.
A journey along the shoals of a gentrifying L.A. neighborhood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The tale of Frogtown is, on the surface, a familiar drama of longtime residents watching as developers descend upon their “undiscovered” neighborhood. Dig a little deeper, though, and what you find is a community that has, for most of its history, held fast to its local character while enduring the convulsions of growing cosmopolitanism. Winding through the narrative is the L.A. River.
On US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Checking her calendar in a park across the street from the Gateway International Bridge in Brownsville earlier this week, her guess is close: 15 days ago. There had been nothing in the news then, and no one had been talking about it until she heard from a friend of a friend that asylum-seekers were lined up on the bridge connecting Reynosa, Mexico with Hidalgo, Texas – a few miles south of McAllen. At first she was surprised, says Ms. Hamilton, a retired educator who lives in Harlingen – then eager to learn what supplies the asylum-seekers needed.
50+ Picnic Food Ideas You Need to Try
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Convicted Car Thief Arrested in XXXTentacion Murder Investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The arrest came about 48 hours after the rapper was shot and killed
Most Americans Approve of How Trump Is Handling North Korea Following Summit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But they don't think North Korea will dismantle its nuclear program
Litter of Mountain Lion Kittens Found in Santa Monica Mountains
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A litter of mountain lion kittens were recently discovered in the Santa Monica Mountains in Calabasas, California, according to a National Park Service video released June 19.The Santa Monica Mountains Recreation Area shared the news on their Twitter page on June 19. “We recently discovered a litter of 4 mountain lion kittens, all female,” the unit shared. Footage shows the kittens in their den with one of them hissing and showing her teeth to the camera.After collecting tissue samples from each kitten, the unit found that the litter weighed between four and a half and five pounds and were four and a half weeks old. Credit: Santa Monica Mountains Recreation Area via Storyful
Photographer captures something rather unexpected while taking pictures of Venus
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A white light flashed up above Venus and moved downward with high speed.
Dead plankton, stunned fish: the harms of man
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Human-caused ocean noise and its dangers to marine life are the focus of meetings at the United Nations this week, a victory for advocacy groups that have long warned of the problem. - What are the causes of ocean noise? Advocacy groups focus on seismic airguns, which are used by oil and gas interests to find reserves on the ocean floor.
President Trump Promotes 'Tough' Immigration Policies at Minnesota Rally After His Turnaround on Family Separation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He also unleashed a torrent of grievances about the media and those investigating him
President Trump's Tweet Just Made It Harder for the House to Pass an Immigration Bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"What is the purpose of the House doing good immigration bills when you need 9 votes by Democrats in the Senate"
Melania and Ivanka attempt to play nice cops on family separation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The day after the White House began a retreat from a border crisis of its own making, the Trump women began a charm offensive to blunt the impact of images of young children separated from their parents.
Order on family separation offers no relief for thousands already being held 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Despite a federal policy change that will affect the detention of new families caught illegally entering the country, children who’ve already been separated from their parents will remain so.
Melania Trump makes surprise visit to migrant child facility in Texas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Melania Trump made an unannounced visit to a Texas facility Thursday, talking with children and staff as she got a first-hand look at some of the migrant children sent there by the U.S. government after their families entered the country illegally. The first lady’s stop at Upbring New Hope Children’s Center came the morning after President Donald Trump signed an executive order halting the practice of separating these families.
2 people injured while trying to avoid hitting kangaroo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
DODSON, Mont. (AP) — A Montana Highway Patrol Trooper says two people were injured after the driver swerved their vehicle to avoid hitting a kangaroo on the road.
Rat breaches bank ATM in India, eats $18,000 worth of cash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Zarir Hussain GUWAHATI, India (Reuters) - When bank technicians in India were finally summoned to investigate why an ATM (automated teller machine) had not been working for days, they began to smell a rat. What they found inside the ATM was almost $18,000 worth of shredded Indian rupee notes and one dead rodent that had somehow eluded the machine's security camera for its next, and last, meal, a State Bank of India (SBI) official said on Thursday. "The ATM was out of order for a few days and when our technicians opened the kiosk we were shocked to find shredded notes and a dead rat," said Chandan Sharma, SBI branch manager in the town of Tinsukia in the northeastern state of Assam.
As OPEC watches nervously, Russia and Saudi Arabia create a new axis – of oil
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The next day it was announced that Russia and Saudi Arabia had agreed to “institutionalize” their two-year old bilateral arrangement to coordinate oil production targets in order to smooth out global price fluctuations.
Why nations are not alone in fighting graft
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
By itself, this news out of Romania on Thursday may not mean much outside Romania: A court sentenced the country’s most powerful politician, Liviu Dragnea, to 3-1/2 years over a fake jobs scandal. As a triumph for rule of law in one of Europe’s most corrupt countries, the sentence was a big one. Romania is one example.
War games 'very provocative'? To S. Korea, so is calling them off
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The military exercises that the United States holds with South Korea every summer, code-named Ulchi Freedom Guardian, have been a vital part of the two countries’ alliance since the 1970s. The main goal of the exercises, which rely heavily on computer simulations, is to ensure that the two militaries are prepared for a sudden crisis, namely an attack by North Korea. It had threatened to call off its June 12 summit with the US, and did call off a meeting with Seoul, over the “Max Thunder” drills in May. This summer’s exercises would have been “very provocative,” Mr. Trump said at the Singapore summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un last week.
American Airlines Doesn't Want to Fly Migrant Children Separated From Their Families
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'We have no desire to be associated with separating families, or worse, to profit from it'
The House GOP's Immigration Overhaul Is on the Brink of Collapse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The bill was a long shot, but failure may now come at a steeper price for the GOP
Rosetta Space Probe's Last Images Were of its Own Grave, ESA Footage Shows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The European Space Agency released a video on June 21 showing the final images recorded by the Rosetta Probe as it crash-landed onto the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in September 2016, ending its 10-year mission.The ESA said of Rosetta’s last recordings: “As it moved closer towards the surface it scanned across an ancient pit and sent back images showing what would become its final resting place.” Credit: ESA via Storyful
Too hot to handle: Politics of warming part of culture wars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — When it comes to global warming, America's political climate may have changed more than the Earth's over the past three decades.
Summer solstice 2018: Everything you need to know about the longest day of the year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It may feel like summer arrived weeks ago: deckchairs are already out in parks, holidays are booked, barbecues have been fired up and – in true British fashion – we've no idea what to wear to our air-conditioned offices. But technically speaking astronomical summer didn't begin until today, when Britain enjoys the longest day of 2018. Read on below to find everything you need to know about summer, the solstice, traditions, the significance of Stonehenge – and how to celebrate it. When is the longest day of the year? In the northern hemisphere, summer solstice, or longest day of the year, takes place between June 20 and 22 each year.  This year it falls today - Thursday, June 21 - when the UK will enjoy 16 hours and 38 minutes of daylight. The sun rose at 4.43am and will set at 9.31pm, according to weather.com.  The crowd cheers as the sun rises through the stones on the longest day of the year. Happy #SummerSolstice! pic.twitter.com/sNhNKEGExR— English Heritage (@EnglishHeritage) June 21, 2018 The solstice officially marks the beginning of astronomical summer which ends when the autumn equinox falls on September 23. Day and night will be at almost equal length on this day, as the sun crosses the celestial equator and moves southward into the northern hemisphere. Read about how Stonehenge builders used Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before Greek philosopher was born What happens during the summer solstice? There are two solstices each year - one in the winter and one in the summer. The summer solstice occurs when the when the tilt of Earth's axis is most inclined towards the sun and is directly above the Tropic of Cancer. Traditionally, the summer solstice period fell between the planting and harvesting of crops, leaving people who worked the land time to relax. This is why June became the traditional month for weddings. It might seem like a day to celebrate, but it actually signals the moment the sun's path stops moving northward in the sky, and the start of days becoming steadily shorter as the slow march towards winter begins.  However, we won't notice the days becoming shorter for a while. The shortest day of the year isn't until Thursday, December 21, known as the winter solstice; it lasts for 7 hours 49 minutes and 41 seconds in Britain, which is 8 hours, 49 minutes shorter than the June solstice. Summer solstice 2018 gallery At the winter solstice, the Earth's axis is tilted furthest away from the sun directly over the Tropic of Capricorn bringing only a few hours of daylight. In the southern hemisphere the dates of the two solstices are reversed. The winter solstice occurs on the same day in June and the summer solstice the same day in December. The term 'solstice' derives from the Latin word 'solstitium', meaning 'sun standing still'. Some prefer the more teutonic term 'sunturn' to describe the event. Astrologers say the sun seems to 'stand still' at the point on the horizon where it appears to rise and set, before moving off in the reverse direction. Equinox and solstice explainer graphic Summer solstice traditions: why is Stonehenge so significant? Stonehenge in Avebury, Wiltshire is the most popular place for Pagans to celebrate the longest day because it famously aligns to the solstices. The rising sun only reaches the middle of the stones one day of the year when it shines on the central altar. Built in three phases between 3,000 B.C. and 1,600 B.C Stonehenge's exact purpose still remains a mystery. The stones were brought from very long distances – the bluestones from the Preseli Hills more than 150 miles away, and the sarsens probably from the Marlborough Downs, 19 miles to the north. Britain's most mysterious stone circles The day marks the ancient middle of summer. It has significance for pagans who have always believed that midsummer day holds a special power.  Midsummer's eve was believed to be a time when the veil between this world and the next is at its thinnest, and when fairies were though to be at their most powerful. Night sky: how and where to see noctilucent clouds Over the centuries, the June solstice has inspired many festivals and midsummer celebrations involving bonfires, picnics, singing, watching the sun rise and Maypole dancing. Many towns and villages across Britain still mark the day.  One ritual was the lighting of fires, heralding the start of shorter days, although this doesn't really happen anymore. The idea was that flames would keep the dark away.  Revellers at the Summer Solstice Sunrise at Stonehenge, earlier today Credit:  Geoff Pugh for the Telegraph Where can I celebrate the summer solstice? Stonehenge always welcomes an influx of garland-wearing hippies, druids and curious tourists who head to the mysterious stone circles and wait for the sun to appear.  Crowds of around 20,000 greet the moment dawn breaks with a mixture of cheers and silent meditation, and the strawberry moon added extra excitement this year.  The solstice car park opened on Wednesday at 7pm ahead of the sunset at 9:26pm.  Crowds cheered the rise of the sun at Stonehenge as thousands gathered to celebrate the summer solstice. Dawn is breaking over Stonehenge at #SummerSolsticepic.twitter.com/OXyLhHcffX— English Heritage (@EnglishHeritage) June 21, 2018 Those who observed the spectacle at the neolithic Wiltshire monument were blessed with clear skies as the sun glinted over the horizon at 4.52am. The sunrise over Stonehenge this morning Credit: Geoff Pugh for the Telegraph It's slightly quieter at the Avebury stone circle, Britain's second greatest prehistoric site, about 20 miles from Stonehenge. In Penzance, the Golowan Festival celebrates the summer solstice from June 23 to 28. If you're in London, watching the sunrise from Parliament Hill will give you great views of the capital.
Daughter of radio host killed in alleged murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I grabbed her hand and I begged her for an ounce of her strength," April Kauffman's daughter Kim Pack said of saying goodbye to her mother before her burial.
Immigration rally in N.Y.C. to mark World Refugee Day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Hundreds of New Yorkers from refugee, immigrant, religious and advocacy communities held a march in observance of World Refugee Day. Marchers laid out 85 pairs of shoes to represent 85,000 refugees who were not allowed into the U.S. in 2018, carried orange rafts symbolizing refugee ocean crossings and read the names of refugees who died in transit.