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National Security Adviser John Bolton Announced the United States Will Not Cooperate With the International Criminal Court
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump’s National Security Adviser John Bolton launched a broadside against the International Criminal Court (ICC)
See Neil deGrasse Tyson Defend Trump’s ‘Space Force’ Plan on ‘Colbert’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Just 'cause it came out of Trump's mouth doesn't require that it then be a crazy thing," astrophysicist says
New Report Details Over 3,600 Sex Abuse Cases Spanning Decades in the German Catholic Church
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More than half of the victims were 13 or younger and most were boys
Nuns get hands dirty, and wet, to save Mexico salamander
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pátzcuaro (Mexico) (AFP) - Rolling up the sleeves of her immaculate white habit, Sister Ofelia Morales Francisco plunges her hands into an aquarium, grabs a large, slimy salamander and lifts it dripping into the air. The nun is part of a team at a Dominican convent in Mexico that is fighting to save the Lake Patzcuaro salamander, a critically endangered species. Revered as a god by the indigenous Purepecha people and keenly studied by scientists, the salamander -- known for its stunning ability to regenerate its body parts -- is found in the wild in only one place: the lake near the Convent of Our Immaculate Lady of Health, in the western town of Patzcuaro.
Royal Botanic Garden seeks respect for world's fungus
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LONDON (AP) — The scientists at the renowned Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew are trying to correct an injustice: They don't believe fungus gets the respect it deserves.
Game theory can help prevent disease outbreaks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Banning travel might not always be the best way to respond to a disease outbreak.
We Spent Some Time With Apple’s Colorful iPhone XR. Here’s What You Should Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Deciding which iPhone you really want is a bit more complicated than before
The Global Fight Against Climate Change Just Stalled. The Clock to Restart It Is Ticking
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The fight against climate change has hit a roadblock as several key countries fail to meet the commitments they laid out to reduce emissions
Hurricane Florence size is 'chilling, even from space,' astronaut writes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alexander Gerst, an astronaut with the European Space Agency, shared photos of Hurricane Florence from space, writing, ''Get prepared on the East Coast, this is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you.''
Unfiltered: ‘The democratic plantation really is worse than the plantation I grew up on.’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Black conservative Jesse Lee Peterson is, to put it simply, not afraid to speak his mind. During the 1950s under Jim Crow laws he grew up on an Alabama plantation where his great-grandparents worked as slaves, but today Peterson is regularly featured on major news networks claiming that racism doesn’t exist, the Democratic Party lies to minorities to intimidate and control them, and July should be officially declared as White History Month. Unlike the Democratic Party — their plantation causes you to become dependent on them and not on yourself.
Doodling is 73,000 years old
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature, the scientists explain that the marks were drawn using a red ochre "crayon." Although ochre was used for many things by ancient peoples, the nature of the markings are enough to determine that this was an artistic endeavor — humanity's first. The previous oldest-known drawings are about 9,000 years younger than this one, Gizmodo reported, though there are human-made engravings that go back even further.
Apple's New Health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It also has a bigger screen and thinner body
This Is How to Pronounce the New iPhone Xs and Xr Correctly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
No, it's not "excess"
New iPhones and More: Here's Everything Apple Just Announced
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Which model is right for you?
Lab test may identify dangerous gene mutations, study finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've found a new way to help determine whether specific genetic abnormalities are likely to make people sick, a step toward avoiding a vexing uncertainty that can surround DNA test results.
Allies Are Doubting How Long President Trump Will Stay in Power. Here's How to Stop Irreversible Damage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
American prestige reaches a new low
Usain Bolt toasts zero
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PARIS (Reuters) - Usain Bolt on Wednesday sprinted through thin air and sipped champagne floating on his back as he enjoyed near zero-gravity conditions in the back of an aircraft performing stomach-lurching parabola dives. The eight-time Olympic champion grinned as he experienced weightlessness in a modified plane normally used for scientific research -- but on this occasion to showcase a champagne bottle that will allow astronauts to drink bubbles in space. The bottle was designed by champagne-maker Mumm. In time the company hopes to capitalize on the advent of space tourism. ...
FAA catches up with drone industry through new program
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ten partners nationwide test drone delivery applications
I'm Definitely Not Saying It's Aliens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But something weird is happening at a solar observatory in New Mexico.
Hurricane Florence Is Headed Straight for North Carolina's Nuclear Reactors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Company officials say they’re ready for the storm
Democrats are counting on rookie candidates to flip the House. How’s that working out for them?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
There is no state more central to the Democratic Party’s effort to win back the House than California.
Who has more mojo on the 2018 campaign trail — Trump or Obama?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Everything you need to know this week about Election 2018
'Jaws of Life' used to free bear with head stuck in milk can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROSEAU, Minn. (AP) — Firefighters had to use the Jaws of Life to help free a black bear whose head was stuck in a milk can in northern Minnesota.
Vietnam's Capital Hanoi Urges Residents to Stop Eating Dog and Cat Meat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In an effort to protect its reputation and halt the spread of diseases such as rabies
American Families Got Richer for a 3rd Straight Year in 2017
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The growth is due to a rise in the number of Americans with full-time jobs
Moon rock hunter closes in on tracking down missing stones
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A strange thing happened after Neil Armstrong and the Apollo 11 crew returned from the moon with lunar rocks: Many of the mementos given to every U.S. state vanished. Now, after years of sleuthing, a former NASA investigator is closing in on his goal of locating the whereabouts of all 50.
IWC vote backs new quotas for aboriginal whale hunts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a rare moment Wednesday, the International Whaling Commission voted overwhelmingly to back whale hunting, but strictly for small subsistence hunts undertaken by some communities, mostly in the Arctic. The vote confirmed a longstanding commitment to so-called aboriginal subsistence hunting (ASW), for nutritional and cultural reasons, which continues to be an exception to the decades-old ban on commercial whaling. "This important agreement gives our native communities the much-needed flexibility to operate more safely in dangerous environmental conditions that vary from one year to the next," said Ryan Wulff, US Commissioner to the IWC.
Potholes: how engineers are working to fill in the gaps
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bumps in the road are dangerous, expensive and difficult to fix.
UNAM Expands infrastructure to analyze biofuels quality  
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Sep. 12 (Notimex).- The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM, for its acronym in Spanish) is expanding its scientific horizons in the area of ​​bioenergetics and ecotechnology, by inaugurating new infrastructure in the Ecosystems and Sustainability Research Institute (IIES, for its acronym in Spanish), Morelia campus. In this first stage, the building has five laboratories: Biodiesel and Water; of Innovation and Evaluation of Biomass Stoves; of Technology and Rural Innovation; of Design, Modeling and Simulation, and Ecotechnological Housing. It will also accommodate the Cluster of Solid Biofuels, which promotes projects of the National Council of Science and Technology (CONACYT, for its acronym in Spanish) and the Ministry of Energy, in addition to the Ecotechnologies Unit and the National Laboratory for Ecotechnology and Sustainability Research (Lanies, for its acronym in Spanish). Also, according to information from the UNAM Gazette, there will be three additional working groups: the Analysis of Sustainability and Public Policies of Solid Biofuels; the group on Supply and Demand of Biomass Resources and another one on Analysis of the Impacts of Ecotechnologies. Omar Masera Cerutti, academic coordinator of the projects carried out in the building, affirmed that in Mexico the energy transition is promoted to renewable sources, which is why it is necessary to ensure the quality and efficiency of the technologies that are disseminated in the country, as well as the long-term use of the various devices. "Here we work to generate these conditions, so that industry and consumers use these energies in a broader way and with guarantees about their performance," explained the specialist. He exemplified that in the Cluster of Solid Biofuels research is carried out to innovate in the use of biofuels such as firewood, charcoal and pellets (fuel obtained from various types of biomass such as chips, sawdust or bark to form small granules that can burn efficiently) to generate heat and electricity. While in the Laboratory of Innovation and Evaluation of Biomass Stoves, the emissions of different types of efficient stoves of biomass are analyzed, in comparison with the stoves that are used in rural areas. The academic of the highest house of studies said that this new stage involved researchers, academics and undergraduate and graduate students, as well as specialists from other institutions such as the National School of Higher Studies, Morelia campus, and the Materials Research Institute. The Center for Research in Environmental Geography and the Institute of Renewable Energies, and civil society organizations such as the Interdisciplinary Group of Appropriate Rural Technology. NTX/MSG/LCH/JCG
The Latest: Experts prepare plan to capture, treat sick orca
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SEATTLE (AP) — The Latest on efforts to save a sick whale (all times local):
Gay Councilor, Former Single Mom Highlight New Hampshire Primary Wins For Democrats
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Former state Sen. Molly Kelly and executive Councilor Chris Pappas won Democratic nominations for keys posts in the New Hampshire primary
The FDA Is Considering Pulling Some Flavored E
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In order to fight the 'epidemic' of youth vaping
NASA eyes SpaceX, Boeing for affordable access to space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA plans to slap ads on spaceships to lower costs.
U.N. Chief Says a 'Bloodbath' Must be Averted in Syria's Idlib
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is appealing to all parties directly and indirectly involved in Syria — especially Iran, Russia, and Turkey — to protect civilians and avoid a “bloodbath” in the last major rebel-held stronghold in Idlib.
Photos of Hurricane Florence from space are truly scary to behold
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hurricane Florence is poised to hit the mid-Atlantic coast and the Carolinas this week, and satellite images of the storm are nothing short of terrifying. Astronauts at the International Space Station, for example, struggled to fit the enormous storm into one frame.  "We could only capture her with a super wide-angle lens from the Space Station, 400 km directly above the eye," astronaut Alexander Gerst tweeted on Wednesday. "Get prepared on the East Coast, this is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you." SEE ALSO: How Hurricane Florence overcame big odds to target the East Coast If Florence hits North Carolina as a Category 4 storm, it will be the strongest storm to make landfall in the state since Hurricane Hazel in 1954.  States of emergency have been declared in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and Maryland in anticipation. DAWN OVER FLORENCE: NOAA's #GOES16 captured the sunrise over #HurricaneFlorence this morning, Sept. 12, 2018. NOAA says the Cat. 4 #hurricane will bring "life-threatening #StormSurge and #Rainfall to portions of the #Carolinas and Mid-Atlantic states." Updates: @NHC_Atlantic pic.twitter.com/01Z34h3191 — NOAA Satellites PA (@NOAASatellitePA) September 12, 2018 Watch out, America! #HurricaneFlorence is so enormous, we could only capture her with a super wide-angle lens from the @Space_Station, 400 km directly above the eye. Get prepared on the East Coast, this is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you. #Horizons pic.twitter.com/ovZozsncfh — Alexander Gerst (@Astro_Alex) September 12, 2018 #HurricaneFlorence this morning with Cape Hatteras #NorthCarolina in the foreground. The crew of @Space_Station is thinking of those who will be affected. pic.twitter.com/XsQ7Zwurfa — Ricky Arnold (@astro_ricky) September 12, 2018 #HurricaneFlorence is very large and incredibly dangerous.✅Follow local evacuation orders!✅Prepare for life-threatening, catastrophic flooding over portions of the Carolinas and Mid-Atlantic states late this week into early next week. pic.twitter.com/IWlJYKOZBS — NWS (@NWS) September 12, 2018 WATCH: A tiny satellite could be the key to cleaning up our space trash
In Arizona Senate race, a battle over political evolution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The contest for Jeff Flake’s Senate seat is between two women who’ve evolved over time: a Republican who has tilted toward Trump and hardened on immigration, and a Democrat who has become more moderate and centrist.
In Albania, new Turkish mosque stirs old resentments
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With its four minarets towering over the Albanian parliament next door, no visitor can miss the Great Mosque of Tirana. When completed in 2019, the hulking new central mosque will be the biggest in the Balkans, with enough room for 5,000 worshipers. Not all Albanians are happy about that – including many Muslims, who make up an estimated 60 percent of the population.
Why good economic numbers aren’t giving Trump a boost in the polls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The second is the unemployment rate for August. Both are evidence of a really, really strong economy – though they’re not as historically unique as President Trump sometimes boasts. The former is the percentage of Americans who approve of the job Mr. Trump is doing, according to an average of major polls at time of writing.
The FDA’s crackdown on teen vaping
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A hallmark of the modern era is the length to which societies will go to protect their most innocent – children. On Sept. 12, for example, the Food and Drug Administration launched its largest coordinated enforcement action in the agency’s history, aimed at the marketing and selling of e-cigarettes to teenagers. The FDA cited an “epidemic” rise in teen vaping over the past year, especially in the most popular brand, Juul, which entices young people with candylike flavors while delivering a strong dose of nicotine.
US defunding of Palestinian refugee agency creates crisis for Jordan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Although never great with numbers, Ahmed Ibrahim says every day he sees the impact of a budget deficit on his home. Because of staff shortages at the local UNRWA health clinic, Mr. Ibrahim must now wait up to six hours to see a nurse for his chronic cough – often times he is only seen for a total of three minutes. Trash in front of his home and across the camp has been piling up since March, when UNRWA, the UN relief agency administering to Palestinian refugees, was forced to lay off most of its part-time street cleaners and sanitation workers following an initial round of US funding cuts.
When Disaster Strikes: What to Put in Your Medication Go Bag
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A well-stocked medication go bag can be used to soothe a cut or burn—or to save your life during a hurricane, flood, fire, or other emergency.   But it’s important not to wait until you’re faced ...
This breakthrough in a type of photosynthesis could provide the world with unlimited energy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Imagine a new, potent generation of solar panels capable of producing unlimited amounts of energy, using only sunshine and algae. All this could be possible, thanks to a breakthrough made by researchers from the University of Cambridge, documented in a Nature Energy 2018 article. Natural photosynthesis, the process plants use to convert sunlight into energy, has been around since the beginning of life on our planet.
Blue Origin’s schedule for putting people on space trips reportedly slips to 2019
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
News Brief: Blue Origin CEO Bob Smith today signaled that the Kent, Wash.-based space company founded by Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos is aiming to start flying people on suborbital space trips “early next year,” rather than later this year as previously envisioned. The signal was passed along by Space News’ Jeff Foust, who’s tweeting from the World Satellite Business Week conference in Paris. Smith was also quoted as saying Blue Origin was making good progress on tests of the BE-4 rocket engine, which is to be used on the company’s New Glenn reusable orbital-class rocket as well as United Launch… Read More
U.S. Identifies Remains of Two U.S. Service Members Returned from North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two Korean War dead have been identified from remains turned over to the U.S. by North Korea
Trump Says Puerto Rico Response Was an 'Unsung Success'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sep.11 -- President Donald Trump speaks with reporters about the recovery efforts in Puerto Rico after last year's hurricane season.
France to run driverless mainline trains within five years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
French railway operator SNCF said Wednesday it was planning to introduce prototypes of driverless mainline trains for passengers and freight by 2023, and include them in scheduled services in subsequent years. "With autonomous trains, all the trains will run in a harmonized way and at the same speed," SNCF chairman Guillaume Pepy said in a statement. Many cities, including Paris, already run driverless metro trains but driverless long-distance travel presents a new set of challenges, Pepy said.
Kidnapper of Elizabeth Smart To Be Freed Earlier Than Expected
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A woman convicted of helping a former street preacher kidnap Elizabeth Smart in 2002 will be freed from prison more than five years earlier than expected, a surprise decision that Smart called “incomprehensible” on Tuesday.
Hurricane Florence Looks Super
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here’s the view from the International Space Station.
Brett Kavanaugh wants to do away with legal abortion. He told us so.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Supreme Court nominee has given strong hints that if he’s confirmed, “states will have free rein to eliminate abortion access via increasingly draconian laws.”