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French Spiderman climbs 29
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — French urban climber Alain Robert has scaled a 29-story hotel in Barcelona with his bare hands and in just 20 minutes.
Why, in Tijuana, a 'different kind of migrant' elicits help
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Each week, Tijuana receives thousands of people fleeing violence or seeking opportunity, including Mexican deportees, Central American migrants, and refugees from around the globe. Many residents have grown accustomed to the long-term challenges that come with Tijuana's transitional nature, like deportees living in canals along the border, or migrants being recruited into criminal gangs.
Medieval Farmers May Have Skinned Cats for Pagan Rituals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Farmers skinned cats about 1,000 years ago in Spain, possibly for the medieval cat-fur industry or a "magical" pagan ritual, a new study finds. Scientists found evidence of the skinning at the archaeological site of El Bordellet in eastern Spain, where medieval artifacts were discovered during highway construction in 2010. One pit was notable because it contained an unusual amount of feline remains — about 900 domestic cat bones.
Malaysia seizes 300kg of pangolin scales
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Malaysian customs officers have seized almost 300 kilograms of pangolin scales being smuggled through the main airport, officials said on Tuesday. The 288-kilogram (635 pound) haul was found at Kuala Lumpur International Airport last Friday in 12 boxes labelled as oyster shells on the waybill. The scales of the endangered pangolin, the world's most heavily trafficked mammal, are highly prized in Vietnam and China where they are misleadingly touted as having medicinal properties.
Woman in serious pain unexpectedly gives birth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MALDEN, Mass. (AP) — A Massachusetts woman preparing to go to the hospital for serious pain instead gave birth to an unexpected baby girl.
After Life of Adventure, Attenborough Regrets Missed Family Time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sir David Attenborough has traveled around the world and back, but despite his countless wildlife adventures and exploits in the natural world, said he does have one major regret. The "Planet Earth" narrator wishes he had spent more time with his children when they were young, he told the Radio Times, a weekly British magazine. Attenborough said he was "unbelievably lucky" to have the life he's led, but said he regrets that his work took him away from his son, Robert, and daughter, Susan.
5 Inventions You Didn't Know Came From Australia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Among many foreigners, Australia is the land of Vegemite, koalas and a dedication to green living. The country ranks in the top 10 for adventure, citizenship, entrepreneurship, cultural influence and quality of life among the 2017 U.S. News Best Countries rankings, but may sometimes be overlooked in another category: inventiveness. A number of popular -- and in some cases, lifesaving -- technologies came from the land Down Under.
Bringing ancient tapestries back to life in Belgium
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The painstaking job of restoring some of the world's finest ancient tapestries, stitch by stitch, is not for the highly strung or restless. Returning to its former glory the kind of creation that adorns a cathedral wall or is displayed at a world-renowned museum can take more than a year for tapestry restorers at Royal Manufacturers De Wit. Tucked away in an elegant medieval monks' residence in Belgium, head restorer Veerle De Wachter and her white-coated, all-female team of 15 labour away with needle and thread, adding thousands of stitches to a single piece.
Radiation, risk and robots: Ripping out a reactor's heart
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MUELHEIM-KAERLICH, Germany, June 12 (Reuters) - As head of the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear reactor, Thomas Volmar spends his days plotting how to tear down his workplace. About 200 nuclear reactors around the world will be shut down over the next quarter century, mostly in Europe, according to the International Energy Agency.
'Surf Syria': a refugee in Lebanon finds a dream at sea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ali Kassem had never seen the sea before he fled his home in Syria for Lebanon, but now he's a regular in the waves and dreams of his own surf school. Kassem is from Aleppo city, though he says he remembers little from his childhood in Syria.
Google wants to guilt you into installing solar panels on your roof
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google is hoping that some good old-fashioned peer pressure will push more people to embrace solar energy.  Project Sunroof, the search giant's solar panel mapping tool and calculator, is adding a nosy new feature, Data Explorer. Now, when you pull up an address using the tool, which visualizes how much sunlight hits each building in an area, you won't just see which roof is best suited to harness solar energy. You'll also be able to select an option to check out a map tracking every rooftop that's already outfitted with solar panels in the area.  SEE ALSO: China just built the world's biggest floating solar project Seeing your neighbors with solar panels could make you much more likely to adopt them yourself. A study published by Yale economics professor Kenneth Gillingham found that people are much more likely to install solar panels if their neighbors had taken the plunge — which means that we're all just trying to keep up with those green Joneses next door.    "It happens at the street level, it happens within zip codes, it happens within states," Gillingham told The Atlantic in an interview about Data Explorer. "It seems to be a common feature of human decision-making that crosses many boundaries.” Google's engineers built the tool by training machine learning algorithms to recognize solar panels, then applying them to the nearly 60 million buildings worth of data the tool has tracked since its expansion earlier this year. Buildings the algorithm IDs are tagged with a tiny red dot when you're zoomed in, while larger swathes of the map are analyzed by region. This household's neighbors are really putting on the pressure.Image: screenshot/googleThe tool has identified roughly 700,000 solar installations in the U.S., which comes up short of the 1.3 million estimated by the Solar Energy Industries Association's (SEIA) count — but like any good program, its creator says it needs some more data to improve.  WATCH: These solar window blinds can cut your energy bills by 70 percent
Northam’s laid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Virginia Democratic primary in the governor's race heats up between Ralph Northam and Tom Perriello.
Tips for New Moms Returning to Work & How to Kick New Mom Guilt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Doctors share some tips to help transition working new moms back into the career world. “You want to have that alone time with your spouse, when your marriage is stronger, your child is stronger,” she adds.
Electric Shock Workouts?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Is the secret to your best workout a jolt of electricity? The Doctors examine a shocking new fitness craze!
Woman’s Masculine Jawline Fix
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Lynette tells The Doctors that she is troubled by what she refers to as a too masculine face. Lynette sought help from plastic surgeon Dr. Nima Shemirani to help give her more of an oval face. My teeth grinding has improved and it was a fast procedure,” she explains.
Are These Trendy Beauty Treatments worth It?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The first trend is a face mask that claims to give your skin the benefits of a hot sauna for $1.99. Dr. Sandra Lee warns that there are some skin conditions that don't react well to heat, like rosacea. Plastic surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon also cautions against using a heat related product if you already have inflammation of any kind. After trying the product, check out how the audience members felt about the product.
The Umbilical Cord Art Trend – Touching or Too Much?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Doctors weigh in on the trend of using the umbilical cord to create works of art and then share them on social media. Plastic surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon understands why some mothers might be inclined to save and preserve their umbilical cord calling it a symbol of the last bond between the mother and the child. The Doctors conducted a quick informal poll of the studio audience asking if anyone would make umbilical art, and a resounding majority all said they would not.
Girl Boss: 5 Things To Know About NASA's Newest Black Astronaut Candidate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Before being accepted in the 2017 Astronaut Candidate Class, Watkins worked at NASA’s Ames Research Center and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and was a collaborator on the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity.
China busts a group recycling used medical supplies and selling the plastic back to factories
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This is pretty graphic. Police in China have busted an underground ring that was recycling plastic to resell to manufacturers.  The illegal operation was found with more than 140 metric tonnes of used medical supplies such as syringes, urine and blood bags. SEE ALSO: Law-breaking pigeon busted with a bag of drugs strapped to its back In alarming pictures supplied to local media, you can see warehouses and trucks full of used supplies strewn all over. Workers were reportedly sorting and pulverising the plastic, while simply hosing off biowaste such as caked blood and urine, and letting the wastewater discharge into a drain. Authorities inspect a truck full of blood bags and syringes, upon other medical waste items in HunanImage: WeiboThe underground recycling ring, which spanned nearly five provinces in central and southern China, had been in operation since October 2015, according to investigators. They obtained some of the medical supplies through hospital workers, as well as others from building management, who smuggled the waste out of hospitals, reported Outlook magazine. Several workers and a dealer revealed that the plant had bought waste for 2,000 yuan ($294.20) per metric ton. When the waste was processed into small, untraceable polypropylene plastic pellets, they were then sold at 5,000 yuan ($735.50) per metric ton.  The plastic recycled was sold for use in manufacturing pipes, and could have found their way to make items used in the food and medical industry, as well as furniture. 12 people who were involved in the underground recycling rings were convicted with polluting the environment in a Hunan, south-central China court last week. Image: WEIBO Image: Weibo The workers that had processed the medical waste didn't wear masks to protect them, authorities said.  The yard also stank of the waste, said Xu Shuli, a local environmental protection bureau official. Used blood collection bags from a blood donation center in Yiyang, Hunan, south-central China.Image: Weibo Image: WeiboThis isn't the first time medical waste has been illegally recycled in China. Three men were prosecuted in eastern China last year for recycling medical waste into pellets, which were then sold to make items such as plastic toys for children. (h/t South China Morning Post) WATCH: Relive this terrible confetti cannon story that had to have happened
A dinosaur picked a fight with the dictionary on Twitter and it was brutal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Today in weird things that happen on the internet, a dinosaur picked a random fight with a dictionary and lost so, so hard. Yes, welcome to the internet in 2017. It all started when SUE the T.rex ran a poll asking her followers what type of fresh dinosaur #content they would like to see from the account. Random feuds won the poll, and yes, SUE is a REAL dinosaur, and you can visit its skeleton at the Field Museum in Chicago. SEE ALSO: 99-million-year-old bird fossil has been found preserved in amber and it's truly exquisite YOU HAVE BEEN RANDOMLY SELECTED TO OFFER FEEDBACK FOR THIS TWITTER FEED. WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE MORE OF HERE? — SUE the T. rex (@SUEtheTrex) June 12, 2017 SUE honored the results of the poll, and picked a fight with the Twitter account for Merriam-Webster dictionary, which was a terrible idea. Comin' for you, @MerriamWebster — SUE the T. rex (@SUEtheTrex) June 12, 2017 The dictionary hit back with a perfect dino joke, shutting SUE down with one perfect tweet.  We're out of your reach. — Merriam-Webster (@MerriamWebster) June 12, 2017 The internet had its own jokes. pic.twitter.com/K4fp8zlEUc — Joe Hanson (@DrJoeHanson) June 12, 2017 too soon , joe, too soon — Hero (@hero_kohai) June 12, 2017 pic.twitter.com/3WIOqeEsgH — Marilee Mole (@marileemole) June 12, 2017 That moment when a Dictionary beat a Dinosaur. Only on Twitter. Gold. pic.twitter.com/VonYL6yRbj — Dr Eric Levi (@DrEricLevi) June 12, 2017 pic.twitter.com/I48OJ5lY0g — Jessica Brewbaker (@Jessica_in_Iowa) June 12, 2017 Please, let's not fall into those tired old "T. Rex's tiny front legs were useless" stereotypes. — Dave B. (@BuckyKatt) June 12, 2017 pic.twitter.com/fDJ5ULptNZ — /an-/ (@andres) June 12, 2017 That was definitely an extinction level event. — Eric DeBlackmere (@AstronomerEric) June 12, 2017 SUE had a pretty good attitude about the whole thing. ....aannnnnd I'm immediately dunked on. https://t.co/h6O2zr1uOI — SUE the T. rex (@SUEtheTrex) June 12, 2017 pic.twitter.com/dodWVwAIbK — SUE the T. rex (@SUEtheTrex) June 12, 2017 The dinosaur even retweeted someone who said it was probably a mistake to get into a war of words with a dictionary. in retrospect, it was probably a mistake to get into a war of words with a dictionary — Jonathan Aguilar (@AggleDetector) June 12, 2017 Extinct for the 2nd time — Juan Escalante (@nerdwich) June 12, 2017 In an internet filled with constant fighting, bickering, threats, and abuse, we'll take dinosaur vs. dictionary any day. WATCH: The weirdest 'Batman' movie never made
How Elon Musk Is Leading The Charge On Brain Connectivity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Silicon Valley powerhouse leaders have announced plans to develop technology to connect the human brain to machines.
You’re probably not rich enough for this luxury submarine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you're both extremely wealthy and also have a love of the deep blue sea, there's plenty of options already available for you to splurge on. You can drop some pretty serious coin on any number of luxurious yachts — from big names like Bugatti, among others — and watch millions of dollars vanish before your eyes. But if you're simply bored of the idea of being ostentatious above the waves, perhaps you'd like to take your extravagant lifestyle below the surface in a 12-person luxury submarine of your very own.  Ocean Submarine — which might be the least creative company name of all time — is currently developing the Neyk Luxury Submarine, a personal submersible for very, very rich people. At 63 feet in length, the craft is capable of achieving depths of 500 meters, and a speed of 15 knots, all while fully loaded with a dozen passengers. The interior features luxury seating, a bar (of course) and, for some reason, a library. The company's Neyk submarine platform is being customized to suit a number of different applications, including deep-sea research, tourism, and even naval combat scenarios. As such, the luxury model boasts much of the same build specifications as its kin, meeting the hull strength requirements set forth by both the Royal Netherlands Navy and NASA. Ocean Submarine is slated to have a full-sized prototype of the luxury submarine ready for January 2018, with manufacturing to begin after that. The company hasn't revealed the actual final price of the craft yet, but with companies like Rolls Royce helping with design, you can bet it won't be cheap.
Make the Best Iced Coffee at Home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Cold brew has given the coffee industry a jolt—retail sales surged 580 percent from 2011 to 2016, says Mintel's 2016 U.S...
NASA Discovers 10 'Potentially Hazardous' Asteroids
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
That's in addition to another 96 newly discovered space rocks and an unexplained increase in comet activity.
The largest planet in the solar system could also be the oldest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jupiter is the largest planet in our solar system, and it might also be the oldest. According to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week, researchers have found evidence that Jupiter is the oldest of the planets thanks to an analysis of 19 meteorite samples on Earth. The new analysis suggests that Jupiter formed only about 1 million years after the dawn of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago. SEE ALSO: Jupiter is the gigantic, stormy hellscape we always feared Researchers examining the meteorites found that they appear to be formed from two different reserves of material in the early solar system. "The most plausible mechanism for this efficient separation is the formation of Jupiter, opening a gap in the disc (a plane of gas and dust from stars) and preventing the exchange of material between the two reservoirs," Thomas Kruijer, lead author of the study, said in a statement. Jupiter's southern hemisphere.Image:  NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman TkachenkoLong story short: Jupiter formed so quickly and was so giant that it kept two different reserves of early planetary material from intermingling in the early days of the solar system. Kruijer and the team of researchers were able to differentiate between the two reservoirs of material by measuring isotopes in the meteorite samples. They found that each set of material did exist within the same period of time in the early solar system, but they didn't intermix, meaning that something — in this case, Jupiter — must have been keeping them separated. Scientists aren't able to directly measure meteorites from Jupiter because we don't have any. "We do not have any samples from Jupiter, in contrast to other bodies like the Earth, Mars, the moon and asteroids," Kruijer said. "In our study, we use isotope signatures of meteorites (which are derived from asteroids) to infer Jupiter's age." Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gabriel FisetThese results are far from a sure thing, and it'll still take more research to figure out exactly when and how Jupiter formed in the early days of the solar system. “We need more evidence that says this is where those two meteorite classes form – one inward and one outward,” Cornell University's Jonathan Lunine told New Scientist of the finding. “But it’s a very nice measurement.” By learning more about Jupiter, we can also learn more about the evolution of every other planet in the solar system. Jupiter has more mass than all of the other planets combined, and its immense gravity helped shape the orbits of the other objects in the solar system as they move around the sun.  WATCH:
Comey 'Stunned' by Trump: Why We 'Freeze' in Uncomfortable Situations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
How could former FBI Director James Comey, a 6-foot-8 onetime prosecutor known to stand up to power — feel "stunned" and lapse into an "awkward" silence during a conversation with President Donald Trump? That's how Comey described his silent response to Trump's demand for loyalty in a private conversation that the fired FBI chief illuminated during a U.S. Senate hearing yesterday (June 8). Comey may tower over the president, but it turns out he succumbed to a human behavior that is not uncommon in which people temporarily freeze, especially when something shocking is said and there's an unequal power dynamic at play, said Samuel Wang, a professor of neuroscience at Princeton University.
Your Calendar For The Lunar Events Of 2017 Is Here
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Full moons are awesome opportunities to reflect on your life, and no one should have to miss out on that. Many people already understand the significance of full moons, but what about new moons? Spiritually speaking, there's one key difference: Where each month's full moon has corresponding symbols among nature-based faiths, new moons don't.
US isolated as allies vow accelerated action on climate change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
US allies in the G7 said Monday that action to contain devastating climate change was irreversible and could even be accelerated, despite Donald Trump's decision to pull the United States out of the Paris accord. Trump's representative at the meeting, Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environment Protection Agency, was unrepentant, insisting US action spoke louder than words. "We are resetting the dialogue to say Paris is not the only way forward to making progress ... (Paris) is not the only mechanism by which environmental stewardship can be demonstrated," added Pruitt, who had left the meeting on Sunday evening to attend Trump's first full cabinet meeting on Monday.
Ninth Circuit cites Trump tweet in opinion blocking travel ban
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The court further cited press secretary Sean Spicer’s admission that tweets are to be considered official presidential statements.
Mother of Pulse victim says social media companies ‘complicit in some of these terror acts’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After losing her son, Christopher, in the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Christine Leinonen works to ensure that such attacks never happen again.
Trump cuts would make troops ‘less safe,’ top retired generals say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A group of senior retired military officers are warning Congress and urging lawmakers to reject the sharp spending reductions.
California couple pleads guilty to hoarding 170 Yorkies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
POWAY, Calif. (AP) — A San Diego County couple has pleaded guilty to hoarding more than 170 Yorkshire terriers and Yorkie mixes in filthy conditions.
'Kinky Boots' cake wins Best in Show at design competition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — For baker Ashley Holt, nothing about this design competition was a piece of cake. And that's actually including the cake.
This Mom Completely "Lost It" When She Found Out She Delivered a Baby Boy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Her face is priceless.
This Man Makes a Great Point About Why Husbands Should Always Read Their Wife's Facebook Posts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Here's why he never ignores them.
The Victim In Dani Mathers' Body
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
She is apparently worried about being identified in public.
7 Birth Photographers Reveal the Coolest Thing They've Seen In the Delivery Room
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
When you've witnessed as many births as they have, you're bound to experience some pretty cool moments.
This Inspiring Couple Lost More Than 360 Pounds by Working Out Together
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Their transformation is incredible!
How to Find the Best Remote Jobs That Don't Require a College Degree
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Great news: New jobs are listed everyday!
How to Deal With Poison Ivy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. If you’re itching for a summer adventure, a trip to the beach or a hike in the park might be just what you need, but wat...
Men's Health Checklist for Every Age
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. It can be challenging to keep track of all the tests, vaccines, and preventive health measures a man needs to be healthy...
Could You Be Killing Your Hair Color?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Is your hair color fading too fast? Extend the time between touch-ups with a simple trick when you style at home!
Extreme Dance Battle Goes Up in Flames!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Things got hot on the dance floor when Fire Gyal Flexi showed off her moves – way too hot. Flexi accidentally set herself on fire! Learn how to avoid a dance catastrophe and keep from getting burned.
Are Fast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A viral video shows molten copper being poured on various food items. An apple, a steak, and popcorn all take obvious damage, but a fast-food burger seems to stay pretty similar to how it began. Does this indicate something alarming about fast food?
Could a New Treatment Blast Your Fat Away?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Want to lose that little extra around the tummy without liposuction? A treatment called SculpSure claims to melt that fat away without diet , surgery, or exercise – and The Doctors put it to the test! Sarina, Amira, and Gabby all agreed to try out the SculpSure procedure.
Clean Your Oven Without Knocking Yourself Out!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Simple, nontoxic household items can make cleaning the oven a snap. De-grease your cooking space without too much elbow grease.
Microsoft's new Xbox One X is a beast, but faces an uphill battle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Microsoft is pushing the One X as the world’s most powerful system. Officially slated for release on Nov. 7, the One X faces some stiff competition in Sony’s (SNE) incredibly popular PlayStation 4 and VR-ready PS4 Pro, not to mention the still hard to get Nintendo (NTDOY) Switch. Microsoft unveils the Xbox One X at the annual E3 gaming convention in Los Angeles, California on June 12.
Pogue's Basics: Operate the Windows Ribbon from the keyboard
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The Windows 10 Ribbon is supposed to enhance your efficiency by putting every conceivable command in one place, with nothing hidden. But how efficient is a tool that requires mousing?
Charmed Existence: Mysterious Particles Could Reveal Mysteries of the Big Bang
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A mysterious particle created in a blazing fireball at an atom smasher is misbehaving, a new experiment shows. The particle, called a charm quark, revealed surprising interactions with its neighboring subatomic particles, measurements show. The surprising charm-quark behavior was first spotted at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in Upton, New York, which aims to recreate conditions in the trillionths of a second after the Big Bang.
Space oddity: Flatworm sent into orbit returns to Earth with an extra head
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists sent two sets of flatworms to the International Space Station for five weeks, while control worms were kept on Earth. When the specimens returned from orbit, researchers realized space can do freaky things to flatworms.