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Rocket Lab says ground equipment marred New Zealand launch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A California aerospace company says a rocket it launched from New Zealand last May did not reach orbit because a problem with ground equipment caused a loss of telemetry that forced range safety officials to terminate the flight
US scientists contradict Trump's climate claims
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Donald Trump touts new oil pipelines and pledges to revive the nation's struggling coal mines, federal scientists are warning that burning fossil fuels is already driving a steep increase in the United States of heat waves, droughts and floods.
7 Things the Thrift Store Doesn't Want From You
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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The Curiosity Rover Has Been Exploring Mars For Five Years Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Curiosity has been roving Mars for five years now and has taken more than 200,000 videos.
Trump warns N. Korea it will face 'fire and fury'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump warns North Korea on nuclear threats, as his administration grapples with unsettling news of a possible nuclear breakthrough by the Stalinist regime.
Accused burglar doesn't flush toilet, leaves DNA for police
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
VENTURA, Calif. (AP) — A man accused of burglarizing a Southern California home took a bathroom break and left DNA evidence in the toilet that led to his arrest, an investigator said Tuesday.
Kenya’s learning curve in democracy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Kenyans cast their ballots on Aug. 8, they were not only voting on the issues and candidates but also to ensure the future of their democracy. This is important for the rest of Africa, where fair and free elections are still a rarity. If Kenya can demonstrate a learning curve in holding credible and peaceful votes, the rest of the continent will take note.
As Kenyans await on
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Amid international concerns of post-election violence, Kenyans are casting their ballots on Tuesday in one of most tightly contested presidential elections in the eastern African nation’s history. “I will cast my ballot first thing in the morning and leave,” Michael Otieno, a carpenter based in Nairobi, said Sunday. Mr. Otieno was one of thousands of Kenyans fleeing major cities for their rural homes to wait out the election, as memories of violence after a contested 2007 presidential election bubble to the surface.
Can Congress keep Robert Mueller from being fired?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Does Robert Mueller need congressional protection? Senators introduced two bills last week intended to block an unwarranted Mueller dismissal. Both would etch in law the principle that Department of Justice special counsels can’t be ousted just because the president feels like it.
25 Trendy Fad Diets That Are Total BS
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Vitamix Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win a Vitamix Ascent blender!
Greensbury Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win a Greensbury Butchered Box!
Breville Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win a Breville Smart Oven!
King Arthur Flour Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win a King Arthur Flour baking bundle!
Oxo Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win a bundle of Oxo's kitchen tools!
Kenmore Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win a Kenmore Smart Fridge!
Polaroid Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win a Polaroid Snap Touch!
Breast Cancer Symptoms That Aren't Lumps
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Watch the video to learn about breast cancer symptoms that aren't lumps.
Coal Plants Might Be Even More Toxic Than We Thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A byproduct may pose human health risks.
What a Leftover Viking Lunch Revealed About the Global Frozen Food Trade
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The legendary Norsemen weren't just raiders.
Timeline: Gene therapy's long road to market
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gene therapy, which aims to patch faulty genes with working DNA, has been a long time in development. The following are major milestones: 1972 - Researchers first suggest gene therapy as a treatment for genetic diseases but oppose its use in humans "for the foreseeable future", pending greater understanding of the technology. 1990 - A four-year-old girl with severe immunodeficiency became the first patient to undergo gene therapy in the United States.
Groups propose ocean refuges for captive dolphins, whales
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Hawaii marine park's purchase of Kina, a 40-year-old false killer whale long used in echolocation research, has reignited a debate about captive marine mammals and the places that care for them. Most ...
The Reason China Can’t Find Anyone to Operate Its Alien
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Even for a million dollar salary.
Sage grouse conservation changes draw mix of praise, alarm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — President Donald Trump's administration has opened the door to industry-friendly changes to a sweeping plan imposed by his predecessor to protect a ground-dwelling bird across vast areas of the U.S. West.
'May you die in pain': Lawmakers face fierce criticism as they return home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
At a town hall in Chico, Calif., Rep. Doug LaMalfa faced anger over his vote to repeal Obamacare and defund Planned Parenthood, and his denial of climate change.
Scientists circumvent Trump to spread climate change report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Climate change experts say the publication of a new report on climate change is just as important for understanding our contemporary political climate as for its scientific findings.
Republican businessman takes on Nevada's Dean Heller
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The race for a Senate seat in Nevada demonstrates the volatility of politics in the age of Trump — and not just among Republicans.
Accused burglar doesn't flush toilet, leaves DNA for police
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A man accused of burglarizing a Southern California home took a bathroom break and left DNA evidence in the toilet that led to his arrest, an investigator said Tuesday. The suspect "did his business ...
$1M bill deposit attempt leads to Iowa man's drug arrest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SIOUX CITY, Iowa (AP) — Authorities say a man who tried to deposit what he presented as a $1 million bill has been charged with drug possession in Iowa.
For 1st time, both national lottery games top $300 million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — For the first time, U.S. lottery players will have a choice of games offering jackpots topping $300 million.
Why these parents want their kids to have an 'old
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When parents ask Julie Turchin why she allows her two daughters so much independence – including freedom to roam their California neighborhood and walk home from school – she often cites an experience she had when she was 9. Six years later, when Ms. Turchin got separated from her high-school classmates in Russia, she didn’t panic, but used her broken Russian to figure out the transit system. “It wasn’t a big deal, because I’d been figuring out how to get home, lost on the subway, since I was 9,” says Turchin.
'Breakthrough' penny
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have hailed a “breakthrough” technology capable of regrowing damaged organs and healing serious wounds with the single touch of a penny-sized pad. The new device uses nanochips to reprogramme skin cells which then generate any type of cell necessary for medical treatment. The non-invasive procedure takes less than a second and in laboratory trials was found to restore the function of badly damaged blood vessels within days. With this technology, we can convert skin cells into elements of any organ with just one touchDr. Chandan Sen, Ohio State University Dubbed tissue nanotransfection (TNT), the technique works by placing a small pad of nanochips over a damaged area. A small electric current then fires DNA into the skin cells, converting them into the specific building block cells of any other part of the body, such as arteries, or even organs like the heart. It promises to transform the chances of patients in need of complex reconstructive  surgery, as well as those whose organs are prematurely ageing. The US researchers who created the technology say it could even be used as a weapon against neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. They believe it will be possible to reprogramme skin cells to harvest brain cells in a peripheral part of the body, such as the arm, which can then be injected into the brain. The team at Ohio State University have successfully trialled TNT on pigs and mice, with a reported success rate of 98 per cent. In one experiment, blood flow in the severely injured leg of a mouse was restored in less than a week after the pad reprogrammed skin cells to create vascular cells. The technology could replace some complex surgery Credit: PA After two weeks, the leg was substantially healed. Researchers plan to start clinical trials on humans next year. “With this technology, we can convert skin cells into elements of any organ with just one touch,” said Dr. Chandan Sen, who led the study. “This process only takes less than a second and is non-invasive, and then you're off. “The chip does not stay with you, and the reprogramming of the cell starts. Unlike stem cell therapies, TNT would require no laboratory-based procedures ahead of use, meaning it could be implemented in everyday healthcare setting, such as a GP surgery. Because the new reprogrammed cells are produced under the guidance of the patient’s own immune system, there is no need for the immunosuppressant drugs that can be necessary when biological matter is transplanted. The technique relies both nanotechnology-based chips designed to deliver the genetic cargo to adult cells in the body, as well as the specific biological information which will determine how to reprogramme those cells. "By using our novel nanochip technology, injured or compromised organs can be replaced,” said Dr Sen. “We have shown that skin is a fertile land where we can grow the elements of any organ that is declining.” TNT extends the concept known as gene therapy, which has been known about for some time, however the big difference is how the DNA is delivered into the body. "The concept is very simple," said Professor James Lee, who co-led the research. "As a matter of fact, we were even surprised how it worked so well. “In my lab, we have ongoing research trying to understand the mechanism and do even better. “So, this is the beginning, more to come." "By using our novel nanochip technology, injured or compromised organs can be replaced. We have shown that skin is a fertile land where we can grow the elements of any organ that is declining,” said Dr Sen. The study is published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
Genetic home testing: why it's not such a great guide to your ancestry or disease risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Most people will be much better off putting the money spent on a genetic test towards a gym membership, or a pair of trainers.
Google is giving away 15,000 pairs of solar eclipse glasses to schools across the US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Doug Peltz has been looking forward to the August 21 solar eclipse since he was 8 years old, so...
PositiveID Successfully Detects Ebola Virus on Its Firefly Dx Prototype System
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Company Publishes White Paper and Data on Ebola Detection DELRAY BEACH, FL / ACCESSWIRE / August 8, 2017 / PositiveID Corporation (OTCQB: PSID ), a life sciences company focused on detection and diagnostics, ...
When is the next full solar eclipse in the UK?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
British nyctophiles - fans of darkness and the night - have been waiting since August 1999 for a total solar eclipse to gaze at. Unfortunately, they might be waiting a while for the next decent one too - it won't take place until August 12, 2026, when up to 95 per cent of the Sun will be obscured. Britain will not see a total solar eclipse until September 23, 2090, but there are a plethora of partial eclipses in the meantime to keep nyctophiles content. At a glance | Future solar eclipses in the UK But isn't there supposed to be a solar eclipse in August 2017? There is - but only people in the US will be able to witness it in person. More specifically, people in the 'path of totality' will be able to see it: that's the name given to the area which will be flooded in complete darkness for over two minutes.  Those lucky enough to be in Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North Carolina and South Carolina will see the total solar eclipse - dubbed the Great American Eclipse - while we Brits will be treated to a partial solar eclipse. It will be visible in parts of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland from around 19:35 on August 21 - but make sure you're in a spot where there's no cloud.  UK eclipse circumstances for August 21 2017 Will there be a live stream? Yes - Nasa will host an Eclipse Megacast for four hours during the eclipse which will be picked up by local, national and international TV stations. You can also follow all the action via the Telegraph. What causes a solar eclipse? The diameter of the Sun is 400 times that of the Moon but it lies 400 times further away. If you are in exactly the right place on Earth at the right time, you'll be lucky enough to see the two celestial bodies overlap exactly. However as the moon and the Earth are always moving, eclipses rarely last long. Scientists believe the longest total solar eclipse to happen between 4000 BCE and 8000 CE will occur on July 16 2186, lasting 7 minutes and 29 seconds. The longest total solar eclipse to date occurred on July 11, 1991: which, at its peak, lasted 6 minutes and 53 seconds. Credit: Nasa When is the next total lunar eclipse in the UK? A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly behind the Earth, so the Earth is between the moon and the sun. Colloquially referred to as blood moons, a fully eclipsed moon usually appears to be red because of how the sun's rays fall. Lunar and solar eclipses come in pairs, meaning a lunar eclipse always happens around two weeks before or after a solar eclipse. The lunar eclipse preceding this year's Great American Eclipse will happen on 7 August, but will only be a partial lunar eclipse. Credit:  Eddie Mulholland Although we'll have to wait 73 years for a total solar eclipse, we Brits will be treated to two total lunar eclipses in the next two years: the first on 27 July 2018 and the second on 21 January 2019. How can I see an eclipse safely? Never look directly at the Sun, even through sunglasses or dark material such as a bin liner or photographic negative. Makeshift filters may not screen out the harmful infrared radiation that can burn the retina of the eye risking permanent eye damage and blindness. Also, viewers must never use binoculars or a telescope. Wear special eclipse viewing glasses - not ordinary sunglasses - or construct a simple pinhole camera which projects an image of the Sun onto a blank piece of paper. Solar eclipse: how to watch the eclipse safely Solar eclipse February 2017, in pictures
Victim of 9/11 identified after 16 years using new DNA technology
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New DNA technology has made it possible for another victim of the 9/11 terrorist attacks to be identified nearly 16 years on. The victim, a male whose name is being withheld at the request of his family, is the 1,641st person to be identified in the attacks that killed 2,753 people in total. The remains were discovered by the New York City’s Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, which has been retesting DNA recovered during cleanup efforts in 2001 this year.
AI Vs. Bioterrorism: Artificial Intelligence Trained to Detect Anthrax by Scientists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
South Korean scientists have been able to train artificial intelligence to detect anthrax at fast speeds, potentially dealing a blow to bioterrorism. Hidden in letters, the biological agent killed five Americans and infected 17 more in the year following the 9/11 attacks, and the threat of a biological attack remains a top concern of Western security services as radicals such as the Islamic State militant group (ISIS) seek new ways to attack the West. Researchers from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have now created an algorithm that is able to study bacterial spores and quickly identify the biological agent, according to a paper published last week for the Science Advances journal.
Trump tweets link to Fox News story based on 'classified' intelligence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley said on “Fox & Friends” Tuesday that she could not discuss the story because it contained “classified” information.
Polls: Americans are losing trust in President Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
When asked whether they are proud to have Trump as their president, 34 percent of Americans said they were, the survey found; 64 percent said they were not.
‘May you die in pain’: Lawmakers face fierce criticism as they return home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
U.S. Rep. Doug LaMalfa uses his Blackberry to photograph legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, and to cut off federal funding of Planned Parenthood that had just been signed by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan following an enrollment ceremony in the Rayburn Room at the U.S. Capitol January 7, 2016 in Washington. As members of Congress return to their districts for the customary August recess, at least one California lawmaker received a hostile reception back home. Rep. Doug LaMalfa, R-Calif., appeared at a town hall in Chico on Monday.
Officials: 'No foreigners' sale sign violates civil rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MASON, Mich. (AP) — A veteran's front-yard sign advertising the sale of his home violates state and federal anti-discrimination laws because it indicates the owner won't sell to foreigners, according to Michigan Department of Civil Rights officials.
Burning river reborn: How Cleveland saved the Cuyahoga – and itself
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Tim Gottshall paused in mid-paddle, his kayak drifting for a moment on the Cuyahoga River, to consider the question: Is the water safe? Nearby on Wendy Park, where the river meets Lake Erie, Jermaine Eggleton was pulling catfish and bass out of the Cuyahoga. Recommended: Climate change: Is your opinion informed by science?
Brexit Is Quietly Killing Science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Nobel Prize winning physicist considers taking his research elsewhere, while applications from foreign researchers has plummeted.
Using smart sensors to monitor a hive reveals when bee colonies are in trouble
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why are bee populations declining? A graduate student from Canada's Simon Fraser University has built a smart hive-monitoring system to help find out by listening to bees communicating.
Dutch students grow their own biodegradable car
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What's made of sugar, can carry four people and travel at 50 miles (80 km) per hour? A biodegradable car, whose inventors say could be the next step in environmentally friendly motoring. The lightweight electric car, created by students in the Netherlands, is made of a resin derived from sugar beets and covered with sheets of Dutch-grown flax.
Algal biofuel production is neither environmentally nor commercially sustainable
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The climate change-mitigating dream turns out to be a green damp squib.
Stunning moon turns blood red during partial lunar eclipse across Europe  
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stargazers were treated to a spectacular celestial display overnight when the moon turned blood red during a partial lunar eclipse. The moon in various stages of partial lunar eclipse over the West Bank city of Bethlehem Credit: Barcroft  The partial lunar eclipse was visible in many European countries including Spain, Greece, Poland and Germany. Picture taken with long exposure time shows the rising full moon during a partial lunar eclipse over Frankfurt, Germany Credit: AP Spectacular images of the partial eclipse were also captured in Bethlehem, Turkey and Egypt. What causes a partial lunar eclipse? A partial lunar eclipse in Szczecin Credit: EPA The website Time and Date explains: “A partial lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth moves between the Sun and Moon but the 3 celestial bodies do not form a perfectly straight line in space. “When that happens, a small part of the Moon's surface is covered by the darkest, central part of the Earth's shadow, called the umbra. “The rest of the Moon is covered by the outer part of the Earth's shadow called the penumbra.”   A man walks with his camel during the eclipse in Turkey  Credit: Getty  For a partial lunar eclipse to occur, two celestial events must happen at the same time:  The Moon should be a full Moon. The Sun, Earth and Moon must be aligned in almost a straight line. People watch at a rising full moon during a partial lunar eclipse atop a hill at the Tio Pio park in Madrid Credit: AP The partial lunar eclipse comes ahead of the full solar eclipse which will be visible in North America for the first time in 99 years on August 21 - it has been dubbed the Great American Eclipse. Everyone in North America, parts of South America, Africa and Europe will see at least a partial solar eclipse. The moon is seen during a partial lunar eclipse in the sky in Cairo Credit: Reuters  In the UK, stargazers will only see a partial solar eclipse which will be visible in parts of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland from around 19:35 on August 21. A plane flies over the sky during the Partial Lunar Eclipse in Turkey  Credit: Getty  Last year, a blood red moon over New York was captured in these spectacular photos.  Where to see it | The Great American solar eclipse
Activists call for whale refuges, but can they stay afloat?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WAIMANALO, Hawaii (AP) — A Hawaii marine park's purchase of Kina, a 40-year-old false killer whale long used in echolocation research, has reignited a debate about captive marine mammals and the places that care for them.
Dutch egg probe widens to chicken meat tests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dutch authorities on Tuesday said they had started testing chicken meat stemming from poultry farms affected by a tainted egg scandal to determine whether it, too, was contaminated. "We are currently testing chicken meat in the poultry farms where eggs were infected to determine whether the meat is contaminated as well," Tjitte Mastenbroek, spokesman for food security agency NVWA, told AFP. The probe focuses on "a few dozen" farms that produce both eggs and chicken meat, NVWA said.