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This Skier is the First Athlete to Compete at the Winter Olympics for Puerto Rico in 20 Years. Here's Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Puerto Rico hasn't recognized winter sports at the Olympics for years
Man Claims Teen Girl Hired Him on Craigslist to Kill Her
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He claims she wanted to end her life because of problems with her boyfriend
Physics: Can Dark Matter Cool? Thousands of 'Clumps' Might Exist Outside Hot Galactic Halos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dark matter is a mysterious form of matter that is not visible to us, and is thought to make up about 27 percent of matter in the universe, according to NASA. According to their research, if most dark matter cooled, then it would still reside inside its galactic halos.
Sen. Paul: Congress Is Full of Hypocrites. I Took a Stand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Republican Senator from Kentucky writes that even Republicans shouldn't accept everything just becomes from a GOP Congress
Elon Musk Continues to Befuddle Planet Earth. But Has He Taken On Too Much?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk Continues to Befuddle Planet Earth. But Has He Taken On Too Much?
Domestic Violence Survivor: Rob Porter Shows How Far We’ll Go to Silence Victims
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'What continues is a unilateral blaming of women — whether they stay or go'
Up for Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Newsy partners with Intelligence Squared U.S. to restore critical thinking. In this debate, experts explore if we should genetically modify food.
The ICC Is Launching Preliminary Probes Into Violence in the Philippines and Venezuela
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The preliminary probe is a first step that could lead to indictments by the global court
‘It’s What She Wanted.’ Man Stabbed His 6
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seth Pickering pleaded guilty to stabbing his daughter rather than give her up
The people who know no war: Afghanistan's most isolated corner
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wakhan Corridor (Afghanistan) (AFP) - "Taliban -- what's that?" asks Sultan Begium shyly from her freezing home in Afghanistan's mountainous Wakhan Corridor, a region so remote that its residents are untouched by the decades of conflict that have devastated their country. Known to those who live there by its Persian name Bam-e-Dunya, or "roof of the world", it is a narrow strip of inhospitable and barely accessible land in Afghanistan bordered by the mountains of what is now Tajikistan and Pakistan, and extending all the way to China.
Elon Musk left a secret message for aliens inside the Tesla he launched into space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's written on a circuit board inside the car
How Nathan Chen Became America's Greatest Hope for Figure Skating Glory at the PyeongChang Winter Olympics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nathan Chen, the 18-year-old known as the Quad King, could become the first U.S. man to win a figure skating medal since the 2010 Olympics
Children Don't Inherit All Their Parents' Genes, But They Are Still Influenced By Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study by Kong and colleagues shows that parents’ genes, even those not passed on to children, have major effects on kids’ health and educational attainment. To me, this new study highlights the importance of parental genes in shaping how we are raised.
Two Philadelphia Eagles Fans Pulled Off the Ultimate Recreation of That Iconic WWII Kiss Photo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The pair met on Twitter following the Super Bowl
Here's How Many Athletes Are Competing in the 2018 Winter Olympics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And how many countries they came from
'He Says He's Innocent.' President Trump Defends Ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Former White House staff secretary Rob Porter resigned this week amid allegations of domestic violence
Five mysterious ‘lost civilisations’, and how we unearthed them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lost cities and ancient civilisations aren’t always unearthed by new technologies
The Sun is getting cooler and dimmer, but scientists aren’t worried
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In what is being considered a particularly rare event, scientists are projecting that the Sun will be an unusually cool customer by the year 2050. By combining data and observations from decades of Sun research, experts are predicting a "Grand Solar Minimum" will occur a few decades from now, making our parent star dimmer and cooler than it has been for a very long time. The Sun might look the same to you today as it has since the first time you laid eyes on it, but our star actually displays plenty of changes. The Sun goes through regular cycles of solar minimums and solar maximums, which are periods where the Sun is either quite calm (the minimum) or incredibly active (the maximum). These patterns repeat every 11  years or so, but new research suggests that there's a pattern behind the pattern, and that a particularly cool solar minimum is on the way. The study, which was published in Astrophysical Journal Letters, was carried out by a team led by physicist Dan Lubin of the University of California, San Diego. After combing the data, Lubin's team has forecasted a grand minimum that will be around seven percent cooler than the typical solar minimum, making it a particularly calm moment for our star. During a solar minimum, the Sun produces far fewer solar flares and sunspots, and as a result, much less ultraviolet radiation is shot out into space and towards Earth. This can have a number of effects on our planet, including changes in the thickness of the stratospheric ozone layer and temperatures far above ground. Those changes can affect weather, though forecasting specific differences has proven difficult. The grand minimum will be an exaggerated version of the typical solar minimum, and could produce some very noticeable effects. The most recent grand minimum is thought to have occurred back in the mid 1600s. The event, called the Maunder Minimum, is credited with plunging temperatures to the point where the Thames River and Baltic Sea froze over. However, other parts of the planet heated up, including Alaska and Greenland, to far above their normal highs. This temporary shakeup of temperatures could happen again, though the researchers say it will have very little effect on the overall global warming trend that mankind has created for itself.
The Chicxulub Asteroid Impact that Killed the Dinosaurs Also Created Ocean Eruptions on the Other Side of the World
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More bad news: The giant magma tanks known as the Deccan Traps, one of the largest volcanic regions on Earth located in what's now India, erupted. Now the new paper suggests that when the asteroid struck, the sheer force of the impact may have also triggered a massive surge in volcanic activity at the bottom of the ocean.
Israel Says it Has Carried Out a 'Large Scale Attack' Against Iranian Targets in Syria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The military said its planes faced massive anti-aircraft fire from Syria that forced two pilots to abandon an F-16 jet that crashed in northern Israel
Man punches and kicks 150
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
DEDHAM, Maine (AP) — A Maine man says he punched and kicked a 150-pound bear, scaring it away after it attacked his puppy in the woods.
Professor replaced after insisting Australia isn't a country
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — An online adjunct professor incorrectly told a student that Australia isn't a country and gave her a failing grade, prompting Southern New Hampshire University to replace the instructor.
The Internet Has Zero Chill About Team USA's Fringed Gloves at the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They're part of the Ralph Lauren-designed ensemble
Shani Davis Was Right To Be Mad About Getting Snubbed As Team USA Flag Bearer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Even if tweeting about it was the wrong move
Harvard genetics pioneer wants to monetize DNA with digital currency, and defeat 23andMe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nebula Genomics is a new idea from Harvard genetics pioneer George Church to use blockchain and digital currency to monetize DNA. It's aiming at 23andMe.
'Sinking' Pacific nation is getting bigger: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Pacific nation of Tuvalu -- long seen as a prime candidate to disappear as climate change forces up sea levels -- is actually growing in size, new research shows. A University of Auckland study examined changes in the geography of Tuvalu's nine atolls and 101 reef islands between 1971 and 2014, using aerial photographs and satellite imagery. It found eight of the atolls and almost three-quarters of the islands grew during the study period, lifting Tuvalu's total land area by 2.9 percent, even though sea levels in the country rose at twice the global average.
Governors say Interior Department shift didn't include them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DENVER (AP) — A bipartisan group of 19 Western governors said Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke did not consult with them about major plans for reorganizing the agency, and have asked him to delay implementing the proposal until he speaks with them.
Is THIS the year Texas goes Democratic? How grassroots organizers hope to make it happen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Grassroots organizers in Texas hope to turn the state blue by ramping up voter registration.
Readers write: Effects of Victoria’s matchmaking, Finland
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Effects of Victoria’s matchmaking
Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir's Blistering Figure Skating Commentary Should Be a Winter Olympic Sport
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"There's no one more judgmental than an ice skater"
Teenager Raises $17,000 To Help 1,000 Girls See “A Wrinkle In Time”
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Girls will know that the possibility of going into space...is not that it is limited but limitless!"
This Is the Order That Countries Marched in at the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Many social media users observing the ceremony seemed slightly confused by the order of events
The black box set to revolutionize the search for life beyond Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the world's driest desert, an unassuming black box called "Espresso" is about to begin a very big mission: scouring the universe for planets like ours to find signs of life beyond Earth. Espresso, an instrument known as a spectrograph, has a humble appearance that belies its cutting-edge technology: it is the most precise instrument of its kind ever built, 10 times stronger than its most powerful predecessor. In the Atacama desert, in northern Chile, Espresso will be hooked up to four telescopes so big that scientists simply named them the Very Large Telescope, or VLT.
10 More Kids Have Died This Flu Season — And We May Not Have Reached the Peak, CDC Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Almost everything we're looking at is bad news'
You Can Stream the Winter Olympics for Free on Snapchat. Here's How
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The app is showing live snippets of big Olympic events
A Major Justice Department Official Is Stepping Down Amid Tensions With Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rachel Brand would have taken over the Russia investigation if Rod Rosenstein was fired
Scientists are simulating Mars in one of the most inhospitable places on Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mars might be the next place humans visit but it's not exactly the kind of place you'd want to hang out just for fun. It's dusty, dry, and while we know there's at least some water frozen near its poles and potentially more underground, being stranded there would end your life quite quickly. As it turns out, there are a few corners of our very own Earth that are just as desolate as the red planet, and scientists are now using one of those locations to test gadgets and other hardware that space travelers might use during a manned Mars mission. Researchers have chosen southern Oman as their Mars testbed, using the desert bordering Saudi Arabia as a fake Martian landscape. There, scientists go to great lengths to mimic what it might be like for an astronaut working on the surface of Mars, right down to simulated communications delays as the signals travel from the red planet to Earth and back. The "fake" astronauts live in inflatable crew quarters and have little to no contact with the outside world. They must wear space suits when walking around outside, and because this is supposed to be another planet, safety is priority number one. They get around on foot or ATVs, and they conduct research in the same way that actual Mars travelers might. The entire experiment is designed to last for a month, at which point the astronauts will return to civilization. In the meantime they'll toy with mapping tools, test robotic rovers, and put the latest in spacesuit technology to the ultimate test. They have enough food to make it through, but the crew is also testing the ability to grow plants in a portable greenhouse which will be crucial for long-term stays on the red planet. It might seem extreme to isolate scientists in the desert for a full month, but the first Mars visitors will experience something much more intense. It will take between six and nine months to make it to Mars from Earth, which means the crew will be living aboard a spacecraft for entirety of that time. Once they arrive, it's unclear how long they might stay, but it's not out of the realm of possibility that they might remain there for several months before catching their return flight.
Convicted killer has A
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The original Bedford County investigator Ricky Gardner continues to believe Jens Soering is guilty of the murders of Derek and Nancy Haysom.
This Company Wants to Sequence Your Genome, Put It On a Blockchain—And Pay You For It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This Company Wants to Sequence Your Genome, Put It On a Blockchain—And Pay You For It
South Korea’s President Meets With Kim Jong Un’s Sister as Olympics Get Underway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's the most significant diplomatic encounter between the rivals in years
Rob Porter's Resignation Raises Questions About White House Vetting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Experts said the hiring of top aide Rob Porter raises serious questions of how it is being handled in the Trump Administration.
German student admits to killing girlfriend's parents: Part 4
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elizabeth Haysom pleaded guilty to being an accessory-before-the-fact, and Jens Soering, who later took back his confession, was found guilty.
Google 'Snow Games' Celebrate the Winter Olympics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new day, a new Doodle
Sen. Duckworth: Olympics Diplomacy or Not, North Korea Is Still a Threat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The DPRK has a history of using diplomatic entreaties as cover for developing nuclear arms