World News
IN SHORT
Friday, June 23, 2017

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
Brain Architecture: Scientists Discover 11 Dimensional Structures That Could Help Us Understand How the Brain Works
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By using an advanced mathematical system, researchers were able to uncover architectural structures that appears when the brain has to process information, before they disintegrate into nothing. The team, led by scientists at the EPFL, Switzerland, were carrying out research as part of the Blue Brain Project—an initiative to create a biologically detailed reconstruction of the human brain. In the latest study, researchers honed in on the neural network structures within the brain using algebraic topology—a system used to describe networks with constantly changing spaces and structures.
The benefits that a digital healthcare system could bring aren't out of reach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There are many obstacles to bringing the power of 21st-century technology to the NHS. But that shouldn't stop us trying.
Review: Interstellar virus makes trouble in new sci
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The Space Between the Stars" (Berkley), by Anne Corlett.
California Prepares for Solar Power Loss During the Great Eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A total solar eclipse that will sweep across the United States on Aug. 21 is expected to make a noticeable dent in solar-energy collection, prompting energy workers to concoct workarounds that will help them meet energy demands while the eclipse passes overhead. Utility workers already have a game plan in California, where 9 percent of electricity came from utility-scale solar plants in 2016.  During the eclipse, when the sun disappears behind the moon, power grid workers plan to ramp up energy output from other sources, including from hydroelectricity and natural gas, and then quickly reintroduce solar power as the sun reappears. In all, California's residents shouldn't notice a difference in their power supply during the duration of the eclipse, said Steven Greenlee, a spokesman for California Independent System Operator (ISO), a nonprofit that manages California's power grid.
Stratolaunch's Gigantic, Rocket
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But by then, no one may care.
Defeat SAT Science Content With This Summer Prep Plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The SAT and ACT once differed in several areas: The ACT was notable for testing scientific knowledge and reasoning, while the SAT left that material to more specialized subject tests. Following the SAT's recent redesign, that exam now contains science questions. If you have decided to make the SAT part of your path to college, but struggle with science or are just concerned with earning your best possible score, take some time during the summer months to learn about the science portion of the SAT.
Sweet sizzlin' beans! Fancy names may boost healthy dining
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CHICAGO (AP) — Researchers tried a big serving of food psychology and a dollop of trickery to get diners to eat their vegetables. And it worked.
Trump's Climate Retreat Is About Fear, Not Just Greed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Conditional cooperation" like the Paris accord breaks down if some individuals feel weak and defensive.
NYC's Hidden Marine Wonderland Revealed in New Map
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New York City, it's time to get to know your neighbors. A new map produced by the New York Aquarium and National Geographic reveals the biodiversity teeming off the city's shores. The map shows the New York Bight, a 16,000-square-mile (41,440 square kilometers) area of the Atlantic where whales, sharks, sea turtles and squid ply the depths.
Einstein letters on God, McCarthy, Israel go up for auction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
JERUSALEM (AP) — A collection of letters written by Albert Einstein is set to go to auction next week, offering a new glimpse at the Nobel-winning physicist's views on God, McCarthyism and what was then the newly established state of Israel.
A Famous 19th
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Time and the tides have washed away the last traces of a famous 19th-century shipwreck from a coral reef in the South Pacific, the scene of extraordinary tales of survival during the "Age of Sail," according to archaeologists who visited the site earlier this year. A team of 11 maritime archaeologists and divers from Australia journeyed earlier this year to Kenn Reefs, a submerged atoll among the Coral Sea Islands, located more than 300 miles (500 kilometers) northeast of their port of departure at Bundaberg on the Queensland coast. The researchers — from the Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) and the Silentworld Foundation, a private maritime archaeology group — had hoped to find the wreck of the Jenny Lind, a small sailing ship that sank after it struck the reef during the night of Sept. 21, 1850.
A severely sunburnt dolphin is recovering swimmingly because nature is resilient
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bottlenose dolphin is healing nicely after suffering from a horrific sunburn, researchers say. SEE ALSO: Man comes across massive injured great white in shallow waters Spirtle the dolphin was stranded on a beach in Cromarty Firth, Scotland, in July 2016. She was believed to have been on the beach for 24 hours before rescuers floated her back out to water. As a result of being stranded, Spirtle suffered sunburn wounds that were quite serious, and, coupled with her dehydration, rescuers weren't sure the young dolphin would survive. Porridge and her calf Spirtle were photographed in Moray Firth in 2012, the year Spirtle was born.Image: university of aberdeenResearchers from the University of Aberdeen photographed Spirtle over the year as part of a photo identification survey to track her progress. The dolphin lives within a special conservation area in Moray Firth, an inlet in the North Sea, along with about 200 other bottlenose dolphins. Recently, the team said it was happy to discover the dolphin has been making an amazing recovery. This photo was taken days after Spirtle was stranded in July 2016 Spirtle suffered from sunburn wounds after being stranded for 24 hours.Image: university of aberdeenThe skin damage was severe. This photograph was taken in September 2016 Spirtle was photographed two months after the stranding  looking significantly better.Image: university of aberdeenResearchers noticed that Spirtle had kept her distance from the other dolphins, potentially to avoid physical social behaviors such as rubbing each other with their flippers.  Spirtle's wounds underwent substantial healing in the two months since the stranding, but the team wasn't certain that the dolphin would survive the winter. This latest photograph was taken on May 25, 2017 Spirtle was photographed in May 2017 with her sunburn almost fully healed.Image: university of aberdeen"We were surprised by the progress of the healing, with the wound almost entirely healed," said Barbara Cheney, a research fellow at the University of Aberdeen. "She was in the middle of a group of dolphins behaving like any other 5-year-old dolphin," Cheney said. The University of Aberdeen will continue to monitor Spirtle's healing and her maturation. "She is now 5 years old and females can have calves anywhere from 6 to 14 years old," Cheney said, adding that the average age is nine. "So hopefully there will still be good news of Spirtle over the next few years." We'd love nothing more than to see Spirtle with a completely healed wound and perhaps a baby Spirtle swimming alongside her. WATCH:
Babies Can Recognize Faces Before They're Even Born, Researchers Find
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research has revealed babies could recognize human faces while still in the womb.
Full coverage: Jeff Sessions’ Senate testimony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
AG Jeff Sessions will testify for the Senate intelligence committee on June 13, and face questions about his meetings with the Russian ambassador to the U.S.
Schumer mocks bizarre Trump Cabinet meeting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer posted video of a Cabinet meeting at which each official was called on to offer praise to the leader of the free world.
Texas woman calls 911 to complain about wait for nuggets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WACO, Texas (AP) — Police in Central Texas say a woman fell into a foul mood when a fast-food restaurant took too long in delivering her chicken nuggets and she called 911 to complain.
Small town tries to put lid on power of Big Trash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
John Jordan’s three-bedroom home in Charlton, Mass., was once appraised to be worth $300,000. Less than a mile away in neighboring Southbridge, what was just a municipal landfill when Jordan moved here in 2001 has grown into the state’s largest trash depository. Over the years, it took in as much as 1,500 tons of waste a day – a lot of it from Boston.
For Trump, new week brings series of especially steep tests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This could be another big week for President Trump. The context is crucial: Time is beginning to work against the White House. There are reports the president has told Chief of Staff Reince Priebus he has until the holiday to get the White House staff straightened out and end internal bickering – or else he’ll be fired.
Are the courts treating Trump differently than other presidents?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
From pink hat-wearing protesters to former FBI Director James Comey, President Trump has accrued plenty of challengers in his first four months in office – but perhaps none has been as effective as the federal courts. The judiciary is a key cog in America’s checks-and-balances system, and a significant question mark loomed over how the institution would respond to such an unorthodox and unpredictable character in the White House. For almost a century, presidents have enjoyed a “presumption of regularity” that, barring evidence to the contrary, they always properly discharge their official duties.
The state of ISIS: shrinking territory, expanding reach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The news headlines about recent bloody attacks conducted by the so-called Islamic State, or inspired by it, give the impression that the ISIS brand of global jihad is ever-expanding and still dynamic. Recommended: How much do you know about the Islamic State? Today ISIS fighters are clinging to their last toeholds in Mosul, Iraq’s second city, where the jihadists declared an Islamic caliphate in June 2014.
12 Travel Tips for a Healthy Vacation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Planning a summer trip? Whether it’s an international getaway or a visit to a nearby beach, you’ll want to spend the time enjoying yourself, not dealing with health problems. Stocking up on the b...
Get Fitter Faster With HIIT
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Looking to ramp up your workout benefits but spend less time at the gym?  Exercise sessions that get your heart pumping faster are important, of course. But it’s impossible to go all-out for very...
South Africa’s maize farmers who survived climate change are now drowning in debt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bumper crop should have been good news for South African maize farmers, but market forces are saying otherwise. It’s been a rough few years for the country’s agriculture producers. A hot, dry El Niño climate pattern that swept across southern Africa made 2015 the driest year on record in South Africa. 2016 offered little…
Mining this asteroid between Mars and Jupiter would net $10 quintillion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
That’s $10 with 18 zeroes after it. Scientists are interested in the metallic composition of the 16 Psyche asteroid.
Alien life could be discovered within the next decade, says astronomer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The hunt for alien life has long been of interest to numerous astronomers and space enthusiasts. Current space missions involve searching for habitable planets, with the hope of also stumbling onto microbial forms of life. Although we are yet to find any substantial evidence to point towards the existence of intelligent life beyond Earth, some experts still believe that we could be closer to discovering alien life than we may think.
Sandy Hook families denounce Megyn Kelly and NBC for Alex Jones interview
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
NBC is planning to air Megyn Kelly’s interview with conspiracy theorist and talk show host Alex Jones on Sunday night. Kelly confronted Jones about his Sandy Hook claims during the interview, but the victims’ families argued that NBC should not be giving the Infowars.com provocateur a platform.
Trump supporters target special counsel because of his friendship with Comey
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As the investigation into President Trump’s ties to Russia has turned into a question of Trump’s credibility versus that of former FBI director James Comey, Trump’s allies have begun questioning the impartiality of special counsel Robert Mueller. Many of Trump’s longtime supporters have taken to Twitter and opinion pieces to argue that Mueller, who was appointed last month by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, will be biased by his long and close relationship with Comey.
Woman rescued from river, arrested on outstanding warrant
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LIMINGTON, Maine (AP) — Police say firefighters helped a woman who was stranded on a rock in a Maine river get safely back to shore, where she was immediately arrested on an outstanding warrant.
G7 nations should increase coordination, Macron a 'worthy partner' for Merkel on Russian affairs, Netanyahu must listen to moderates on both s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Avoiding the isolation of the United States and solidifying unity is a way to maintain the influence of the Group of Seven major industrialized countries...,” states an editorial. “Since the inauguration of the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump, antiprotectionist wording has disappeared from joint statements at major international conferences attended by the United States. This is a reflection of the thinking of the U.S. administration, which is touting ‘America first’.... As emerging countries are rapidly gaining power, the G-7 nations are required to coordinate more than before in their policies.
How to Watch NASA Create Colorful Clouds Over New York and the East Coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA is set to launch a rocket that will create colorful artificial clouds over the U.S. East Coast to study part of the Earth’s atmosphere. The clouds should be visible from New York down to North Carolina, and as far west as Charlottesville, Virginia. Viewers can watch the broadcast online below, or via the NASA Wallops Ustream site.
South Africa’s best crop in history still isn’t enough to lift its farmers’ spirits
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bumper crop should have been good news for South African maize farmers, but market forces are saying otherwise. It’s been a rough few years for the country’s agriculture producers. A hot, dry El Niño climate pattern that swept across southern Africa made 2015 the driest year on record in South Africa. 2016 offered little…
Ivanka Trump: I felt blindsided by the ‘viciousness’ of D.C.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“I was not expecting the intensity of this experience,” the first daughter-turned-White House adviser says.
Orlando Sentinel publishes emotional tribute on anniversary of Pulse massacre
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Since the Pulse nightclub attack one year ago, the local Orlando community and worldwide LGBT community have memorialized and honored the victims and survivors of the shooting through vigils, stories and art.
Girl uses 'Hunger Games' to rescue friend with leg wound
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GLOUCESTER, Mass. (AP) — A 12-year-old Massachusetts girl used what she learned about creating a tourniquet from "The Hunger Games" to rescue her friend.
Madrid buses move to curtail "manspreading" practice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MADRID (AP) — If you're taking a bus in the Spanish capital, be sure to keep your legs to yourself.
G7 nations should increase coordination, Macron a 'worthy partner' for Merkel on Russian affairs, Netanyahu must listen to moderates on both s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Avoiding the isolation of the United States and solidifying unity is a way to maintain the influence of the Group of Seven major industrialized countries...,” states an editorial. “Since the inauguration of the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump, antiprotectionist wording has disappeared from joint statements at major international conferences attended by the United States. This is a reflection of the thinking of the U.S. administration, which is touting ‘America first’.... As emerging countries are rapidly gaining power, the G-7 nations are required to coordinate more than before in their policies.
Death by Vampire Bat: How Rabies Kills
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A man in Brazil died of rabies in May after a vampire bat bit him. These bats can carry and spread the rabies virus, and indeed, the man who died caught rabies from the bat that bit him. The rabies virus can have a long incubation period, said Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious-disease physician and a senior associate at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, who was not involved in the Brazilian man's care.
A UK train station’s tribute to a famous mathematician got everything right except his math
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new train station opened last month in the British university town of Cambridge. In promotional materials for the new station, both the building’s architect and its operating company said the striking aluminum façade was inspired by the Game of Life, the famous mathematical model created by former Cambridge University professor John Conway in 1970.…
Teen Pot Use Linked to Illegal Drug Use by Age 21, Study Suggests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Teens who regularly or occasionally use pot are more likely to take other illegal drugs or use other harmful substances by age 21, a new study suggests, adding weight to the idea that marijuana does indeed act as a "gateway" to the use of other drugs. Researchers found that teenagers in the study who regularly used marijuana were 26 times more likely to have used other illegal drugs, such as cocaine, amphetamines or hallucinogens, by the time they reached early adulthood, compared with teens who hadn't smoked pot, according to the findings published online today (June 7) in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. The study also revealed that the teens who typically used marijuana once a week or more were 37 times more likely to be hooked on nicotine, and three times more likely to have harmful drinking habits by age 21 than their peers who did not use marijuana.
NASA and Ikea are teaming up to build furniture meant for new horizons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Setting up Ikea furniture may be difficult, but it's not rocket science...or is it? Thanks to a new collaboration between NASA and the Swedish furniture store, the two challenges may not be so disparate after all.
These Photos of One of the Saltiest Seas on Earth Are Drop
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Dead Sea's beauty is hard to describe if you haven't seen it with your own eyes. People from all over the world are drawn to it, and for a good reason.
When you crash a Lambo in Qatar, these are the ‘doctors’ that fly out to fix it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Most body shops aren't qualified to repair carbon fiber, so Lamborghini took matters into its own hands. We step behind the scenes to find out what happens when a car needs to be mended in a faraway corner of the globe.
Japan zoo toasts birth of panda cub, snug in mum's furry hug
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Japanese zoo celebrated the first birth of a baby panda in five years Monday, with the tiny cub small enough to fit in the palm of a human hand. Eleven-year-old mum Shin Shin gave birth just before noon, officials at Tokyo's Ueno Zoo said in a statement. Pandas are born pink, hairless and weighing around 100 grams (three-and-a-half ounces) -- so small it can be difficult to determine their sex.
G7 nations should increase coordination, Macron a 'worthy partner' for Merkel on Russian affairs, Netanyahu must listen to moderates on both s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Avoiding the isolation of the United States and solidifying unity is a way to maintain the influence of the Group of Seven major industrialized countries...,” states an editorial. “Since the inauguration of the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump, antiprotectionist wording has disappeared from joint statements at major international conferences attended by the United States. This is a reflection of the thinking of the U.S. administration, which is touting ‘America first’.... As emerging countries are rapidly gaining power, the G-7 nations are required to coordinate more than before in their policies.
FDA Asks Drug Company to Pull Painkiller in First
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today (June 8) that it has requested that Endo Pharmaceuticals, a drug company, remove the opioid painkiller Opana ER from the drug market. This is the first time that the federal agency has requested that a drug company voluntarily stop selling a medication because of the risk of abuse that the drug carries, the FDA said in a statement. If the company does not choose to do so voluntarily, the FDA will force the issue by withdrawing its approval for the drug.
Ikea and NASA are partnering on furniture that’s out of this world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Setting up Ikea furniture may be difficult, but it's not rocket science...or is it? Thanks to a new collaboration between NASA and the Swedish furniture store, the two challenges may not be so disparate after all.
Overweight Kids More Likely to Be Ostracized
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For middle schoolers, obesity can lead to unreciprocated friendships and even cause peers to actively dislike a child, new research finds. Previous work has suggested that overweight schoolchildren have fewer friends and are often pushed to the periphery of social groups, and the new research finds that overweight children may be actively ostracized by their peers. The negative relationships, said the authors, can carry serious mental and physical health implications for overweight kids, who have become a significant part of the U.S. population.
Japan zoo celebrates birth of panda cub
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Japanese zoo celebrated the first birth of a baby panda in five years Monday, with the tiny cub small enough to fit in the palm of a human hand. Eleven-year-old mum Shin Shin gave birth just before noon, officials at Tokyo's Ueno Zoo said in a statement. Pandas are born pink, hairless and weigh around 100 grams -- so small it can be difficult to determine their sex.
Despite conflicts, Mideast research center to launch in fall
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A top-notch research center that brought together Iran, Israel and other Mideast antagonists is launching operations in Jordan this fall
G7 nations should increase coordination, Macron a 'worthy partner' for Merkel on Russian affairs, Netanyahu must listen to moderates on both s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Avoiding the isolation of the United States and solidifying unity is a way to maintain the influence of the Group of Seven major industrialized countries...,” states an editorial. “Since the inauguration of the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump, antiprotectionist wording has disappeared from joint statements at major international conferences attended by the United States. This is a reflection of the thinking of the U.S. administration, which is touting ‘America first’.... As emerging countries are rapidly gaining power, the G-7 nations are required to coordinate more than before in their policies.