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Kevin Spacey's 'Sexual Behavior' Halted Filming on The Usual Suspects, Gabriel Byrne Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Spacey won an Oscar for his role in the classic thriller
Milky Way Clouds: Mysterious, Fast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 25th anniversary of the Hubble Telescope was marked by this image featuring a giant hydrogen cloud in the Milky Way. Using the map, he was able to highlight the high-velocity clouds, which are moving different speeds to the Milky Way. “These gas clouds are moving towards or away from us at speeds of up to a few hundred kilometers per second,” he said in a press release.
President Trump Says He May Be Willing to Raise Corporate Tax Rate – After Winning 20% Figure in Congress
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump said he would consider setting the corporate tax rate at 22 percent
Cards Against Humanity Isn't Joking About Disrupting President Trump's Border Wall Plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They just took a big step
Skydiving Santa crashes on Florida beach with Elf on a Shelf
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GULFPORT, Fla. (AP) — A skydiving Santa looking to make a grand entrance while taking an Elf on the Shelf to a 9-year-old girl crashed into a tree and light pole before hitting a Florida beach and breaking his leg.
ISS: Watch NASA Astronauts Make Pizza for Movie Night in Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thankfully, life without pizza isn’t something we have to ponder on Earth, but for the astronauts aboard the International Space Station, a giant slice is not a regular menu item. When Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency told his boss about his pizza craving in a live event, it spurred a special delivery to the ISS. Astronauts then enjoyed a rare pizza night, although their pies weren't in the form of the ooey, gooey, cheesy goodness we’re used to seeing.
Bacteria’s at the core of this 3D
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A team at ETH Zurich led by Professor André Studart has found developed a "3D printing platform that works using living matter." The bacteria-laden ink allowed researchers to produce "mni biochemical factories with certain properties.
Breathtaking photos from the Royal Society photography competition 2017 show science like never before
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From bear-shaped embryos to Antarctican glaciers and sleepy polar bears, the Royal Society competition shows the wonders of science like never before.
Why Did NASA Wake Up This Interstellar Spacecraft After 33 Years?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Actually, it's awesome.
Confronting a nuclear North Korea: Lessons from China
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A scene-setter for current tensions with North Korea? Yes, but also a fair description of events in 1964, when the People’s Republic of China, ruled by Mao Zedong, conducted its first successful test of a nuclear bomb
Northrop Buys Orbital ATK, and All of Space Launch Is Watching
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Can a combined Northrop and Orbital challenge already-allied Boeing and Lockheed? Or will Northrop's arrival bring the whole space economy tumbling down?
Underwater Volcano Eruptions Sound like Gunshots And Can Travel 10,000 Miles Through The Ocean
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Buried in the depths of the oceans, over a million enormous underwater volcanoes puncture the seabed. Using hydrophones—special microphones designed for use underwater—scientists from the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recorded the sounds of two volcanos erupting. Presenting their findings at the 174th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in New Orleans, the team, led by Gabrielle Tepp, from the AVO, show how different eruptions sound drastically different—while some explosions lasted hours, others ripped through the sea like gunshots.
This Supreme Court Case Is About Cake. But It Could Change LGBT Rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three Colorado men will face the Supreme Court of the United States on Dec. 5 to settle a dispute over a wedding cake.
Republican Senator Says Comments About 'Booze or Women' Were Misunderstood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Whether it's on booze or women or movies"
President Trump's Lawyer Says He Can't Be Charged With Obstruction of Justice. Experts Disagree
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Legal experts debate whether President Trump, or any President of the United States, can obstruct justice and be charged for it.
Falcon's attack strategy could inspire new drones: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Peregrine falcons are nature's fastest predators, and the way they swoop down on a target may one day inspire small, visually guided drones that can take out rogue drones, researchers said Monday. Falcons' attack trajectories do not follow any geometric rules, contrary to popular belief, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Rather, the birds use their eyes to line up parallel to a moving target on final approach, much like a guided missile.
Adding These 7 Quick Changes to Your Morning Routine Can Make You Happier
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These all take 10 minutes or less
Spiro Agnew's Lawyer: Donald Trump’s Lies Are Fatally Wounding Our Democracy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Without strict adherence to truth about Russia, Michael Flynn, the FBI and everything else, there can be no organized system of justice.
4 Ways the Republican Tax Plan Could Affect Teachers, Students and Schools
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It includes taxes on tuition waivers and university endowments
'Reputation is in Tatters – Worst in History!' President Trump Attacks His Own FBI in Tweet Storm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump responded to revelations that an FBI agent was removed from Mueller's team
Ancient China: Colossal Waterway System Built by 5,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A recently excavated hydraulic system is rewriting the history of early Chinese engineering. Four years of research have revealed that the water management system of the Liangzhu, an agricultural Neolithic society known for their jade objects, took an estimated 3,000 people nearly a decade to build, and pushes back the date of China's earliest known large-scale water engineering project to about 5,100 years ago. From 2009 to 2013, a team of researchers used a combination of archaeological samples, remote sensing data, geographic modeling, and satellite imagery to analyze how the Liangzhu people managed the water in the Yangtze Delta between 5300 B.C. and 4300 B.C. The delta, which drains into the east China Sea, was underwater up until about 7,000 years ago.
'We Need Roy Moore.' President Trump Endorses Moore Despite Sexual Misconduct Allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Moore has been accused of molesting a 14 year old girl when he was 32
The Alabama Special Election Race Between Roy Moore and Doug Jones Will Be Over Soon. Here's What to Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here’s everything you need to know about the 2017 Alabama special election Senate race between Roy Moore and Doug Jones
Patagonia fights back hard against Trump's national monument land grab
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The president stole your land. That's the stark, unequivocal, monochrome message writ large on the Patagonia homepage Monday, following Trump's announcement that the government aims to dramatically cut back two national monuments. SEE ALSO: Patagonia and Google look to defend public lands with stunning VR film series In what the outdoor clothing company slams as "the largest elimination of protected land in American history," Trump announced plans to scale back Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante by some 80 percent and 45 percent, respectively — leaving the land open to drilling and hunting. The former takes the biggest hit; it will now be just 220,000 acres, down from 1.35 million. It was designated a national monument in the dying days of the Obama administration less than a year ago. Bill Clinton designated Grand Staircase in 1996. Trump's decision has proven controversial. While some praised him for bringing the land back into public use, arguing that Obama overreached with his 2016 decision, many have slammed Monday's news. Environmentalists and Native American rights groups have expressed severe dismay. And Patagonia is not taking it lying down. It's launching one of several lawsuits, aiming to protect Bears Ears National Monument specifically. The company is working with conservation nonprofit Friends of Cedar Mesa and grassroots Native American organization Utah Diné Bikéyah, among others, on the action. An utterly depressing graphic on Patagonia's site visualizes the extent of the issue, and insists "an area bigger than Yosemite National Park is now at risk of industrialization" at Grand Staircase. Image: patagonia"Americans have overwhelmingly spoken out against the Trump Administration’s unprecedented attempt to shut down our national monuments," Rose Marcario, president and CEO of Patagonia said. "The administration’s unlawful actions betray our shared responsibility to protect iconic places for future generations and represent the largest elimination of protected land in American history. We’ve fought to protect these places since we were founded and now we’ll continue that fight in the courts." Patagonia has an almost 30 year history of fighting to protect public lands. Earlier this year, the company teamed up with Google to launch an immersive interactive film aiming to raise awareness of the beauty and vulnerability of Bears Ears. The site's "take action" page allows concerned members of the public to sign up for more information and express their views to the administration on Twitter. UPDATE Dec. 4 6:00 p.m. PT The North Face has joined Patagonia in the fight, pledging $`100,000 to help create an education center outside Bears Ears. WATCH: Volunteers are helping the earth by reusing industrial waste
5 Places Where U.S. Diplomats Are Desperately Needed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With or without Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
Ending refugee program for Central American youth may drive them to smugglers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Trump administration’s crackdown on immigration across the southern U.S. border may drive a new wave of youngsters from Central America to attempt a dangerous and illegal journey through Mexico to escape rampant gang violence in their home countries.
Police: DUI suspect dances on car, flees on kid's scooter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
RENO, Nev. (AP) — Police say a Nevada woman was arrested on suspicion of drunken driving after she drove down a highway the wrong way, danced atop her SUV and attempted to flee from officers on a kid's scooter.
Ancient Egyptian Statues of Lion Goddess Sekhmet Discovered in 3,500
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists in Egypt have uncovered pieces from 27 fragmented statues of the lioness goddess Sekhmet at a dig site in the country’s southern city of Luxor. The experts found the black granite statues at the funerary temple of Amenhotep III. The legendary Egyptian pharaoh, also known as Amenhotep the Magnificent, was the ninth Pharaoh from the ancient nation’s Eighteenth Dynasty.
This Flu Season Could Be a Whopper, Officials Warn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.S. health officials said they are concerned the upcoming flu season could be a bad one, based on reports from the Southern Hemisphere, where the flu season recently ended for the year. In Australia, for example, there were record-high numbers of laboratory-confirmed flu cases this year — more than 2.5 times the number last year, according to the Australian Government Department of Health. "As clinicians in the United States prepare for the start of another influenza season, experts have been watching the Southern Hemisphere winter for hints of what might be in store for us in the north," Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and colleagues wrote in a recent paper published in The New England Journal of Medicine.
Humans, say hello to your oldest relative: A big, mushy blob of sponge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Planet Earth is teeming with interesting creatures of all shapes and sizes, but life on our little blue marble wasn't always so diverse. Science tells us that all the life we see on the planet today is the result of primitive organisms evolving over millions and millions of years into much more complex forms. Now, scientists have declared that they've discovered the single common ancestor of all animal life on the planet, including humans, and it's not exactly a glamorous origin story. As it turns out, all of us — that means you, your dog, your cat, the mighty blue whale, lowly ant, and even your uncle Bob — all descended from sea sponges. Yep, we're all different branches of an evolution tree that began with a mushy blob of sponge that sits on the bottom of the sea, eats whatever runs into it, and doesn't do much else. Actually, come to think of it, I'm starting to see the human connection... The discovery, which was published in a new paper in the journal Current Biology, offers some clarity to previous research which had narrowed down the origin of all modern day animals to a pair of candidates: sea sponges and comb jellies. Both sponges and the jellies have been around for eons, and both are simple organisms, but new evolutionary models built on the most accurate data reveal that the sea sponge is a much better fit for being the "root" of the tree of life. “I think part of why people love this debate so much is the comb jellies are beautiful and the sponges are somewhat ugly," Davide Pisani of the University of Bristol, and co-author of the study, explains. "The sponge is the underdog in a sense. So it is quite nice to know that we have really humble beginnings, rather than this glamorous start.” Sponges are filter feeders, meaning that they just kind of sit there and find bits of food in the water that floats by. Knowing that humans and everything we see around us today evolved from such a modest creature might be hard to fathom, but that's what happens when you give evolution a few billion years to tweak things.
'It's Crazy.' Lindsey Graham Says It's Time to Move Americans Out of Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After North Korea launched another missile test late last month
Former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh Killed by Rebels
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Saleh was killed as his loyalists and Shiite rebels battle for control of Yemen
Companies Are Cutting Back on Holiday Party Booze Amid Sexual Harassment Scandals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"As soon as you introduce alcohol at an off-site activity, peoples' guards are dropped"
NASA nails test on Voyager spacecraft, 13 billion miles away
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA has nailed an engine test on Voyager 1 spacecraft, 13 billion miles away
Ending refugee program for Central American youths may drive them to smugglers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Trump administration’s crackdown on immigration across the southern border may drive a new wave of youngsters from Central America to attempt a dangerous and illegal journey through Mexico to escape rampant gang violence in their home countries.
Lift the ban on sports gambling?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Dec. 4 about the federal ban on sports gambling, with many of the justices appearing to lean toward overturning the ban in order to uphold state rights. Illegal sports gambling may already be widely practiced and mostly underground. Congress was not wrong when it passed the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992, which imposed a national ban while grandfathering the practice for four states that already allowed it.
Republicans say tax plan will boost growth. How much, and for how long?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Republican tax rewrite that has now passed both House and Senate represents a legislative triumph for one core idea: that lighter tax burdens mean more economic growth. Right now, it’s not just the sales pitch behind the tax plans, it’s arguably the idea that most unites a Republican Party challenged by internal divisions and electoral uncertainty. “If we can’t do better than 1.9 percent [growth], we’ve got real problems in this country,” Sen. Rob Portman (R) of Ohio said last week, citing the current growth rate projected for the next decade by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.
Religious liberty or right to discriminate? High court to hear arguments in wedding cake case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In July 2012, Charlie Craig and David Mullins walked into a cake shop in Lakewood, Colo. Across the counter was Jack Phillips, owner of the bakery he had opened 24 years earlier. Before they could open it, Mr. Phillips told them that while he would be happy to make them other products, he did not sell baked goods for same-sex weddings because of his Christian beliefs. Mr. Craig and Mr. Mullins left embarrassed and, they say, distraught.
Yes, Elon Musk will launch Tesla Roadster to Mars orbit on SpaceX Falcon Heavy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Update: After a bit of back and forth, SpaceX is confirming that the Roadster to Mars is a real payload, and that it intends to comply with all launch licensing regulations. Previously: Billionaire CEO Elon Musk tweeted out the idea of putting a cherry-red Tesla Roadster on SpaceX’s first Falcon Heavy rocket and sending it toward Mars, sparking lots of questions in the process. The first question has to be: Is he serious? So far, it sounds as if he might be. SpaceX folks are signaling that the plan is “legit,” and Musk’s replies to Twitter fans were also of a confirmatory nature. Here’s… Read More
Archaeopteryx: Scientists Have Been Wrong About the First Ever Bird Dinosaur Fossil for 160 Years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In 1855, paleontologists made a discovery that changed the way we looked at dinosaurs, evolution, and birds. In Germany, they found what would come to be known as Archaeopteryx, the world’s first bird. As it turns out, the “Haarlem specimen,” named for the city in the Netherlands where it is currently kept, is actually a member of a completely different group of feathered dinosaurs known as the anchiornithids.
Pigeons Have Abstract Intelligence and Can Understand Concepts of Space and Time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The humble pigeon, our urban counterpart, has proven through decades of experiments that it is capable of complex thought. Researchers at the University of Iowa put short and long lines on a screen and left them on the screen for short and long amounts of time.
Bronze Age Elite Forged All Their Best Weapons and Jewelry From Meteorites
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
How could people living during the Bronze Age pull off the difficult process of making iron? The logic behind names of prehistoric periods is breathtakingly straightforward: During the Bronze Age, archaeologists find lots of artifacts made of bronze, but then, when the Iron Age begins, suddenly metal implements are made of iron instead. Albert Jambon, a mineralogist at the Pierre and Marie Curie University in France, tackles these weird early iron exceptions in a paper, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein: Senate 'Putting Together' Obstruction of Justice Case Against President Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Feinstein cited the recent indictments and guilty pleas by former advisers
How the Brain Keeps Time Finally Discovered by Scientists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Neurons appear to fire in a similar pattern, whether operating at fast or slow speeds, the research found. To do anything, Mehrdad Jazayeri, an author on the study, told Newsweek, from playing a melody on a piano to reading aloud a tongue twister at different speeds, the brain needs to have some sense of keeping time.
Donald Trump Is Still Undecided on Recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's Capital, Jared Kushner Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The president is going to make his decision," the senior adviser says
Roman Fort Is the 'First Evidence' of Julius Caesar's Invasions of Britain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An ancient fort near a beach in southeast England is the first solid archaeological evidence of Julius Caesar's invasions of Britain in 54 and 55 B.C., according to researchers. Caesar himself wrote about his invasions of Britain, which have long been regarded as the first historical events ever recorded in the British Isles. But there was no direct archaeological evidence of Caesar's invasions until archaeologists discovered an ancient defensive ditch in 2010 while carrying out excavations ahead of a road construction project through the village of Ebbsfleet beside Pegwell Bay.
An American Tourist Was Killed By a Shark While Scuba Diving in Costa Rica
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Officials say it was an isolated incident
'They've threatened your hearts': Trump shrinks two national monuments in Utah
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump signed two presidential proclamations dramatically scaling back the sizes of two national monuments in Utah — outraging environmentalists and Native American tribes.
In Atlanta, some black voters weigh backing city's first white woman mayor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
James Morgan feels in his bones that being a “descendant of slaves” is still a defining quality of his existence as a black man in America. In that way, the retired gas-line worker takes particular pride in Atlanta’s nearly five decades of black leadership, epitomized today by Mayor Kasim Reed, a descendant of Nigeria’s Igbo tribe who has overseen a spectacular economic run for the South’s preeminent trade and culture hub. Born and raised on the city’s rapidly-gentrifying east side, Mr. Morgan, wearing a fedora and leather jacket, understands the importance of the city as a paragon of black competence – a legacy that to him seems especially important as the FBI in November reported an uptick in racial hate crimes nationally against both whites and blacks.