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Man Arrested in Saudi Arabia After Viral Video of Him Having Breakfast With a Woman
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A man has been arrested in Saudi Arabia after a viral video showed him having breakfast with a veiled woman.
Russian cosmonaut allays concern about hole in space lab
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MOSCOW (AP) — A Russian crewmember on the International Space Station has recorded a video message to assuage concerns about an air leak on the orbiting outpost.
UN panel calls for immediate release of American scholar held in Iran
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A United Nations panel has concluded that Iran’s arrest, conviction, and continued imprisonment of an American scholar is arbitrary and without legal basis, and recommends that Xiyue Wang be released immediately.
The GOP's narrow path to holding the House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Monitor Breakfast host Linda Feldmann was on the road with President Trump last week, so I had the pleasure of filling in for her as the moderator for our guest, Rep. Steve Stivers of Ohio, on Sept. 7. As chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), he’s tasked with making sure his party holds on to its majority in the House come November. As the Monitor’s correspondent on Capitol Hill, I was eager to hear the congressman’s strategy for winning, especially given that independent analysts are increasingly confident of Democratic chances to take over the lower chamber.
Frat houses refine the purpose of brotherhood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At college fraternities across the United States and Canada, the true meaning of brotherhood has just been clarified. After several high-profile deaths from heavy drinking at parties or initiation rites, the major association representing fraternities announced Sept. 4 that it will no longer allow frat houses to serve hard liquor at chapter facilities and events. “At their core, fraternities are about brotherhood, personal development, and providing a community of support.
Challenge to US sovereignty? In polls public accepts constraints on power
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
National security adviser John Bolton’s vigorous defense Monday of national sovereignty in the face of what he views as globalism run amok was enthusiastically received by his immediate audience, the Washington-based Federalist Society. Ambassador Bolton, the White House’s über nationalist and defender of American hard power, directed warning shots against the International Criminal Court and its purported plans to take up alleged US war crimes in Afghanistan and in third-country “black sites.” Underlying his remarks was what he called President Trump’s reassertion of national sovereignty after years of erosion at the behest of President Obama and other internationalists. “This administration will fight back to protect American constitutionalism, our sovereignty, and our citizens,” Bolton said.
Toxic Waste. Animal Manure. Hurricane Florence Could Be a Public Health Disaster
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The storm surge and flooding could trigger an environmental nightmare
Australian Newspaper Doesn't See How This Cartoon of Serena Williams Is Racist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The illustration has drawn comparisons to racist images of the Jim Crow era
Incredible Images of Hurricane Florence Captured From the International Space Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Preparations for Florence are underway on the East Coast, with more than 1 million ordered to evacuate. The Category four hurricane is expected to hit the mainland on Thursday night into Friday morning, according to the National Hurricane Center.
A different kind of climate summit comes to San Francisco
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The international effort to fight climate change is about to get injected with a bit of Hollywood flash, a lot of Wall Street green and a considerable dose of cheerleading rather than dry treaty negotiations.
Orbiting satellite offers a unique view of a recent rocket launch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Now here's a view of a rocket launch you probably weren't expecting. Showing last week's launch of a Chinese rocket, the extraordinary footage was captured from an orbiting satellite 332 miles up.
Here’s What it Looks Like to Fly Directly Into the Eye of Hurricane Florence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here’s What it Looks Like to Fly Directly Into the Eye of Hurricane Florence
SpaceX president says Elon Musk is 'as lucid and capable' as ever — report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"[He] is a brilliant man," Shotwell said, according to the report. The Air Force has begun looking into the latter situation, telling CNBC in a statement Sept. 7 the military "will need time to determine the facts and the appropriate process to handle the situation." It is unclear whether a formal investigation will be launched by the Air Force.
‘This has defined my career’: New York medical examiners still working to identify more than 1,000 World Trade Centre victims, 17 years later
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seventeen years after two planes struck the World Trade Centre in New York City, a dedicated team of scientists is still working to identify more than 1,000 of the victims. Just over half of the 2,753 people who died in the terror attacks on 11 September, 2001 have been accounted for through forensics. "This has defined my career," said Mark Desire, the assistant director of forensic biology at the Office of Chief Medical Examiner in New York, who is the only remaining member of the original team.
Trump still can't strike the right note about 9/11
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump's excited tone seemed at odds with the somber anniversary, but his speech was comparatively dignified.
Labrador dog named Lucy saves Oregon man from sex conviction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The discovery of a black Labrador named Lucy led to the unraveling of a criminal case Monday against an Oregon man who had begun serving a 50-year prison sentence.
Indian Ocean islands' decolonization dispute gets day in international court
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In the memories of the elders, passed down over bowls of coconut and octopus stew in the shacks of the Mauritian capital, Port Louis, the Chagos Islands were paradise.
Scientists draw up plan for ‘igloo base’ for first manned Mars mission
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What would a real mission to Mars look like?
At Least 45 People Were Killed in a Southern India Bus Crash, Officials Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bus carrying pilgrims from a Hindu temple in the hills of south India plunged off a road on Tuesday, killing at least 45 people, officials said. At least 25 other people were injured.
Curious Kids: if the universe is like a giant brain, then where's its body?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Our brain cells do look a lot like a map of the universe – but that doesn't mean they're the same thing.
These creepy new fish species from the bottom of the ocean will give you nightmares
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Most of the Earth is covered in oceans, and yet scientists actually know fairly little about the creatures that live at the most extreme depths. As past research efforts have shown, incredibly deep ocean trenches are often the habitat of some seriously bizarre creatures, and a recent expedition by Newcastle University has continued that tradition. Using a baited camera system, the researchers sent a bit of food down to the floor of the Atacama Trench and waited. What they saw wasn't just weird, it was also entirely new, adding a trio of never-before-documented species to the books. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txSOP_9yLCI The team, which is made up of 40 scientists from around the world, were able to observe new species of snailfish that had never been seen before. Snailfish, which feature an elongated body that acts like one giant fin, are common in many ocean ecosystems at varying depths. The team was able to gather a single specimen to bring back to the surface for further examination. With hundreds of known species, finding a few new ones isn't necessarily groundbreaking, but discovering any new animals that live at such incredible depths is always a treat. As for these new species, they're clearly a good fit for the trench, as Newcastle's Dr Thomas Linley explains. "Their gelatinous structure means they are perfectly adapted to living at extreme pressure and in fact the hardest structures in their bodies are the bones in their inner ear which give them balance and their teeth," Linley said in a statement. "Without the extreme pressure and cold to support their bodies they are extremely fragile and melt rapidly when brought to the surface.” There's really no telling what's left to be discovered in some of the deepest parts of Earth's oceans, but the only way we're going to find out is by exploring.
Oklahoma Zookeeper 'Joe Exotic' Indicted for Allegedly Trying to Have an Animal Rescuer Killed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Joe Exotic" is accused of trying to have an animal rescuer killed
U.N. Chief Says World Must 'Put the Brake' on Emissions by 2020 to Slow Climate Change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Monday that the world is facing “a direct existential threat” and must rapidly shift from dependence on fossil fuels by 2020 to prevent “runaway climate change.”
9/11: Then and now — 17 years later
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Yahoo News recently returned to the scenes of many memorable images taken in New York City on Sept. 11, 2001.
Remembering 9/11 on the 17th anniversary of terrorist attacks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Americans are commemorating the Sept. 11 terror attacks with somber tributes, volunteer projects and a new monument to victims. Thousands of victims’ relatives, survivors, rescuers and others are expected at Tuesday’s ceremony at the World Trade Center. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump plan to join an observance at the 9/11 memorial near Shanksville, Pennsylvania.
U.S. Marks the 17th Anniversary of 9/11 With Somber Tributes and a New Monument
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After a year when two attacks demonstrated the enduring threat of terrorism in the nation's biggest city
Louisiana Woman Charged With Shooting Her Husband in a Walmart Parking Lot in Front of Kids
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three children were present but unharmed
China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs Denies Human Rights Abuse Allegations in Xinjiang
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China's government said Aug. 31 allegations from the United Nations of human rights abuses in camps built for ethnic minorities in Xinjiang are "irresponsible and lack a substantial basis."
Greenhouse gases from rice paddies may be 2x higher than thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The way some irrigated rice paddies are managed worldwide, with cycles of flooding followed by dry periods, may lead to twice the planet-warming greenhouse gas pollution as previously thought, researchers said Monday. Since rice is a major staple for at least half the world's seven billion people, the way it is managed has significant effects on the Earth's warming climate, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a peer-reviewed US journal. For the study, researchers at the non-profit Environmental Defense Fund took a closer look at emissions of nitrous oxide, a long-lasting atmospheric pollutant that is more potent than methane or carbon dioxide.
U.N. Chief Says World Must 'Put the Brake' on Emissions by 2020 to Slow Climate Change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said extreme weather is "leaving a trail of death and devastation”
More Than 100 Migrants Have Died in a Shipwreck off the Libyan Coast, a Humanitarian Group Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The remaining survivors are being held detention in Libya
Trump administration rushes to lease federal lands
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Department of Interior is quietly preparing to offer hundreds of thousands of acres of public land for leasing to energy companies, a move critics have charged is being undertaken with minimal public input and little consideration for ecological and cultural preservation.
Dozens of rare Hermann's tortoises stolen in Corsica
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A turtle conservation park on the French island of Corsica is asking the public for help after 56 rare Hermann's tortoises, considered a nearly threatened species, were stolen from the site. The A Cupulatta park in Vero, about 30 kilometres (20 miles) northeast of Ajaccio, issued its appeal on Facebook on Monday after discovering the missing adult tortoises, recognisable by their distinctive black-and-yellow shells. It also warned that wild turtle populations could be at risk if the Hermann's were stolen by anti-zoo activists who might be planning to release the tortoises.
Georgia School Brings Back Paddling as a Form of Punishment for Its Students
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Corporal punishment in schools is still legal in 19 states
The Trump Administration Is Shutting Down the Palestinian Office in Washington
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The move is likely to harden Palestinian resistance to the U.S. role as a peace broker
£60m Government
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new lab for manufacturing cutting-edge gene therapy treatments has won approval from the medicines regulator to begin producing potentially life-saving drugs, in a boost for Britain’s post-Brexit economy. The Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult in Stevenage was awarded two crucial licences from the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) today, allowing the companies it works with to begin manufacturing cell and gene therapies that might one day be used by patients around the world. The two licences are an EU requirement for the production of commercial medicines for patient use or to support clinical trials. The Catapult, which is based in London and Stevenage, is a government-funded initiative to support the sector by helping scientists and businesses translate early stage research into commercially-viable medicines. The Stevenage manufacturing plant opened last spring and cost £60m, paid for by the Government through its industrial strategy fund. The hope is that this centre of excellence will turn the UK into a global leader in the emerging field of cell and gene therapy, and become a major contributor to the economy after Brexit. Companies that will begin manufacturing in Stevenage include Adaptimmune, Autolus, Cell Medica and Freeline. They are all involved in engineering cells and genes to treat diseases such as cancer and haemophilia. podcast promotion - brexit The licences will help these biotechs develop therapies that can progress faster to clinical trials and, ultimately, commercial supply. Keith Thompson, chief executive of the cell and gene therapy Catapult, said: “The granting of these licences demonstrates how our Stevenage manufacturing centre is becoming one of the world’s leading facilities for the development and production of cell and gene therapies.” The news comes a week after the NHS made a breakthrough gene therapy cancer treatment called Kymriah available for routine use. It means British patients will be the first ever in Europe to be dosed with an approved treatment of this kind, known as CAR-T therapy. Kymriah was developed by Swiss pharmaceuticals giant Novartis. Lord Henley, the minister for life sciences, said: “The go-ahead to make cell and gene therapies that could ultimately save lives is a great boost for the area, but also shines a light on the whole of the UK as an attractive place for this innovative industry to thrive."
A Louisiana Mayor Ordered a Boycott of Nike Gear Over 'Political' Colin Kaepernick Ad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Kenner city mayor said he was protecting taxpayers from a political campaign
Elon Musk said Tesla is about to have the 'most amazing quarter' in its history — here's what workers think of his prediction (TSLA)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One former and two current Tesla employees shared diverging opinions to Business Insider on whether the company will fulfill Musk's lofty vision for the quarter. The company has said that it expects to become consistently profitable beginning in the third quarter and, on Friday, CEO Elon Musk said in an email to employees that was posted on Tesla's website that the third quarter will be the "most amazing quarter in our history." He said in the email that Tesla will build and deliver over double the amount of cars it did in the second quarter, when it built 53,339 and delivered 40,740.
A New Pillow Uses NASA Technology to Deliver a Good Night’s Sleep
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Simba Hybrid puts its space-age materials inside an old-school housing.
South Korea's Moon Calls for 'Bold Decisions' Ahead of a Summit With Kim Jong Un
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
South Korea's president said his coming summit must lead to another "big step" toward denuclearization
1 Million People Ordered to Evacuate South Carolina Coast as Hurricane Florence Gathers Strength
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
1 Million People Ordered to Evacuate South Carolina Coast as Hurricane Florence Gathers Strength
Flight DD
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
機票比價模組介紹
Texas Company Says Its Pipeline Dumped 8,000 Gallons of Jet Fuel Into an Indiana River
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The mayor of Decatur Indiana says the clean up could take weeks, after a company spilled over 8,000 gallons of jet fuel into a local river.
North Korean Students Rally During Elaborate Finale of 70th Anniversary Celebrations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A sea of university and high school students spelled out slogans with torches
Europe's Space Champions Need More Orders at Home to Beat Musk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Europe’s space champions are urging buyers at home to favor their technology over that of foreign rivals, as competition intensifies from the likes of Elon Musk’s Space X. As executives from the space industry meet in Paris this week for the World Satellite Business conference, French satellite operator Arianespace is calling on Europe to translate its space sovereignty ambitions into more public orders.
A Man Serving a 50
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The dog demonstrated the complainant had lied under oath
Juno orbiter’s view of a beautiful brownish spot on Jupiter sparks a bit of potty humor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jupiter’s titanic storms have spawned their share of memorable cloud features, including the Great Red Spot, Oval BA (a.k.a. Red Jr.) and the now-defunct Baby Red Spot. Now there’s a new spot on the map, nicknamed “Mr. Hankey.” Mr. Hankey? The jolly cartoon poo made famous in a “South Park” Christmas episode? Believe it: The longish, brownish storm system was the star of the show during last Thursday’s close encounter involving Jupiter and NASA’s Juno orbiter. In the days since the encounter, known as Perijove 15, the probe has been sending back Junocam’s imagery for processing by a legion of… Read More
California Pledges 100% Clean Electricity by 2045
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ambitious commitment comes as the state gears up for a sprawling climate change summit