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Birthplace of Apostle Peter found in Israel: archaeologist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers may have found the home town of Peter and two other apostles of Jesus near the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel, an archaeologist said Monday. Israeli and American archaeologists have likely uncovered the lost Roman city of Julias near the banks of the lake, also known as Lake Tiberias, Mordechai Aviam of Kinneret Institute for Galilean Archeaology said.
Atheists thought immoral, even by fellow atheists: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A unusual social study has revealed that atheists are more easily suspected of vile deeds than Christians, Muslims, Hindus or Buddhists -- strikingly, even by fellow atheists, researchers said Monday. This suggests that in an increasingly secular world, many -- including some atheists -- still hold the view that people will do bad things unless they fear punishment from all-seeing gods.
Stream Outer Space From Telescopes Around the World
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Anyone will be able to enjoy the space sights through Slooh's telescopes from the comfort of their own home.
Academic Research Insight: Diagonal Models versus 1/N Diversification
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In spite of several efforts by researchers to overcome the estimation-risk problem (the use of estimate inputs based on sample information as if they were representative of the true population) which produces the so-called “wacky weights”, DeMiguel, Garlappi and Uppal (2009) present striking evidence that favors a simple 1/N naıve portfolio strategy. Are asset allocation models that use “diagonal” elements of the inverse covariance matrix superior to those using the “full” matrix, in addressing the “wacky weights” problem?
Questions over DNA tests sold for nutritional advice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Critics question the accuracy of metabolic tests that make dietary recommendations based on patient's genetic profile
EU demands Polish 'reassurance' over ancient forest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Top European Union officials have written to Poland's right-wing government seeking "reassurance" it will obey a ban on logging in Europe's last primeval woodland, sources said on Monday. Brussels has also pushed the bloc's top court to act urgently on the fate of the Bialowieza forest after the ruling Law and Justice party vowed that it would continue to log in the UNESCO world heritage site. "First Vice-President Frans Timmermans and the Commissioner for Environment Karmenu Vella sent a letter to the Polish authorities on Friday 4 August asking for reassurance that Poland will fully respect the interim measures issued by the Court of Justice concerning the Bialowieza forest," a Commission source told AFP.
Trump blasts Sen. Blumenthal for backing Russia probe: 'Now he judges collusion?'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president tore into the Connecticut Democrat after he voiced his support for Robert Mueller’s investigation into the Trump campaign’s possible Kremlin ties.
Trump claims base is bigger 'than ever before.' Polls suggest otherwise.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A new Quinnipiac poll shows just 33 percent of Americans approve of the job Trump is doing as president. His approval among Republican voters dipped to 79 percent.
Czech pig farm to quit WW2 Roma concentration camp site
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Robert Muller PRAGUE (Reuters) - The Czech government has persuaded an agricultural firm to sell a pig farm partly covering the site of a World War Two Nazi concentration camp where most of the victims were Roma. The firm, AGPI, said on Monday it had accepted an undisclosed financial offer from the government. The center-left government of Prime Minister Bohuslav Sobotka had entered talks with AGPI in November 2016, with the Culture Ministry representing the government in the talks.
North Korea’s impending famine, President Trump’s siding with Sunni leaders, Nigeria’s agencies can learn from offshore professionals, Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Warnings that North Korea may soon encounter its worst food shortages in decades raise three interconnected questions for the rest of the world,” states an editorial. “The first is what those other nations can do to alleviate suffering in North Korea. The second addresses the strategic dimension of assistance.... The third concerns the morality of linking the two – the humanitarian dimension and the security problem.... It is generally agreed that humanitarian aid and politics should not be linked, but the world has tried to link food aid to the state’s nuclear programs, to little if any effect.
On one tiny Greek island, a warm welcome for Syrian refugees
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Syrians, Iraqis, and Afghans are stuck in limbo, waiting to hear whether they will be granted asylum and allowed to settle in the European Union – or rejected and sent back to Turkey, from where they crossed in boats to Greece. Ever since the migration crisis erupted in 2015, the island has embraced asylum seekers. The islanders are keen to integrate the newcomers as much as possible and hope they will forge new lives amid the olive trees and ancient stone terraces of Tilos.
Is The Middle Child Syndrome a Myth or Do Parents Need To Take It Seriously?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Attention parents of three or more kids: We've got good news and bad news...
NASA Responds To Nine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jack Davis, a nine-year-old from New Jersey, applied for a job with NASA and the space agency responded via social media.
Ancient Egyptian Pharaoh is World’s Oldest Case of Gigantism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An ancient Egyptian pharaoh who ruled 4,700 years ago was a giant, scientists have announced. The remains, believed to belong to King Sanakht, who ruled during the third Dynasty, are believed to represent the oldest case of gigantism ever found—indicating the condition was not associated with social isolation. In an article published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, experts analyze skeletal remains first discovered in 1901 in a tomb near Beit Khallaf, Egypt, around 70 miles northwest from Luxor.
Trump blasts Sen. Blumenthal for backing Russia probe: ‘Now he judges collusion?’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president tore into the Connecticut Democrat on Monday after he appeared on CNN to voice his support for special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the Trump campaign’s possible ties to the Kremlin.
Horses snack on watermelons after spill on Philly street
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Some lucky carriage horses in Philadelphia got a summertime treat after a truck spilled a load of watermelons on the street near Independence Hall.
Cooked It tops pecking order in real life Chicken Run
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
While pundits often say some of the best runners can fly, one group of competitors gathered in England's Peak District really did have wings and feathers. The annual World Hen Racing Championships took place this weekend, with 30 to 40 hens taking part for a little local glory. The winner's trainer was nine-year-old schoolboy Jack Allsop, from Ible in Derbyshire, who has a collection of racing hens.
Lost high school ring 'keeps coming back' to Florida woman
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PENSACOLA, Fla. (AP) — A Florida woman says her high school ring "keeps coming back to me."
North Korea’s impending famine, President Trump’s siding with Sunni leaders, Nigeria’s agencies can learn from offshore professionals, Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Warnings that North Korea may soon encounter its worst food shortages in decades raise three interconnected questions for the rest of the world,” states an editorial. “The first is what those other nations can do to alleviate suffering in North Korea. The second addresses the strategic dimension of assistance.... The third concerns the morality of linking the two – the humanitarian dimension and the security problem.... It is generally agreed that humanitarian aid and politics should not be linked, but the world has tried to link food aid to the state’s nuclear programs, to little if any effect.
Three reasons to think twice about mapping the brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Areas of the brain are being mapped, much like the towns, cities and countries represented in a typical atlas.
Does New Jersey need the PennEast pipeline? To the companies that want to build it, that’s the wrong question.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Jacqueline Evans is a single mother with three young children living on the certified organic farm her family built in rural New Jersey. A proposed pipeline that’s upended her community would go right past her front door in the bucolic town of Stockton, N.J. She fears it would destroy her farmland, ruin her property value and place her children in “an incineration zone” — that is, if the natural gas in the pipeline catches fire and explodes. Evans accuses the PennEast Pipeline Company’s surveyors of trespassing on her property and harassing her family.
North Korea’s impending famine, President Trump’s siding with Sunni leaders, Nigeria’s agencies can learn from offshore professionals, Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Warnings that North Korea may soon encounter its worst food shortages in decades raise three interconnected questions for the rest of the world,” states an editorial. “The first is what those other nations can do to alleviate suffering in North Korea. The second addresses the strategic dimension of assistance.... The third concerns the morality of linking the two – the humanitarian dimension and the security problem.... It is generally agreed that humanitarian aid and politics should not be linked, but the world has tried to link food aid to the state’s nuclear programs, to little if any effect.
Complete list of every full moon in 2017 including August's Sturgeon Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Moon is the largest and brightest object in our night sky and has enchanted and inspired mankind for centuries.   Here's everything you need to know about Earth's only natural satellite, including all its different names and the dates you can spot the next one, including June's Strawberry Moon. How often does a full moon occur? A full moon occurs every 29.5 days and is when the Moon is completely illuminated by the Sun's rays. It occurs when Earth is directly aligned between the Sun and the Moon.  What causes the phases of the moon? 02:14 Why do full moons have names? The early Native Americans didn't record time using months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Instead tribes gave each full moon a nickname to keep track of the seasons and lunar months. Most of the names relate to an activity or an event that took place at the time in each location. However, it wasn't a uniform system and tribes tended to name and count moons differently. Some, for example, counted four seasons a year while others counted five. Others defined a year as 12 moons, while others said there were 13. Colonial Americans adopted some of the moon names and applied them to their own calendar system which is why they're still in existence today, according to the Farmer’s Almanac. January: Wolf Moon This moon was named because villagers used to hear packs of wolves howling in hunger around this time of the year. It's other name is the Old Moon. When? January 12 February: Snow Moon Snow moon is named after the white stuff because historically it's always been the snowiest month in America. It's also traditionally referred to as the Hunger Moon, because hunting was very difficult in snowy conditions.  When? February 11 'Snow Moon' Shines Over Hermosillo, Mexico 00:51 March: Worm Moon As temperatures warm, earthworm casts begin to appear and birds begin finding food. It's also known as Sap Moon, Crow Moon and Lenten Moon. When? March 12 April: Pink Moon April's full moon is known as the Pink Moon, but don't be fooled into thinking it will turn pink. It's actually named after pink wildflowers, which appear in the US and Canada in early spring.  This moon - which you can see around 07:08 on Tuesday April 11 -  is also known as Egg Moon, due to spring egg-laying season. Some coastal tribes referred to it as Fish Moon because it appeared at the same time as the shad swimming upstream.  This moon is important because it used to fix the date of Easter, which is always the first Sunday after the Pink Moon appears. This year, Easter falls on Sunday, April 16.  The Pink Moon also heralds the beginning of Jewish Passover. When? April 11  May: Flower Moon Spring has officially sprung by the time May arrives, and flowers and colourful blooms dot the landscape. This moon is also known as Corn Planting Moon, as crops are sown in time for harvest, or Bright Moon because this full moon is known to be one of the brightest. Some people refer to it as Milk Moon. When?  May 10 June: Strawberry Moon This moon is named after the beginning of the strawberry picking season. It's other names are Rose Moon, Hot Moon, or Hay Moon as hay is typically harvested around now. This moon appears in the same month as the summer solstice, the longest day of the year (June 21st) in which we can enjoy approximately 17 hours of daylight. When? June 9 The so-called 'Strawberry Moon' rises behind Glastonbury Tor on in June 2016.  Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images July: Thunder Moon Named due to the prevalence of summer thunder storms. It's sometimes referred to as the Full Buck Moon because at this time of the year, a buck's antlers are fully grown.  When? July 9 August: Sturgeon Moon Tribes in North America typically caught Sturgeon during this month, but also it is when grain and corn were gathered so is also referred to as Grain Moon. When? August 7 September: Harvest Moon It was during September that most of the crops were harvested. This moon also gave light to farmers working through the night. Some tribes also called it the Barley Moon.  The Harvest Moon can sometimes occur in October - whichever Moon is closest to the autumnal equinox.  When? September 6 Harvest Moon October: Hunter's Moon The light of this bright moon made it easy for hunters to spot prey ahead of the lean winter months. It's also called Blood Moon.  When? October 5 November: Frost Moon The first of the winter frosts begin to take their toll around now.  When? November 4 December: Cold Moon Nights are long and dark and winter's grip tightens, hence this Moon's name. With Christmas just a few days away, it's also referred to as Moon before Yule, and also Long Nights Moon. When? December 3 Clouds clear to allow a view of the final full moon of the year, a so-called 'Cold Moon' on December 13 2016 in Cornwall. Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images Once in a blue moon Does this well-known phrase have anything to do with the moon? Well, yes it does. We use it to refer to something happening very rarely and a blue moon is a rare occurrence. It's the name given to a second full moon that occurs in a single calendar month and this typically occurs only once every two to three years. What's a supermoon? A supermoon occurs when a new moon or full moon comes closer to Earth than usual making it appear brighter and closer to us earthlings. Supermoons can cause real physical effects including larger-than-usual tides.  There are four supermoons in 2017, although three of them won't be visible. The one to watch out for is not until December 3. How was the Moon formed? How the Moon was formed Tell me more about the moon The moon is 4.6 billion years old and was formed between 30-50 million years after the solar system. It is smaller than Earth - about the same size as Pluto in fact. Its surface area is less than the surface area of Asia - about 14.6 million square miles according to space.com Gravity on the moon is only 1/6 of that found on Earth. The moon is not round, but is egg-shaped with the large end pointed towards Earth. It would take 135 days to drive by car to the moon at 70 mph (or nine years to walk). The moon has "moonquakes" caused by the gravitational pull of Earth. Experts believe the moon has a molten core, just like Earth.  Man on the Moon Only 12 people have ever walked on the moon and they were all American men, including (most famously) Neil Armstrong who was the first in 1969 on the Apollo II mission.  The last time mankind sent someone to the moon was in 1972 when Gene Cernan visited on the Apollo 17 mission. Although Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, Buzz Aldrin was the first man to urinate there. While millions watched the moon landing on live television, Aldrin was forced to go in a tube fitted inside his space suit. Buzz Aldrin Jr. beside the U.S. flag after man reaches the Moon for the first time during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969.  Credit: AP When the astronauts took off their helmets after their moonwalk, they noticed a strong smell, which Armstrong described as “wet ashes in a fireplace” and Aldrin as “spent gunpowder”. It was the smell of moon-dust brought in on their boots. The mineral, armalcolite, discovered during the first moon landing and later found at various locations on Earth, was named after the three Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil ARMstrong, Buzz ALdrin and Michael COLlins. An estimated 600 million people watched the Apollo 11 landing live on television, a world record until 750 million people watched the wedding of the Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981. One of President Nixon’s speechwriters had prepared an address entitled: “In Event of Moon Disaster”. It began: “Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay to rest in peace.” If the launch from the Moon had failed, Houston was to close down communications and leave Armstrong and Aldrin to their death. How the Daily Telegraph reported Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon in 1969.
Falcon Heavy: SpaceX teases November launch of ‘world’s most powerful rocket’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX CEO and billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk is trying to drum up some excitement for November's first-ever launch of the Falcon Heavy, described as "the world's most powerful rocket."
Hong Kong cleans up greasy beaches after palm oil spill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A clean-up operation was under way in Hong Kong Monday after a massive palm oil spillage from a ship collision in mainland Chinese waters clogged some of its most popular beaches. The coast was coated with rancid-smelling sticky white clumps of the oil as it washed in Sunday, with 11 beaches still closed to swimmers Monday in the height of a summer heatwave. There are still lumps of the solidified oil on the beaches and the sea water in some areas is greasy.
Australian teen's feet bloodied by mystery sea creatures
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — A teenager who went for a swim at an Australian beach and emerged with his feet covered in blood has stumped marine experts.
North Korea’s impending famine, President Trump’s siding with Sunni leaders, Nigeria’s agencies can learn from offshore professionals, Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Warnings that North Korea may soon encounter its worst food shortages in decades raise three interconnected questions for the rest of the world,” states an editorial. “The first is what those other nations can do to alleviate suffering in North Korea. The second addresses the strategic dimension of assistance.... The third concerns the morality of linking the two – the humanitarian dimension and the security problem.... It is generally agreed that humanitarian aid and politics should not be linked, but the world has tried to link food aid to the state’s nuclear programs, to little if any effect.
Big Little Lies: The Complete First Season DVD Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter to win the complete first season DVD of HBO's Emmy®-nominated series, Big Little Lies!
Passenger knocked out as whale slams into Australia boat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A man was knocked unconscious and three others suffered facial fractures and broken ribs after a whale slammed into a charter fishing boat off Australia's north coast, the skipper said Monday. The 30-foot (9-metre) vessel was returning to port in the Whitsundays off the Queensland state coast with eight passengers on board when a humpback whale rammed it from below, sending it airborne. "Within a split second we all hit the floor, the boat launched up into the air and it dislodged everyone off their feet," captain Oliver Galea told AFP of the drama on Saturday.
The August Full Moon Is Called The Sturgeon Or Blueberry Moon, Here's How To See It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The full moon during the month of August is called the sturgeon or blueberry moon, here's how and when to see it.
As eels grow in value, US government clamps down on poaching
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BREWER, Maine (AP) — Changes in the worldwide sushi industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than $2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardizing the species.
North Korea’s impending famine, President Trump’s siding with Sunni leaders, Nigeria’s agencies can learn from offshore professionals, Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Warnings that North Korea may soon encounter its worst food shortages in decades raise three interconnected questions for the rest of the world,” states an editorial. “The first is what those other nations can do to alleviate suffering in North Korea. The second addresses the strategic dimension of assistance.... The third concerns the morality of linking the two – the humanitarian dimension and the security problem.... It is generally agreed that humanitarian aid and politics should not be linked, but the world has tried to link food aid to the state’s nuclear programs, to little if any effect.
Woman's Home Walls Literally Dripping with Honey!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Despite the removal, honey has begun seeping out of the walls of her home and continues to flow. “It was like a constant drip!” she tells The Doctors, explaining that it’s not just honey that has been a problem. Will her family get stung? The Doctors bring in professional exterminator Nick Isaac to weigh in on her extreme bee issue.
Rejuvenate Your Face with Your Own Blood?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If you’re looking to refresh your face, the answer might be your own blood! Facial plastic surgeon Dr. Kian Karimi joins The Doctors with Adrienne, who is hoping to freshen up her eyes and mouth, to a share a brand-new natural alternative to fillers.
Climate Control Bedding – The Secret for Couples Who Disagree on Temperature?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Agreeing on the temperature in the bedroom is no easy task for couples, especially if you are dealing with post-menopausal hot flashes. The Doctors and sleep specialist Dr. Raj Dasgupta investigate if climate control bedding is the answer! Carole and Rick cannot seem to find a temperature sweet spot, as Carol is dealing with temperature issues related to being post-menopausal and is sweating one minute and cold the next.
Burn Survivor Embraces Her Life with Scars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Alyssa was just two years old when she suffered 3rd-degree burns on 75 percent of her face. When two-year-old Alyssa pulled a pan of hot butter down on her face, her family tried to wipe the butter off but the skin was coming off too. There is nothing I can do about it." Alyssa feels like she was given a second chance, and she's choosing to live it freely.
Drs. Exclusive: Meet the Toddler with the Rare "Hulk" Disease
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
In a Doctors’ exclusive, Joni shares how her daughter is dealing with a rare gene mutation, which only affects 200 people worldwide, and has caused extreme swelling on her chest and arms.
Quora: A Timeline for Colonizing the Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Quora Questions are part of a partnership between Newsweek and Quora, through which we'll be posting relevant and interesting answers from Quora contributors throughout the week. David Brin (a great raconteur as well as an amazing writer—never pass up a chance to hear him speak) pegged the economic aspect of the issue: there is never a colony without an economic interest to sustain it.
North Korea’s impending famine, President Trump’s siding with Sunni leaders, Nigeria’s agencies can learn from offshore professionals, Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Warnings that North Korea may soon encounter its worst food shortages in decades raise three interconnected questions for the rest of the world,” states an editorial. “The first is what those other nations can do to alleviate suffering in North Korea. The second addresses the strategic dimension of assistance.... The third concerns the morality of linking the two – the humanitarian dimension and the security problem.... It is generally agreed that humanitarian aid and politics should not be linked, but the world has tried to link food aid to the state’s nuclear programs, to little if any effect.
NASA wants to beam your message into space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In honor of the 40th anniversary of the launch of Voyager, NASA will beam a user-submitted #MessageToVoyager into space in September.
The Distribution of Dark Matter And Energy Hasn't Changed Much Since The Big Bang
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers have found that there was about the same distribution of dark matter and energy right after the Big Bang as there is now in our universe.
SCIENCE SATURDAY: Is there life on Mars?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Is there life on other planets? It's one of the enduring questions of our lifetime, and space agencies like NASA are closer than ever to definitively figuring out what -- if anything -- thrives beyond Earth.
Total Solar Eclipse 2017: Astronomer Artist Tyler Nordgren Makes Stunning Posters to Inspire Sky Watching
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tyler Nordgren missed the total solar eclipse that passed over what was then his home in Portland, Oregon. “It wasn’t until 1999 that I finally saw one for myself, and I realized what an amazing phenomenon I had missed,” says Nordgren, now a professor of astronomy and physics at the University of Redlands in California. A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon moves between the Earth and the sun in such a way that it blocks the sun from view for those in the path of totality.
Hiroshima after the atomic bomb
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima on August 6, one on Nagasaki on August 9, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used.
Photo: Vermont boy reels in a record
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FERRISBURGH, Vt. (AP) — A 10-year-old who reeled in a giant carp says he knew it was a record contender before he ever got it ashore.
North Korea’s impending famine, President Trump’s siding with Sunni leaders, Nigeria’s agencies can learn from offshore professionals, Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Warnings that North Korea may soon encounter its worst food shortages in decades raise three interconnected questions for the rest of the world,” states an editorial. “The first is what those other nations can do to alleviate suffering in North Korea. The second addresses the strategic dimension of assistance.... The third concerns the morality of linking the two – the humanitarian dimension and the security problem.... It is generally agreed that humanitarian aid and politics should not be linked, but the world has tried to link food aid to the state’s nuclear programs, to little if any effect.
The 5 best ways to view the 2017 total solar eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From the inexpensive to the wallet-breaking, there are lots of ways to watch this year’s eclipse.
NASA's Best Volunteer For The Planetary Protection Officer Gig Is A Sci
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA shared Jack's adorable note on Twitter. Dr. James L. Green, NASA's Director, Planetary Sciences Division, wrote Jack back to thank him for his interest. Officially, NASA is hiring a planetary protection officer.
Pauly Shore delivers pitch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
These days, there's ample work for comedic impersonators, including Pauly Shore, who delivered a spot-on impersonation of White House senior adviser Stephen Miller.
North Korea’s impending famine, President Trump’s siding with Sunni leaders, Nigeria’s agencies can learn from offshore professionals, Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Warnings that North Korea may soon encounter its worst food shortages in decades raise three interconnected questions for the rest of the world,” states an editorial. “The first is what those other nations can do to alleviate suffering in North Korea. The second addresses the strategic dimension of assistance.... The third concerns the morality of linking the two – the humanitarian dimension and the security problem.... It is generally agreed that humanitarian aid and politics should not be linked, but the world has tried to link food aid to the state’s nuclear programs, to little if any effect.