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How Scientists Listen to Black Holes Colliding A Billion Years Ago
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The physics community was electrified."
U.S. lawmakers skeptical of promises to shield farmers from trade dispute
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.S. lawmakers and the farm industry were skeptical of the Trump administration’s promise to shield farmers from the rapidly escalating trade dispute between the United States and China, concerned about the lack of details in protecting the U.S. agricultural export sector now embroiled in the back-and-forth. Major farming states supported U.S. President Donald Trump in big numbers in the 2016 election, but lawmakers from those states were harsh in their criticism on Friday of proposed tariffs that have unsettled both the industry and agricultural trading markets.
Gambling physically alters the brain, making people more prone to anxiety and depression, study finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gambling physically alters the structure of the brain and makes people more prone to depression and anxiety, new research has shown. Scientists examining problem gamblers found they had more grey matter in and connections between regions linked to the mental conditions. They said the discovery could lead to new treatments for gambling addiction, through drugs or psychological techniques. Gambling has long been known to be associated with both debt and family difficulties as well as other mental health problems, such as depression. But the new findings, published in the journal Neuron, suggest the same system that causes affective disorders plays a role in a person's ability to tolerate economic risk. Symptoms | Depression Brain scans showed structural and functional connections between the amygdala and the mPFC are associated with individual differences in the degree to which a person accepts risk in order to achieve a greater financial return. The researchers recruited 108 healthy young adults who were asked to answer several questions involving their comfort with financial choices - each involving various levels of risk and reward. Study lead author Professor Joseph Kable, of the University of Pennsylvania, said: "Perhaps we can get a better assessment for someone's economic risk tolerance to provide the best advice possible for that particular individual. "The idea of using these brain markers and pairing them with some questionnaire or other assessments may help determine a better, more well-rounded sense of your tolerance for risk." The study identified individuals ranging from extremely risk-averse all the way to risk-seeking. Symptoms | Anxiety Separately, using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and DTI (diffusion tensor imaging), the researchers measured the connections between various parts of the participants' brains, homing in on the amygdala/mPFC system. They also measured the size of the amygdala, including volume of grey and white matter. To make an assessment of an individual's risk tolerance, the scientists correlated their assessment with the measures of brain structural and functional connectivity. They faced over 120 different scenarios involving the risk of making more or less money. Fixed-odds betting terminals can allow gamblers to lose £100 every 20 seconds Credit: SHAUN CURRY Prof Kable said: "We assessed how willing individuals were of accepting the risk of getting nothing for the chance of getting a higher amount of money." He added:  "The three measurements - structural and functional connections and the volume of amygdala grey matter - reinforce each other to suggest there is something important about the function of this system related to differences in how tolerant people are to taking risk. "Just by looking at these features of your brain, we could have a reasonable idea if you are someone who will take lots of risk or not." Specifically, individuals with higher tolerance for risk in the study possessed a larger amygdala, with more grey matter, and more functional connections between the amygdala and mPFC as measured by MRI. Warning signs | Are you a problem gambler? And higher risk tolerance was identified in individuals with fewer structural connections or pathways between these areas, as measured by DTI. Now the researchers plan on collaborating with financial planning organisations to see how these brain-system findings can be used as a marker for risk tolerance involving larger economic-based decisions. More than two million people in the UK are either problem gamblers are at risk of addiction, according to a report published by the Gambling Commission last year. It found evidence of an increase in addiction among those using the controversial fixed-odds betting terminals, which can allow gamblers to lose £100 every 20 seconds.
Jupiter's Great Red Spot Captured by Juno in Stunning NASA Photos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More images, more mysteries.
Zuckerberg's apology offensive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Admits 'huge mistake' on Facebook data breach.
'Social jetlag' linked to lower grades
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Shereen Lehman (Reuters Health) - When work, school and other scheduled activities are out of sync with a person's body clock, "social jetlag" results and diminishes performance, researchers say. The study team used a university computer system to follow nearly 15,000 students' daily rhythms and activities over two years. "Social jetlag is the misalignment between an individual’s circadian clocks and their environment due to social impositions like work or school," said study coauthor Aaron Schirmer of Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago.
Ancient Vikings Used Crystals to Navigate in a Surprisingly Legitimate Way
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sunstones are unexpectedly accurate natural compasses.
Workers' radiation exposure halts nuke plant demolition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seven decades after making key portions of the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation are being exposed to radiation as they tear down buildings that helped ...
A Fire at Trump Tower in New York Leaves 1 Person Dead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Four firefighters suffered minor injuries, officials said
Body Found Near Site of Cliff Crash That Killed Hart Family
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The crash was suspected to be intentional
King Penguin Colonies Move Like Liquid Molecules
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Watch this breeding penguin community flow like liquids
German Van Driver Who Killed 2 Was Well
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The man who drove a van into a crowd had a history of run-ins with the law
Trump calls out Putin for backing 'Animal Assad' in Syria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump delivered a critique of Russian leader Vladimir Putin after reports that the Syrian government launched another chemical attack against its own people this weekend.
Is Germany’s bold new law a way to clean up the internet or is it stifling free expression?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It was a seemingly innocuous tweet: The police in the German state of North-Rhine Westphalia (NRW) were extending New Year’s greetings to residents. In addition to a missive in German, the department sent their well wishes in French, English, and Arabic.
Russell Crowe Is Selling a Skull, Jockstrap and More at His Divorce Auction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The auction items are a collection of memorabilia from Crowe's films and life.
Climate change is a more partisan issue than ever, and Donald Trump is to blame
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump administration's rollbacks of crucial climate change policies, from the intended pullout from the Paris Agreement to the scuttled Clean Power Plan, have earned most of the media attention and scorn from environmentalists.  However, the ignorant climate science statements espoused by top federal officials, from the president to the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the secretary of Energy, and many others is having a corrosive effect on Americans' understanding of climate science.  Recent public opinion polling clearly shows that Americans are more divided now than they were a year ago on the causes of global warming, its seriousness, and the urgency of taking action.  SEE ALSO: Shell knew truth of global warming in 1980s; foresaw a Hurricane Sandy scenario While the majority of Americans still believe that global warming is caused by human activities, and that the effects of it have already begun, it's clear that the building drumbeat of flat out incorrect statements about climate science uttered by top officials is molding public opinion in a way that makes it harder for action to be taken on climate change.  A recent Gallup poll, for example, found that Republicans and independents have become more skeptical in their views on climate change, while Democrats have become even more convinced of the need to urgently reduce greenhouse gas emissions to curb global warming.  Results from recent Gallup polls on global warming views in U.S.Image: gallup.According to the Gallup poll, which is consistent with other public opinion surveys, majorities of Americans say that most scientists think global warming is taking place (66 percent), that it is caused by human activities (64 percent), and that its effects have already begun (60 percent).  However, there's a hardening of the partisan divisions that's occurred under Trump.  Gallup's annual survey on the environment, conducted during the first week of March, found that Americans are more divided than ever on climate change.  "President Donald Trump, who has called global warming a "hoax," may have contributed to this widening divide by reversing a number of government actions to address the issue," Gallup wrote in their online analysis accompanying the poll results.  Trump and his cabinet officials have also frequently misstated the scientific consensus on global warming in ways that cast doubt on the seriousness of the problem or even its existence.  For example, Trump does not seem to know the difference between weather and climate, using a December cold snap to rebut evidence of global warming. In the East, it could be the COLDEST New Year’s Eve on record. Perhaps we could use a little bit of that good old Global Warming that our Country, but not other countries, was going to pay TRILLIONS OF DOLLARS to protect against. Bundle up! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 29, 2017 Scott Pruitt, the embattled EPA administrator, has openly questioned the scientifically solid link between increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the air and global warming, telling CNBC last year that this long-lived greenhouse gas is not a "primary contributor" to global warming. (This is at odds with scientific knowledge documented in the 18th Century.) "I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do and there's tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact, so no, I would not agree that it's a primary contributor to the global warming that we see," Pruitt said. The Gallup poll found that while 82 percent of Democrats think global warming has already begun, only 34 percent of Republicans agree. In fact, 32 percent of Republicans said climate change effects will "never happen." In addition, about 69 percent of Republicans said news reports exaggerate the seriousness of global warming, but 64 percent of Democrats say the seriousness of global warming is underestimated. Even though the vast majority of climate scientists know that global warming is human-caused and already occurring, going as far as saying in a 2017 government report that there is no natural explanation for the global warming we've seen in recent decades.  The report, published by the Trump administration but released with little fanfare and ignored by Pruitt and others, stated: Yet despite such scientific assessments, a sizable 63 percent of Republicans think climate change is mostly due to natural causes, according to the Gallup poll.  Climate scientists understand that the use of the bully pulpit to espouse unscientific nonsense does not come without consequences.  In a Twitter thread on Friday, Texas Tech University climate researcher Katharine Hayhoe linked officials' statements with public opinion trends and a slowing down of urgently needed actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions if we are to avoid the worst global warming impacts.  Over the last year, we've seen an unprecedented level of obfuscation, rejection, and outright denial from politicians and both elected and appointed leaders. So it is no surprise that the opinions of those who support and endorse them have followed suit. No surprise at all. — Katharine Hayhoe (@KHayhoe) April 6, 2018 The cost of rejecting science is that our society is making decisions based on faulty & flawed information. We will be unprepared: for rising sea levels, stronger storms & droughts, increasing risks to our health, our economy, even national security. And we will pay the price. — Katharine Hayhoe (@KHayhoe) April 6, 2018 Tony Leiserowitz, senior research scientist and director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, said up until the 2016 election, recognition of climate change as a real, important issue was growing within the Republican Party. But that has changed dramatically in the last year, which he attributes largely to cues coming from the party's leaders.  “It’s the power of political elite cues,” he said, noting in an interview that partisans “... tend to listen to and follow the lead of what they hear from their political leaders.” After the rise of the Tea Party and Trump, Leiserowitz said, his polling group has also found a steep drop in Republican recognition of the scientific consensus on climate change.  He said the Republicans made a “huge lurch to this new position that climate change is a hoax.”  “They climbed way out not just a limb but the farthest twig of a limb.”  He called his own group's findings and Gallup's conclusions evidence of the "Trump Effect" when it comes to climate change in particular. “Groups are getting farther and farther split apart,” Leiserowitz said. Lasting ramifications Climate science studies couldn't be more clear in showing that we're running out of time to make the emissions cuts that would avoid sharp rises in sea levels, more frequent and severe heat waves, and other extreme weather events. We may look back one day at the anti-science rhetoric of the past 15 months and realize this was the time when the fight for a so-called safe amount of climate change was lost, given that the U.S. is the world's second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases.  Rolling back climate actions while also casting doubt on climate science has far-reaching consequences that could reverberate across generations, given that one molecule of carbon dioxide can remain in the air for at least 1,000 years.  Think about that the next time the president tweets about a cold day as if it renders the mainstream scientific consensus on global warming moot, or the Energy secretary says that we should be relying more on fossil fuels and less on wind and solar power.   WATCH: The lake that reminds them of home
How will lawmakers approach questioning Mark Zuckerberg?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg prepares to answer questions before Congress; The Hill reporter Ali Breland shares insight.
From CERN to the ISS, here are 9 big tech projects that changed the world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Whether it’s rocketing us into space, bringing us all together, or answering some fundamental questions about who we are and where we come from, here are nine tech projects which changed the world.
The debate over jailing women for abortions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In fact, the idea of prosecuting women for abortions has been kicking around on the fringes of the antiabortion movement for some time.? Back in 2014, conservative provocateur Kevin Williamson recommended (in a tweet and a podcast) execution, preferably by hanging, as the appropriate punishment.
Psychology will fail if it keeps using ancient words like “attention” and “memory”
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If fMRI had been invented in the 18th century, scientists would have used neuroimaging to find biological evidence of poetic talent, murderousness, and wit. So argues Russell Poldrack, psychologist and neuroscientist at Stanford University, who believes the words we use to conceive of mental states have always drastically distorted the science of psychology. A century…
Mission Deep Sea: Why Map Mars Before the Ocean?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In terms of wider direct economic benefit from marine ecosystem services, the World Wildlife Fund’s (WWF's) report Reviving the Ocean Economy estimated the ocean to be worth $2.5 trillion annually—which would give the ocean a seat at the G7 table in its own right. People will inevitably, and with increasing urgency, turn to the sea and to coastal regions for places to live and for food, energy, and the new medicines and natural products of the future. The most visible effects of plastics in the ocean, which are attracting significant public attention, are the ingestion and entanglement of charismatic marine species such as birds, turtles, mammals, and fish.
EPA Chief Spent Millions on Security and Travel: Report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pruitt has said his use of first-class airfare was initiated following unpleasant interactions with other travelers
Michelle Obama Uses Parenting Metaphor to Describe Donald Trump's Presidency
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'It was sort of like having the good parent at home'
Laura Ingraham Expected Back at Fox News After Controversial Tweet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She upset advertisers over her tweet mocking a Parkland shooting survivor
What causes the aurora to dance across the night sky?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An aurora can dance across the night sky in a variety of colors, making it one of nature’s most dazzling displays.
'I’m Not Going to Be a Gabby Giffords.' Rep. Ralph Norman Pulls Gun at Constituent Meeting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I’m not going to be a Gabby Giffords."
Faced with global warming, aviation aims to turn green
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A handful of firms and regulators hope that the electric revolution in cars will also take to the skies, helping the industry cope with an expected boom in travel and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. "Many people say that we must get rid of air transport because we will never be able to deal with emissions and noise, but this is an outdated approach," said Norwegian Transport Minister Ketil Solvik-Olsen, who recently hosted an aviation conference in Oslo. Norway, the largest oil and gas producer in western Europe, is paradoxically a pioneer in the field of electric transport.
The World’s First Luxury Space Hotel Is Now Taking Reservations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's how much it'll cost.
This Luxury Hotel Will Be 200 Miles Up and $792,000 a Night
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s not that far-fetched, but one skeptic says a startup’s audacious plan may be a trial balloon to see how many wannabe astronauts sign up.
A Fire at Trump Tower in New York Has Left One Person Dead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Four firefighters suffered minor injuries, officials said
A new 'race to the moon' is about to take off among startups
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Since 2009, the commercial space industry has garnered $12.8 billion in investment. As the Lunar X Prize shows, startups lead the way.
Japan's vaunted alert system runs up against limits
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On January 5, as Tokyo's commuters were struggling back to work after their long New Year break, blaring sirens from every phone pierced the sleepy atmosphere: "strong" earthquake coming. The message delivered via the country's alert system, part of its much-hyped J-Alert mechanism, warned of a big one directly hitting the Japanese capital -- potentially on the scale of the devastating 2011 earthquake that wrought massive destruction. It turned out that the system, which aims to give a precious few seconds to find shelter before a major earthquake strikes, had been tricked by an unusual seismological coincidence.
Team Captain Among 15 Dead After Bus Carrying Hockey Players Crashes in Canada
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Police said 15 people were killed and 14 people were injured from the accident
New Facebook scandal: hospital data
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Tech Tyranny': Social network reportedly sought patient data to see which users needed 'special care'; reaction from Beverly Hallberg, president of District Media Group. #Tucker
An Alaska Man Kicked a Mamma Moose. She Stomped on His Foot in Return.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"If you get into a kicking contest with a moose, guess who's going to win?"
Astronomers Release Stunning Images from One of Our Closest Galactic Neighbors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomers have released stunning new images from one our closest galactic neighbors, the Small Magellanic Cloud—a dwarf galaxy located ‘just’ 200,000 light years from Earth. The pictures—which were taken using the MUSE instrument on the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope in Chile, as well as others—have helped researchers to identify an elusive object known as an isolated neutron star outside our own galaxy for the first time. This neutron star is essentially a stellar corpse buried among clouds of gas left over from a 2,000-year-old supernova—the titanic explosion that occurs at the end of a massive star’s life.
Mystery over identity of 4,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A century-long mystery over the identity of a 4,000-year-old Egyptian mummy has finally been solved by the FBI. It took a forensic scientist at the FBI, using advanced DNA sequencing technology, to say definitely that the head belonged to the governor himself. Odile Loreille, an FBI biologist, drilled into a tooth extracted from the skull, collected the powder and dissolved it in a chemical solution.
Cystic Fibrosis: Bacteria Causing Chronic Infections May Have A ‘Memory,’ Study Reveals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The findings, which could have implications for those suffering from cystic fibrosis—a rare disorder that leads to severe lung damage, among other complications—were unforeseen by the multidisciplinary research team. “[Bacteria] are single-celled, don’t have neurons and don’t have a central nervous system, so how do they have anything that looks like memory?” study author Gerard Wong, a chemistry and biochemistry professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), told Newsweek. In the research, published in the journal PNAS, Wong and his colleagues analyzed the early stages of biofilm development in a bacteria called Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Pictures: Japan Volcano Erupts, Spewing Hot Rocks and Producing Lightning
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Thursday, Japan's Shinmoedake volcano erupted and hurled hot rocks into the sky, producing a plume of gas thousands of feet high. Shinmoedake became active in October 2017 and has erupted occasionally since then. "This is a very active volcano, so this is quite normal," Janine Krippner, a volcanologist at Concord University in West Virginia, told Newsweek. She added that Japan in general is quite used to dealing with small eruptions, which makes them better prepared to deal with situations like this.
2 Soldiers Killed in Helicopter Crash at Fort Campbell
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The crash is still under investigation
At the centre of our galaxy, there's a black hole party
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Black holes are hanging out at the centre of our galaxy by the thousands, according to scientists who have detected a bunch of them in the neighbourhood of a supermassive black hole already known to reside at the heart of the Milky Way. Researchers said data from the NASA's orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory allowed them to detect a dozen black holes surrounding Sagittarius A*, the mammoth black hole at the centre of our spiral-shaped galaxy. Black holes, which come in a variety of sizes, are extraordinarily dense entities with gravity so powerful that not even light can escape.
Lunar XPRIZE Will Continue Without Google—Or Its Cash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Google Lunar XPRIZE, a $30 million competition that challenged private firms to land a spacecraft on the moon, is to continue. X Prize has announced a bid to launch a new Lunar XPRIZE —with or without a title sponsor. Google declined to sponsor the competition beyond its March 31 2018 deadline, after more than a decade at the helm.
Brazil Is Bracing for the Arrest of Former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He has until 5 p.m. to turn himself in
Facebook may need group therapy to fix its engineering culture
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mark Zuckerberg would likely see little resemblance between Facebook and Royal Dutch Shell. But in one key respect, the social network and the oil giant are similar—and that similarity may be a source of Facebook’s current woes. Like Shell, Facebook is full of engineers, mainly introverted men who tend to make decisions based on emotionless…
Hey, how about we helicopter grizzly bears into this remote National Park?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ancient groves of Douglas fir trees still stand in North Cascades National Park. The little-visited park — it receives less than one percent of the annual visitation of Yellowstone — can resemble the misty, prehistoric woods before the Pacific Northwest was settled. Wolverines, cougars, moose, and hundreds of other species of animals dwell here, living among ponds and beneath towering, pinnacled mountains. But although these woodlands in Washington State were also once rich in grizzly bears, the park hasn't confirmed spotting any in years. After being thoroughly hunted, there may be none left.  "Without help, that population will not recover on its own," Frank van Manen, head of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team and an ecologist at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), said in an interview. SEE ALSO: Crumbling national parks mired in $11 billion backlog, but experts scoff at jacking up fees The nation's top wildlife managers have been planning to recover grizzly bears in North Cascades since 1991. The process, though, is intensely bureaucratic, requiring years of evaluations, re-evaluations, and proposals (some of which are hundreds of pages long).  Now, though, after more than 20 years of research, it might actually happen.  The recovery plan recently gained a powerful supporter: Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke traveled to the verdant park on March 23 to announce the restarting of recovery planning.  "The loss of the grizzly bear in the North Cascades would disturb the ecosystem and rob the region of an icon," said Zinke. Grizzly reintroduction planning abruptly halted in December 2017, with no clear explanation why.  Lupine blooms in a North Cascades National Park meadow.Image: National Park Service/O'CaseyZinke's enthusiasm for recovering grizzlies took many people — both those who support and oppose federal conservation efforts — by surprise.  Last year, Zinke made the controversial recommendation to President Donald Trump that Bears Ears National Monument in Utah be dramatically reduced in size. Trump then proceeded to slash the size of this fossil-rich land, previously protected by former President Barack Obama, by over one million acres (an over 80 percent reduction).  But Zinke maintained that grizzly bear recovery is part of "continuing our commitment to conservation."  He may have been swayed by the expanse and wildness of the North Cascades region. There aren't many places left to recovery grizzly bears, and North Cascades is as good as it gets. The park is surrounded by national forests on three sides and several Canadian territorial parks adjoin the park to the north. "It’s a tremendously wild area," Chris Servheen, the former Grizzly Bear Recovery Coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said in an interview. "There’s a tremendous amount of grizzly bear habitat." Recovering grizzly bears in the North Cascades means transporting bears from British Columbia into the park. According to the park's plans, the bears will be helicoptered in, as that's the only way to access extremely remote areas in a mostly roadless place. There are four different options on the table right now, detailed in the park's Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). One option, which Zinke apparently opposes, is doing nothing. If so, the remaining few bears will die out. The other three options propose restoring grizzly bear populations to approximately 200 individuals during the next 25, 60, or 100 years. Ross Lake in North Cascades National Park.Image: Andy Porter/National Park ServiceHelicoptering sedated bears to their homes in the deep backwoods of North Cascades, then, isn't just a logistical challenge. It requires a long-term commitment from wilderness managers from multiple agencies. It's also pricey. "A well-funded project that has a broad base of public and political support can do the job," Stephen Herrero, professor emeritus in animal behavior and ecology at the University of Calgary, said in an interview. "It ain't easy — but it sure is possible," he said. A shining example of where successful bear recovery has occurred is in Yellowstone National Park. In 1975, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the population of 136 bears there as endangered, but the population has since grown to around 700 bears today. These bears were taken off the endangered species list last year. North Cascades, with few bears left (perhaps none), may have a significantly more difficult hill to climb. Fortunately, decades of successful — and at times unsuccessful — bear management in Yellowstone show how it can be done.     "We have the tools in our toolbox to recover grizzlies in the North Cascades," said Severheen. "We know how to do that." A critical factor, learned from Yellowstone, is keeping grizzly mothers alive. "Ultimately, grizzly bear populations thrive or decline depending on the survival of adult females," said van Manen.  A sow and cub in Yellowstone National Park.Image: National Park serviceEven into the early 1980s in Yellowstone, grizzly bear populations were declining. "There were too many adult females dying," said van Manen. This was occurring in large part because bears were getting into garbage dumps, and they became habituated to humans, which then created conflicts with people. Many of these bears had to be killed. But park managers solved these problems, and many others, including by encouraging cattle ranchers with allotments next to the park to voluntarily give up this leased land. Although North Cascades and the surrounding forests provide a massive expanse of territory to reintroduce bears, some aren't pleased with the government's bear recovery plans.  The local Board of Skagit County Commissioners, have repeatedly opposed the grizzly introduction, citing public safety concerns. A spokesperson for the commissioners said none were available for comment.  Some ranchers are also concerned about grizzly bears in the area — and not just because bears that roam outside the park might eat some cattle. "Reintroducing as many as 200 man-eating predators into an area already reeling from exploding gray wolf populations is anything but neighborly," Ethan Lane, the National Cattleman's Beef Association federal lands executive director, said in a statement.  A Yellowstone grizzly bear eating a bison carcass.Image: National Park SErviceComing across a grizzly in the vast North Cascades wilderness, however, is unlikely. This is especially the case during the first decade, when 10 or 15 bears might be wandering the woods. "We’re talking thousands of square miles of country," said Severheen. "People won’t even know they’re in there." Additionally, bears "are the ultimate omnivores," said van Manen. They eat almost anything in the wild: Fish, berries, grass — but humans are not part of a bear's diet.  Nor do bears seek out people (unless they've been attracted to something like a food dump). "Anybody that spends much time in grizzly bear country recognizes that there is a pretty low probability of having an interaction with bears," said Severheen.  The Interior Department says that the final EIS draft will be released in late summer 2018. It will consider 126,000 public comments. From there, the Park Service and its management partners will pick one of the recovery options.  Recovering a fallen icon of the American West is bold, expensive, and will inevitably have its opponents. But national parks are required to conserve these places as they naturally exist, and grizzly bears are an integral part of this environment.  "There should be recovery in the North Cascades," said Severheen. WATCH: MIT created this imposter robot fish to spy on sea creatures
It Turns Out Puffins Have Fluorescent Beaks That Glow Under UV Light
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As if puffins -- the super cute seabirds know for digging burrows and mating
Africa's scientists encouraged to become the next Einstein
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Africa's young scientists encouraged to become the next Einstein; help build 'a bright continent'
Maine community creates massive ice carousel on frozen lake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SINCLAIR, Maine (AP) — Residents in a Maine town believe they've created the world's largest ice carousel on a frozen lake.
At the center of our galaxy, there's a black hole party
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Black holes are hanging out at the center of our galaxy by the thousands, according to scientists who have detected a bunch of them in the neighborhood of a supermassive black hole already known to reside at the heart of the Milky Way. Researchers said data from the NASA's orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory allowed them to detect a dozen black holes surrounding Sagittarius A*, the mammoth black hole at the center of our spiral-shaped galaxy. Black holes, which come in a variety of sizes, are extraordinarily dense entities with gravity so powerful that not even light can escape.
3 Judges for the Nobel Literature Prize Have Resigned
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Their decision could be related to the management of an internal sexual misconduct crisis