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Prehistoric, Dinosaur
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The rare frilled shark is considered a “living fossil,” as its makeup has remained unchanged for 80 million years. This summer, researchers found one alive and thriving off the coast of Portugal, adding evidence regarding the resilience of this ancient sea creature. The frilled shark has remained the same, both inside and out, since the time of the dinosaurs, with scientists dating it back to the Cretaceous Period, a time when the Tyrannosaurus Rex and Triceratops still roamed the planet.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
'Morally Bankrupt.' The GOP Tax Bill Repeals a Credit for Teachers Who Buy School Supplies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Teachers spend an average of $485 per year to buy school supplies
Dinosaurs Might Have Survived the Asteroid, Had It Hit Almost Anywhere Else
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The age of dinosaurs met an unlikely end — because had the cosmic impact that doomed it hit just about anywhere else on the planet, the "terrible lizards" might still roam the Earth, a new study finds. The impact of an asteroid about 6 miles (10 kilometers) wide about 66 million years ago created a crater more than 110 miles (180 km) across near what is now the town of Chicxulub (CHEEK-sheh-loob) in Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula. Prior work suggested the Chicxulub impact would have lofted huge amounts of ash, soot and dust into the atmosphere, choking off the amount of sunlight reaching Earth's surface by as much as 80 percent.
Convicted Murderer's Execution Delayed Over Paralytic Drug That Might Mask Suffering
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The lethal injection included the powerful opioid fentanyl
A conflict
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Given the lack of gravity, personal space, or guarantee of surviving any given day, one would think space stations would rank among the more stressful, conflict-ridden workplaces. But according to retired US astronaut Scott Kelly—who spent 520 days in space over four different missions and was commander of the International Space Station during his final,…
Rep. Mike Honda: The California GOP Works for Trump, Not Voters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They have voted with him 97% of the time
Space station getting delivery from Virginia for a change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
International Space Station is getting a delivery shipped from Virginia for a change
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
The Ways a Nuclear Blast Would Affect Your Health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We know you've had this thought once or twice -- how would a nuclear blast affect you? Here's what you need to know, and some tips on how to stay safe.
Future Humans Will Live Underwater and Erase Bad Memories: Tech Experts' Most Insane Predictions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Web Summit at Lisbon is known for being a bit of a spectacle, with attitudes and declarations that draw criticism for the tech world. “Are we going to see an aspect of society moving into the oceans in future?
Here's Who Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman Purged to Pave the Way to Power
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The young Crown Prince targeted five centers of influence in his purge of rivals
IBM says it's reached milestone in quantum computing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
IBM has announced a milestone in its race against Google and other big tech firms to build a powerful quantum computer
Ward family ripped apart by the Texas church massacre: 'She lived for those kids'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Lorenzo Flores, left, and Terrie Smith weep in remembrance of those killed in the shooting at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas, Nov. 9, 2017. SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Texas — It was Joann Ward’s sixth wedding anniversary, and she already had the perfect day in mind. A mother of four, Ward had the afternoon off from Theresa’s Kitchen, the tiny restaurant inside the Valero gas station where she worked a few hours a week.
Readers write: Rewilding of Europe, guide to Puerto Rico’s challenges, encouragement for students, hope for the future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? Regarding the Oct. 9 OneWeek article “Puerto Rico: Out of the shadows?”: Having previously lived in Puerto Rico for more than 12 years, I thought this was an excellent article that would give someone with little knowledge of Puerto Rico a very balanced perspective of what challenges people are facing there.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Stunning Photos Show Aurora's Northern Lights Over U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lucky Americans, particularly across the northern Midwest, have been treated this week to a brilliant lightshow: the Northern Lights, also known as the aurora borealis. It's an unpredictable phenomenon, but experts believe the current streak may continue through the next couple of evenings.
FBI can't unlock Texas shooter's iPhone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 'Cyber Guy' Kurt Knutsson weighs in.
7 Problems With the GOP’s ‘If True, Roy Moore Should Step Aside’ Stance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
7 reasons why it's problematic that many Republicans reacted to the Roy Moore sexual abuse allegations with "if true, he should step aside."
Baillie Gibson becomes one of the best discus, shot put athletes in the country: Part 1
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gibson signed on to attend University of Arizona in 2010, with a full scholarship and trained under her coach Craig Carter.
President Trump Still Hasn't Spoken to His Top General in Afghanistan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The lack of contact between the commander-in-chief and the top military official in Afghanistan is unusual
How Robert Mueller Works a Case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
I worked with the former FBI director for 12 years. Here's what to know about how he'll approach the Donald Trump and Russia investigation
Climate activists stage protest at German coal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Environmental activists protested at a German coal-fired power plant on Friday — the same day that Italy became the latest country to announce a deadline for ending its use of the heavily polluting fossil ...
Is the Sun Getting Brighter? How NASA Scientists Are Tracking Solar Activity to Look for Weird Behavior
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The sun had been making headlines recently. In September, NASA announced it had released its biggest solar flare for 12 years. This was pretty unusual considering it is supposedly heading into a period of quiet, where activity on its surface becomes muted—also known as the solar minimum.
99% of Student Loan Fraud Complaints Come from For
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Most complaints came from former students of the now-shuttered Corinthian schools and ITT Technical Institute
Mysteries of Shipwreck Hundreds of Years Old Revealed by 3D Scanning Off the Italian Coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists in Italy have discovered a Byzantine shipwreck off the coast of Sicily and are using cutting-edge 3D technology to further uncover the secrets of the vessel that had been submerged beneath the sea for hundreds of years. The experts in underwater archaeology from the University of Udine, Texas A&M University and Sicily’s local marine authority discovered the wreck at a depth of ten feet below the water line just off Ragusa. According to a University of Udine press release the team constructed a trench along the center of the ship to facilitate their work and documentation.
The U.N. Says Australia Is Responsible For the Remaining Asylum Seekers on Manus Island
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.N. Human Rights Committee insists Australia resettle the 600 asylum seekers who remain at the facility
A Radioactive Cloud from Russia Swept Over Europe — and No One Knows Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The radioactive nuclide Ruthenium 106 is believed to have originated in Russia or Kazakhstan
Republicans Are Stuck With Roy Moore. Here's What Could Happen Next
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
5 Alabama Senate race scenarios after Moore was accused of sexual misconduct with minors
Large U.S. farm study finds no cancer link to Monsanto weedkiller
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LONDON, (Reuters) - - A large long-term study on the use of the big-selling weedkiller glyphosate by agricultural workers in the United States has found no firm link between exposure to the pesticide and cancer, scientists said on Thursday. Published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI), the study found there was no association between glyphosate, the main ingredient in Monsanto's popular herbicide RoundUp, "and any solid tumours or lymphoid malignancies overall, including non-Hogkin Lymphoma (NHL) and its subtypes". The findings are likely to impact legal proceedings in the United States against Monsanto, in which more than 180 plaintiffs are claiming exposure to RoundUp gave them cancer - allegations that Monsanto denies.
SEAL candidate injured in study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Navy is investigating a slapping incident near San Diego that left a SEAL candidate in a coma.
28 Turkey Stuffing Recipes Your Thanksgiving Needs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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16 Simple and Flavorful Ways to Prepare Green Beans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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19 Easy and Delicious Ways to Cook Potatoes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Cats may prevent children getting asthma, scientists say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Keeping a cat in the home may prevent asthma in young children, according to Danish scientists. A study of nearly 400 toddlers revealed that those growing up with a cat had a far lower likelihood of suffering from the inflammatory condition. Researchers believe this is due to a genetic variation that plays a significant role in triggering asthma which is somehow switched off in the presence of a cat. It’s very exciting that they find this connection because other studies have struggled to conclude anything finalDr Arne Høst However, the same gene does not appear to be affected by the presence of dogs. When activated, the variation of the TT gene doubles the risk of asthma and is also responsible for bronchitis and pneumonia. Almost one in three children in the study carry the variant, which experts believe is proportionate to the population in general. Jakob Stokholm, who led the study at the Copenhagen Studies on Asthma in Childhood Research Center, said: the explanation could be related to bacteria that cats carry and perhaps fungi or viruses that they bring into the home. “If we can explain these mechanisms, it opens up opportunities to isolate them and to protect against the disease,” he said. The TT gene variant was previously suspected to be involved in some way to asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia, however scientists did not know precisely how. "It’s very exciting that they find this connection because other studies have struggled to conclude anything final,” said Dr Arne Høst, who co-led the research. “Now it looks like the effect is linked to a particular gene-variant, which goes to show just how complex the development of asthma and allergies are," he added. "It’s not only about genes and the environment, but how the two interact, and there’s so much that we still don’t know. Approximately 5.4 million people in the UK are currently receiving treatment for asthma, including more than 1.1 million - equivalent to one in 11 - children. Professor Hans Bisgaard said the study showed in unprecedented detail how the environment affects the behaviour of genes, in particular in early life and during pregnancy. “For me, this is the core message because it’s a recognition in the direction of how disease occurs,” he said.
Woman Abruptly Ends Her Date After She Found Out the Guy Voted for Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The course of true love never did run smooth
Billionaire Yuri Milner discusses his plan to look for life on Saturn moon – and his Russian connections
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russian billionaire Yuri Milner today laid out his vision to send the first privately funded interplanetary space mission to look for life at the Saturnian moon Enceladus — but first he had to address less lofty matters. Milner has been in the news for the past week because newly published confidential documents known as the “Paradise Papers” revealed that two firms controlled by the Russian government backed his early investments in Facebook and Twitter. So, of course, that was the first topic Milner was asked about during an onstage fireside chat at The Economist’s “New Space Age” conference at the Museum… Read More
Senate Republicans Have Their Own Tax Reform Plan. Here's How It Differs From the House Bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We have been laser focused, Mr. President, on reducing taxes for the middle class"
Search for Aliens: Why China Will Find Them First
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The biggest radio telescope in the world is dedicated to looking for extraterrestrial life—and if it finds something, sharing that information will be up to the Chinese government. Ross Andersen’s feature in The Atlantic’s December issue goes through all of the reasons and the history influencing China’s rise as an alien-scouting superpower. A few factors cited include the country’s heavy investment in scientific research, especially since the 1980s.
All the Ways Alabama Republicans Are Defending Roy Moore
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Mary was a teenager and Joseph was an adult carpenter. They became parents of Jesus"
Jumbo air tanker wins protest, may fight more US wildfires
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A giant passenger jet converted to fight wildfires was grounded this year by U.S. officials during much of what turned out to be an especially destructive U.S. fire season, but it could be flying much more next year.
1 Dead in Police Chase and Shootout on Busy Interstate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Witnesses said they saw the truck ramming other cars
Roy Moore denies knowing woman who says he preyed on her as a teen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Republican Senate candidate in Alabama, former chief justice of the state's supreme court, rejects the claims made by women who have said that he pursued them sexually when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s.
Saudis Warned to Leave Lebanon 'Immediately' as Tensions Rise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Saudi Arabia has since asked all citizens to leave Lebanon immediately
4 People and Dog Found Shot to Death in Apparent Murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They were found thanks to a concerned neighbor
Roy Moore Is Fundraising Off Report He Pursued Relationships With Teens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The forces of evil are on the march in our country," he told supporters
First Visitor From Outside Our Solar System Has a Name and an Origin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Less than a month after spotting the first ever confirmed object from another solar system visiting Earth, astronomers haven't just given it a name, 1I/'Oumuamua—they even think they know where it came from. Astronomers were first struck early in their observations of the object, which at the time they thought was a comet, by its extraordinarily weird path. Most comets travel more or less in the plane of space that contains Earth, our sun, and our neighboring planets.
The New York Times Is Launching A Monthly Section For Kids
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The New York Times announced Thursday that it will launch a monthly section for kids in its print newspaper.
Activists occupy ranger headquarters in primeval forest dispute
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Several dozen environmental activists on Thursday occupied the Warsaw headquarters of Poland's state forest management agency to protest against logging in the Bialowieza forest, a protected UNESCO site that includes Europe's last primeval woodland. Critics say Poland's rightwing government is defying a European Court of Justice injunction to suspend logging in the forest, but the environmental ministry says it is obeying the order and felling trees only for public safety reasons.