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An 18
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For an Indian student, even the sky is not the limit. Eighteen-year-old Rifath Shaarook designed what he describes as the world’s lightest satellite, from scratch. The device weighs a mere 64 grams (0.14 lbs), making it even lighter than a smartphone. “We did a lot of research on different cube satellites all over the world…
Computer forerunner the Antikythera mechanism marked by Google's Doodle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The link between today's technology and out ancient past is being marked by Google with its latest Doodle. The search engine shows an image of the Antikythera mechanism that some call the"world's first computer", which was discovered 115 years ago by divers. It was a Greek archaeologist, Velerios Stais, who sifted through the artefacts of the Roman shipwreck to find what was initially thought to be a wheel or a gear but which turned out to be a complex clockwork mechanism that had been built in Greece around 87BC.
Scientists just discovered something incredible about the dinosaur
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Determining why the dinosaurs went extinct has been debated for ages and studied for even longer. Now, the most acceptable extinction event hypothesis — that of an astroid impact that changed the Earth's climate — has a very interesting new wrinkle. As it turns out, it might not have been the size of the rock or the actual destruction it wrought that made the asteroid so utterly devastating, but simply the exact spot where it slammed into our planet. Studying rock samples from up to 1,300 meters beneath the Gulf of Mexico, researchers were able to get a fantastic look at what the area was like at the time when the asteroid — estimated to be nearly 10 miles wide — struck. When the rock slammed into the Earth 66 million years ago, the area was little more than a shallow sea, and scientists now believe that the collision sent an enormous amount of sulphur skyward, which ultimately doomed the planet by sending it into an ice age which the lumbering prehistoric beasts simply couldn't endure. The researchers, who presented their findings in a new BBC documentary called The Day The Dinosaurs Died, suggest that if the killer asteroid had made a watery splashdown in the middle of the Atlantic or Pacific oceans, the deadly vaporized rock that blotted out the sun in the days after its impact would have been far less severe. If that had happened, plant life would still have gotten the sunlight it needed to survive, and the food chain might have remained intact. Of course, had that happened, the eventual rise of mammals may also never have occurred, and we might not even be here to study any of it at all.
Ransomware attack a money
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Former CIA counterterrorism analyst Aki Peritz weighs in
Skydiving From the Edge of Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On May 8, 2013, Alan Eustace, then the 56-year-old senior vice president of knowledge at Google, jumped from an airplane18,000 feet above the desert in Coolidge, Arizona. Anyone watching would have witnessed an odd sight: Eustace was wearing a bulky white space suit—the kind nasa astronauts wear. He looked like a free-falling Michelin Man.
Boredom Is Good for You
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Boredom has, paradoxically, become quite interesting to academics lately. The International Interdisciplinary Boredom Conference gathered humanities scholars in Warsaw for the fifth time in April. In early May, its less scholarly forerunner, London’s Boring Conference, celebrated seven years of delighting in tedium. At this event, people flock to talks about toast, double yellow lines, sneezing, and vending-machine sounds, among other snooze-inducing topics.
Surprising developments in China, India could blunt Trump's climate rollbacks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stop me if you've heard this one: The U.S. shouldn't act to cut its planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions because it would harm the economy while China and India are building coal plants and emitting whatever they want.  That is an argument that opponents of climate action, mainly in the Republican Party, have used for decades in order to oppose measures to cut planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions.  It's one that President Donald Trump himself has made, as has his Environmental Protection Agency administrator, Scott Pruitt, in recent months. But increasingly, it's not based in reality.  SEE ALSO: 9-year-old girl seeks clean air for her generation, sues Indian government over pollution Two new reports show that China and India are moving faster than expected to cut their greenhouse gas emissions and pollution woes, while scaling up renewable energy resources.  The speed and extent of the actions in these two developing nations are hugely consequential for what happens to global emissions during Trump's presidency, since the U.S. is backing away from its leadership position on this issue.  According to an analysis released at a round of United Nations climate talks in Bonn on Monday, China and India could more than compensate for the United States' failure to meet its proposed emissions cuts under the Paris Climate Agreement.  An Indian security guard walks amid a rooftop solar plant in Gandhinagar, India.Image: Ajit Solanki/AP/REX/ShutterstockWhat's changing is China and India's coal use. Experts from Climate Analytics, Ecofys, and the New Climate Institute, which together run the Climate Action Tracker, say that global carbon emissions are likely to be about 2 to 3 billion tonnes lower in 2030 compared to previous forecasts.  This could offset Trump's climate change rollbacks, such as killing the EPA's Clean Power Plan and trying to revive the moribund coal sector. The Trump effect on the climate would only cause an uptick in carbon emissions of about 0.4 billion tonnes of carbon, the group found. “The highly adverse rollbacks of U.S. climate policies by the Trump Administration, if fully implemented and not compensated by other actors, are projected to flatten US emissions instead of continuing on a downward trend,” said Niklas Hohne, of NewClimate Institute, in a press release. According to the Tracker, which keeps tabs on countries' commitments and whether they are living up to them, China’s coal consumption decreased from 2013 through 2016, with a slow decline expected to continue. This is partly related to an economic slowdown, in addition to policies put in place by the central government in Beijing.  Coal is one of the dirtiest forms of energy, pumping huge amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Burning less coal has the benefit of lowering carbon emissions. In India, plans for more coal-fired power plants may be canceled since the country is making headway at dramatically expanding its solar power capacity.  “Five years ago, the idea of either China or India stopping — or even slowing — coal use was considered an insurmountable hurdle, as coal-fired power plants were thought by many to be necessary to satisfy the energy demands of these countries,” said Bill Hare of Climate Analytics, in a statement.  “Recent observations show they are now on the way toward overcoming this challenge.” While the U.S. remains undecided on whether it will remain a part of the Paris Agreement, the global energy market is still moving quickly ahead, favoring renewable energy to such an extent that in more areas it is cost competitive with coal and other fossil fuel sources. This has played a role in slowing and even reversing coal's expansion in China and India. Trump’s #climate policies would see US CAT rating downgraded from “medium” to “insufficient” - briefing https://t.co/p2NzBmhi82 #unfccc #1o5 pic.twitter.com/nzcMUexGox — ClimateActionTracker (@climateactiontr) March 31, 2017 The results of the Climate Action Tracker's report are bolstered by findings from a Center for American Progress analysis of China's coal consumption. The report makes clear that the argument that China's emissions would outweigh any progress made in the U.S. is, at best, outdated, and more accurately a zombie argument.  As David Roberts writes at Vox, China is taking on coal head on by shutting down older, more heavily polluting plants in favor of newer, more efficient facilities and renewables. It is also planning for a non-coal future based on renewables.  "In short, while the US dithers along in a cosmically stupid dispute over whether science is real, China is tackling climate change with all guns blazing. The US, not China, is the laggard in this relationship," Roberts wrote. It's unclear if anyone will be able to successfully convince Trump and his team that China is beating the U.S. on transitioning to a cleaner, more efficient future early enough for the administration to decide to remain part of the Paris Agreement. It's more likely that for now, at least, the mantle of climate change leadership has been passed to Asia.  WATCH: This might be the cutest and tiniest smartphone ever
Let the Garden Be Your Medicine Cabinet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Biodynamic farmer Alice Bamford joins The Doctors to discuss her new book, “One Gun Ranch,” and explain how we can all garden our way to better health. “I love that the book really focuses on the concept of growing food as your medicine, so to speak,” says ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork. Alice explains that One Gun Ranch is home to about 60 animals, all of them rescues, including horses, as well as biodynamic garden beds full of beneficial plants.
Travis Barker’s Health Crisis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Blink 182 drummer Travis Barker joins The Doctors to talk about surviving a plane crash and overcoming drug addiction. Tragically, DJ AM, his fellow survivor, succumbed to drug addiction the following year. “You’ve had more experiences than most people will have in a lifetime,” adds ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork.
Doug the Pug’s Medical Scare!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Leslie and Rob noticed the Doug was feeling itchy, so “I had given him a pill that a vet had given me, to help with the itching,” Leslie explains. “But the next day, we noticed bright red spots on his stomach.” When Leslie and Rob took Doug to the vet, she told them that his platelets were critically low and his life was in danger. The vet diagonosed IGP, an autoimmune disease, and prescribed steroids and antibiotics.
increTreating Drug Addicts – with Pot!?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Marijuana has sometimes been described as a “gateway drug” that encourages hard-drug use. “So few people seek treatment, and we do need as many tools in the arsenal as possible,” notes ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork. High Sobriety founder Dr. Joe Schrank says that this can provide a point of entry into treatment for those who find the idea of detox overwhelming.
Are You Prepared for the Real Cost of Kids?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
You can’t put a price-tag on a parent’s love – but you can estimate the cost of raising a child, and a new study finds that most couples underestimate what they’ll be spending when that bundle of joy. The founder of Tot Squad, Jennifer Saxton, recommends that couples who are planning to add a baby to the family start preparing financially two years in advance.
Treating Drug Addicts – with Pot?!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Marijuana has sometimes been described as a “gateway drug” that encourages hard-drug use. “So few people seek treatment, and we do need as many tools in the arsenal as possible,” notes ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork. High Sobriety founder Dr. Joe Schrank says that this can provide a point of entry into treatment for those who find the idea of detox overwhelming.
Ancient human sacrifice discovered in Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Evidence of human sacrifice to try to ensure the success of ancient construction projects has been found for the first time at a Korean site, officials said Tuesday. Two skeletons dating from the 5th century were found under the walls of the Wolseong, or Moon Castle, in Gyeongju in South Korea, the capital of the former Silla kingdom, Seoul's Cultural Heritage Administration said in a statement. "This is the first archaeological evidence that folklore about humans being sacrificed for the foundations of buildings, dams or walls were true stories," spokeswoman Choi Moon-Jung of the Gyeongju National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage told AFP.
Tesla teams up with utility company to offer super
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tesla is pairing up with a Vermont utility provider to offer subsidized Powerwall battery packs to bolster its power grid and give customers a chance to harness its energy when other lights go out. Vermont's Green Mountain Power (GMP), a utility company with a decidedly environmental focus, will be the first power provider in the world to integrate Tesla's system as a major part of its grid. GMP will install Tesla's industrial Powerpacks on its own utility land and offer 2,000 of its customers 7 kW Powerwall 2 units for an extra $15 per month charge on their power bill or a one-time, $1,500 fee. The batteries store energy during off-peak hours, like nighttime, for later use, and typically cost up to $3,000.  GMP says it will harness the energy stored in the Powerpacks and customer-installed Powerwalls to provide its grid with an extra boost during peak usage times in an effort to lower costs for all of its customers. This network won't just give the company an extra source of reliable energy — it'll help to cut down dependence on costly, "dirty" backup generators. SEE ALSO: Groom credits Tesla Model X for saving his life the night before his own wedding The Tesla batteries already proved successful for GMP on a small scale, when three customers with their own Powerwalls were able to keep their lights on during a storm that knocked the power out for 15,000 other GMP-powered homes.  The new partnership will look to leverage that reliable source of stored energy to a larger group of its customers. "There hasn’t been any really successful large-scale trial, so that's why this is so exciting," J.B. Straubel, Tesla's chief technology officer, told local station WCAX-TV of the deal. "It's been a potential, and on people's minds for a lot of years, and it's been in development at Tesla for quite some time, but this is our first real deployment." GMP was selected by Tesla especially for the project — in no small part because of its green track record in a state that has embraced solar power.   The Tesla Powerwall 2.Image: tesla"Vermont is, surprising to some people, but it's one of the states with the highest penetration of solar power per capita in the country," Straubel said to WCAX-TV. The state indeed ranks eighth in the nation's ranks of solar capacity per capita at 270 watts per person, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA). “Green Mountain Power is unique in their excitement to adopt this sooner than others, but the same technology and the same exact model is relevant, frankly, all over the world," Straubel said. "So, you know, we’re already having some early discussions with other utilities and grid operators and our feeling is that this is possible a way that most storage will end up getting networked together in the future and I think it has a really exciting, you know, road map." Telsa also opened up preorders for its Solar Roof tiles last week, offering potential customers a means to generate their own energy at costs the company claims will be comparable or even lower than roofs made from traditional tiles. The Solar Roof system can use a Powerwall unit to store the energy it produces, but the two systems can work on their own.     GMP's Powerwall initiative doesn't require its customers to have access to solar energy production but admits in the program's FAQs that customers with some sort of system in place "will get the most benefit from your home battery." WATCH: Elon Musk's $2.6 billion bet on a clean energy empire
SpaceX’s sixth successful launch in 2017 puts Elon Musk’s company on pace to beat its rivals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Flying the biggest satellite that SpaceX has ever launched, weighing in at more than 6 metric tons, proved a routine piece of business for the company’s Falcon 9 rocket yesterday. The Inmarsat-owned satellite, built by Boeing, was originally scheduled to fly on a larger rocket, the Falcon Heavy, that SpaceX hopes to debut later this…
North Korea's latest missile launch suggests progress toward ICBM: experts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Jack Kim and Ju-min Park SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea's successful missile test-launch signals major advances in developing an intercontinental ballistic missile, such as mastery of re-entry technology and better engine performance key to targeting the United States, experts say. The isolated country has been developing a long-range missile capable of striking the mainland United States mounted with a nuclear warhead. The North's official KCNA news agency said the new strategic ballistic missile named Hwasong-12, fired on Sunday at the highest angle to avoid affecting neighboring countries' security, flew 787 km (489 miles) on a trajectory reaching an altitude of 2,111.5 km (1,312 miles).
Giving the crowd ‘blue meat’ on Trump and Russia at progressive conference
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Maxine Waters, the fiery California congresswoman, renewed her call for the impeachment of President Trump during remarks at the Center for American Progress 2017 Ideas Conference.
How to Make Veggie Chips
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
To lighten up chips so they fit in with your slim-down goals, we made them from good-for-you veggies. Watch this video to see how simple it is to make the healthy, crunchy snack at home.
Did the first farmers deliberately domesticate wild plants?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New study finds little evidence that farmers consciously tried to turn wild plants into more useful crops.
A physicist answers the grandest question of all: Why are we here?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Physicist Robbert Dijkgraaf, a contributor to the "The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge," explains...
Researchers found a dinosaur that still has its skin and guts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When archeologists hunt for fossils what they're typically after are bones, footprints, and other fossilized traces of ancient creators having once roamed the planet. What they almost never even hope to find is a dinosaur that still has some of its most delicate bits and pieces, but that's exactly what paleontologists uncovered in Alberta, Canada, over half a decade ago. Now, after years of piecing together and studying the historic remains of the 3,000-pound creature, the fossil is finally ready for the public eye, and it's a truly stunning sight. The fossil is that of a nodosaur, a type of herbivorous dinosaur that lived between 110 million and 112 million years ago. Despite being a plant eater, it was an absolutely monstrous beast, measuring 18 feet long, with heavy armor plating and spiked scales stretching from head to toe. The remains were found completely on accident, when mine workers sliced through part of the dinosaur's fossilized skin. Once they realized they'd discovered something strange they alerted archeologists who unearthed the rest and found it to be the most spectacularly preserved example of a fossil of this type, not to mention a totally new species of nodosaur. Just half of the creature's remains were able to be located — from the tip of its nose down to its hips — but the state of the fossilized skin and some of its organs is a truly rare treat. As you can see in the images, the skin is in such remarkable condition that even its individual scales and be seen, along with its large spikes, details of its skull, and shoulders. The fossil is currently on display at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Alberta, Canada in a new "Grounds for Discovery" exhibit.
Robotic Exosuits Help Workers Lift Heavy Loads
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Employees at a Lowe's hardware store in Christiansburg, Virginia, recently channeled Ellen Ripley in the 1986 movie "Aliens," as they donned mechanical exoskeletons to help them lift and move heavy objects. The wearable robotic suits — which are significantly lighter and less cumbersome than the forklift with legs that Ripley wore to defeat the xenomorph queen — were developed in partnership with the Assistive Robotics Laboratory at Virginia Tech College of Engineering and Lowe's Innovation Labs.
Washington sets new sanctions on Syria regime
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Trump administration targeted five individuals for sanctions in response to Bashar Assad's “continuing violent attacks” on his own citizens.
Report: Trump asked Comey to end FBI’s Flynn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A second consecutive day of bombshell stories sent the Trump administration scrambling after the New York Times reported Tuesday that President Trump implored FBI Director James Comey to drop the bureau’s investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn’s ties to Russia at a February meeting. The White House issued a response minutes after the story posted to the Times website, denying the president ever made such a request.
Plant with rotting flesh smell blooms in California
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FULLERTON, Calif. (AP) — A Southern California nature center has a flower that smells deathly.
In Macron, Germany sees an opportunity to aid France – and boost the EU
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
There are few Europeans more hopeful over the election of Emmanuel Macron in France and its bearing on the European Union than those in the Pulse of Europe movement. The group that has been leading weekly pro-EU rallies since last fall in a rare burst of Euro-optimism gathered, fittingly, outside the German chancellery Monday as President Macron arrived in Berlin for his first trip abroad. Many draped in EU flags, the group chanted “Jetzt auf geht's,” or “Europe, let's go!” as Macron headed to a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
A peace accelerator in the Mideast desert
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
China and the United States reconciled decades ago through a table tennis match. Serbia and Albania have edged closer after putting on a production of “Romeo and Juliet.” India and Pakistan have talked of joint research on Himalayan glaciers. South Korea, host of the next Winter Olympics, hopes to welcome a team from North Korea.
What Trump's intellligence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump’s disclosure to Russian officials of sensitive intelligence provided by a US partner in the fight against the Islamic State threatens to put a chill on one of Mr. Trump’s priorities – the global effort to defeat Islamist terrorism. Violate that trust by loosely sharing intelligence from at-risk sources, the experts add, and information critical to stopping one attack – or prevent a new means of carrying out deadly attacks – can dry up. “This whole episode is terrible for trust – and trust is what makes intelligence sharing work,” says Joshua Rovner, an expert in relations between leaders and intelligence officials at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.
First responders face new risk amid opioid crisis: accidental overdose
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
“No way I’m overdosing,” Officer Chris Green of East Liverpool, Ohio, thought as the strange sensation moved through his body. Green had just returned to his police station after a traffic stop. He had worn gloves and a mask while searching the inside of a vehicle covered in white powder, but when he brushed residue off his shirt with his bare hand an hour later, he fell down and “started talking weird,” he told the Morning Journal. “I slowly felt my body shutting down. I could hear them talking, but I couldn’t respond. I was in total shock.”
6 Big Moments in Period History
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Menstruation is an experience shared by almost every woman, and yet it still has plenty of stigma attached to it. To understand how far menstruation has come in modern society, watch the video to see six breakthrough moments in period history.
Great Workout Headphones
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Almost two-thirds of headphone users listen to music or other forms of audio while they exercise, according to research ...
Golden Fruit and Nut Granola Bars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Love snacking on granola bars, but not a fan of all the added sugars? Watch this video to learn how to make your own delicious fruit and nut granola bars that don’t contain refined sugar.
20 Random Acts of Kindness to Inspire You
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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This Total
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
8 amazing moves that will fire up your core and strengthen your body from head to toe.
10 of the Worst Wedding Faux Pas That Have Actually Happened
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Here comes a really pissed off bride.
Would You Take Your Friends On Your Honeymoon?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
More brides and grooms are keeping the party going *after* the reception.
6 Things You Didn't Know About Kate and Pippa Middleton's Relationship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
And why Kate won't be in Pippa's wedding party.
This Couple Got Married In the Middle of a Marathon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
NBD.
DIY Busy Boards Are the Most Genius Way to Keep Toddlers Busy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
This is brilliant!
Zesty Orange Chocolate Energy Ball
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Researchers Find Source Of Flashes Coming Off Of Earth And Going Into Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One of NASA's cameras caught flashes happening on Earth from water in the atmosphere.
Baby Kylo: 'Star Wars' Names Raced Up the Charts in 2016
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kylo, after the dark warrior Kylo Ren from "Star Wars: The Force Awakens." Over the span of a year, Kylo went from the 3,269th most popular name to the 901st most popular name. SPOILER ALERT: Ren kills his father in the movie. "What dad wants to name his son after a son who kills his dad?" said baby-name expert Laura Wattenberg, who analyzed the latest data on Babynamewizard.com.
Why Donald Trump Is Wrong About Exercise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump reportedly eschews exercise because he believes it drains the body's "finite" energy resources, but experts say this argument is flawed because the human body actually becomes stronger with exercise. Trump's views on exercise were mentioned in a New Yorker article published this week by politics reporter Evan Osnos. Other authors have also noted Trump's aversion to exercise.
Explaining The Universe’s Accelerating Expansion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new theory involving quantum vacuum offers a possible reason that causes the phenomenon, which was first discovered by astronomers in 1998.
Climate change is messing with all your favorite birds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Timing is everything for migratory songbirds chirping away in North America's trees. If they arrive too late, they'll get only the scraps of spring's insect buffet. Plus, the best nesting spots and mates will be taken, leaving them with lackluster prospects for making baby birds. Arrive too early, and they'll face a hostile winter chill. Yet climate change is making it harder for birds to get it right. Spring is arriving earlier in the eastern states and later in the west, disrupting the timing of dozens of songbird species, a new study found. SEE ALSO: The atmosphere has forgotten what season it is in the U.S. As birds struggle to settle in and lay eggs, it could create a "domino effect" that threatens the survival of many popular backyard species, U.S. and Canadian researchers said in a study published Monday in the journal Scientific Reports. "The long-term concern is that this growing mismatch can lead to population declines," Stephen Mayor, the study's first author and a postdoctoral researcher with the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida, said in an interview. "Getting the timing right — not too early but not too late — is really important for the birds," he added. Migratory birds that winter in Central and South America take their cues from seasonal changes in daylight, which stay constant from year to year. But the conditions they encounter when they arrive up north are becoming more variable and unpredictable due to rising air temperatures and shifting weather patterns, two effects of human-caused global warming. Nine species in particular are struggling most to get that timing right, the study found. They are: great crested flycatchers, indigo buntings, scarlet tanagers, rose-breasted grosbeaks, eastern wood pewees, yellow-billed cuckoos, northern parulas, blue-winged warblers, and Townsend's warblers. This year, after a mild U.S. winter, spring weather arrived more than three weeks earlier than usual in some places. The date of "first leaf," a temperature-based calculation of when dormant vegetation shows signs of life, came much earlier than the 30-year average, according to a study by World Weather Attribution. Climate change is pushing songbirds and springtime out of sync.Image: Florida museum of natural historySpring is also arriving earlier in three-fourths of the 276 natural resource parks that U.S. scientists examined, resulting in seasonal changes in vegetation such as pollen, seed, and fruit production, a 2016 report found. For the bird study, researchers looked at satellite images from across North America for the period 2001 to 2012. Over that time, plants in the eastern half of the continent put out new leaves — a process called "green-up" — increasingly earlier in the season. In the west, however, green-up typically came later.  The team also combed through tens of thousands of bird observations for 48 common songbird species. They wanted to see when those populations first arrived, and whether their arrival coincided with the first signs of spring. Researchers found the gap between green-up and the birds' arrivals grew by an average of more than half a day per year across all 48 species, at a rate of five days per decade. For the nine species in particular, however, the mismatch is growing at double or triple that rate. Rose-breasted grosbeakImage: michael jeffords/illinois natural history surveyMayor said it's still unclear why those nine birds species are far more discombobulated than the rest of the group. "That's something we're trying to tease apart with follow-up research," he said. Still, the outlook might not be entirely dire for songbirds and other avian species.  Previous studies have shown that some birds are shifting the timing of major life events, such as reproduction and laying eggs, in an effort to keep pace with the changing climate. Scientists are watching to see if birds can keep it up long term. "If anything could adapt to climate change, you'd think that birds that migrate thousands of miles could," Mayor said in a press release. WATCH: These bladeless wind generators are economic and bird friendly
In first interview, Sally Yates says Russians had ‘real leverage’ over Flynn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former acting Attorney General Sally Yates said in a CNN interview that aired Tuesday morning that Russians had “serious leverage” over former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn and that her office had expected the administration to act quickly after she alerted White House counsel Don McGahn on Jan. 26. In clips of an interview with Anderson Cooper that will air in full Tuesday night, Yates said she considered Flynn’s connections to Russia, and his misleading explanations to Vice President Pence and others, an urgent national security concern. “I think this was a serious compromise situation,” said Yates “The Russians had real leverage.
McMaster defends Trump’s decision to reveal intelligence to Russians
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The national security advisor defended the president's divulging of sensitive information, saying that it was “wholly appropriate” for him to do so and that Trump had not been briefed on the source of the information he decided to share.