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The law that has a soldier’s back
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In March, the Trump administration threatened a preemptive strike on North Korean nuclear facilities. In April, it launched missiles against Syria for its use of chemical weapons. Like many presidents before him, Mr. Trump has initiated military actions as commandeer in chief without clear approval from lawmakers.
Her recycling project faced long odds in Lebanon. Still, she persisted.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Packed inside are bundles of crushed plastic water bottles and barrels of empty soda cans, plastic bottle tops, and glass shards. The warehouse is the hub of a small but thriving local recycling initiative that began when a group of women came together to improve their village’s environment.
Trump rallies supporters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Donald Trump holds a marathon rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on June 21, 2017.
Genoa makes special airport waiver for famed pesto sauce
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROME (AP) — The Italian port city of Genoa has taken pride in its famed pesto sauce to new heights by granting special airport waivers for those who can't get enough of the basil and pine nut pasta sauce.
Suspect lights cigarette at end of wild police pursuit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Los Angeles police say a woman led officers on a wild chase in a suspected stolen car that lasted a half-hour and ended when she crashed into a pole.
Is Whole
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Stroll through the dairy aisle of your grocery store and you may notice that fat is back—at least in the yogurt case. Although low-fat and nonfat yogurts still dominate the dairy aisle, according...
U.S. total solar eclipse sparks spectator excitement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - The first total solar eclipse across the continental United States in a century is expected to spark watching parties and traffic jams as it darkens skies from Oregon to South Carolina, authorities said on Wednesday. It is the first coast-to-coast total eclipse since 1918. Weather permitting, people can watch as the moon's 70-mile (113-km) wide shadow crosses through 14 states from 10:15 a.m. PDT (1715 GMT) around Lincoln Beach, Oregon, to 2:49 p.m. EDT (1849 GMT) in McClellanville, South Carolina.
Russia debacle destroys the last rationale for Trump, the myth of the genius CEO
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
There’s nothing wrong with the notion of a CEO president. But what the revelations around Russia prove is that Trump doesn’t actually run things well.
Could sons of older dads have an educational advantage?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Carried out by a team from King's College London along with The Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in the USA, the large-scale study looked at behavioral and cognitive data from 15,000 UK-based twin pairs in the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS). The researchers found that sons of older fathers were more likely to demonstrate the "geek-like" traits, care less about what their peers thought of them, and spend more time on their special interests.
Pakistani citizens gasp for clean air
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Furhan Hussain moved to Islamabad seeking fresher air, only to find Pakistan's leafy capital in a semi-permanent haze. Frustrated, he joined a vanguard of citizens monitoring pollution themselves amid a void in government data. Fast-growing Pakistan is home to some 200 million people and suffers from some of the worst air pollution in the world, thanks to its giant population plying poorly maintained vehicles on the roads and unchecked industrial emissions.
Geek DNA: Sons Born To Older Fathers Are Huge Nerds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sons born to older fathers are more likely to be total geeks — intelligent, driven people who attain academic and career success.
Man stopped on Thai border with orangutans, tortoises, raccoons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thai wildlife officers have arrested a Malaysian man attempting to smuggle two baby orangutans, 51 tortoises and six raccoons into the kingdom across its southern border, officials said Thursday. The animals were packed into plastic boxes and suitcases loaded into Ismail Bin Ahmad's car, officials said. The 63-year-old was stopped Wednesday as he was attempting to drive through a border checkpoint in Thailand's southern Songkhla province -- part of an insurgency-torn region known as a funnel for drugs, weapons and other contraband.
Oregon joins states where roadkill can be harvested for food
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Some folks in Oregon might not want to ask, when served an elk burger or a venison steak, where the meat came from. Under a roadkill bill passed overwhelmingly by the Legislature and signed by the governor, motorists who crash into the animals can now harvest the meat to eat.
Why IPA beers have 'India' in the name — and why it tastes so unique
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Patrick McGovern is the scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Project at...
SpaceX's Elon Musk Earns 8th Spot on Glassdoor's Top 100 CEOs List
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Amid SpaceX's recent successes, employees are raving about their visionary CEO.
Google Maps honors indigenous lands in Canada on National Aboriginal Day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the culmination of a seven-year collaboration between indigenous communities across Canada and Google Earth Outreach, indigenous lands have been added to both Google Maps and Google Earth.
Buoyant Trump spouts boasts, proposals — and falsehoods — at Iowa rally
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A jubilant President Trump recapped some of his campaign’s greatest hits, offered some new policy ideas and offered some blatant misstatements during a marathon rally Wednesday night in Iowa. Trump spoke for 70 minutes in front of an exuberant crowd in his first trip west of the Mississippi as president. During his speech, Trump verified reports that he was unhappy with the health care plan that passed the House, saying that he told lawmakers to “throw money” at health care to come up a plan with “heart.” He made a brief plea for bipartisanship, saying that Democrats wouldn’t vote yes even if Republicans came up with a plan that offered the best health care for free, but if the parties worked together they could get “really, really great legislation” passed.
German teen suspected of shooting toy gun at Thai king
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
German prosecutors said on Wednesday they were investigating a 14-year-old boy suspected of shooting plastic bullets from a toy gun at the King of Thailand who was cycling near Munich this month. The king was not hurt. The unidentified youth, together with a 13-year-old who is too young to be investigated, is suspected of having fired the gun from a garden or house window at a group of cyclists that included King Maha Vajiralongkorn, a regular visitor to Bavaria, and his entourage.
Keep Your Fruit Salad Fresh!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Cut-up fruit is a tasty and convenient way to get more produce in your diet – but it can turn brown in seconds. ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork has an easy, and tasty, way to keep your salad at its best.
Millions of glowing tropical sea creatures have started to appear in the Pacific Northwest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Millions of strange-looking glowing sea creatures called pyrosomes have started to "bloom" off...
These Companies Are Creating Biodegradable Urns That Sprout Trees
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Several companies are making eco-friendly funerals easier by creating biodegradable urns.
Roadkill: It's what's for dinner under new Oregon law
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Some folks in Oregon might not want to ask, when served an elk burger or a venison steak, where the meat came from. Under a roadkill bill passed overwhelmingly by the Legislature and signed by the governor, motorists who crash into the animals can now harvest the meat to eat.
Fake quake: Report of major California temblor a false alarm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The only tremors from a reported major earthquake off the California coast came on the internet.
Is Your Home Full of Hidden Allergens?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
One in five Americans suffers from allergies or asthma. Interior Designer Robin Williams joins The Doctors to talk about cleaning and decorating to minimize your allergen exposure.
Stay Safe When Your Drug Is Off
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The middle-aged woman who came in for an appointment told me that another doctor had prescribed hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) to help her with symptoms of Raynaud’s disease. With this condition,...
Working Out and Still Not Losing Weight Here Are 7 Reasons Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Watch the video to learn what common mistakes may be to blame for your frustration.
Keep Your Ride Smelling Sweet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
ER physician Dr. Travis Stork and lifestyle expert Moll Anderson share an easy way to keep your car smelling fresh.
A Bra with a Booby Trap!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Any woman can tell you that a good bra can be a lifesaver – but can this bra literally save your life? A new sports bra is meant to protect more than your décolletage.
The 3 big challenges facing Uber’s next CEO
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is out. After a series of public relations disasters resulting from claims of sexual harassment, sexism, privacy invasions and law enforcement evasions, the co-founder announced his resignation under pressure from investors. The new face for the company will undoubtedly encounter a slew of challenges right off the bat.
The Search For Exoplanets Around Our Closest Stars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Red Dots campaign has started gathering data to look for exoplanets that exist in three nearby star systems, all less than 10 light-years away.
How to stop your dog getting heatstroke – according to science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You're lucky – dogs can only sweat through their paws.
NASA enlists citizen scientists to widen its view of totality during solar eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists are gearing up to gather data from the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, but the most crucial observations can be made during only two minutes of totality — unless they have help. Fortunately, they have a lot of help. On the day of the eclipse, the moon will block all of the sun’s disk for no more than two minutes and 40 seconds, as seen from any single location. To get more observation time, NASA is calling upon citizen scientists and students along the coast-to-coast path of totality to pitch in. When satellite observations are added to the mix,… Read More
Can the U.S. run only on wind, water, and solar power? Scientists disagree.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists widely agree that human activity is the main driver of global warming, and that we have to radically reduce greenhouse gas emissions to avoid its worst impacts. But when it comes to how we can best slash emissions, some scientists are fiercely at odds. A scholarly brawl broke out this week after energy experts ripped apart a widely cited 2015 study that found the U.S. economy could affordably run on 100-percent renewable energy by midcentury. SEE ALSO: Climate change efforts still 'not nearly enough' to meet Paris targets Nearly two dozen physicists, engineers, climate scientists, and scholars poked gaping holes in the previous analysis — which asserts that wind, solar, and hydropower alone could power not only the entire U.S. electric grid but also the transportation system, all heating needs, and the entire industrial sector by 2055.  In response, Mark Jacobson, who led the 2015 study and is a prominent engineer at Stanford University, fired back. His critics knowingly made "factually false claims" and deliberately smeared his research, he said in an email. Pylons carry electricity in Germany.Image: sean gallup/Getty ImagesThe journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences published both the critique and Jacobson's rebuttal on Monday. (It had also published Jacobson's original paper.) On the one hand, this quarrel over whether we can really get to 100-percent wind, water, and hydropower can be seen as a distraction. The U.S. and all countries need to take drastic steps to reduce emissions from the economy within a matter of decades — why stir up a feud about one particular approach, especially at a time when the White House is occupied by a climate denier? On the other hand, this dispute represents a fundamental debate over how America's clean energy future should be implemented. Should we winnow our energy system down to only a few renewable sources, or can nuclear, natural gas, biofuels, and battery storage systems play an important role for decades to come? These two visions aren't hypothetical roadmaps meant for scientific audiences. Instead, they offer competing guides for policymakers to adopt, with trillions of dollars and the sustainability of our planet on the line.  Image: BNEF clean energy investment 2016Studies like these can influence real-world decisions — and indeed, cities and states across the U.S. are increasingly pushing for a 100-percent renewables agenda. The Solutions Project, an organization that Jacobson co-founded after publishing his study two years ago, is working to accelerate a renewables-only plan in all 50 states. That advocacy effort is largely why this group of scientists said they decided to speak out. They're concerned policymakers will mandate goals that can't be achieved with available technologies at reasonable prices, leading to "wildly unrealistic expectations" and "massive misallocation of resources," David Victor, an energy policy researcher at the University of California, San Diego, and coauthor of the critique, told MIT Technology Review. "That is both harmful to the economy, and creates the seeds of a backlash," Victor told the magazine. People gather near the U.S. Capitol for the People's Climate March on April 29, 2017 in Washington, D.C.Image: Astrid Riecken/Getty ImagesIn the original 2015 paper, Jacobson and his coauthors concluded that U.S. energy systems could convert almost entirely to wind, solar, and hydropower sources alone. This would largely be achieved by using vast energy storage systems and by integrating regional electricity grids to better balance supply and demand.  Nuclear power plants, carbon capture and storage technology, big banks of batteries — none of these would be needed in this scenario. Yet the critics — led by Christopher Clack, who is the founding CEO of Vibrant Clean Energy, a grid modeling firm — said this conclusion doesn't hold water. The 2015 analysis and related research "are severely compromised by modeling errors, unrealistic methods, and incorrect, implausible, or inadequately supported assumptions," they wrote in the new paper. For instance, they said Jacobson and his colleagues miscalculated the amount of available hydropower. The 2015 paper shows that maximum output from U.S. hydroelectric plants is around 145 gigawatts today — about 50 percent more than the actual installed capacity.  At the same time, however, Jacobson's paper shows hydro output exceeding 1,300 gigawatts, about nine times higher than his own model projected. Grand Coulee Dam in Washington state.Image: nicholas K. Geranios/AP/REX/ShutterstockCritics also noted the analysis assumed the U.S. would build vast amounts of energy storage, with an output capacity that's more than 2.5 times the size of today's entire U.S. electricity system. Hydrogen and underground thermal systems — or heat stored in rocks buried below the surface — would supply almost all of that storage, yet neither technology is widely available at a commercial scale today. Instead of going all-in on renewables, "The most feasible route to a low-carbon energy future is one that adopts a diverse portfolio of technologies," Clack and his coauthors wrote. "The paper should not in any way be construed to support action against policies to encourage renewable energy development," they wrote. "Rather, the paper asserts that wind, solar, and hydropower alone likely do not represent a complete, reliable, or cost-effective pathway to decarbonization." Jacobson defended his research, noting the hydropower numbers are not the result of a modeling error; rather, they reflect assumptions that are baked into the analysis. He noted that commercial-scale storage projects with hydrogen and underground thermal energy already exist in parts of the world, and it's not unreasonable to think they could scale up within a few decades. "Our conclusions are correct," Jacobson said. However we proceed, climate scientists are clear: Today's energy systems will have to drastically change if we're going to curb emissions and prevent dangerous levels of global warming this century. WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record
Stranded Curiosity Rover Gets More Free Will: What Could Go Wrong?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Mars robot can now decide which discoveries are most important to send back to Earth.
Tim Kaine: U.S. strikes on Syrian forces ‘completely illegal’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Tim Kaine sharply condemned U.S. strikes on Syrian regime forces as “completely illegal.” He says President Trump needs a new AUMF.
Why Michigan's Iraqi Christians thought Trump would spare their loved ones
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Like many 30-somethings, Alen Hirmiz has tattoos. On June 11, a Sunday, immigration agents detained Mr. Hirmiz in front of his shocked parents at the family’s home in suburban Detroit. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
An epic case of medical fraud – and the agent who cracked it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In December 2009, the Iowa Republican demanded to know how a Miami psychiatrist was writing more than 96,000 prescriptions for Medicaid patients. Health-care fraud costs the US government and insurance companies some $100 billion a year in overcharges and other rip offs, according to experts.
Clues from Georgia on Democrats' future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This was the special House race Democrats thought they could win. Clearly, anti-Trump energy alone isn’t enough to beat Republicans not named Trump. Not that Jon Ossoff, the Democrats’ young, first-time candidate for an open House seat near Atlanta, was relying just on anti-Trump feeling to defeat his Republican opponent June 20.
21 Sweet Nothings He Needs to Hear
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
'Black
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"Beauty is an arbitrary standard that is defined by false ideas."
New York to London in 40 Minutes? Maybe Someday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Private companies are betting that they can build ‘space planes’ for commercial hypersonic travel.
NASA, Honeywell claim they can reduce sonic booms over land, potentially bringing supersonic flight to masses
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA and American multinational conglomerate Honeywell say they now know how to reduce sonic booms when flying a supersonic aircraft over land following the completion of a two-year study.
Your Brain Treats a Blink Like a Tiny Nap
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Time slows down when your eyes are closed.
This adorable baby turtle blob is bringing hope to Southeast Asia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hello, turtle friend. The months-old blob seen above is an Asian giant softshell turtle. Scientists long thought this species was extinct in the Cambodian portion of the Mekong River — until they discovered some stragglers in the early 2000s. SEE ALSO: This frog's slime can destroy flu viruses Since then, conservation groups have worked with local communities and officials to boost the wild population of these endangered turtles. A team recently released 150 hatchlings back into their natural habitat, bringing the running total to more than 7,700 baby turtles in the past 10 years. Image: Yoeung Sun/wildlife conservation societyHuge swaths of the turtle's habitat in southeast Asia have disappeared due to urban and industrial development along the Mekong River, which flows more than 3,000 miles from China to Vietnam. The sand where turtles breed is routinely hauled away for use in construction projects, while fishing nets scoop up hatchlings. Poachers also take turtles and their eggs to sell for food. "The species has quite a wide historical range across Asia ... but much of that range is now completely gone," said Joe Walston, who worked extensively with softshell turtles in Cambodia for the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), where he's now vice president for global conservation. The freshwater turtle species is officially listed as endangered by the IUCN Red List, an authoritative inventory of threatened plant and animal species. "Giant" hatchlings.Image: MENGEY ENG/wildlife conservation societyFor the last decade, WCS, Conservation International, the Turtle Survival Alliance and local groups have worked to protect turtle nests and breeding grounds. Their goal is to ensure eggs will multiply and hatch, and that baby turtles grow strong enough to eventually fend for themselves in the wild. Walston said he first went to Cambodia shortly after the end of the Khmer Rouge, the brutal regime that controlled Cambodia from 1975 to 1979.  "We had no idea what the state of species would be in the area," he recalled. "But we did know that the Mekong River holds some of the largest examples of freshwater turtles and fish, including the giant Mekong catfish, the giant Mekong ray, and some of these giant softshell turtles." Image: Yoeung Sun/wildlife conservation societyInitial surveys in 2003 and in 2007 found two small populations of the blob-like turtles along a 30-mile stretch between the Kratie and Stung Treng provinces.  Conservation efforts soon followed, including a program to hire former egg collectors to help search for and protect nests instead of harvesting the eggs, said Sun Yoeung, WCS's project coordinator for Asian giant softshell turtles. Turtle friend, we're so glad you made it. WATCH: Scientists are trying to save reef turtles who are dying from mysterious tumors
Scrutiny intensifies over safety at US nuclear weapons lab
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The safety record at the U.S. laboratory that created the atomic bomb is facing intensifying criticism as work ramps up to produce a key component for the nation's nuclear weapons cache.
Risky gold rush: Indonesia tackles illegal mining boom
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hulking excavators claw at riverbanks on Indonesia's Sumatra island in the hunt for gold, transforming what was once a rural idyll into a scarred, pitted moonscape. It is one of a huge number of illegal gold mines that have sprung up across the resource-rich archipelago as the price of the precious metal has soared, luring people in rural areas to give up jobs in traditional industries. Now authorities in Sumatra's Jambi province, which has one of the biggest concentrations of illegal mining sites in Indonesia, have started a determined fightback, combining a crackdown with attempts at regulation.
Queen's Speech: Plan aims to secure space sector
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A government plan to protect the UK's £13.7bn space industry has been laid out in the Queen's Speech.
5 Weird Objects Sent to Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From the pages of Playboy Magazine to the lightsaber from "Star Wars" and KFC's fried chicken sandwich, here are 5 weird objects that were sent to space or are going up in space this year.