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The public role of psychoanalysts in the Trump era: 'We live in ominous times'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Psychoanalysts Jonathan Lear, Kerry J. Sulkowicz and Jerrold Post addressed the ethical and psychological implications of commenting publicly on national figures, including President Trump, at the American Psychoanalytic Association's 2018 national meeting.
Most Massive Black Holes Ever Found in the Universe Discovered 3.5 Billion Light Years Away
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have detected a set of gargantuan black holes that are likely the most massive ever discovered in the universe. The “ultramassive” black holes are located up to 3.5 billion light years from Earth. To make their findings, astrophysicists from the University of Montreal and the Institute of Space Sciences (ISS) in Spain examined 72 galaxies in the middle of some of the universe’s most massive and brightest galaxy clusters.
In dieting, low
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The findings could have implications for the $66 billion US weight loss industry, and particularly the latest trend of DNA dieting, which claims to point people to the best diet for their genes. "We've all heard stories of a friend who went on one diet -- it worked great -- and then another friend tried the same diet, and it didn't work at all," said lead author Christopher Gardner, professor of medicine at Stanford University. The study enrolled 609 people -- 57 percent women -- aged 18 to 50 and randomly assigned them to either a low-fat or low-carb diet for a year.
Why Kids Are Afraid Of Everything, And How To Help
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have been trying to unlock the mysteries of fear for decades. Is fear nature or nurture? At what age do kids become afraid of the dark? Why are infants afraid of slithering reptiles they’ve never before encountered? To answer these questions, researchers have used some pretty out-there methods. Think terrifying babies with pictures of... View Article The post Why Kids Are Afraid Of Everything, And How To Help appeared first on Fatherly.
What You Need to Know About SpaceX's Next Rocket Launch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What You Need to Know About SpaceX's Next Rocket Launch
When Do the Winter Olympics End? Here's What You Need to Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There are still more events to watch before the closing ceremony
Some fear California drought cuts could erase water rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A proposal to make California's drought-era water restrictions permanent could allow the state to chip away at long-held water rights in an unprecedented power grab, representatives from water districts and other users told regulators Tuesday.
Top experts warn against 'malicious use' of AI
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Artificial intelligence could be deployed by dictators, criminals and terrorists to manipulate elections and use drones in terrorist attacks, more than two dozen experts said Wednesday as they sounded the alarm over misuse of the technology. In a 100-page analysis, they outlined a rapid growth in cybercrime and the use of "bots" to interfere with news gathering and penetrate social media among a host of plausible scenarios in the next five to 10 years. "Our report focuses on ways in which people could do deliberate harm with AI," said Sean O hEigeartaigh, Executive Director of the Cambridge Centre for the Study of Existential Risk.
More Americans Than Ever Support Stricter Gun Control Laws, Poll Finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tougher laws now have the highest favorable percentage ever recorded by Quinnipiac
Kratom Is Linked to a Salmonella Outbreak Across 20 States, CDC Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Controversy continues for the herbal supplement
Space station builder Bigelow forms new company to help sell space habitats to the masses
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bigelow Aerospace on Tuesday announced the creation of Bigelow Space Operations, the next step in the company's private space station efforts.
NASA Satellite Began Mars Odyssey 16 Years Ago And Is Still Going Strong
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The hardest-working orbiter around.
The 10,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A project designed to outlive us all.
Rep. Tom Rooney Is the Latest Republican Who Isn't Seeking Reelection in 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Florida Republican will retire at the end of his term.
At Least 5 People Have Been Charged With Copycat Threats Since the Florida School Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Many of those arrested are high school students
The Trump Administration Will Look Into Banning Bump Stocks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump directed Attorney General Jeff Sessions to craft regulations banning bump stocks "very soon."
This Olympic Halfpipe Skier Didn't Do a Single Trick. Here's How She Made It to the Games
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I’m just trying to do the best for myself"
Bigleow aims to launch its own expandable space station as NASA plans pullback from ISS
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bigelow Aerospace — which currently has an inflatable capsule attached to the International Space Station (ISS) — announced bold plans to populate low-Earth orbit with inflatable space capsules. The announcement on Tuesday comes soon after the Trump administration proposed a NASA budget that would cease funding the Space Station after the year 2024. The company's CEO, Robert Bigelow — who is convinced aliens have visited Earth — announced the creation of a new company called Bigelow Space Operations, which will sell and manage the company's inflatable capsules.  Last week, NASA announced it will allow private companies to play a leading role in maintaining the massive, aging Space Station after 2024. Bigelow could potentially play a role in the upkeep and management of the station, or provide expandable platforms for a new station.  SEE ALSO: An astronaut and cosmonaut floated into the Space Station's first inflatable habitat today Beyond the current capsule, called the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, or BEAM, now loaded with Space Station gear, Bigelow said the company will launch two new capsules into space in 2021. The capsules, called B330, are designed to be self-sustaining, permanent structures that can be "ganged together" to form a larger station complex, Bigelow said in a call with reporters.  And if there's enough demand from various nations or companies to purchase Bigelow's expandable capsules — which are marketed as being lighter, substantially less bulky, and cheaper to launch than traditional metal capsules — Bigelow has even grander plans: A single new space station, with nearly two and a half times the volume of the current ISS, that would be launched on a single rocket and then unfurled in space. Such a product would weigh between 165,000 to 176,000 pounds on launch, Bigelow said. Bigelow's conception of what its B330 capsules will look like.Image: bigelow aerospace For reference, when the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blasts its Dragon cargo spacecraft to the Space Station, its total weight maxes out at 13,228 pounds.  The looming question for Bigelow, however, is not if it can successfully build this inflatable technology. As the BEAM technology on the space station proves, it can. Instead, Bigelow is concerned about whether there will be demand for such low-Earth orbit technology.  Along with the announcement of the 2021 launch, Bigelow said he's now hiring for and funding a multi-million dollar study to determine "what the hell a commercial market really looks like," in the coming years. In Bigelow's view, no one really knows.  "The time is now to quantify in detail the global, national and corporate commercial space market for orbiting stations. This subject has had ambiguity for many years," a Bigelow statement reads. But Bigelow is certain about two existential threats to the future of U.S. commercial space enterprise: China and NASA.  China, he noted, is "systematically" courting the world's nations to join the Chinese space station, set to begin launching into Earth's orbit sometime around 2020. If nations decide to join the Chinese, they may have no interest in Bigelow's products, or any potential partnerships with the ISS.  "That's a huge disadvantage that exists today," said Bigelow.  Bigelow's BEAM capsule attached to the International Space Station.Image: nasaThe second threat, he said, comes from NASA, simply because the agency's new budget proposal focuses heavily on deeper space exploration, notably the moon and Mars.  "They may not have much money left in terms of being a customer for LEO [low-Earth orbit]," said Bigelow. "This is a political problem." If NASA wants to hand-off operation of the Space Station to commercial partners, it needs to develop a coherent plan immediately, Bigelow said.  But, he notes, "I don’t see it being addressed." Regardless of the uncertainty about the future demand for Earth-orbiting space outposts, Bigelow said his two capsules will be ready for launch in 2021. But before then, possibly by the end of the year, Bigelow will release the results of his commercial space study. "We will make a conclusion and indicate whether the news is terrible, mediocre, or great," he said. However dramatic, ambitious, and exciting Earth-orbiting technology might be to speak about and advertise, he emphasized there might simply be no money for it.  "Talk is easy," he said.  WATCH: Here’s how NASA is preparing the largest telescope ever built for space  
President Trump Tweeted He's Been Tougher on Russia Than Obama. That's Not True
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump took to Twitter Tuesday to argue that he's been tougher on Russia than his predecessor Barack Obama. That's not true.
The Bachelor Recap: It's Time for Hometown Dates
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On hometown dates one father promises that if The Bachelor hurts his daughter, he will find him — "on Google"
The Olympics Brought North and South Korea Together. But Hope for a Unified Korea Is 'Withering Away'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I think most younger South Koreans are not in any kind of thrall about what this means for unification"
Physicists create a new type of light, and it’s heavier than before
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Physicists at MIT and Harvard University may have just invented a whole new type of light by forcing groups of photons to bound together to form a completely new kind of photonic matter.
U.S. intelligence chief Coats defends visit by Russian spymasters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats is defending a controversial secret visit to the United States by Russian spy chiefs — including one under U.S. sanctions imposed in 2014 to punish Russia for its annexation of the Ukrainian region of Crimea.
Police: Man's target practice leaves bulletholes in walls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CAPE CORAL, Fla. (AP) — Authorities say a Florida man who was taking target practice in his home was arrested after bullets went through the wall into his neighbors' apartment.
APNewsBreak: NY touts economic boom with South African photo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A New York economic development agency report meant to show the state's growth was illustrated with an 8-year-old photo showing construction cranes in South Africa. The Associated Press discovered the ...
Gold Medal Ice Dancer Tessa Virtue Didn't Always Want Scott Moir as Her Olympic Partner
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Figure skating's gold medal ice dancer Tessa Virtue had her eye on a different partner at a young age: Scott Moir's older brother.
New dinosaurs are being discovered in record numbers, and it’s changing everything we thought we knew
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Every kid grows up loving dinosaurs. As we grow older we listen to science teachers explain how dinosaurs lived and died, we watch documentaries about the age when reptiles ruled the land, and by the time we reach adulthood most of us like to think we have a pretty good handle on what things were like millions and millions of years ago. A new study focusing on the frequency of fresh dinosaur discoveries suggests we might have it all wrong, and that our understanding of the hundreds of millions of years that preceded humanity's takeover of the planet could change dramatically over the next decade or two. All we know about the history of the dinosaurs is what we're able to piece together from the remains they left behind. We have bones and tracks and that's about it. Working with that sparse evidence has always been a challenge for paleontologists, but the frequency with which new dinosaurs are being discovered has spiked dramatically in just the past twenty years or so. Those new discoveries are constantly changing what we thought we knew about prehistoric life, and it won't be long before we look back on previous assumptions and find how misguided those guesses were. "It’s a nice little paper that shows that in the last 20 years, the number of dinosaur genera named, as well as the number of specimens of those genera, has increased greatly," Jonathan P. Tennant, co-author of the work, explains. "This has profound impacts on our understanding of dinosaur diversity, especially as these discoveries are unevenly spread over time and space. There are still huge gaps in our knowledge of the fossil record, and areas in space and geological time where the rapid pace of discovery is changing much of what we thought we knew about dinosaurs." You don't have to look far to find examples of how an increase in dinosaur discoveries has shifted our knowledge. A few decades ago, the idea that some land-dwelling dinosaur species were covered in feathers was laughable at best. Crafty hunters like the velociraptors in Jurassic Park are depicted as leathery beasts, but we now know that the creatures were largely covered in plumage. Likewise, the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex was long thought to be the ultimate predator, but more recent discoveries have suggested it may have also been a scavenger, feasting on already-dead carcasses rather than hunting for a fresh feast when it was hungry. There's no telling what discoveries lie under the next rock, but scientists are painting a prehistoric picture faster and with more detail than ever before, and it's quite exciting.
Plants Appeared on Land 100 Million Years Earlier Than Scientists Thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Plants grew on land 100 million years earlier than scientists previously thought, new research suggests, pushing our understanding of life on Earth and even climate change back in time. This colonization had major implications from plant life to the makeup of the Earth's atmosphere itself. “Previous attempts to model these changes in the atmosphere have accepted the plant fossil record at face value,” Jennifer Morris from the University of Bristol, U.K., and co-lead author on the study, explained in a statement.
Trump claims he 'never met' the woman who says he forcibly kissed her at Trump Tower
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump turned his Twitter attention Tuesday to previously disclosed claims by Rachel Crooks, who says he forced himself on her at Trump Tower in 2006.
Romney, like other Trump skeptics, makes nice – for now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump’s enthusiastic endorsement tweet to Mitt Romney on his US Senate bid from Utah should come as no surprise. As much as Trump is a maverick, he needs establishment Republicans like Romney to vote for his agenda in Congress and keep a fractious GOP together.
‘Black Panther’ challenges limits on identity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As the new art of photography delighted Americans in the 19th century, Frederick Douglass seized hold of it as “the revenant” of black culture. While Douglass may not have foreseen photography’s evolution into the blockbuster movie, he might approve of what the new Marvel superhero film “Black Panther” does for black identity as well as women’s identity – and even for the cool factor of science, technology, engineering, and math. Mothers and fathers across the racial spectrum report children excited to put their 3-D glasses on and feel the Dolby percussion as they’re transported to the good-versus-evil battles over the make-believe, high-tech nation of Wakanda.
Grey's Anatomy May Be Giving You the Wrong Ideas About Medicine, Study Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sorry, Seattle Grace
Google Retinal Scans Can Predict if You Will Have a Heart Attack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists working for Google’s parent company Alphabet have used artificial intelligence to determine a person’s risk of having a heart attack from their retinal scan. The method—detailed in a paper published on Monday, February 19, in the Nature journal Biomedical Engineering— involves analyzing blood vessels in an area of the eye called the retinal fundus. The researchers from Verily, formerly known as Google Life Sciences, developed the algorithm in the hope of making accurate assessments of patients’ cardiovascular health more quickly and easily than current methods.
An Olympic Doping Scandal in Curling — Yes, Curling — Could Have Big Consequences for Russia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's what to know about the allegations facing Alexander Krushelnytsky
Should you worry about your family medical history?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dr Ellie Cannon sheds lights on inherited conditions
The Internet Is Thrilled About Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir's Ice Dancing Gold Medal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scott Moir and Tessa Virtue bested the French pair for gold
People Carve Love Notes Into Beached Blue Whale and Take Smiling Selfies Atop Carcass
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A dead blue whale has become the subject of macabre selfies and vandalism after washing up on a beach in Chile. The 66-foot whale carcass drew curious locals near Punta Arenas—in the Magallanes region of Chile's far south—to the beach.
Turmoil shakes up agency in charge of vast US lands
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and a sweeping reorganization proposed for its 70,000 employees.
Now there's a game you can play to 'vaccinate' yourself against fake news
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers have developed a game to 'vaccinate' people against fake news – by showing them how to become a fake news mogul.
Volcanic blast reshaped summit of Indonesia's Mount Sinabung
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The eruption of Indonesia's Mount Sinabung that shot ash 5 kilometers (3 miles) high also blew away much of the mountain's summit.
NASA warns that Jupiter’s Great Red Spot could be about to disappear
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The storm has been monitored by people on Earth since 1830
Profiles in expediency: 'Dumb' Romney welcomes endorsement of 'con man' Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The relationship between Donald Trump and Mitt Romney — who has been criticized for having particularly malleable positions — has followed a long and tortuous path, and more twists and turns likely lie ahead. Here is a timeline of the more head-snapping reversals in recent years.
Trump, inexplicably, says he has 'been much tougher on Russia than Obama'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump declared on Tuesday that he has been “much tougher on Russia” than President Barack Obama, despite evidence that the opposite is true.
Trump claims he 'never met' the woman who says he forcibly kissed her in Trump Tower
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump turned his Twitter attention Tuesday to previously disclosed claims by Rachel Crooks, who says he forced himself on her at Trump Tower in 2006.
Tar cakes tires, slows commute on New Jersey highway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
OLDMANS TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) — It was a sticky commute on a New Jersey interstate after tar coated the highway.
Hundreds of KFC outlets in UK closed amid chicken shortage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LONDON (AP) — Chicken is still as scarce as hen's teeth at KFC's British outlets.
Israel and Iran: A long
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It was, as intended, a moment of high drama at last weekend’s international security conference in Munich. The conflict between these rival powers is not new – with roots going back to the 1979 Islamic revolution that toppled the Shah of Iran, a key United States ally and the only Middle East leader at the time with close ties to the Israelis. Recommended: How much do you know about Israel?
In Tunis suburb, a revolutionary demand: jobs, not freedoms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Here in Tunisia’s own “Paris suburbs,” the unemployed, unrepresented, and unheard young men who led the Tunisian revolution have a message that is both simple and provocative. “We don’t want freedoms, we want jobs,” says Yassin Ben, 24. In neighborhoods like this one at the edge of the capital, Tunis, the very same conditions that led to Tunisia’s 2011 revolution – unemployment, marginalization, urban migration, and police harassment – persist.
In South Korea, a new Cinderella story is unfolding – on ice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Now they’re the hottest ticket in Olympic curling – the country girls who have seemingly come out of nowhere to become serious medal contenders. By Tuesday, they had bagged enough wins to secure one of the four slots in the semifinals – becoming the first Korean women’s team to do so, and establishing themselves as serious medal contenders. “A lot of people are saying that our curling team appeared suddenly.
'I Honestly Tried My Best.' Fergie Speaks Out About Her National Anthem Performance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Her jazzy rendition at the NBA All-Star game didn't go smoothly