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The Future Sucks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Old Guys™ discuss the biggest letdowns of our adult lives.
Mexico catches, releases endangered vaquita porpoise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico captured a rare vaquita marina porpoise as part of a bold program to save the critically endangered species, but released it because it was too young to be separated from its mother, officials said. The vaquita, the world's smallest porpoise, has been pushed to the brink of extinction by illegal fishing. "The successful rescue made conservation history," Mexican Environment Minister Rafael Pacchiano said in a statement.
Video undermines White House attack on Rep. Wilson over condolence calls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The controversy continues over President Trump’s treatment of a military widow during a condolence call, with Rep. Frederica Wilson, Fla., accusing the White House of lying about her record.
Amid Niger questions, Congress calls Tillerson, Mattis to testify in war powers debate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Senate took a step late Thursday toward reviving the post-9/11 debate over where, when, how, why and on whose authority young Americans should go off to war.
Police: Newborn's dad sold heroin in hospital maternity ward
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GREENSBURG, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania man has been jailed on charges he sold heroin in the hospital maternity ward room where people were visiting his newborn daughter.
KFC Twitter follows 11 Herbs and Spices, intrigues internet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A Twitter user has earned kudos online for discovering a subtle message on KFC's account.
Why a former minister is challenging churches' tax privileges in US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Dan Barker was a Pentecostal minister in California, he knew he could exclude his clergy housing allowance from his income tax returns, taking advantage of an IRS benefit that the federal government grants to “ministers of the Gospel” – though not to anyone else. Back then, he didn’t give much thought to this special social benefit, which today gives American ministers a tax break worth some $800 million a year. In the 1970s, Mr. Barker was never that concerned about the nitty gritty of social policy.
Trump's Afghan policy causing a rethink on both sides in conflict
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In the Afghanistan war’s 2015 and 2016 fighting seasons, Taliban insurgents made significant gains, capturing the provincial capital Kunduz each year before losing it again, and seizing an increasing number of district centers. The systematic Taliban advances also threatened a number of other provincial capitals, as their reach extended across one-third of Afghanistan, a setback for American aims in the longest war in United States history. Recommended: How well do you know Afghanistan?
6 Wacky Ways Cities Are Trying to Win Amazon's New Headquarters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The open request for proposals has caused a frenzy at city halls around the country
NASA Just Tapped SpaceX to Continue One of the Scariest Climate Studies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A long-running study will continue, thanks to NASA and SpaceX.
The Pentagon Is Being Pressed for Details on the Deadly Attack on U.S. Troops in Niger
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Congress is demanding to know what went wrong and why the U.S. was caught by surprise
Calls to Bring U.S. Nuclear Weapons Back to South Korea Are Getting Louder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.S. maintained a cache of nuclear weapons in South Korea until 1991. Some want them returned
Astronomers discover how gold was created
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Theoretical physicist Dr. Michio Kaku on Thursday explained how scientists were able to figure how gold may have been created through a watershed space explosion.
Woman says she may have sold 'Killer Clown' murderer the costume
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Deborah Offord and Barbara Castricone say detectives asked them about a customer who bought a clown costume.
'It Stuns Me.' Trump's Chief of Staff Accuses Democratic Congresswoman of Politicizing Solider's Death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It stuns me," John Kelly said while defending Trump's call to a military widow
Police: Man accused of fake ID use found hiding in trash can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Authorities say a man accused of trying to rent a car in Delaware using fake identification was caught hiding in a trash can.
Puerto Rican puppies find forever homes in New England
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On a sunny Saturday at the Nevins Farm MSPCA animal shelter in Methuen, Mass., dozens of hopeful adopters turn out to meet a new batch of puppies. Eight dogs rescued from hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico arrived at the shelter last week looking for their forever homes. When natural disasters strike, animal shelters in the affected areas quickly become overwhelmed as facilities already full of adoptable dogs attempt to handle incoming loads of displaced pets.
The 2 main steps Richard Branson is taking to prepare for his trip to space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sir Richard Branson revealed his space-preparation routine at a Hearst Master Class in conversation with Esquire editor-in-chief Jay Fielden.
Moving machinery using mind power alone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A unique citizen science project in which volunteers will be trained to move a piece of steel machinery using the power of their mind begins on October 27. The Mental Work project uses brain-machine interfaces developed at EPFL (Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne), as Jim Drury discovered.
The Senate Has Passed the GOP's $4 Trillion Budget Blueprint
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The move is a major step forward for President Donald Trump's ambitious promise of "massive tax cuts and reform"
Trump blames rise in British crime on Islamic terror, surprising Britain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Donald Trump fabricated a linked between a rise in United Kingdom crime to Islamic terror Friday morning, causing confusion among Brits. Trump is apparently referring to a report released Thursday by the United Kingdom’s Office of National Statistics, which indeed cited a 13 percent rise in crime.
Police: Robbery suspect left wallet behind at crime scene
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FAIR LAWN, N.J. (AP) — Police in New Jersey have arrested a robbery suspect who they say left his wallet behind at the scene of the crime.
Amazon’s big competition could deliver for many cities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The online retailing giant Amazon set Oct. 19 as the deadline for applications from cities wishing to host the company’s second headquarters, its “HQ2,” as the company is calling it. The prize for the winning city indeed will be golden: 50,000 new jobs with an average wage of $100,000, Amazon says. Amazon, based in Seattle, has set out a few prerequisites for bidders: The metro population should be more than 1 million, the airport should have direct flights to key US and international cities, and the mass transit system should be top-notch.
The CIA Fired a Dog Because Sniffing Bombs Just Wasn't Her True Calling
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CIA dog Lulu was let go from official duties after the agency discovered she just didn't have the enthusiasm for a career in bomb sniffing.
'Women of NASA' Lego Set Missing a Hidden Figure
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lego's 'Women of NASA' set includes mini-figures of American astronauts Sally Ride and Dr. Mae Jemison, astronomer Nancy Grace Roman and computer scientist Margaret Hamilton.
'You Cannot Complain If You Didn't Vote': Barack Obama Returns to the Campaign Trail
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Some of the politics we see now, we thought we’d put that to bed"
Mars Has a Mysterious "Tail," According to New Find From NASA Spacecraft
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
So wonderfully weird.
The LAPD Is Investigating a Sexual Assault Allegation Against Harvey Weinstein
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They're looking into an incident from 2013
Trump says Puerto Rico hurricane response was a '10' but these numbers prove otherwise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump gave the federal response to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico a 10 out of 10 on Thursday. Yes. Really. He gave himself the highest marks for what has been a well-documented and tragic mess. SEE ALSO: Photos from Puerto Rico reveal the devastating power of Hurricane Maria He said this, and other objectively inaccurate statements about the U.S. territory, with a straight face while sitting next to Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló at the White House Thursday.  Here's his full answer to the reporter's question: WATCH: President Trump, seated next to Gov. Rosselló, grades the federal response efforts in Puerto Rico a 10 out of 10 pic.twitter.com/Wyywx1QUOp — NBC News (@NBCNews) October 19, 2017 In no world is the U.S. government's response to the natural disaster perfect. Far from it.  Based solely on basic statistics from the Puerto Rican government — in the words of the governor — "a lot still has to be done." “I think we’ve done a really great job," says Pres Trump on disaster relief in Puerto Rico. Gov Rosello says "a lot still has to be done." pic.twitter.com/futAvxexq1 — Mark Knoller (@markknoller) October 19, 2017 As of Thursday — nearly a month after Hurricane Maria made landfall on the island nation as a Category 4 storm — these are just some of the grim statistics: Only 21.6 percent of Puerto Rico has power. 71.58 percent has access to drinking water, but this varies greatly by region. Northern Puerto Rico, for example, has just 37 percent. Just 25.07 percent of cellphone antennas and 46.57 percent of cell towers are back in operation The situation is so dire in some communities that some Puerto Ricans — who are American citizens — have resorted to drinking from contaminated water sources, including Superfund sites containing extremely hazardous substances. Trump gives his Puerto Rico response a 10 despite 85% of island still lacking electricity https://t.co/t8sDNYDcIH #breakingnews #news — Antonio Saalamandras (@Apocrifos) October 19, 2017 Those are not 10 out of 10 numbers.  WATCH: Balloons may be Puerto Rico's best chance for communication
A liberal is a conservative whose house just flooded
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Some Trump voters, after their towns were flooded by Hurricane Harvey, are beginning to reconsider their conviction that climate change has no scientific basis.
‘Bigotry Seems Emboldened.’ Read George W. Bush's Speech Attacking Nationalism in Politics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The former President said the U.S. is suffering from a "crisis of confidence"
Roy Moore Is Rising in Alabama. Here's How He Could Disrupt Trump's GOP
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What Roy Moore's rise means for the Republican Party
Waves of Rohingya Refugees Are Overwhelming Aid Workers and Authorities in Bangladesh
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We need support," one Bangladeshi official tells TIME
Barack Obama Returns to the Political Arena For the First Time Since Leaving the White House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This is the first time the former president is stepping back into the political spotlight since leaving the White House
Google Earth for Brains? Scientists Zoom In With X
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The children of the Magic School Bus had the impossible opportunity to shrink down and zoom through parts of the body in all three dimensions. The hope was to get a clearer picture of the brain at a level that scientists normally learn about by cutting through sliced samples of brain tissue. Neurons are surrounded by blood vessels and other supporting cells.
Man Accused of Helping and Filming a Teen Hang Herself Is Facing a Murder Charge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He had said that it would be "like getting away with murder," prosecutors said
Blade Runner's "False Memory" Problem Could've Been Solved by Science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I have memories, but I can't tell if they're real."
Donald Trump Pushes for Republican Senators to Pass $4.1 Trillion Budget Plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But in a tweet before daybreak Thursday, Donald Trump said, "I think we have the votes, but who knows?"
This is the Surprising Reason Why Chad Was Included in the Most Recent U.S. Travel Ban
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Talk about an office supply glitch
Here Are the Disturbing Numbers on Puerto Rico One Month After Hurricane Maria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A million people in Puerto Rico lack water and three million are still without power
Warning of ‘ecological armageddon’ as number of flying insects drops 75%
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The research was based on the work of amateur scientists who have been catching insects in tent-like traps since 1989
Fallen Soldier’s Father Says President Trump Promised Him $25,000, But Never Sent the Check
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A White House spokesperson says the check has been sent
Kids Are Spending More Time On Mobile Devices Than Ever Before
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And almost half have their own tablets
Ancient Monument Found in Abandoned Greek Settlement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Experts made the discovery on the Greek island of Thirassia.
'We Don't Want Your Nazi Hate.' Protesters Drown Out Richard Spencer's University of Florida Speech
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The event was the latest example of a campus clash over a far-right speaker
Israel: Biblical Roman Stables Discovered in Area Where Jesus Lived and Preached
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A family digging in their garden in the Israeli village of Eilabun have unwittingly uncovered a complex of underground stables, hewn into the soft rock in Roman times 2,000 years ago. Archaeologists, led by Nir Distelfeld, told Haaretz that the man-made caves would also have been used for storage, given some of the remnants found there. The animals would have been tied to the carved holes that formed a handle, with a stone trough laid below them for food and water.
World's deepest lake in peril, scientists warn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lake Baikal is undergoing its gravest crisis in recent history, experts say, as the government bans the catching of a signature fish that has lived in the world's deepest lake for centuries but is now under threat. Holding one-fifth of the world's unfrozen fresh water, Baikal in Russia's Siberia is a natural wonder of "exceptional value to evolutionary science" meriting its listing as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Starting in October, the government introduced a ban on all commercial fishing of omul, a species of the salmon family only found in Baikal, fearing "irreversible consequences for its population", the Russian fisheries agency told AFP.
Amazon’s second headquarters: Craziest ways cities wooed the company
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Amazon is on the hunt for its second headquarters in North America and with 50,000 thousand jobs on the line, cities are trying to woo the ecommerce giant. From orange monuments to social media campaigns, here’s a roundup of the most creative and craziest ways cities submitted their bid.
Scientists shocked by 75 percent decline in flying insect numbers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bees, moths, and other flying insects can be a bit of a nuisance when you're trying to enjoy a nice sunny day outside, but they're still incredibly vital links in the ecological chain. Now, new research out of Germany has caused a panic in the scientific community, revealing that the total biomass — that is, the total amount of flying insect life in the surveyed area — has plummeted by a whopping 75% over just the past 27 years. The research, which was published in the journal PLOS One, was conducted by monitoring the insect biomass in 63 different protected nature areas within Germany, and paints an extremely dire picture. What makes the troubling trend even worse is that the researchers found the decline was universal across all habitats and was seemingly not affected by weather change or the type of land the insects call home. To get the best possible idea of the insect population in the surveyed areas the scientists used what are known as Malaise traps. Vaguely resembling a mesh tent, the traps act like a funnel, and as insects collide with the trap's wall, they fly upwards and are directed into a cylinder where they are captured. These types of traps allow long-term observation of insect activity without the need for constant monitoring. No matter where you look on the Earth, insects are an incredibly vital part of the ecosystem. They're one of the very first bricks in nature's tower, and when those bricks begin to crumble, bad things happen for everything above them, and that includes humans. This new study doesn't point the finger at any one source in particular, but past research has pinned the decline of bees in particular on human use of pesticides and fungicides. It's not exactly a stretch to think that manmade chemicals or other human factors are also contributing to the loss of insect populations on a much larger scale, and it's incredibly important that scientists pinpoint the cause and propose a solution.
Obama makes a plea to Virginians and signals a way forward for Democrats
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former President Barack Obama makes an impassioned return to the campaign trail in New Jersey and Virginia.