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Greek Yogurt Waste Could Be Used In Jet Fuel And Livestock Feed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Your Greek yogurt creates food waste that could one day be used in jet fuel. A process that mixes this waste with thousands of species of bacteria and some heat transforms the whey into a new material called bio-oil, which could be used in biofuels or additives in livestock feed. A study published in Joule on Wednesday details how thousands of bacteria feed on the leftovers from making Greek yogurt and then turn it into caproic acid and caprylic acid—or bio-oil.
Here's how a real lightsaber would fare in a Star Wars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In Star Wars, 'force lightning' is a lethal weapon that can only be tackled with a lightsaber. But would it work in real life?
Ancient Skeleton With an Arrow in Its Chest Discovered Downtown in European City
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists excavating a medieval grave in Bulgaria discovered an unidentified body with an arrow in its chest. The grave, in the southern Bulgarian city of Plovdiv, is dated to around the 11th or 12th century. The gender of the deceased has not been specified, but archaeologists believe that the arrow was either the cause of death, or was placed there afterward symbolically, according to Archaeology in Bulgaria.
Multiple Women Accuse Hip
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He stepped down from Def Jam Recordings in November after separate accusations
Why Military Women Are Missing from the #MeToo Moment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Military commanders must be held accountable for the culture of sexual harassment and assault they have fostered
Latest Monsanto GMO seeds raises worries of monopoly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The rapid growth of Monsanto's new GMO seeds resistant to the controversial herbicide dicamba has revived worries about the company's stranglehold over farming during a period of industry consolidation. Long a producer of dicamba, Monsanto last year introduced genetically-modified cotton and soybean seeds that can resist the weed killer. The products took off, amassing more than 20 percent of US soybean fields and 50 percent of US cotton fields in just two years, according to Monsanto data.
U.K. Lawmakers Have Given Parliament Veto Power on the Brexit Deal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The vote was the government's first defeat in Parliament on its Brexit legislation
Despite public outrage, web access for prisoners isn't a luxury item – here's why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Digital and communication poverty is unhelpful – depriving prisoners is short-sighted.
School shooting survivors united by a chain of grief — and hard lessons passed on
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
School shootings didn’t begin, or end, with Sandy Hook. Yahoo News looks at the aftermath of four of these tragedies and the lives they changed.
Doug Jones calls on Roy Moore to concede: 'It's time to move on'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Fresh off his stunning victory in Alabama, Democratic Senator-elect Doug Jones says it’s time for his Republican opponent to concede.
Holy cow! Wandering bovine returned to Philly nativity scene
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A cow that escaped twice from a nativity scene in Philadelphia is back in place.
Gaza eatery offers discounts to North Koreans but no takers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — A Gaza eatery is offering massive discounts to North Korean diners but there is just one problem — there are no North Koreans in Gaza.
Gold coins found in Salvation Army holiday kettle in Florida
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
POMPANO BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Officials say they found gold coins among the donations in a Salvation Army kettle in Florida.
Homeless man finds $354,000 in room at Paris airport
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
French police say a homeless man found a huge amount of cash last week at Paris' Charles de Gaulle Airport and was able to leave the complex with 300,000 euros ($354,000). Two police officers, who are ...
Megyn Kelly’s Show Sees Ratings Boost After Addressing Sexual Misconduct
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It's starting to gel"
Trump signs directive pushing NASA to send astronauts back to the moon, but there’s a catch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The US space program hasn't sent astronauts to the moon since the early 1970s, but if Donald Trump has his way, NASA will be once again exploring the lunar surface before long. A policy directive signed on Monday is "an important step in returning American astronauts to the moon for the first time since 1972 for long-term exploration and use," according to Trump, but plenty of hurdles still stand in the way of Trump's wishes, including funding and, even more importantly, an actual plan to go. The signing of the directive was praised by private spaceflight companies, and Trump trotted out longtime NASA astronaut Harrison Schmitt — who also served as Republican senator — for the event. However, with very little in the way of concrete goals, the directive is being seen as less of a push for scientific advancement and more of a dig against the Obama administration's space policies, which encouraged NASA to research nearby asteroids and plan for a Mars mission by the 2030s. As The Washington Post accurately points out, Trump isn't the first president to suggest man revisit the moon. In fact, both George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush were bullish on space exploration and did plenty of photo ops to cement themselves as pro-science, but failed spectacularly in providing NASA with the money or aim to actually deliver on those lofty promises. That said, Trump's stated desire to have private companies lead the way in a return to the moon is unique. We're now at a point where private firms have pioneered many space travel technologies and companies like SpaceX, Moon Express, and Blue Origin are competing to reach important milestones. NASA has already showed a willingness to work with these companies closely, trusting SpaceX in particular with delivering supplies to NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station, and there's no reason to think that other companies wouldn't also be welcomed into the fold if they can prove useful in the pursuit of new science. With NASA's budget still rather modest, private companies will remain the best hope for returning to the moon and potentially planning trips beyond for the foreseeable future.
Three amazing (and possibly disturbing) medical innovations are here today
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Computers may soon interact with (and help) your brain. By Jurica Dujmovic.
New island offers clues in search for life on Mars: NASA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The world's newest island -- formed during a volcanic eruption in the remote Pacific three years ago -- may offer clues to how life potentially developed on Mars, NASA said Wednesday. The island of Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha'apai rose from the seabed about 65 kilometres (40 miles) northwest of the Tongan capital Nuku'alofa in late 2014-early 2015. Jim Garvin, the chief scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, said it was a rare chance to study the life cycle of a newly created island.
Japan Will Join U.S. Efforts to Launch New Space Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Japanese government will join a U.S. project to build a new space station that will orbit the moon, reports the Japan Times. The project, which is expected to be complete in the 2020s, may provide the chance for Japan to send one of its own astronauts to the surface of the moon for the first time in history. According to the South China Morning Post, the move might allow Japan to beat China at sending the country's first astronaut to the moon’s surface.
Man in Red Suit Uses Sleigh to Rescue Deer Trapped on Ice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The deer was stranded on a frozen pond
School shooting survivors united by a chain of grief – and hard lessons passed on
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
School shootings didn’t begin, or end, with Sandy Hook. Yahoo News looks at the aftermath of four of these tragedies and the lives they changed.
Sandy Hook mom and dad speak out in rare interview: 'You don’t heal from grief'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Five years ago, JoAnn and Joel Bacon's daughter, Charlotte, was killed at school in Sandy Hook. Now they share what their grief has been like since.
The ones that got away: Jonesboro's survivors — and the shooters — recall a moment of horror
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Twenty years on, Jonesboro, Ark., is still traumatized by an attack carried out by two middle-school boys — and how survivors deal with the knowledge that the killers are now grown men and free from prison.
Sexual harassment is wrong. Mob justice is, too.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In this season of national catharsis around sexual harassment, to establish yourself as enlightened seems to require rushing to judgment, ignoring ambiguity and silencing dissent.
Images from Newtown
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A collection of photos taken in the weeks that followed the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.
Paducah, Jonesboro, Columbine and Newtown: A chain of tragedy and grief
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It was five years ago that a young man invaded Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., and shot and killed 20 young children and six staff members, a tragedy that indelibly scarred that small city and lives on in the collective national memory. See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Twitter and Tumblr.
Cow corralled on interstate escapes nativity scene _ again
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A cow that escaped from a nativity scene and found its way onto Interstate 95 in Philadelphia is away from the manger again.
IBM teams up with Samsung, JPMorgan to develop quantum computing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
IBM's partners will research quantum computing applications across different sectors from automotive to finance.
UN warns of surging e
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The UN warned Wednesday that waste from discarded electronics like mobile phones, laptops and refrigerators is piling up worldwide, and it urged far better recycling of the often hazardous rubbish. A full 44.7 million tonnes of so-called e-waste was generated around the world in 2016, up eight percent from two years earlier, according to a report from the UN's International Telecommunication Union, the UN University (UNU) and the International Solid Waste Association. By 2021, the world will likely be cluttered with a full 52.2 million tonnes of such waste, which today consists mainly of fridges, washing machines and other domestic appliances, but also increasingly mobile phones and computers.
Jeff Bezos says Blue Origin gives test dummy ‘a great ride’ on New Shepard suborbital spaceship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos says his space venture, Blue Origin, launched the latest version of its New Shepard suborbital spaceship today for the company’s first test flight in 14 months, with an instrumented test dummy seated aboard. “He had a great ride,” Bezos said tonight in a tweet. The uncrewed, straight-up, straight-down trip was conducted at Blue Origin’s testing ground in West Texas. The video that Bezos included with his tweet showed the New Shepard blasting off and rising above a wide-open spread of ranchland. In addition to the dummy, which was nicknamed “Mannequin Skywalker,” the New Shepard crew capsule… Read More
No One Knows Who Will Win Alabama's Senate Election
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Polls are all over the map
Records: US Steel failed to test for toxic metal after spill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PORTAGE, Ind. (AP) — U.S. Steel failed to test a Lake Michigan tributary for a potentially carcinogenic chemical after a spill from one of the company's plants in northwest Indiana, documents show.
A Chinese 'Rooftopper' Has Fallen to His Death While Scaling a Skyscraper
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 26-year-old daredevil Wu Yongning was attempting a "rooftopping" challenge
Black Voters Just Sent a Strong Message to Democrats By Electing Doug Jones
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Princeton University professor examines what the Alabama senate race between Roy Moore and Doug Jones means for America
A Man Was Arrested Following a Heated Sriracha Dispute Escalates
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Too hot to handle
Geminid Meteor Shower 2017: What it is, when it's happening and where to watch it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This week, stargazers will witness the peak of one of the year's best shooting star displays in the United States.
Goodyear blows up new home for airship: an inflatable hangar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CARSON, Calif. (AP) — Morning commuters on a Southern California highway were greeted Wednesday by a huge structure that wasn't there the night before.
Expecting dad stages own pregnancy photo shoot, shows belly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PEABODY, Mass. (AP) — An expecting father in Massachusetts has shown off his paternal glow with a pregnancy photo shoot.
‘I Want Justice.' Another Woman Who Accused Trump of Sexual Misconduct Calls for Investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Melinda McGillivray told Megyn Kelly on Tuesday that she wants President Donald Trump to face consequences for his alleged behavior.
Brand new Pacific island is a whole lot like Mars, and scientists are excited
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's not often that a whole new chunk of land just comes jutting out of the ocean, but that's just what happened with a new island in the South Pacific. A large undersea volcano blew its top in late 2014, shooting rock and ash skyward, and once everything calmed down an entirely new island had been formed. Now, NASA is looking at the newly formed landmass for possible hints at how the landscape of Mars behaved billions of years ago. The new island, which is being referred to by the unofficial name Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai, didn't seem to have a bright future when it first emerged in the wake of the volcano's fury, but researchers now believe it actually might stick around for quite a while. New data suggests it might even last as long as 30 years. "Everything we learn about what we see on Mars is based on the experience of interpreting Earth phenomena," Jim Garvin of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center explains. "We think there were eruptions on Mars at a time when there were areas of persistent surface water. We may be able to use this new Tongan island and its evolution as a way of testing whether any of those represented an oceanic environment or ephemeral lake environment." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hds1OBxVg4s Heat, liquid water, and a suitable atmosphere are thought to be some of the most crucial ingredients for life as we know it. If Mars was once dominated by an ocean, and if that ocean experienced volcanic activity as ours do here on Earth, that's very good news for anyone who dreams of one day hearing that life did exist on Mars. In its present state, the island is essentially a huge pile of volcanic ash and rock which is slowly eroding into the ocean from which it was born. Storms and wave activity have already pushed lots of material back underwater, but a large portion still remains. On Mars, despite billions of years of wind erosion and impacts from space rocks and debris, similar volcanic features still remain, and the newly born island is helping to inform astronomers about what the martian surface may have looked like a long time ago.  
Microsoft Wants to Take on Google by Making its Search Engine Smarter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bing is getting some new smarts that could tempt you to switch
Paris hosts major climate summit _ and it's all about Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PARIS (AP) — The global climate summit in Paris was designed to bypass Donald Trump, but the U.S. president ended up playing a starring role.
Defects found at China nuclear reactor project
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Defects were found in equipment for a third-generation nuclear reactor under construction in southern China with the problematic parts being replaced, the state-owned China General Nuclear Power Group (CGN) said Wednesday. The issue concerned equipment used in one of two new European Pressurised Reactors (EPR), large units designed to offer improved power and safety. With EPRs in Finland and France facing setbacks, the Chinese Taishan 1 and 2 are on track to become the first working reactors of their kind in the world.
Prince William and Prince Harry Had the Best Time on the Star Wars Red Carpet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The royals hung out with the cast, including BB-8
Wife of Hockey Legend Accuses President Trump of Harassment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Just felt bad keeping it to myself"
Netflix Fires Exec Who Told One of Danny Masterson's Alleged Victims 'We Don't Believe' the Rape Claims
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Netflix spokesperson said Andy Yeatman, a kids’ programming executive, was "no longer employed" at the company
This Startup Has a New CRISPR Enzyme
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“This is a true gift we’re giving to the community because I truly believe this technology is so important that holding it or restricting it is not the company that Inscripta wants to be,” says Kevin Ness, the chief executive of the company, Inscripta.
Trump tells NASA to send Americans to Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
US President Donald Trump directed NASA on Monday to send Americans to the Moon for the first time since 1972, in order to prepare for future trips to Mars. "This time we will not only plant our flag and leave our footprint," Trump said at a White House ceremony as he signed the new space policy directive. The directive calls on NASA to ramp up its efforts to send people to deep space, a policy that unites politicians on both sides of the aisle in the United States.