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Kim Kardashian and Kanye West Take Their Kids On a Totally Normal Family Trip to Disneyland
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It's the first time the reality star and her husband have been spotted together in a month.
This Woman's Viral Post About Being a "Bad Mom" Is So Relatable
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
And what Constance Hall learned from a therapist is something every mom should keep in mind.
19 People Reveal the Exact Moment When They Knew They Were In Love
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
From bird poop to curse words and class time in calculus, it's pretty shocking what actually makes sparks fly these days.
This App Lets You Turn Your Baby Bump Into a Work of Art
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Now you're a bonafide Picasso.
Health Benefits of Wine: What It Can (and Can't) Do for You
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. In case you hadn’t already marked your calendar, Thursday, May 25, is National Wine Day. Before you get too carried away...
How the Microsoft Surface Pro compares to Apple's best
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The new Microsoft Surface Pro laptop-tablet hybrid is an impressive-looking device that should have Apple looking over its shoulder.
Siberia: Ancient grave reveals 'dancing' skeleton tied up after death in ritual burial
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the Russian Far East, in the province of Primorsky Krai, archaeologists have unearthed a strange-looking skeleton, that of a man in his thirties. The team of archaeologists had been working at the site conducting emergency excavations after serious flooding occurred in 2013.
Five surprising ways holograms are revolutionising the world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From military mapping to brain imaging, holograms are no longer relegated to your bank card.
You Can Buy a Replica of Carl Sagan's Famous Pioneer Plaque
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A piece of human history explaining humans worth celebrating.
Whales Weren’t Always The Giants We Know Them To Be
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Until as recently as 4.5 million years ago, the marine mammals were no longer than about 33 feet, a third the size of the biggest whales today.
World's Largest Aircraft Completes Successful Test Flight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A massive airship dubbed the Airlander 10 recently completed a successful test flight, bringing the helium-filled behemoth one step closer to commercial use. It is designed to stay aloft at altitudes of up to 20,000 feet (6,100 meters) for up to five days when manned, according to Hybrid Air Vehicles, the company that built the aircraft. On May 10, the Airlander 10 flew for a total of 180 minutes to test the aircraft's handling, improved landing technology and more, according to Hybrid Air Vehicles.
The best way to get children to understand evolution is to teach genetics first, finds study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers find striking results from a large study of secondary school students.
Alaska aquiver: State hosts plate tectonics research effort
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alaska averages 40,000 earthquakes per year, with more large quakes than the other 49 states combined, and America's shakiest state is about to have its ground examined like never before. A federal agency that supports basic science research is completing installation in Alaska of an array of seismometers as part of its quest to map the Earth's upper crust beneath North America. When the magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake ripped through the state in 1964, there were two seismometers in Alaska.
Russia's Gigantic New Submarine Has Enormous "Wings"
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The submarine will be twice as long as a jumbo jet.
How the Zika virus stealthily swept the Americas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nearly a year since the Zika virus outbreak arrived in Miami, scientists say they've learned new details about how the mosquito-born virus emerged and spread throughout the Americas. Researchers sequenced nearly 200 Zika virus genomes to see how the virus mutated and traveled over time. These genetic blueprints shed new light on a poorly understood epidemic that's affected thousands of people in recent years. "We used [genomes] to investigate the timing and path of how Zika spread in a way that had not yet been possible, until now," Browyn Macinnis, an associate director at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, said this week on a press call. SEE ALSO: This frog's slime can destroy flu viruses Macinnis is the lead author of one of three Zika-related papers published in the journal Nature on Wednesday. All studies found the virus spread unnoticed for many months before transmission was detected. Aedes aegypti mosquito is seen through a microscope in Recife, Brazil.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesZika is an RNA virus that mutates and evolves at a fairly high rate, which makes its genetic data like a trail of bread crumbs that scientists can follow. For the studies, researchers collected Zika virus genomes from infected patients and Aedes aegypti mosquitos in 10 countries.  The studies detailed where the Zika outbreak began and how it moved across the region. The virus likely began circulating in northeast Brazil around late 2013 or early 2014 – months before it was detected and an outbreak established. Soon, local mosquitos began transmitting the virus to Brazilians, including pregnant women. That likely spurred a rise in newborns with microcephaly, or an unusually small skull. From northeast Brazil, Zika traveled south to major population centers, including São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, and spread throughout South America, Central America, and Caribbean countries. The Caribbean was Zika's main pathway to the continental United States, where the virus also circulated undetected for several months. A woman hugs her 5-month-old son, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesZika likely arrived in Florida in the spring of 2016, though the first cases of local mosquito-born transmission weren't reported until July, said Kristian Andersen, a lead author on one of the Nature studies and an assistant professor at the Scripps Research Institute.  The leap from Caribbean to continental U.S. likely happened around 30 to 40 times, meaning it wasn't a lone mosquito that sparked the outbreak. "It's not a one-off event. This is something that keeps happening over and over again," Andersen said on the press call. In Florida, 218 cases of Zika were acquired through local mosquito-born transmission last year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Six additional cases were acquired locally in Brownsville, Texas. Another 4,830 cases were reported across the U.S. last year, but all of those were travel-related infections, meaning people acquired the virus while visiting another country, the CDC reported. Forty-six more cases were acquired through sexual transmission. A Dec. 2, 2016, map of South Florida.Image: CDCAndersen said the Miami and Brownsville areas face the highest risk of a Zika outbreak, while remaining swaths of the continental U.S. are unlikely to see a significant outbreak. That's because southern Florida and parts of southern Texas have a year-round population of Aedes aegypti mosquitos, the main species that transmits Zika and other viruses like dengue and chikungunya. In the rest of the country, the mosquitos only appear during certain months, giving them fewer opportunities to spread the virus. Miami is also a major destination for people living in Caribbean countries, where the Zika virus thrived. Local officials in the U.S. and throughout the Americas have since taken drastic steps to limit the Zika outbreak, including by spraying insecticides and issuing travel warnings for pregnant women in affected areas. Scientists are still working to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus, although the new genome sequences reported on Wednesday may help advance that research. The sequences reveal parts of the virus likely to mutate and resist the vaccine, Andersen said. "We need to know what the virus looks like so we can target the vaccine against that," he told reporters. "Sequencing gives you the blueprint of the virus." WATCH: These worms may solve the plastic waste problem
Pope Francis just threw some serious papal shade at Donald Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's well known that Pope Francis and President Donald Trump don't exactly see eye-to-eye on global climate change.  The pope recognizes the issue as a moral and religious challenge that must be addressed in order to make progress in alleviating poverty and other global goals.  And Trump, well, he doesn't think global warming exists in the first place.  SEE ALSO: Pope Francis convenes world's mayors to discuss global warming In other words, there is a chasm between them on this issue. If anything, the differences sharpened in the days leading up to Trump's visit to the Vatican on Wednesday, with Trump still dithering on whether to keep the U.S. within the Paris Climate Agreement, which Francis supports.  In addition, Trump proposed a budget on Tuesday that would decimate climate science research across the federal government, making it harder for scientists to keep tabs on the changing planet.  It's against this backdrop that Pope Francis handed Trump a copy of his 2015 climate change letter, "Laudato Si: On the Care of the Common Home." This was as awkward as it looks.Image: Pool/AGF/REX/ShutterstockFrancis also gave Trump copies of his other official writings, and signed a message of peace that he had issued. "Well I'll be reading them," the president said, according to a White House pool report. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who spoke to reporters aboard Air Force One as it flew from Rome to Brussels, said it's unclear if climate change came up during Trump's audience with the pope.  However, it did come up in a meeting between Trump and the Vatican's Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin. “I don’t know in the meeting with the pope, but it did come up with Cardinal Parolin," Tillerson said. "We did have a good exchange on the climate change issue.”  “The cardinal was expressing their view that they think it's an important issue. I think they were encouraging continued participation in the Paris accord," Tillerson said.  "But we had a good exchange [about] the difficulty of balancing addressing climate change, responses to climate change, and ensuring that you still have a thriving economy and you can still offer people jobs so they can feed their families and have a prosperous economy. And that’s a difficult balancing act to take, and so I think we had a good exchange there, and we look forward to having further talks with them on climate policy.”  WATCH: NASA timelapse shows just how quickly our Arctic sea ice is disappearing
Spacewalking astronauts pull off urgent station repairs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Spacewalking astronauts have successfully completed urgent repairs at the International Space Station
Trump budget chief faces sharp questions during House hearing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In testimony before the House Budget Committee Wednesday, the president’s budget director faced pointed questions from members of both parties.
NATO chief wants allies to ‘step up’ in fight against ISIS after Manchester bombing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The head of NATO cited the Manchester bombing as evidence that member states of the international coalition are not doing enough to fight ISIS and other terrorist groups.
DeVos grilled by Democrats on public school cuts, private
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Democratic legislators pressed Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos in her first public testimony since a contentious confirmation process.
Dog stuck on 400
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MOUNT MORRIS, N.Y. (AP) — A dog stuck about half-way down a 400-foot cliff in a western New York gorge has been rescued by a police officer who had to use ropes to reach the stranded canine.
No Joke: Unconscious man rode on car's trunk for miles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — When police pulled over a Tennessee couple and told them a body was lying on the trunk of their car, they thought it was a joke — until they got out to look.
Manchester’s lesson about fragile states
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
One connection between Salman Abedi, the suicide bomber in Manchester, England, and most of his victims was their youthful fragility. According to British authorities, he was recently in Libya, home to a branch of Islamic State (ISIS). Much of the world’s struggle against terrorism involves either protecting or preventing fragility – and not only in people.
Adam Schiff: Why Congress needs to go forward with own Russia investigations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In one way, the appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel in the Russia investigation could greatly hamper parallel investigations in Congress. Witnesses may well resist appearing before congressional committees for fear of incriminating themselves, knowing that Mr. Mueller, the former FBI director appointed by the Department of Justice, is on the hunt for criminal wrongdoing.
How a forlorn playground became one of America’s most innovative public spaces
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Day after day in this heavily Latino and African-American neighborhood, she’d come to this sorry spot ridden with hypodermic needles and gin bottles, its swings shredded by pit bulls trained to improve their jaw strength by hanging from the seats. “I’d be thinking, ‘What’s that white lady think she’s going to do in this neighborhood?” Ms. Cerda, who is Native American, recalls. Ms. Maher, whose rubber gardening boots complement the yellow rubber bands fastened around the pigtails she still wears in her mid-50s, is an urban visionary – a playground-whisperer who stubbornly believes that the most beautiful and enlightened public spaces, especially playgrounds, not only belong in the most disadvantaged communities but also can be designed, built, managed, and programmed by the people who live there.
How to Marinate Meat Safely
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. With Memorial Day weekend right around the corner, many Americans will be firing up their backyard grills for the first ...
10 Fun Piña Colada
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Beekeepers think AI that targets mites can save us from the ‘beepocalypse’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A concerned team of beekeepers from Sweden has proposed a plan to save bees. They want to develop an AI-powered app called BeeScanning, which would analyze images of beehives to spot harmful mites.
Nasa 2018 budget highlights: Human spaceflight takes priority as education misses out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nasa's budget proposal for 2018 has been released by the space agency revealing what's in store for future missions and what projects could be stalled. In terms of its missions, Nasa has chosen to prioritise human spaceflight and exploration of the solar system over Earth sciences and educational outreach programmes. In simple terms, Nasa is pushing for an aggressive space outreach programme where it wants a successful manned mission to anything beyond what humankind has achieved as soon as possible.
In jest, Pope Francis asks Melania Trump if she feeds pastries to the president
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In a nod to the first lady’s native country, the pope asked Melania Trump if she gives the president a food called potica.
Obama should have confronted Russians on hacking, Democratic House intel leader says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Adam Schiff’s surprisingly sharp critique of the Obama administration came during a breakfast meeting with reporters in which he signaled that the House committee — like its Senate counterpart — plans to subpoena documents from Michael Flynn and his businesses. The former Trump White House national security adviser has refused requests for the documents, citing his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.
Paul Ryan says James Comey is no ‘nut job’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Speaker Paul Ryan said that former FBI Director James Comey is not a “nut job” during an on-stage conversation at the Axios News Shapers event in Washington.
Large inflatable obstacle course stolen in Phoenix burglary
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHOENIX (AP) — Phoenix police are investigating the theft of a large multicolored inflatable obstacle course.
Bear trying to get doughnuts tears off Colorado car bumper
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — A bear trying to get doughnuts has ripped off the bumper of a car used to deliver doughnuts in Steamboat Springs, Colorado.
As crisis intensifies, Venezuelans look beyond Chavísmo's sharp divides
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Emerlinda sits in the Caracas home where she’s lived for nearly five years, reflecting on how things have changed since 2013: the year Hugo Chávez died and his hand-picked successor Nicolás Maduro was elected. Like many of Venezuela’s poor, the domestic worker adored Mr. Chávez, the country’s self-professed messiah: He made it possible for her, a native Colombian, to gain Venezuelan citizenship, and his social policies put a roof over her head, and guaranteed her access to health care and an education. It was only logical, she says, to put her faith in President Maduro.
What Bio
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In 1Q17, Bio-Rad Laboratories’ (BIO) Life Science segment reported revenues of ~$174.3 million, which represents a YoY rise of ~5.1%.
China urges balance on environment, economy in Antarctica
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese leader on Tuesday urged international representatives to strike a "proper balance" between environmental and economic interests in Antarctica, as the frozen continent's vulnerability to climate change raises worries that some nations could seek to exploit its natural resources.
All the ways Trump's budget screws over climate research
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Shots fired.  President Donald Trump may be 6,000 miles away from Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, but that didn't stop him from launching an all-out assault on climate science and related energy research. The weapon of choice? His fiscal year 2018 budget proposal. The cuts are staggering in scope, and the consequences are already starting as federal employees and contractors — spooked by the figures out this week — begin job searching in earnest.  SEE ALSO: Trump might pick a non-scientist to be USDA's 'chief scientist' Every single agency that touches climate change research, from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the Department of Energy, NASA, and especially the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), would see sharp reductions and eliminations of climate research programs. NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice in Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesWhile the proposal is just the start of negotiations with Congress over a final, enacted budget, it represents the clearest statement yet of Trump's priorities for governing the country.  And those priorities do not put climate change — ranked by other major industrialized and developing countries as one of the top threats facing the world today — high on the list.  According to Mick Mulvaney, the head of the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the administration targeted climate funding for sharp reductions, but he rejected the charge that it's anti-science. “I think the National Science Foundation last year used your taxpayer money to fund a climate change musical. Do you think that’s a waste of your money?” he said, citing a well-worn example from 2014 of wasteful research spending often pointed to by Republican lawmakers who deny the link between human-caused greenhouse gas emissions and climate change.  “What I think you saw happen during the previous administration is the pendulum went too far to one side, where we were spending too much of your money on climate change, and not very efficiently,” Mulvaney said at a budget briefing on Tuesday morning.   “We don’t get rid of it here. Do we target it? Sure," he said. "Do a lot of the EPA reductions aimed at reducing the focus on climate science? Yes." "Does it meant that we are anti-science? Absolutely not." Losing our eyes and ears The budget cuts Trump is proposing would leave climate scientists without critical data and would shrivel up the job market for researchers at a time when climate change expertise is more needed than ever.  One budget cut at NASA would hit an instrument meant to improve scientists' ability to monitor the amount of solar radiation entering and exiting the atmosphere, which is a foundational measurement needed for keeping tabs on and projecting climate change.  Tens of thousands of protestors gathered on April 22, 2017  to protest the Trump administration's anti-science moves.Image: LO SCALZO/EPA/REX/ShutterstockAnother would eliminate a mission known as CALIPSO, which is a satellite instrument aimed at increasing our understanding of how clouds and particles known as aerosols affect the climate.  This would address one of the biggest uncertainties in climate science, but hey, Trump and his cabinet members do like citing uncertainty as a reason not to act on global warming, so...  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ NASA's overall Earth Science Mission, which helps provide research and observations of our planet, would be cut by nearly 9 percent, including the elimination of five Earth observation missions and an education program aimed at supporting the next generation of space science researchers. At the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the office responsible for helping restore and protect our coasts in a time of sea level rise would be completely eliminated. The agency's climate research programs, considered to be among the best in the world, would also take a funding cut on the order of 30 percent. The NOAA budget also contains some bizarre cuts that the meteorology community will likely strongly object to, including getting rid of the array of Pacific Ocean buoys that enable forecasters to detect El Niño events, as well as a network of specially-designed ocean instruments to detect destructive tsunamis in the Pacific Ocean before they hit land.  In addition, the NOAA budget would slow the National Weather Service's implementation of more accurate computer models, increasing the gap between U.S. capabilities and those in Europe and elsewhere, which have surpassed this country. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey, would be cut by more than 10 percent. Even before these cuts, the agency has been having trouble maintaining its network of river gauges that the National Weather Service relies on for triggering flood warnings. So just as heavy rains are becoming more common in a warming climate, the number of functioning gauges is declining.  The Energy Department's Office of Science, which funds research in physical sciences and cutting edge computer modeling, would also see a funding decrease of 17 percent.  None of these decreases are small, and all would reverberate across labs scattered across the country and throughout universities that depend on government grants for research funding. Picking the losers as winners The cuts could also fundamentally change the energy landscape, eliminating the government program that helped launch innovative renewable energy companies such as Tesla.   Under former president Barack Obama, the Energy Department turned into a massive venture capital firm dedicated to funding potentially transformational energy technologies. Now Trump is proposing to eliminate that program, known as the Advanced Research Projects Agency: Energy, or ARPA-E. If the current administration has its way, the office would see its budget plunge from $290 million in Fiscal Year 2017 to just $20 million as it is put to rest completely, along with hopes that the next Tesla will crop up in the U.S., and not, say, in China or another economic competitor. But the shift in priorities doesn't end there.  The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy would be cut by 70 percent compared to Fiscal Year 2017 levels, a staggering decrease that sets the government up against market trends as solar, wind and battery technologies comprise more and more newly-built electric facilities.  Last one: select S&T agencies and programs, requested changes from omnibus levels. #sciencebudget pic.twitter.com/6HoswXd42R — Matt Hourihan (@MattHourihan) May 23, 2017 Don't worry though, fossil fuels like coal and oil would fare just fine under the budget request. And nuclear power, which has stagnated due to regulatory hurdles and lower natural gas, wind, and solar prices, would get a boost in funds. Here comes the brain drain Major science groups that are normally inclined to avoid partisan combat have already come out and slammed the budget as misguided at best.  Rush Holt, a physicist and former congressman who is the director of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), said the budget would have a near-term impact on public health and overall science and technology capabilities in America.  "What we see is not just a reduction in government programs, what we see is a failure to invest in America," Holt said on a conference call with reporters. "We’re not just talking about the long-term future either. The harm to public health and to other areas would start to be felt really very soon." @AAAS_GR R&D by character, as a share of GDP. Research funding would hit a 40-year low in 2018. #Science @AAAS_GR pic.twitter.com/btVEj3RxMQ — Matt Hourihan (@MattHourihan) May 23, 2017 According to one AAAS analyst, the only science and technology-related government agency to see a funding increase under Trump's budget is the secretive Defense Advance Research Projects Agency, better known as DARPA.  The funding cuts, if they get through Congress as proposed, which is doubtful, would also discourage those seeking to go into science and engineering careers from doing so, as it would eliminate thousands of post-doctoral and career positions.  One contractor who works with the federal government on environmental issues, but asked not to be identified since he is not authorized to speak to the press, told Mashable that he and "many others" he knows have already begun "changing their career plans" as they brace for job cuts. "The ramifications of these cuts – which are below the FY17 omnibus levels – will have significant impacts on the health and welfare of the nation," Chris McEntee, the executive director and CEO of the American Geophysical Union, which is the world's largest organization of Earth scientists, said in a statement. Joanne Carney, director of government relations at AAAS, said the budget cuts will hurt the U.S. by impeding our ability to anticipate the ramifications of climate change.  "...This is about dealing with reality at all levels of government," she said.  "So defunding the very programs that seek to allow us to better understand the Earth and our changing environment isn’t helping the U.S. to address climate-related changes. It’s not allowing us to make informed decisions on how to adapt or to mitigate, and it has long-term consequences." Maria Gallucci contributed reporting for this story. WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record
Seth Rich’s parents speak out against ‘unspeakably cruel’ conspiracy theories
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The parents of a murdered Democratic National Committee staffer wrote an op-ed condemning right-wing media commentators and outlets that have advanced conspiracy theories about their son.
Quiz: How Much Do You Really Know About a Healthy Pregnancy?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Every year, almost 4 million babies are born in the U.S. That means millions of new—or soon-to-be—parents want to know w...
Four climbers found dead on Everest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rescuers found the bodies of four climbers on Mount Everest, an expedition organiser said Wednesday, taking the season's death toll to 10 as experts warn cut-price mountaineering outfits are putting clients at risk.
Apollo 11 moon dust bag used for first lunar sample to be auctioned for up to $4m
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Apollo 11 moon rock bag that was recently at the centre of a legal dispute is now set to go under the hammer in what could be a record-setting auction. Sotheby's, the renowned brokers for collectables and art, will be offering the moon-dust stained, lunar sample pouch as part of its space history-themed sale. The auction is slated to take place on 20 July, the 48th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission's historic first moon landing, in New York where the pouch is expected to fetch anything between $2m (£1.54m) and $4m — an amount no space exploration artefact has ever commanded at an auction.
Our brains predict events in fast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a study published today in the journal Nature Communications, Ekman and other scientists focused instead on how the brain predicts motion. The volunteers watched the dot for about five minutes while scientists scanned their brains with ultra-fast fMRI. This way, the researchers know what pattern of brain activity was activated in the visual cortex while they watched the dot.
Horned Dinosaurs Roamed Eastern North America
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The chance discovery of a rare tooth from Mississippi is the first evidence that horned dinosaurs roamed the entire continent.
Half of World's Languages Could Be Extinct by 2100
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Irish language, Gaelic, is one of more than 40 percent of the world's 6,000 spoken languages that are endangered, according to UNESCO. Most of the endangered languages have less than 10,000 speakers remaining. "With every language that dies we lose an enormous cultural heritage," write the founders of the Endangered Languages Project, a global collaboration of the linguistic community aimed at strengthening endangered languages.
Be a Careful Consumer at the Pharmacy!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork looks at seemingly random labeling and pricing of over-the-counter drugs – including examples where the same drug, marketed for two different conditions, has entirely different pricing. Dr. Stork found two boxes of pills in a local drugstore. One in a blue box is marketed as a night-time sleep aid.
His
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains graphic images that may be disturbing. Parents are advised that these images may not be suitable for young children.
Loneliness Hurts – But Can It Kill?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Forty to 45 percent of adults 65 and older say they regularly or frequently feel lonely – and that could be a deadly. A new UCLA study indicates that being lonely causes the same mortality rate as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. “It’s a crazy statistic,” says ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork.