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Postman, shopper, builder: In Japan, there's a robot for that
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Forget the flashy humanoids with their gymnastics skills: at the World Robot Summit in Tokyo, the focus was on down-to-earth robots that can deliver post, do the shopping and build a house. Introducing CarriRo, a delivery robot shaped a bit like a toy London bus with bright, friendly "eyes" on its front that can zip around the streets delivering packages at 6km/h (4 miles per hour). CarriRo "is designed to roll along the pavements and direct itself via GPS to an address within a two-kilometre radius," explained Chio Ishikawa, from Sumitomo Corp, which is promoting the robot.
President Trump Asks for the Audio Evidence in Khashoggi Case 'If It Exists'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We've asked for it, if it exists"
Republican candidates trying to have it both ways on Obamacare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Some GOP candidates running this cycle who have or are trying to gut Obamacare are still running on the importance of protecting people with pre-existing conditions.
Donald Trump is destroying the American brand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump makes no pretense of balancing moral imperatives, or even military objectives, against the economic agenda that is his only real priority.
No money down the drain for Philippine sanitation workers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Philippines sanitation workers unblocking a drain discovered dozens of wallets had been clogging it up, some containing credit cards and IDs, but no money. A man working near the scene shot video footage showing the workers in a village in Batangas city, south of the capital Manila, sorting through wallets and removing and laying out items including identity cards found in them. Police officer Mario David, who went to investigate what he suspected were stolen items, said many of the wallets were pulled out from deep in the drain, meaning they had been there for a long time.
Meanwhile in ... Afghanistan, fans are rejoicing over what’s being called the 'fairy tale' success story of the country’s cricket team
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Afghanistan, fans are rejoicing over what’s being called the “fairy tale” success story of the country’s cricket team. In the United Arab Emirates last month, at the 2018 Asia Cup cricket tournament, Afghanistan became the talk of the tournament by trouncing Sri Lanka and Bangladesh and then tying the powerhouse Indian team. Afghanistan’s cricket team is performing way above expectations against far more established competitors.
Australia's Queensland Decriminalizes Abortion After a Decades
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Only New South Wales continues to ban abortion in Australia
Rocket Lab picks Virginia’s Wallops Island for U.S. launch site, adding to N.Z. pad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rocket Lab officially unveiled its plan to build a commercial launch site at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport on Virginia’s Wallops Island, with liftoffs due to begin in a year. The facility, which will be called Launch Complex 2, provides a U.S.-based alternative to Rocket Lab’s first launch pad on New Zealand’s Mahia Peninsula. So far, Rocket Lab’s Electron launch vehicle has flown just two test missions, including a successful rise to orbit in January. The third liftoff, nicknamed “It’s Business Time” in homage to the New Zealand comedy duo known as Flight of the Conchords, is set to launch from… Read More
Paul Allen’s passing leaves unfinished business on Stratolaunch’s space frontier
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seattle billionaire philanthropist Paul Allen’s death comes just as his Stratolaunch space venture is counting down to the first flight of the world’s biggest airplane — and lifting the veil on a wide range of space applications. Now it’s up to the Stratolaunch team to make good on the high-flyingest idea from the self-described “Idea Man,” who succumbed to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma at the age of 65. Heading that team is President and CEO Jean Floyd, who spent decades as a manager and executive at Orbital Sciences Corp. (now part of Northrop Grumman) before joining the venture in 2015. Like many… Read More
S. Korea's last polar bear dies ahead of British retirement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The last polar bear kept in South Korea has died of old age only weeks before his planned departure to better living conditions in Britain, zoo officials said Thursday. The zoo had planned to move him to the Yorkshire Wildlife Park next month to allow him to enjoy his final days in more appropriate surroundings -- the facility in northern England has a 40,000 square metre polar reserve -- and had thrown him a farewell party in June. The average life span of polar bears is around 25 years and Tongki was the equivalent of around 80 in human terms.
Taylor Swift Has a New Political Message for Her 112 Million Followers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“Something I wish I knew about when I was 18 and voting for the first time: ?EARLY VOTING?,” Swift wrote.
YouTube Went Down Around the World Today Prompting Outcry on Social Media
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The disruption appeared to affect users around the world
"Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful" Will Send Shivers Down Your Spine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Out on December 4, read an exclusive excerpt below.
Indian Temple Set to Allow Entry to Women After Top Court's Ruling
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Since 1991, the centuries-old temple has barred women and girls ages 10 to 50 from entering
Want to test your DNA? Amazon has AncestryDNA kits on sale for $30 off.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Besides the flaming mess that is the current political climate, DNA testing is a huge thing in the news right now. If you've checked social media at all recently, you've more than likely seen something about it. We're not sure if that has anything to do with Amazon putting AncestryDNA test kits on sale for $30 off, but hey — we'll take it. Elizabeth Warren is usually making headlines for calling out Donald Trump — but this time, it's her recently released DNA test results that have people talking. In fact, the test itself was meant to be a clapback at Trump. According to Rolling Stone, "At a rally in July, the president bet a million dollars that Warren wouldn’t submit to DNA testing — and if she did, it would not validate her claims of Native ancestry." But now that she's done it, many are not happy, and some Cherokee tribe members are actually demanding an apology. We won't get into it here, but generally speaking, let this be a lesson that a DNA match doesn't mean you can automatically claim to be part of that culture. Moving on. SEE ALSO: Which DNA test kit should you get? This guide can help. DNA testing is also the basis of a new TV drama, because of course it is. Family History dives into the nature versus nurture debacle and shows how much deep family stuff can come out of a simple DNA test. The show just got the green light for a pilot on ABC. Our point: Doing a DNA test is on its way to becoming just as mainstream as owning a smartphone. With the news plus the rise in at-home test kit stats (it doubled in the last year), tracing your roots is basically a must-do — and this clutch sale on AncestryDNA kits is your foot in the door. AncestryDNA is one of the most popular at-home DNA services, famous for its pie chart breakdowns and it's assistance in helping you find distant relatives. They use an autosomal (family finder) DNA test to survey your whole genome at over 700,000 locations, covering both your father's and your mother's lineage (though it won't say what DNA came from which parent). That massive genealogical pool plus the high chance of connecting with found relatives via their huge user database makes it one of the best on the market. Just fill the included tube with your spit, send it back for testing, and you'll receive results in 6-8 weeks.  Regularly $99, you can save $30 and get your test kit for just $69. (Psst: This would make a super unique holiday gift as well, so feel free to stock up.) Image: ancestrydna Save $30 on AncestryDNA test kits — $69 See Details
Anna Burns Wins Man Booker Prize for 'Very Powerful' Milkman
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The novel is about men, women, conflict and power during Northern Ireland's years of Catholic-Protestant violence
Why the Release of Pastor Andrew Brunson Is a Good Sign for U.S
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's how Erdogan and Trump can move forward on key issues
How keeping the windows clean and curtains open could stop you getting ill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It is a simple strategy for staying healthy, but a new study has found that allowing sunlight to stream in through windows could kill bacteria that live in dust. Researchers at the University of Oregon found that in dark rooms 12 per cent of bacteria on average were alive and able to reproduce. In comparison only 6.8 per cent of bacteria exposed to daylight and 6.1 per cent of bacteria exposed to UV light were able to replicate. Lead author Dr Ashkaan Fahimipour said: “Humans spend most of their time indoors, where exposure to dust particles that carry a variety of bacteria, including pathogens that can make us sick, is unavoidable. “Therefore, it is important to understand how features of the buildings we occupy influence dust ecosystems and how this could affect our health.” The researchers made eleven identical climate-controlled miniature rooms that mimicked real buildings and seeded them with dust collected in residential homes. Sunlight may stop bacteria being able to replicate Credit: HO Reuters  The authors applied one of three glazing treatments to the windows of the rooms, so that they transmitted visible, ultraviolet or no light. After 90 days, the authors collected dust from each environment and analysed the composition, abundance, and viability of the bacteria present. Dust kept in the dark contained organisms closely related to species associated with respiratory diseases, which were largely absent in dust exposed to daylight. The authors also found that a smaller proportion of human skin-derived bacteria and a larger proportion of outdoor air-derived bacteria lived in dust exposed to light that in than in dust not exposed to light. They believe it may suggest that daylight causes the microbiome of indoor dust to more strongly resemble bacterial communities found outdoors. Dr Fahimipour said: “Our study supports a century-old folk wisdom, that daylight has the potential to kill microbes on dust particles, but we need more research to understand the underlying causes of shifts in the dust microbiome following light exposure. “We hope that with further understanding, we could design access to daylight in buildings such as schools, offices, hospitals and homes in ways that reduce the risk of dust-borne infections.” The researchers warn that homes and offices may contain architectural and geographical features that produce lower or higher dosages of light which would produce different results.  
Mexican scientists develop trawl gate for shrimp fishing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Oct 17 (Notimex) - A group of researchers from various disciplines developed a trawl gate for shrimp fishing, which allows promoting the use of technology in this sector to contribute to the massive capture of the product. The gate is made up of two mechanical wings and an expanding arm, which allows varying the angle of opening of the wings. In addition to the fact that the force of the fluid helps with the displacement of the system generating a better hydrodynamic performance, informed the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt, for its acronym in Spanish), through its information agency. Josue Enriquez Zarate, specialist in mechanical design engineering by the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM, for its acronym in Spanish), explained that with this development seeks to support Mexican fishermen, especially those of Salina Cruz, Oaxaca. He explained that it is essential that local fishermen have technology that allows them to save energy and protect microecosystems, as they deteriorate by the current towing activities in fishing. It was the staff of Technologies for Capture of the Regional Fisheries Research Center, led by master Saul Sarmiento Nafate, who designed the model of the gate. With the support of the National Institute of Fishing and Aquaculture, the multidisciplinary team carried out a computational simulation that allows establishing the interaction of the water and the behavior of the gate in the sea, this through a tool that carries out an analysis of the fluid, aided by the theory of the finite element. The design reached the drag and lift coefficients, which are the basic principles used in the aerodynamic and hydrodynamic context. The innovation yielded positive results from the evaluation of the software at the simulation level, so the next stage consists in the construction of the gates on a real scale, since there is already a prototype model for testing at sea. Enriquez Zarate informed that it corresponds to Inapesca to carry out the construction of these inputs, to begin to support the manufacture of the gates and distribute them in the shrimp fleet of the country. However, he emphasized "the first steps for development are already taken and that it is essential to support this important economic sector of the country�. NTX/MSG/PAP
West Coast quake warning system now operational, with limits
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Automated alerts from the fledgling West Coast earthquake early warning system are ready to be used broadly by businesses, utilities, schools and other entities but not for mass public notification, officials said Wednesday. "We're making a large change from a production prototype in pilot mode to an open-for-business operational mode," Doug Given, earthquake early warning coordinator for the U.S. Geological Survey, told a press conference at the California Institute of Technology. The system being built for California, Oregon and Washington detects that an earthquake is occurring, quickly analyzes the data and sends out alerts that may give warnings of several seconds to a minute before strong shaking arrives at locations away from the epicenter.
Canada Has Legalized Marijuana. Here's What That Means For American Travelers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"What happens in Canada needs to stay in Canada"
China accused of mass cyber spying – but working out the truth is just the start of the problem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We've no way of knowing if allegations that China implanted secret spying microchips in widely used computers are true. BUT
Pakistan Executed a Man Convicted of Killing Six
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Zainab Ansari's murder in January sparked outrage around the world
There Are Very Fine Scientists on Both Sides. On Both Sides.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Donald Trump, American president, again displays a completely moronic grasp of the scientific method.
On the stump, Paul Ryan blasts 'Montclair Mikie' Sherrill. (If you lived in N.J., you’d know what he means.)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Paul Ryan put down Democrat Mikie Sherill as “Montclair Mikie” and a Nancy Pelosi clone at a rally for Republican Jay Webber in New Jersey.
Australia Considers Moving Its Israel Embassy to Jerusalem, in Tandem With President Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Australia’s prime minister said Tuesday that he was open to shifting the Australian Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem in line with President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize the contested holy city as Israel’s capital.
Are Sunflower Seeds Healthy? Here's What Experts Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They beat chia and flax seeds in many ways
Del. Judge Upholds $4M Award Over Spacecraft Tech Contract
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.S. District Chief Judge Leonard P. Stark of the District of Delaware on Monday declined to roll back the Jan. 12 verdict, which awarded Intuitive Machines cash and equity in Moon Express Inc. as a result of Moon Express' failure to complete work on the software underpinning its project.
Scientists spot six near
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The near-extinct vaquita marina, the world's smallest porpoise, has not yet disappeared from its habitat off the coast of Mexico, a research team said Wednesday after spotting six of them. The vaquita has been nearly wiped out by illegal fishing in its native habitat, the Gulf of California, and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) warned in May that it could go extinct this year. The team emphasized that the study was not a full population estimate, which they will present in January after further research.
She Had a Nobel Prize—But Not a Wikipedia Page
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She Had a Nobel Prize—But Not a Wikipedia Page
'Bad news': CO2 emissions to rise in 2018, says IEA chief
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Energy sector carbon emissions will rise in 2018 after hitting record levels the year before, dimming prospects for meeting Paris climate treaty goals, the head of the International Energy Agency (IEA) said Wednesday. The energy sector accounts for 80 percent of global CO2 emissions, with most of the rest caused by deforestation and agriculture, so its performance is key to efforts to rein in rising world temperatures. "I'm sorry, I have very bad news for you," IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol told guests at a diplomatic function hosted by the Polish embassy in Paris.
Exclusive: Science journal to withdraw chronic fatigue review amid patient activist complaints
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Emails seen by Reuters show editors at the influential Cochrane Review journal asking researchers who conducted the analysis, which was published in April 2017, to agree to it being temporarily withdrawn.  They also ask the review's authors to agree to a statement saying their analysis requires "further work in response to feedback and complaints". Published on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane's evaluations are considered a gold standard in scientific literature and known internationally as dispassionate analyses of the best evidence on a given subject. It is unusual for Cochrane to withdraw a review without the authors' agreement and unless new scientific evidence emerges for inclusion in an update.  Research into CFS and ME, widely referred to by the joint acronym CFS/ME, is highly contentious -- in part because the illness is poorly understood.
Terrifying video shows a bridge sagging under the weight of a massive bus
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Please enjoy this deeply terrifying video of a bridge flexing under the weight of a bus.  The historic Beaver Bridge in Arkansas is a one-lane suspension bridge built in 1949 that offers picturesque views of Table Rock Lake. It's delicate — and the lane is made out of wood.  SEE ALSO: This viral mashup of Kendrick Lamar and 'Take On Me' is the catchiest thing you'll hear today A viral video shows a massive 35 ton bus — weighing more than three times the bridge's 10 ton weight limit — ambitiously driving across. As the bus ambles along, the bridge's suspension sags and the road seems to dip with the vehicle.  Nearby cars honk at the bus, and the person recording the video says, "Holy cow, look at that!"  It seems pretty unsafe.  A spokesperson from the Arkansas Department of Transportation told 40/29 News that the local highway police are supposed to enforce the bridge's 10 ton weight limit. State officials shut the bridge down on Tuesday for a structural inspection.  In an announcement, the Arkansas Department of Inspection said:  Holy cow, indeed. WATCH: Boston Dynamics 'parkour' robot took more than 20 attempts to nail it
Turkish Police Search Saudi Consul's Home for Clues in Jamal Khashoggi's Disappearance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The new search put further pressure on Saudi Arabia to explain what happened
A Student Gunman Killed 19 and Injured 50 at a Vocational College in Crimea, Russian Officials Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The student, a local man acting alone, killed himself after the attack
Julián Castro says he's 'likely' to run for president in 2020
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Julián Castro, former San Antonio mayor and U.S. secretary of housing and urban development in the Obama administration, was unusually open about his political ambitions in an interview with Yahoo Finance.
In Florida's kaleidoscopic politics, a window into America's future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For Hannah Klein and William Joel Bravo, paid canvassers for the liberal NextGen America, that’s half the challenge – getting people to open the door and engage. “I believe that as a woman, it is my moral obligation to vote for anyone but Donald Trump,” says Batlle, a Cuban-American native of Miami who works as a paralegal. President Trump isn’t literally on the ballot Nov. 6, but really, he is.
At stake in Khashoggi affair: control of the Arab world’s narrative
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The disappearance and alleged murder of Saudi journalist and Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi has done more than strike fear in the hearts of Arab journalists and intellectuals everywhere. The affair’s outcome, they say, holds in its balance the future of access to information across the Middle East. Arab academics and press freedom advocates warn of dire consequences if the United States and the West fail to hold Mr. Khashoggi’s killers accountable.
Aly Raisman Joins Chorus of Criticism Against New USA Gymnastics Head
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Why hire someone associated with the firm that helped cover up our abuse?"
China to launch artificial 'moon' into orbit to light up city 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China is to launch a fake "moon" into space that it hopes will illuminate one of the country's biggest cities. Officials in Chengdu, a city of 14 million people in China's southwestern province of Sichuan, announced plans to place a satellite in orbit by 2020 capable of reflecting sunlight onto its streets at night, claiming it will be bright enough to entirely replace street lights.   The satellite would use a reflective coating to direct light to illuminate an area on earth of up to 50 square miles, according to Wu Chunfeng, chairman of the city’s Aerospace Science and Technology Microelectronics System Research Institute.  The launch follows a similar project in 1999 when Russian researchers planned to use orbiting mirrors to light up cities in Siberia, hoping it would be a cheaper alternative to electric lighting.  The scheme developed by Russia used a device called Znamya 2. It was equipped with a 25-metre mirror to illuminate a three-mile wide patch of land. During its first orbit the craft was destroyed following a collision in space. The scheme was abandoned.   Technology intelligence - newsletter promo - EOA In remarks first reported by CIFNews, Mr Chunfeng told a science event in Chengdu that the artificial moon, which has been undergoing testing for several years, will produce at least eight times more light than the real moon. He did not say how much the project would cost.  Scientists have warned the device could disturb wildlife and disrupt systems that observe the earth’s atmosphere. However, Kang Weimin, a director at the School of Aerospace at the Harbin Institute of Technology, told CIFNews that the satellite will produce a dusk-like glow, meaning it will not affect animals.
10 Ways to Keep Your Heart Healthy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cardiovascular disease remains America’s biggest killer
'It's Very Sad.' Ariana Grande Explains Why She Is Taking a Break From Social Media
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The pop princess is taking a break from the Internet
Israel Retaliates With Airstrikes After Rocket Fired From Gaza Hits House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A rocket fired from Gaza struck a residential home in southern Israel early Wednesday and the Israeli military began attacking militant sites in Gaza in response after days of rising tensions
Glitzy 'Science Oscars' to make stars of researchers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nine scientists were recognized Wednesday with a "Breakthrough Prize," a $3 million Silicon Valley-funded award meant to confer Oscars-style glamour and prestige on the basic sciences. The prizes in physics, life sciences and mathematics went to six men and three women, including four researchers who shared two prizes and five who get the full reward to themselves. Five US-based researchers who won prizes in the life sciences included Frank Bennett and Adrian Krainer, from companies in Carlsbad, California and Long Island, New York.
Secret of dandelion flight discovered by scientists 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fluffy dandelion seeds are known to travel 500 miles on the wind, but until now it has been a mystery how they did it. Although light enough to be whisked into the air in updrafts, their downy heads are 90 per cent empty space - a poor design for a parachute - and scientists have puzzled as to how they manage to stay afloat for so long. Now researchers at Edinburgh University have discovered that the soft bristles work together to create a ring-shaped bubble of air which keeps the seed aloft. This type of flight has never before been seen in nature and the experts believe that the technique could be used to help windbourne micro-drones stay in the air without using power so they can explore remote and inhospitable regions, or even other planet in the Solar System. Dr Cathal Cummins, of the University of Edinburgh's Schools of Biological Sciences and Engineering, who led the study, said: “Taking a closer look at the ingenious structures in nature - like the dandelion's parachute - can reveal novel insights. “We found a natural solution for flight that minimises the material and energy costs, which can be applied to engineering of sustainable technology. “The dandelion has managed to create a parachute which is virtually entirely empty space. Our research is suggesting that basically, less is more.” Dandelion seeds balancing on top of each other  Credit: University of Edinburgh The unique aerodynamic capabilities of dandelions make them one of the most successful of all wind pollinators, and a single plant can produce 12,000 seeds in its clocks. A 2003 study at the University of Regensburg in Germany found that 99.5 per cent of dandelion seeds land within 10 metres of their parent, but the University of Cornell calculated that some can travel for 500 miles. To find out how dandelion seeds achieved the feat, researchers at Edinburgh built a tiny vertical wind tunnel which blew air softly upwards, allowing seeds to hover at a fixed height so they could study how air moved around the fluffy seed head, known as a pappus. They then recorded how air currents moved around the fluffy seed head - known as a pappus - using long-exposure photography and high-speed imaging. The images revealed that a ring-shaped air bubble forms as air moves through the bristles, enhancing the drag that slows each seed's descent to the ground. A single dandelion plant can produce up to 12,000 seeds  Credit: Rolfo The newly found air bubble - which scientists have named the separated vortex ring -follows the seed like a little halo. This mass of whirling air helps increase the drag on the seed, and is created when neighboring filaments on the seed interact with each other as it floats along. The amount of air flowing through, which is critical for keeping the bubble stable and directly above the seed in flight, is precisely controlled by the spacing of the bristles. According to the researchers, it is four times more efficient than what is possible with conventional parachute design, according to the research. Researchers suggest that the dandelion's porous parachute might inspire the development of small-scale drones that require little or no power consumption. Such drones could be useful for remote sensing or air pollution monitoring. The study was published in Nature.  
UNAM astrophysicist Susana Lizano enters the National College
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Oct. 16 (Notimex) - Estela Susana Lizano Soberon, from the Radioastronomy and Astrophysics Institute, under the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM, for its acronym in Spanish) will join The National College as a new member. The academic, considered one of the most outstanding astrophysicists in the country, who studies the formation of stars in the Milky Way, joins the 40 members of the institution. In a statement, the highest house of studies highlighted the trajectory and contributions that the specialist has made to science, as she has conducted studies that help the contemporary understanding of the phenomenon of stellar birth, from the theoretical point of view to the observational. Her research includes theoretical models of how within large galactic clouds of dust and gas small dense nuclei are formed, as well as how they condense and collapse by their own gravity to form a star or a group of stars in their centre. Susana Lizano, who was born in Mexico City, holds a Ph.D. in Astronomy from the University of California at Berkeley, and after a postdoctoral stay at the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Florence, Italy, joined the UNAM Astronomy Institute. She has been distinguished with the 1996 Scientific Research Academy Award and the 2012 National Science and Arts Award. She is currently vice-president of the Mexican Academy of Sciences (2017-2020). Her lines of research include the study of the powerful bipolar winds that are produced in the suns in formation, more powerful than those of the Sun, and that destroy the maternal cloud. Lizano Soberón, the sixth woman to belong to this group, is also interested in the formation of dust and gas disks around the stars, called protoplanetariums; which are produced because the material of the cloud is in rotation. They are the origin of planetary systems, such as the Solar System. Around the stellar birth, she explained that a lot remains unknown. For example, the mechanism of the formation of massive stars is not well understood. Bipolar disks and winds have been found around some of them, so there is a possibility that this process is a scaled version of low-mass stars. It may also be that there is no single process. Upon entering The National College, Lizano emphasized "it is an enormous, unexpected honor, and an opportunity to do a more intense activity of spreading science. Joining prominent personalities from the exact and natural sciences, the social sciences and the humanities, it is a very big distinction. NTX/MSG/LCH/PAP
Jordan Brown recalls arrest at age 11 for murder: 'I had no idea what was going on'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brown, now 21 years old, was convicted of shooting and killing his soon-to-be stepmother and her unborn child in 2009. His conviction was overturned this July.
EPA puts off final say on science transparency rule
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency said Wednesday it is putting off for at least a year any final announcement on a controversial proposal overhauling how the agency evaluates science.
Beto goes negative on Cruz in new ads
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Democratic Senate hopeful Beto O’Rourke is running new ads in which he criticizes his Republican opponent, Sen. Ted Cruz.