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Hoping American values will outshine the confusing Trump era, While the West focuses elsewhere, Africa should take advantage, Britain hopes to hedge i
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“In the era of Donald Trump, the world is confused about what America stands for and with whom it stands...,” states an editorial. “That is why people’s attitude [about the Feb. 7] visit to Jamaica by Rex Tillerson is so paradoxical.
Asteroids May Show How Life On Earth Began With 'Time Capsule' Molecules
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Was life on Earth carried in an asteroid?
Gus Kenworthy's Boyfriend Matthew Wilkas on the Meaning of Their Historic Olympics Kiss
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It would be a huge moment for a young gay kid to see an awesome athlete so open and proud of himself"
Trump Wants $19.9 Billion for NASA in 2019
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
America spends more on space than the rest of the world, combined -- and will continue to do so, when you look at the bigger picture..
Trump: Russians are 'laughing their asses off' after stirring U.S. election chaos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump claimed Sunday morning that he never said Russia did not attempt to meddle with the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Rather, he maintained, the repeated mentions of a hoax referred to the allegation that his campaign had colluded with Moscow, which he adamantly denies.
Washington snipped here? College says it found prez's hair
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. (AP) — Tucked in the pages of a grimy, leather-bound almanac in the archives at New York's Union College was a tiny envelope with the hand-scrawled words "Washington's hair."
Hoping American values will outshine the confusing Trump era, While the West focuses elsewhere, Africa should take advantage, Britain hopes to hedge i
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“In the era of Donald Trump, the world is confused about what America stands for and with whom it stands...,” states an editorial. “That is why people’s attitude [about the Feb. 7] visit to Jamaica by Rex Tillerson is so paradoxical.
Ester Ledecka Just Won Olympic Gold in Skiing. Will She Do It Again in Snowboarding?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ester Ledecka competes in another snowboarding event next weekend
Hoping American values will outshine the confusing Trump era, While the West focuses elsewhere, Africa should take advantage, Britain hopes to hedge i
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“In the era of Donald Trump, the world is confused about what America stands for and with whom it stands...,” states an editorial. “That is why people’s attitude [about the Feb. 7] visit to Jamaica by Rex Tillerson is so paradoxical.
How Nathan Chen Hopes to Redeem Himself at the Olympics With His Figure Skating Long Program
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hear Chen talk about what is going through his mind throughout his four and half minute program
Taking poo samples to school was an essential part of South Korea's modernisation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Parasites are not only a personal health problem – they are political too.
Suspected Florida Shooter Was Investigated After Cutting His Arms in Snapchat Video, Records Show
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Mr. Cruz was on Snapchat cutting both of his arms"
Hoping American values will outshine the confusing Trump era, While the West focuses elsewhere, Africa should take advantage, Britain hopes to hedge i
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“In the era of Donald Trump, the world is confused about what America stands for and with whom it stands...,” states an editorial. “That is why people’s attitude [about the Feb. 7] visit to Jamaica by Rex Tillerson is so paradoxical.
The 2018 Flu Season Might Finally Be Leveling Off
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This nasty flu season, which has been worsening for months, may finally be leveling off.
Gus Kenworthy and His Boyfriend Kissed on TV at the Olympics and Fans Are Ecstatic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He is one of the first openly gay Americans to compete at the Winter Olympics
Why Chinese Tourists Absolutely Love This Luxury Outlet 46 Minutes Outside London
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's second only to Buckingham Palace
Robots are working together to open doors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Boston Dynamics released footage of robots join forces; 'The Greg Gutfeld' panel reacts.
Get your Sagan on with 60 awe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Few things instill a sense of wonder quite like the final frontier. The best space photos show off the beauty of Earth, our solar system, and the far corners of the universe. Here are our current favorites.
'One of the Good Guys.' Mourners Honor Slain Chicago Police Commander
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Of all Commander Paul Bauer's responsibilities, the ones that mattered the most to him were being a good husband and father, speakers said
NASA believes its supersonic X
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Most of the pricey machines NASA outlined in a 2019 budget proposal this week — a 32-story mega-rocket, moon landers, and Mars rover — will be launched to Earth's orbit or beyond.  But aside from those big-ticket items, the space agency's budget also requests funding for a curious airplane that currently exists only in sketches and the minds of NASA engineers: The X-Plane.  This aircraft is designed to travel faster than the speed of sound, and to do so relatively quietly, without sending sonic boom sound waves into unsuspecting neighborhoods thousands of feet below. If it works, NASA's X-Plane could revolutionize flight, cutting flight times in half and changing the way we fly.  SEE ALSO: Elon Musk's vision of human spaceflight can take us to Mars, but there's a cost If NASA has its way, the first X-Plane — a prototype — will take flight for the first time in 2021, according to the budget. "We’re heading into an exciting phase here — we have the funds to proceed forward," said NASA engineer David Richwine, in an interview.  An artist's conception of what NASA's X-Plane might look like.Image: nasaFlight engineers already know how to build planes that can break the sound barrier — take the retired European craft the Concorde, a commercial jet that could hold over 100 passengers, as an example. But governments would not allow the Concorde to fly over land in order to protect their citizens from the sonic booms the plane emitted. Beyond that, sonic booms also produce blasting bursts of sound waves that jolt buildings.  "If you’re not expecting them, they can be startling," said Richwine, who is the Deputy Project Manager of Technology for the X-Plane, known more formally as the Low Boom Demonstration project.  The X-Plane, unlike the Concorde, will be designed to produce low booms that will sound like "a thump or a heartbeat," said Richwine. The exact design of the plane is yet to be determined, but it will look something like the Concorde, said Richwine, with a needle-like body and swept-back wings, as opposed to the look of a traditional airplane's wings. To break the sound barrier without creating massive shockwaves, the plane will also need to change shape during flight — though quite subtly. Most of those in-flight changes will be imperceptible to passengers, however. The Concorde preparing to land.Image: flickr user  Aero Icarus"A little tweak goes a long way when it's traveling 30,000 feet to the ground," said Rodney Bowersox,   director of the Texas A&M National Aerothermochemistry Laboratory, in an interview. "It’s not like transformers where the plane is really going to change shape or anything." According to Bowersox, the plane will likely need to subtly change its shape during various weather conditions — like hitting a storm front, for example — in order to keep the sonic booms quiet. "The goal is to shape the airplane such that the shockwaves generated by the plane don’t coalesce into a large shockwave that hits the ground," Bowersox, who leads a team responsible for making recommendations to NASA about how the shape of the plane will need to change in flight, said in an interview.  "You want a series of smaller waves so it sounds more like a rumble and less like a boom." This could mean that the body, or fuselage, of the plane may need to change its shape by just 1 percent while in flight. This could take the form of small bumps that would extend or retract on a portion of the plane's body or wings to deflect sound. Engineers will spend the next few years figuring out what will produce low booms, and what doesn't.  Test engineer Samantha O’Flaherty works on an X-Plane model.Image: nasaThese subtle changes are necessary for NASA's purposes with the X-Plane. "You have to be able to fly over land for this enterprise to be commercially viable," said Darren Hartl, an aerospace engineer at Texas A&M University and member of Bowersox' design team. Hartl added that the Concorde's business model didn't work out "because you could only go from New York to Paris." Once NASA gets its first X-Plane flying, it plans to test it by flying over government lands at first, but eventually the agency plans to fly the supersonic craft over real U.S. communities.  However, before any of that happens, NASA is going to have some hoops to jump through.  The Federal Aviation Administration, will need to approve any plane that changes its shape, even slightly, in-flight. In all likelihood, that approval will take years, though exactly how long remains unknown.  "It is a long process for a new airplane to be put in production," said Hartl.  "As exciting as it is, when it comes time to put your aunts and mother on the plane it becomes a very conservative business." WATCH: NASA created a new chainmail tire that can transform its shape
Palmreaders? Japan team builds second skin message display
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Palmreading could take on a whole new meaning thanks to a new invention from Japan: an ultra-thin display and monitor that can be stuck directly to the body. Takao Someya, the University of Tokyo professor who developed the device, envisions it as a boon for medical professionals with bed-ridden or far-flung patients, as well as family living far from their relatives.
Crowd Chants 'No More Guns!' at Vigil for Florida Shooting Victims
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dressed in the school's red color, some held flowers while others wielded signs asking for action to fight school violence
What does a bear do in the Alaska woods? Disperse seeds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Does a bear leave scat in the woods? The answer is obvious but the effects on an ecosystem may not be.
Satellite launch from California is delayed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A SpaceX satellite launch from California that could create a spectacular aerial display has been delayed
Pacific cruise liner brawl sends guests fleeing to cabins
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Passengers say their cruise in the South Pacific was interrupted by brawls apparently caused by a 23-member family who threw punches at other guests, some of whom locked themselves in cabins to escape three days of violence.
Hoping American values will outshine the confusing Trump era, While the West focuses elsewhere, Africa should take advantage, Britain hopes to hedge i
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“In the era of Donald Trump, the world is confused about what America stands for and with whom it stands...,” states an editorial. “That is why people’s attitude [about the Feb. 7] visit to Jamaica by Rex Tillerson is so paradoxical.
The Internet Is Head Over Heels for the Yuzuru Hanyu and Javier Fernández Figure Skating Bromance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Yuzuru Hanyu and Javier Fernández's friendship is one for the record books
Adam Rippon Enchants Fans With Spellbinding Individual Figure Skate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Adam Rippon has enthralled the internet with his latest skate at the 2018 Winter Olympics
Five surprising things DNA has revealed about our ancestors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The first British people were black – and other interesting findings made possible by genomic sequencing.
'There Was Nothing I Could Lose.' Nathan Chen Redeems His Dismal Olympics and Makes Skating History
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"There was nothing I could lose"
4 Soldiers Wounded in Gaza Border Explosion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Israeli military said Saturday that four soldiers were wounded, two seriously, in an explosion along the Israeli border with Gaza.
Washington, D.C., Has Given the Boring Company a Permit for a Possible Hyperloop Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's tentative, but the future could bring a Hyperloop stop to the U.S. capital.
Elon Musk’s Tesla Roadster might crash into Earth – and scientists think they know when
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Remember when we first heard that a Tesla Roadster that’s speeding through space at 25,000 mph would not crash into Mars, but instead just fly past the red planet? Well it turns out that’s actually great news for scientists who are worried that microorganisms inside Elon Musk’s car could have jeopardized their studies of Mars. But now researchers have conducted various simulations to determine where the Roadster might ultimately end up, with Earth being the car's most likely destination. Venus and the Sun are also potential targets, but Earth is the most likely among them. Thankfully there's no cause for concern, and we'll explain why. "NASA goes to great lengths sterilizing spacecraft designed to land on Mars, in order to make sure there's no chance of Earthly microbes contaminating the surface," the Planetary Society's Jason Davis wrote before launch. "Such a contamination could harm existing life and muddle scientific efforts to search for said life." Three researchers from the University of Toronto have already written a paper that says the Roadster isn’t likely to hit Mars. Titled The random walk of cars and their collision probabilities with planets, the paper is based on the study of Tesla’s trip through space. "Earth is the most likely place the car will crash, followed by Venus, and then the sun," lead author of the study Hanno Rein told Business Insider. Don't worry though, because there's no chance that any of us will see the Roadster crash into Earth or any other planet. "Every 30 years or so, it will come relatively close to the Earth," Rein said. "This causes a change of a few percent in some of the orbital parameters. The distance to the sun would change slightly, for example, and the orbit's eccentricity." The Roadster will come within one Earth-moon distance from our planet in 2091. After the third flyby, the Roadster will get a somewhat chaotic trajectory through space, and that’s because the car spends plenty of time near Earth’s orbit. The researchers ran hundreds of simulations spanning 3.5 million years from today and concluded there’s a 6% chance for the Roadster to crash into Earth, and a 2.5% chance to hit Venus. "We've not seen any single collision with Mars in 240 simulations, though we continue to run them and see what happens," Rein said. "The likely outcome is that it will crash, in tens of millions of years, into Earth or Venus or the sun."
Hoping American values will outshine the confusing Trump era, While the West focuses elsewhere, Africa should take advantage, Britain hopes to hedge i
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“In the era of Donald Trump, the world is confused about what America stands for and with whom it stands...,” states an editorial. “That is why people’s attitude [about the Feb. 7] visit to Jamaica by Rex Tillerson is so paradoxical.
'He's the Winner of the Olympics.' Adam Rippon Stole Everyone's Hearts During the Olympics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'He's the winner of the Olympics'
Meet the scientist who makes identical snowflakes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The old adage “No two snowflakes are alike,” is wrong. At least in the laboratory. So says a scientist at the California Institute of Technology who has been making twin, and even triplet and quadruplet snowflakes in controlled conditions inside a homemade snowflake creation chamber. Kenneth Libbrecht is part physicist, part artist, with eight books…
No, Fidel Castro Is Not Justin Trudeau's Father
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Despite what the internet seems to think
Chester A. Arthur Is the Most Forgotten President in U.S. History, According to Science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Unless you are associated with a really famous event, you will probably be forgotten"
Parkland, Florida Shooting: A Timeline From the Attack to the Arrest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Police said Cruz went to a Walmart and McDonald's after the shooting
'Incontrovertible' Meddling to U.S. Is 'Just Blabber' to Russia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russian and U.S. officials exchanged barbs over the indictment of 13 Russians accused of a plot to disrupt the 2016 presidential election
Experts weigh in on prosecutors' murder theory in man's kayak death: Part 4
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A kayak safety expert and legal analysts tell ABC News' "20/20" that case against Graswald is weak.
13 Killed in Helicopter Crash in Mexico After Quake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
All fatalities were on the ground
NASA just discovered nearly 100 new alien planets as the search for life heats up
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Kepler space telescope was launched for the purpose of finding new objects, like planets, far off in space, and it has done its job so incredibly well astronomers now have more new planets than they know what to do with. Researchers just announced latest batch of worlds that Kepler has detected, numbering a whopping 95, and pushing the space telescope's total tally to over 2,400 new planets. The Kepler telescope is currently in an extended mission phase after already completing its primary mission and discovering thousands of new worlds. This new effort, called "K2," has already resulted in the discovery of nearly 300 new planets, proving that the telescope still has plenty of power to comb the heavens for undetected exoplanets. In order to spot these new worlds, scientists began sifting through an immense amount of data that Kepler has sent back. Dating back to 2014, the wealth of observations produced a total of 275 "candidate" signals which may or may not have been planets. After sifting through the numbers one-by-one, 149 of the signals were shown to be exoplanets, and 95 of those are entirely new to science. "Exoplanets are a very exciting field of space science," Andrew Mayo of the National Space Institute at the Technical University of Denmark said in a press release. "As more planets are discovered, astronomers will develop a much better picture of the nature of exoplanets which in turn will allow us to place our own solar system into a galactic context." The new planets range in size from smaller than Earth to larger than even the mighty Jupiter, and one of the planets was particularly special. The never-bef0re-seen world is orbiting the brightest start ever discovered by the Kepler telescope. That's particularly important because planets orbiting bright stars are often easier to study, and can yield additional information with subsequent observations. Because of the distance of the planets from Earth — often hundreds of light years or more — it's difficult for researchers to determine their potential for hosting life. As telescope technology pushes forward, additional information about the planets may be revealed, but for now we simply know that they exist.
Spacewalking astronauts finish months of robot arm repair
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Spacewalking astronauts have wrapped up months of repair work on the International Space Station's big robot arm
Florida school shooting prompts gun
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Thousands of angry students, parents and residents demanded stricter gun control laws Saturday as new details were revealed about the suspect accused of shooting and killed 17 people in a Florida high school.
Hoping American values will outshine the confusing Trump era, While the West focuses elsewhere, Africa should take advantage, Britain hopes to hedge i
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“In the era of Donald Trump, the world is confused about what America stands for and with whom it stands...,” states an editorial. “That is why people’s attitude [about the Feb. 7] visit to Jamaica by Rex Tillerson is so paradoxical.
Jeffrey Tambor Has Been Fired From Transparent Over Allegations of Sexual Harassment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The actor said he was “profoundly disappointed" by Amazon's investigation
America's Vincent Zhou Makes History by Landing a Quadruple Lutz at the Olympics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Internet was very proud
Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux Separate After Two Years of Marriage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Above all, we are determined to maintain the deep respect and love that we have for one another"
Trump Says Russian Meddling Indictment Proves 'No Collusion'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump has consistently pushed back against the idea of Russia meddling in the election that put him in power.