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US Sen. Elizabeth Warren gets 2nd turn as comic book hero
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOSTON (AP) — All comic book heroes need a sequel — even U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren.
Brexit: Could Britain change its mind?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Britain’s exit from the bloc. British Prime Minister Theresa May may be breathing a sigh of relief that London last week overcame the first major hurdle in its negotiating marathon – a deal on the practical aspects of the divorce. In a show of what the press has dubbed “Bregret,” more voters now think Britain was the wrong choice to leave the EU than still think it was the right decision – 47 percent to 42 percent, according to a YouGov poll.
TPS: What it is and how it's changing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is determining the future residency of more than 300,000 Central Americans and Haitians who have been in the United States under the Temporary Protected Status program. Q: WHAT IS TPS? TPS is meant to provide short-term protection from deportation for people who can’t return to their home country because of natural disasters, civil unrest, or health crises.
SpaceX delivery delayed a day; 1st reused rocket for NASA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX has delayed its latest space station grocery run for at least a day
Rosie O'Donnell Went All in For Roy Moore's Opponent Doug Jones
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The actor has contributed the maximum amount allowed to the Democratic candidate's campaign opposing embattled Republican Roy Moore.
McMaster rips Russian 'campaigns of subversion'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, accused Russia on Tuesday of waging “campaigns of subversion” against the United States and its allies.
Ancient penguin was as big as a (human) Pittsburgh Penguin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — Fossils from New Zealand have revealed a giant penguin that was as big as a grown man, roughly the size of the captain of the Pittsburgh Penguins.
Singer of novelty song welcomes hippopotamus to Oklahoma
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma City native Gayla Peevey has welcomed another hippopotamus to the city's zoo, more than 60 years after her song about wanting one for Christmas helped the facility purchase its first.
In Alabama election, a state wrestles with its identity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Loyal supporters of controversial Republican candidate Roy Moore have expressed pride in his unbending, court-defying stand for faith in God, traditional marriage, and the unborn, and his railing against the GOP establishment and “fake news.” It’s the kind of rabble-rousing, nose-thumbing rebelliousness for which Alabama has long been famous. “Alabama’s always had a fiercely independent streak,” explains GOP pollster and consultant Whit Ayres. “George Wallace came from Alabama, and stood in the schoolhouse door to tell the federal government to get lost,” says Mr. Ayres, referring to the Democratic governor of Alabama who opposed integration in the turbulent 1960s, when the state was ground zero for the civil rights movement.
What foiled New York subway attack says about lone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When New York officials gathered outside the Port Authority in Manhattan on Monday to discuss the failed subway bombing a few hours earlier, they expressed a city’s collective sense of relief. On a packed subway system that serves more than 5.6 million riders, its cars and platforms teeming with shoulder-to-shoulder commuters every workday, many New Yorkers have long been aware of the havoc a single explosion could wreak. “Let’s be clear, as New Yorkers, our lives revolve around the subways,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio on Monday.
President Trump Brags He Was a Top Student at Wharton. Here's What It Said About His Tax Bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump likes to brag that he graduated from the Wharton School, so its take on his tax reform bill might sting a little.
Serial Killer Who Murdered 7 People Says He Has More Undiscovered Victims
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"At this point, I really don't see reason to give numbers or locations"
Nasa schedules press conference as it announces breakthrough in mission to find Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Kepler space telescope is tasked with finding other planets, some of which could support life.
Hezbollah Shifts Its Focus to Israel in the Wake of Washington's Jerusalem Move
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The group hopes this marks the "beginning of the end" of the Jewish state
Vladimir Putin Says Russian Troops Will Partially Withdraw From Syria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russian airstrikes tipped Syria's civil war in Assad's favor
Fetid attraction: London fatberg to go on museum display
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LONDON (AP) — Part of a monster fatberg that clogged one of London's sewers is destined for fame in a museum.
These 'Star Wars' fans combine dressing up with doing good
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Dozens of members of the “Star Wars” fan groups – the 501st Legion and the Rebel Legion – headed out in the rain dressed as characters ranging from Princess Leia Organa to Stormtroopers to the malevolent Darth Vader himself. Recommended: Could you survive the Star Wars universe? Both the 501st Legion, which represents the dark side of the “Star Wars” universe, and the Rebel Legion, which represents the good guys, have charity and giving back as central aims.
Pentagon Will Allow Transgender People to Enlist Despite President Trump’s Opposition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Despite the President's opposition
France names winners of anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PARIS (AP) — Eighteen climate scientists from the U.S. and elsewhere hit the jackpot Monday as French President Emmanuel Macron awarded them millions of euros in grants to relocate to France for the rest of Donald Trump's presidential term.
This Type of Whale Could Become Extinct Soon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
17 have died in 2017
Trump tells NASA to send astronauts back to the moon in new directive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The president promised to "restore American leadership in space."
Trump says Sen. Gillibrand 'would do anything' for campaign cash after she calls for his resignation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump lashed out Tuesday at one of the Democratic lawmakers calling for him to resign over the multiple allegations of sexual assault against him.
Apple Just Bought Shazam. Here's What We Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It could integrate well with Apple Music
Celebrity Chef Mario Batali Will 'Step Away' From Company After Sexual Misconduct Allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The chef apologized to the "people I have mistreated and hurt"
What We Know About the New York Bomb Attack Suspect
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He has been identified as 27-year-old Akayed Ullah
The Rape and Murder of a 6
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Protests erupted in the northern state of Haryana
A state in bondage to its past confronts a difficult choice for Senate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In Alabama, religion brings people together — but blacks and whites still see the controversial Senate race through very different eyes.
50 World Leaders Will Discuss Climate Change in Paris. Donald Trump Wasn't Invited
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A group of 50 world leaders gather in Paris this week for a climate change summit hosted by the French president. Trump wasn't invited.
The Simpsons Just Addressed One of Your Most Burning Questions Ever
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Somethings in Springfield never change
An Actor’s Fight for LGBTQ Rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Star Trek: Discovery actor broke barriers as an openly gay teen in My So-Called Life— now he wants to help others like him
Uber Accidentally Charged a Passenger $14,000 for a 21
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The company has since issued a full refund
Cats Are As Brainy As Bears But Fall Short of Dogs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's a bad news/good news situation for Fluffy: Cats don't have as many neurons as dogs, suggesting they just aren't as cognitively capable. Instead, they discovered that the number of neurons in any given carnivoran's brain has more to do with brain size — at least to a point. The biggest animals in this group, such as lions and bears, have a relatively piddling number of neurons.
Ancient Fishing Hooks Found at Burial Site Could Rewrite Our Understanding of Pleistocene Gender Roles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The discovery of the world’s oldest known fishing hooks to be placed in a burial mound may end up rewriting the history of gender roles in Pleistocene-era Indonesia. The hooks—five of them—were found in a 12,000-year-old grave on Alor Island, and appear to be arranged around the head of a woman. Sue O’Connor, the archaeologist from the Australian National University who found the hooks, wrote in a new paper that the men of this region and time period were the ones assumed to be doing most of the fishing.
'We're Still Anxious.' Firefighters Continue to Battle Growing California Wildfires
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The fire has become the fifth largest in California history
President Trump Blames the New York Explosion Terror Attack on a 'Lax' Immigration System
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The terrible harm that this flawed system inflicts on America’s security and economy has long been clear."
Wild New Optical Illusion Will Make You Question Reality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just when you think you’ve seen it all, a researcher from Japan identified a new type of optical illusion, and it’s sure to blow your mind. According to study researcher Kohske Takahashi, a psychologist at Chukyo University, Japan, this is the first time anyone has identified this particular illusion, to the best of his knowledge, Indy 100 reported.
'Cruel and Vicious.' Woman Who Killed Pregnant Neighbor to Keep Baby Pleads Guilty
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
22-year-old Savanna Greywind was 8 months pregnant when she disappeared
The world's youngest island
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists think Hunga Tunga Hunga Ha'apai might hold clues on where to look for life on Mars.
Photos and video show terrifying spread of California's Thomas Fire
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As wildfires continue to blaze throughout Southern California, displacing residents and destroying buildings, terrifying images and videos show firefighters struggling to battle the historically large Thomas Fire. SEE ALSO: How to help victims of the Southern California wildfires As of Monday morning, the fire had grown to 230,500 acres, and spread from Ventura County into Santa Barbara County. Ventura County's crisis center reports that the fire is 15 percent contained.  The fire's flames are being fed by strong Santa Ana winds and plenty of fuel in the form of dried out plant life that grew after a wet winter and subsequently dried out after a dry summer in the state. The fire has grown to over 230,000 acres, and threatens areas in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.Image: Ventura county fire department The #ThomasFire so far:–230,500 acres–15% contained–796 structures destroyed–18,000 buildings threatened–New evacuation orders issued Sunday nighthttps://t.co/HoFWZT15W1 pic.twitter.com/OXztvKrPBe — Los Angeles Times (@latimes) December 11, 2017 Firefighters have made progress quenching the flames on the fire's southern side, and City of Ventura residents have been allowed to return to their homes.  However, the fire's latest drive north into Santa Barbara has triggered additional evacuations in Carpinteria and Montecito.  Flames come close to a house as the Thomas Fire advances toward Santa Barbara County seaside communities.Image: David McNew/Getty Images #ThomasFire - FF’s knock down flames as they advance on homes atop Shepherd Mesa Road in Carpinteria at 6 am Sunday morning. pic.twitter.com/86OjtRh9hQ — SBCFireInfo (@EliasonMike) December 10, 2017 Massive imposing smoke from #ThomasFire today. Looking west from Newbury Park. pic.twitter.com/gekRcWcPiO — Greg Vit (@gvitty) December 10, 2017 A firefighter battling the Thomas Fire near Lake Casitas.Image: David McNew/Getty Images Firefighters use drip torches to set a backfire at night in an effort to make progress against the Thomas Fire.Image: David McNew/Getty ImagesAccording to the Los Angeles Times, 88,000 people have had to evacuate their homes, and the cost of fighting the fire is estimated at $25 million. The Thomas Fire continues to rage as firefighters also work to contain the Creek, Rye, Skirball, and Lilac fires in Los Angeles and San Diego counties. Firefighters watch after setting a backfire at night to make progress against the Thomas Fire,Image: David McNew/Getty Images The Thomas fire burns through Los Padres National Forest.Image: Noah Berger/AP/REX/Shutterstock Horses that were evacuated from the Thomas Fire are seen on December 10, 2017 in Ojai, California.Image: David McNew/Getty Images Firefighters monitor a section of the Thomas Fire along the 101 freeway.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesCalifornia Governor Jerry Brown called the fires a "terrible tragedy," and also warned that, thanks to climate change, massive wildfire seasons could become the norm. “This could be something that happens every year or every few years,” Brown said. “We’re about to have a firefighting Christmas.” DEC 10: Christmas decorations illuminate a house as the growing Thomas Fire advances toward Santa Barbara County.Image: David McNew/Getty Images DEC 10:: People watch as the Thomas Fire advances toward Santa Barbara County.Image: David McNew/Getty ImagesCelebrities like Ellen Degeneres and Oprah Winfrey, who live in the area, have tweeted their support for those in the path of the fires. Everyone in the Montecito area is checking up on each other and helping to get people and animals to safety. I’m proud to be a part of this community. I’m sending lots of love and gratitude to the fire department and sheriffs. Thank you all. #ThomasFire — Ellen DeGeneres (@TheEllenShow) December 10, 2017 Peace be Still, is my prayer tonight. For all the fires raging thru my community and beyond. #peacebestill — Oprah Winfrey (@Oprah) December 11, 2017 Schools remain closed, and the University of California, Santa Barbara has postponed exams until after the new year. Final exams scheduled for the coming week will be rescheduled for the week of January 8. #UCSB students who wish to leave campus are encouraged to do so. Please read additional details in this Sunday memo from Chancellor Yang: https://t.co/fIwSFD0iFm — UC Santa Barbara (@ucsantabarbara) December 10, 2017 Fires this morning above Carpenteria High School. Evacuations in this area. #kcrw #kcrwsantabarbara #ThomasFire pic.twitter.com/BM0f2acGXH — Saul Gonzalez (@SaulKCRW) December 11, 2017 8,500 firefighters are battling six wildfires across Southern California. Along with the massive wildfires that ravaged Northern California wine country this fall, 2017 has made for one of the worst fire seasons in California's history. Going above and beyond clearing a path for fire personal to get in and out with a Caltrans plow on hwy 33 north of Ojai. #Hwy33 #ThomasFire #ForestService #Caltrans @LosPadresNF @usfs_r5 @R5_Fire_News pic.twitter.com/WQt6gLPQct — RW805 (@RW805) December 11, 2017 The massive #ThomasFire from Oxnard. pic.twitter.com/Yn6jG5kZw3 — Joe Buttitta (@KEYTNC3Joe) December 10, 2017 National Guard helicopters make water drop as the Thomas Fire approaches the Lake Casitas.Image: David McNew/Getty Images #ThomasFire- View from Shepard Mesa Drive at 3:48 am looking north. SBSO has evacuated area & FD has engines on structure protection. pic.twitter.com/trdzfOMFCJ — SBCFireInfo (@EliasonMike) December 10, 2017 WATCH: Different parts of the US are experiencing totally opposite weather extremes
China Is Preparing for an Influx of North Korean Refugees, Report Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A leaked document says five refugee camps are being built near the border
Volkswagen boss urges end to diesel tax breaks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The head of the world's biggest automaker Volkswagen has issued an unprecedented call to end tax breaks for diesel fuel in Germany, saying the technology must make way for cleaner ways of getting around. German carmakers like BMW, Mercedes Benz and Volkswagen -- with its 12 brands ranging from Audi and Porsche to Skoda and Seat -- bet big on diesel in the 1990s, hoping to lower carbon dioxide output compared with petrol and meet greenhouse emissions targets.
SpaceX launching recycled rocket, supply capsule for NASA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Space Age hand-me-downs are soaring to a whole new level.
Women Who Accuse President Trump of Sexual Misconduct Are Speaking Out. Watch Here
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The women are holding a press conference asking Congress to investigate their claims
Youth climate trial reaches federal appeals court, as judges signal it's going to trial
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A landmark case involving a group of 21 young Americans who are suing the federal government for its failure to protect them from the adverse consequences of climate change is inching closer to a trial date.  The case, known as Juliana v. United States, was  scheduled to go to trial in Oregon beginning on Feb. 5. That court date has been postponed due to a rare request from the federal government to have an Appeals Court step in and halt the proceedings. On Monday, a panel of judges from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments regarding the Trump administration's move to squash the case using a little-used legal tactic known as a writ of mandamus. If granted, the writ would have the Appeals Court review a 2016 U.S. District Court decision not to dismiss the case. If the Appeals Court grants the writ, it could halt the case in its tracks, preventing a trial by declaring that the District Court made one or more errors in its consideration of the case. SEE ALSO: To obtain funding, scientists may be avoiding use of the term 'climate change' in research proposals However, questions from the three-judge Appeals Court panel to the Justice Department indicated they are skeptical of the need to review the District Court's decision. The Justice Department argued that this case, which seeks a remedy involving government action to address global warming, is "unprecedented" for its claims and broad scope, among other factors.    The case already broke new legal ground when a District Court judge declared the plaintiffs have a constitutional right to a stable climate. Among the issues to be determined at trial is whether the government's actions — including its use of federal lands for energy extraction over the past several decades (the years when scientists' understanding of global warming solidified) — violated the plaintiff's constitutional rights.  Global average temperature anomalies from 2012-2016, compared to the 20th-century average.The case asks the judicial branch to help determine the remedy to ensure the plaintiff's rights are no longer being violated. This could mean that the courts tell the government what its climate policy should be, which traditionally is the purview of the legislative and executive branches of government, not the courts. (That breach is one of the arguments put forward by the Justice Department to halt the case.) "This court is on a collision course with the Executive Branch," said Eric Grant, a deputy assistant attorney general.  However, Julia Olson, the lead attorney for the plaintiffs who works for Our Children's Trust, an advocacy group, rejected that argument. She was accompanied in the courtroom by her co-counsel, as well as 18 of the 21 plaintiffs. “Plaintiffs seek a judicial safeguard against the continued degradation of their rights," she said — but this safeguard could come from the appropriate branch of government, meaning that the plaintiffs are not asking the courts to set climate policy. Rather, a possible remedy would be for the court to demand that the government enact policies to cut global warming pollutants, leaving the specific details up to Congress and federal agencies.  “What the complaint alleges is that the federal defendants collectively and through the fossil fuel energy system are affirmatively depriving these young people of their rights to life, liberty, and property,” Olson said.  In response to judges' questions about whether the plaintiffs have legal standing to sue on the basis of being deprived of a stable climate, Olson said yes, because they will experience a rapidly deteriorating climate system for the rest of their lives unless action is taken soon.  “Children are disproportionately experiencing the impacts of climate change,” Olson said. She noted that children will bear the brunt of the impacts of global warming, giving them standing in their case. “Your honor, these children will live far longer than you, they will live till the end of the century, when the seas are projected by these federal defendants to be 10 feet higher,” she said. 18 of the 21 youth-plaintiffs were before the 9th Circuit in San Francisco challenging the U.S. Government for not protecting them from #climate change. pic.twitter.com/zE0ltHO6BF — Lyanne Melendez (@LyanneMelendez) December 11, 2017 “The significance of the harm, the monumental threat that these injuries pose to these plaintiffs is very distinguishable from the rest of the country.” Once the Ninth Circuit rules on the writ of mandamus, the case will either proceed to trial in District Court in Oregon, or head down another unprecedented path.  Many experts have consistently underestimated the likelihood that this suit would reach this far, considering how other judicial approaches to address climate change have failed.  If the 21 young people succeed in getting a judge to order the Trump administration to alter its pro-drilling, climate denial policies, they will have succeeded where no environmental activists or international allies have, simply by alleging a constitutional violation of their rights.  While this is an unlikely outcome, it gets more and more plausible with each passing legal proceeding.  WATCH: Different parts of the US are experiencing totally opposite weather extremes
A Roy Moore victory would put Senate GOP in a tough spot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A victory for Roy Moore means the Senate majority leader will be able to hold onto his slim two-vote majority, but the former judge brings to the Senate a toxic mix that few Senate Republicans are keen to accept.
White House hides troop numbers in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The White House left out the number of U.S. troops fighting in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria from a semi-annual accounting it provided to Congress on Monday.
Allegations against Roy Moore overshadow his final campaign rally
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
— On the eve of a special election for an open U.S. Senate seat, embattled Republican politician Roy Moore told voters in the state that they shouldn’t support him if they have doubts about his integrity. “If you don’t believe in my character, don’t vote for me,” Moore said at a rally with a few hundred supporters Tuesday night. The race to between Moore and Democrat Doug Jones, which will decide who fills the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, is too close to call.
Firefighters rescue girl stuck in McDonald's playground
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SPENCER, Mass. (AP) — Firefighters in Massachusetts responded to a fast food restaurant over the weekend to free a young girl who got stuck in the playground.