World News
IN SHORT
Saturday, August 19, 2017

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
Millions of solar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When was the last time you stepped into a library? If you plan to gaze up at the solar eclipse on...
Popularity of latest 'honesty app' Sarahah shows how much we desire validation, whatever the cost
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Apps inviting anonymous comments play upon our desire to know our social standing, but are an open goal for bullies.
SpaceX just landed a rocket back on Earth after flying it to space. How's your Monday?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This isn't getting old yet. The first stage of a Falcon 9 rocket built by Elon Musk's SpaceX came in for a dusty and impressive landing at the company's landing zone in Cape Canaveral, Florida on Monday. The landing occurred about 10 minutes after the rocket launched a Dragon cargo craft carrying supplies to the International Space Station. SEE ALSO: Elon Musk's SpaceX starts off its week with an impressive rocket launch and landing This marks the company's 14th successful landing and its 6th successful one on land, with the rest of them taking place on drone ships in the ocean. SpaceX founder Elon Musk has long said that he hopes this kind of feat can become routine, and the company is well on its way toward making that happen.  Quick video recap of Falcon 9 launch of Dragon for its twelfth @ISS resupply mission. A post shared by SpaceX (@spacex) on Aug 14, 2017 at 12:04pm PDT The rocket landings are a critical component of SpaceX's business plan, which calls for lowering the cost of spaceflight through the reuse of rockets. At this point it's a surprise when a landing doesn't work perfectly, not when it does.  The Dragon is now working its way to the Space Station, loaded down with thousands of pounds of supplies for the crew onboard. It should arrive at the orbiting lab in about two days.  This marks SpaceX's 12th official cargo run to the station for NASA.  Kicking up some dust during landing.Image: spacexIn the future, the company is expected to start launching people to the station for NASA as part of the agency's commercial crew program, designed to end reliance on Russian rockets to get astronauts to outer space.  WATCH: Here's how Virgin's space program is different than SpaceX
Belgian town cooks giant omelet amidst egg scare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Charlotte Steenackers MALMEDY, Belgium (Reuters) - A Belgian town honored its 22-year-old tradition of making a giant omelet on Tuesday amidst an egg contamination scare, cooking 10,000 eggs in a pan four meters wide. Millions of chicken eggs have been pulled from European supermarket shelves as a result of the scare over the use of the insecticide fipronil, which is forbidden in the food chain and can cause organ damage in humans. Hundreds of people gathered in the eastern Belgian city of Malmedy undeterred by the scare and the president of the local branch of the giant omelet fraternity, Benedicte Mathy, said she was confident Tuesday's dish was safe to eat.
12 Things Your Poop Says About Your Health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Yep, we went there.
Ending Healthcare Subsidies Would Push Up Premiums 20%
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Premiums for middle-priced plans under the Affordable Care Act would rise 20% by next year if President Trump ends federal subsidies for the program, a newly released report by the Congressional ...
Lori Loughlin's Daughters All Grown Up and Look Exactly Like Their Mom
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Aunt Becky's real-life daughters are now YouTube stars.
Your next smartphone's camera could get a huge improvement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Qualcomm's new depth-sensing camera technology could improve smartphone's and virtual reality headsets.
Trappist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Since NASA announced the discovery of Trappist-1, a dwarf star, and its planetary system in February, astronomers and scientists have posited it as among the likeliest candidates for finding life outside our solar system. At the very least, the Trappist-1 star is 5.4 billion years old, almost a billion years older than our solar system, which formed around 4.5 billion years ago. Old age does not necessarily mean there cannot have been, or still be, forms of life on the planets in this system.
Researchers to study chemical contamination of US waters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SOUTH KINGSTOWN, R.I. (AP) — University of Rhode Island and Harvard University professors are collaborating through a new research center to study chemicals that have contaminated water at sites nationwide.
Rare crocodile eggs hatched at Cambodian conservation center
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — Nine eggs of an endangered crocodile species found in the wild in June and taken to a conservation center in southern Cambodia have hatched, conservationists announced Tuesday.
Napolitano blasts DOJ's 'chilling' warrant for website info
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Department of Justice seeks 1.3 million IP addresses, user photos and contact info for visitors to a website that organized protests against President Trump; reaction from Fox News senior judicial analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano
5 researchers share $500,000 prize for work on gene editing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Five researchers will share a $500,000 medical prize for their roles in developing a ground-breaking gene-editing tool that lets scientists alter the DNA of living cells
Jacksonville reassesses Confederate monuments in Charlottesville's aftermath
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After a violent clash over a Confederate statue in Virginia, political leaders like Anna Lopez Brosche are reassessing monuments elsewhere.
Trump says Steve Bannon is 'not a racist'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump defended Steve Bannon, arguably his most potent hard-right nationalist aide, without ever outright dismissing calls for him to be fired.
Trump stands by remarks on Charlottesville: 'George Washington was a slave owner'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump had a heated debate with reporters over the violence that took place in Charlottesville, Va., last weekend and said there was "blame on both sides."
Wisconsin man drives to hospital after nail shot into heart
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PESHTIGO, Wis. (AP) — A Wisconsin man who doctors say came perilously close to death after accidentally shooting a nail into his heart while working on his house calmly drove himself to the hospital and even parked his pickup truck in the lot before walking into the emergency room.
Moral leadership in the wake of Charlottesville
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump finally denounced white supremacism on Monday, uttering a detailed if belated message that both Democrats and Republicans said was urgently needed from America’s leader, given the violent weekend protests in Charlottesville, Va. “Well done Mr. President,” tweeted one of his sharpest critics, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R) of South Carolina. The United States is dotted with hundreds of Confederate monuments whose potential removal, as is planned in the Virginia college town, is expected to galvanize the KKK, neo-Nazis, and other white supremacist groups, who feel they have an ally in the president.
Sanctions haven’t stopped North Korea yet. But could latest ones help?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As it considers how to stop North Korea’s nuclear program, the Trump administration confronts an uncomfortable truth: The more sanctions the West has piled on the regime, the more progress it has made in missile technology. Instead of blunting its nuclear ambitions, more than a decade’s worth of sanctions have pushed North Korea into the arms of China, which so far has resisted turning the screws on its troublesome ally. The stepped-up pressure by itself isn't likely to convince North Korea’s Kim Jong-un to give up his nuclear ambitions. But it does create a glimmer of fresh hope for a seemingly intractable predicament: What's possible, though far from certain, is that economic pressure from the US on China and from China on North Korea – coupled with robust US military preparation for any kind of action from Pyongyang – could set the stage for talks that lead to a diplomatic breakthrough on the larger geopolitical issues.
What You Need to Know About Urea Cycle Disorder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Urea cycle disorder affects the body's ability to metabolize protein. Watch the video to learn more about the rare disease.
Myths and Facts About Vaccines for Children
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Over the years, vaccinations that help protect children from infectious diseases such as measles and mumps have saved hundreds of thousands of lives in the U.S. and prevented millions of hospital...
The Best Microwaves for $150 or Less
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The costs for outfitting a dorm room or off-campus apartment can add up fast. But if there’s a microwave on your list, you don’t have to spend a lot. More than 30 of the 70-plus countertop micro...
Tidal Locking Of Exoplanets More Common Than Thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We always see the same face of the moon from Earth not because the moon doesn’t rotate on its own axis, but because the two bodies are tidally locked with each other.
Web hosting provider challenges DOJ warrant
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Department of Justice issues warrant requesting DreamHost provide 1.3 million IP addresses related to Trump resistance site
Scientists discover 91 volcanoes slumbering beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a discovery that sounds like the premise for an environmental disaster movie starring Jake Gyllenhaal, researchers say they've identified 91 previously unknown volcanoes sitting underneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.  Yes, that's the same ice sheet that climate scientists are concerned has slid into an irreversible collapse, due to human-caused global warming. If verified through other studies, the new results would bring the total number of volcanoes beneath this part of Antarctica to nearly 140, and raise the unsettling possibility that subglacial heat from these volcanoes could speed up the melting of the ice.   SEE ALSO: One of the largest icebergs ever recorded just broke free of Antarctica The study, from researchers at Edinburgh University, used radar data from aircraft and satellites that penetrates through the ice to expose the rock below. They then analyzed the observations to find basalt rock formations closely resembling volcanoes. According to the study, the volcanoes are concentrated along the 1,864-mile-long West Antarctic Rift System, which extends from the Ross Ice Shelf to the Antarctic Peninsula.  "It is fascinating to uncover an extensive range of volcanoes in this relatively unexplored continent," said study co-author Robert Bingham, in a press release. "Better understanding of volcanic activity could shed light on their impact on Antarctica’s ice in the past, present and future, and on other rift systems around the world." If the discovery is validated by further work, the newly-found volcanoes could make the West Antarctic Ice Sheet home to one of the densest volcanic ranges in the world, similar to East Africa's volcanic ridge. Critically, though, the study does not indicate whether the subglacial volcanoes are currently active. But it does raise reasons to be both concerned and also potentially optimistic about how the volcanoes could either hasten or hinder Antarctic ice melt.  Heating from below is already being looked at as a contributor to glacial ice loss in Antarctica and elsewhere. A 2014 study found that geothermal heat has been hastening the melting of the Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica, for example.  Data from the study showing the identification of cone-shaped formations under the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.Image: M. VAN WYK DE VRIES ET ALBut one possibility the study raises is that as more ice melts above these volcanoes, it will encourage molten rock, known as magma, to flow upwards, increasing volcanic activity.  This dynamic, where melting glaciers are leading to more active volcanic activity, has been observed in Iceland, the study notes. Any additional subglacial heat would flow into the bottom of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, speeding its flow into the sea, where it would hasten sea level rise. There is another possibility, though, which is that the protrusions of the subglacial volcanoes could act to "pin" parts of the ice sheet in place, the study found.  In this way, it could actually slow the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. "Numerical models used to project potential rates of  WAIS [West Antarctic Ice Sheet] retreat show that, once initiated, ice retreat will continue unabated as long as the ice bed is smooth and downslopes inland, but that any increase in roughness or obstacle in the bed can act to delay or stem retreat," the study states.  "We have identified here a number of volcanic edifices sitting within the [West Antarctic Ice Sheet's] deep basins; these edifices, which are likely to owe their existence to volcanism, could represent some of the most influential pinning points for past and future ice retreat," the study says.  So, if you live in a coastal location and are worried about sea level rise, you might want to add volcanic activity to your list of things to closely watch for signs of how Antarctica will respond to a warming climate. 
U.S. cuts grant for group that seeks to deradicalize neo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Trump administration retooled its grants to organizations battling extremism, cutting out a network founded by an ex-skinhead that seeks to reform white supremacists.
Jacksonville reassesses Confederate monuments in Charlottesville’s aftermath
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After a violent clash over a Confederate statue in Virginia, political leaders like Anna Lopez Brosche are reassessing monuments elsewhere.
Wisconsin man drives to hospital nail shot into his chest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PESHTIGO, Wis. (AP) — A Wisconsin man came perilously close to death after accidentally shooting a nail into his chest.
Defying Europe's egg scare, Belgian town makes giant omelet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MALMEDY, Belgium (AP) — Defying rain and a tainted egg scandal that has shaken European consumers, a Belgian town has turned nearly 10,000 eggs into a giant omelet for the whole community.
Removal of mysterious circular object from beach canceled
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WESTERLY, R.I. (AP) — A tree removal company's attempt to uproot a mysterious object with steel legs that is lodged on a Rhode Island beach has been postponed.
After Thatcher, New Labour, and austerity, has Britain decided to turn left again?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As a foot soldier in the Labour Party, Peter Chowney is a veteran of the doorstop pitch. Come election time, Mr. Chowney, a district councilor, canvasses for Labour in this seaside town. “This was the first time I actually got out with a Labour manifesto that I fully supported.
In call to cancel debt, Cambodia asks: When war is over, who cleans up the mess?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On Aug. 15, 1973, a flurry of American planes flew at least 225 military missions over Cambodia. The Vietnam War was right next door, and the United States aimed to stop the North Vietnamese from moving troops and equipment into South Vietnam along the Ho Chi Minh Trail, part of which ran through Cambodia. To that end, US forces dropped 2.7 million tons of ordnance on more than 100,000 Cambodian sites – more than Allied forces dropped during all of World War II.
Why the US demands China innovate, not steal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The US complained that China prefers to take the technology and intellectual property of foreign companies rather than rely mainly on its own ingenuity to build a more competitive economy. The complaint was in the form of an order by President Trump to investigate China’s alleged theft of specific US patents, copyrights, and other intellectual property. In particular, the US wants to stop China from targeting American companies and forcing them to hand over their trade secrets when they try to enter the large Chinese market.
Allergy Causes: The Myths and Facts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Spring allergies may grab most of the attention, but ragweed is now causing misery for up to 50 million Americans—and it will continue setting off symptoms into the fall. Allergies are extremely ...
How companies leave your data online without your knowledge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Your private data could be freely available online and there's little you can do about it.
A cotton candy machine could be used to help heal human tissue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Don’t eat this “cotton candy.” Labs at Vanderbilt University and Harvard University, working with the National Science Foundation, are spinning cotton candy-like fibers for doctors and the military. Instead of sugar, researchers pour polymers into a cotton candy machine to make a heap of wispy strands. One research team is experimenting with combining the polymer…
The awe you experience from seeing an eclipse could take you off psychological auto
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Much of our adult lives are spent behind mental filters: We filter new information through the lens of what we feel we know. But emotion research suggests that experiencing awe—as many eclipse-watchers in the US are likely to on August 21—can temporarily cause those filters to drop away. In other words, awe may allow a…
The Disruptors: Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Disruptors: Space - Planet Labs
U.S. cuts grant for group that seeks to de
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Trump administration retooled its grants to organizations battling extremism, cutting out a network founded by an ex-skinhead that seeks to reform white supremacists.
Correction: Kale
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HAMBURG, N.Y. (AP) — In a story Aug. 14 about a Georgia man who won a New York county fair's kale-eating contest, The Associated Press erroneously reported the town where the winner lives. Gideon Oji lives in Morrow, Georgia, not Marrow, Georgia.
Florida man gets 6 years for firing gun while taking selfie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — A Florida man has been sentenced to six years and five months in prison for accidentally shooting a gun while taking a selfie in a strip club restroom.
Workers to try to pull mysterious circular object from beach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WESTERLY, R.I. (AP) — A tree removal company will try to uproot a mysterious object with steel legs that is lodged on a Rhode Island beach.
Wayward alligator found in swimming pool at New Jersey motel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — An alligator has been found in a swimming pool at a motel at the New Jersey shore.
2 accused of theft get locked in store, break glass to flee
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FAIRFIELD, Conn. (AP) — Police say a Connecticut woman and her 12-year-old daughter were locked inside a convenience store by an employee who suspected them of stealing, and they kicked out the store's glass doors to escape.
How a colorful Iowa newspaperman is taking on big interests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Art Cullen is not afraid of horsewhipping, but he allows that some folks really don’t like what he writes in his newspaper. Mr. Cullen, too, has a penchant for telling it like he sees it. In the small town of Storm Lake, Iowa, where agriculture and slaughterhouses rule, he has taken on powerful interests.
First burgers made from insects to go on sale in Europe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People in Europe can now tuck into burgers made from wriggling mealworms – touted as a cheap, high-protein replacement for beef. The burgers will go on sale in Coop, Switzerland’s second-largest supermarket chain – made by a Swiss start up called Essento. Switzerland’s second-largest supermarket chain will begin selling insect burgers for human consumption after the country’s food safety laws were revised.
Spider silk turns bionic through nanomaterials
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Silk transformed through nanomaterials could have applications in everything from the home to the military.
Genetically altered ants let scientists sniff out role of smell in the colony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mutant ants have been engineered by scientists from three separate universities but they’re not poised to take over the world. Instead they’re helping researchers study the genetic basis of complex social behaviors.