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Why did humans evolve such large brains? Because smarter people have more friends
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Our huge brains help maintain complex social relationships, suggests research.
New Drug Gives Skin a 'Natural Tan,' Without the UV Rays
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new drug can give human skin a "natural" tan — it activates the same process that causes skin to darken in the sun, without exposure to harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays, according to early research. In the study, researchers applied this drug to human skin samples in a lab dish and found that it darkened the skin, because it spurred production of the pigment melanin. Much more research is needed to determine if the drug is safe before it could be used in people, the researchers said.
This Yale biologist has a fascinating theory of how women changed human evolution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Richard Prum, the author of "The Evolution of Beauty," explains how who a female chooses to mate...
Science Says: DNA shows early spread of cats in human world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — Long before cats became the darlings of Facebook and YouTube, they spread through the ancient human world.
Even 2C warming means more killer heatwaves: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Climate change will sharply boost the frequency of lethal heatwaves even if humanity caps global warming at two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), the core goal of the Paris Agreement, scientists said Monday. Fulfilling that 196-nation pledge would, by 2100, still leave nearly half the world's population exposed at least once a year to bouts of heat and humidity that have proven deadly in the past, they reported in the journal Nature Climate Change. "We found that killer heatwaves around the world are becoming more common, and that this trend already seems unavoidable," said Camilo Mora, a professor at the University of Hawaii and lead author of the study.
When cows attack: how dangerous are cattle and how can you stay safe around them?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bulls aren't the worst offenders – and 94% of walkers killed had dogs.
NASA telescope finds 10 more planets that could have life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's planet-hunting Kepler telescope found 10 new planets that are not too hot or cold and just the right size to have life on them
Energy chief: Carbon dioxide not prime driver of warming
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — Energy Secretary Rick Perry said Monday he does not believe carbon dioxide is a primary contributor to global warming, a statement at odds with mainstream scientific consensus but in line with the head of the Environmental Protection Agency.
Rep. Scalise's Injuries: Why a Bullet in the Hip Can Be So Damaging
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Congressman Steve Scalise remains in critical condition today, after being shot in the hip on Wednesday (June 14). Indeed, Scalise was in shock when he arrived at the hospital, and was at "imminent risk of death," Sava said.
Trump’s lawyer: ‘I don’t tell him what to write’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Jay Sekulow, an attorney on the president’s outside legal team, told “Fox & Friends” Monday that he does not give his client advice when it comes to Twitter.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
What refugees might say of World Refugee Day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In 2000, when the United Nations designated every June 20 to be World Refugee Day, little did it know that new conflicts would create the highest levels of displacement on record. In recent years, about 66 million people, or 1 percent of the world population, have fled their homes. World Refugee Day, in other words, should not simply be a pity party.
What's behind fewer African
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Like the majority of African-Americans in their 70s, Mr. Mohammad, a retired math professor at Morehouse College in Atlanta, saw the Democrats as liberators for striking a deal on civil rights in the mid-1960s. Beyond the race for the Sixth, voting experts say, is the dampening effect of voter-ID laws and other measures passed in GOP-led states such as North Carolina, Texas, and Wisconsin – fueling a sense among black voters that the game is rigged.
'Human Project' study will ask 10,000 to share life's data
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wanted: 10,000 New Yorkers interested in advancing science by sharing a trove of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events. For 20 ...
Portugal risks more and more deadly fires: experts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Highly exposed to global warming's climate-altering impacts, Portugal is likely to see more massive forest fires such as the one -- still raging -- that has killed at least 60 people this weekend, experts say. The Iberian peninsula encompassing Portugal and Spain is experiencing a warmer, drier June than usual, explains Thomas Curt, a researcher at France's Irstea climate and agriculture research institute. Added to that, the country has vast expanses of highly inflammable plants, including forests of pine and eucalyptus trees.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
Are geniuses born or made?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
N/A
Religious, indigenous leaders demand rainforests be saved
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Religious and indigenous leaders worldwide are calling for an end to deforestation in an international multi-faith, multi-cultural plea to reduce the emissions that fuel climate change, which is killing ...
There’s actually a good reason to be grumpy in the summer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Think back to an occasion when you were forced to work, or do anything constructive or collaborative, in excessive heat. Chances are you probably weren’t your best, most other-oriented, generous-of-spirit self. Psychologists have proposed that an uncomfortably warm environment makes people less helpful and friendly—or, in psychological terms, less prosocial—but the link has never been…
How to build the perfect sandcastle – according to science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There is a direct correlation between the age of the builder, spade size and the speed at which boredom sets in.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
Octopus inspires S. Korea 'breakthrough' adhesive patch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The clinging power of octopus tentacles has inspired a breakthrough new adhesive patch that works on wet and oily surfaces with potentially huge medical and industrial uses, according to South Korean researchers. Octopuses are among the most intelligent and behaviourally diverse of all invertebrates, but it was their extreme strength that attracted the interest of the research team from Sungkyunkwan University. "Two years ago, we bought an octopus from a Lotte Supermarket, put its suction cups under a microscope and analyzed how they worked," researcher Sangyul Baik told AFP.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
This '4D' printing method could make packing for outer space much easier
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These tiny objects made with 3D printers can dramatically expand when exposed to heat. Scientists have created a pair of compact, unfurling structures that could pave the way for innovations in biomedical devices or space exploration, where payloads can cost tens of thousands of dollars per pound. SEE ALSO: Start printing your breakfast with this pancake bot A team at the Georgia Institute of Technology crafted these objects using "tensegrity" — a structural system of floating rods in compression and cables in continuous tension. Researchers crafted the rods and cables, called "struts," from shape memory polymers that unfold when heated. "Tensegrity structures are extremely lightweight while also being very strong," Glaucio Paulino, an engineering professor at Georgia Tech and co-author of a new study, said in a press release.  A "tensegrity" object.Image: georgia tech"That's the reason there's a heavy amount of interest right now in researching the use of tensegrity structures for outer space exploration," Paulino added. "The goal is to find a way to deploy a large object that initially takes up little space." This method is what some people in the scientific community would call "4D printing," in which a 3D-printed structure changes shape after a print, Tech Crunch noted. The fourth dimension is time, in this case. The Georgia Tech team published their findings last week in the journal Scientific Reports.  Researchers made the struts from 3D printers. To allow the struts to be temporarily folded flat, the team designed the struts to be hollow, with a narrow opening spanning the length of the tubes. Attachment points at the end of each strut connect the tubes to a network of elastic cables, which were also made with 3D printers. Next, the struts were heated to 65 degrees Celsius, or 149 degrees Fahrenheit. This allowed researchers to partially flatten and fold the struts into a shape resembling the letter "W." Once they cooled, the structures retained their temporary shape.  "We believe that you could build something like an antenna that initially is compressed and takes up little space, but once it's heated, say just from the heat of the sun, would fully expand," Jerry Qi, a coauthor of the report and engineering professor at Georgia Tech, said in the press release. Image: georgia techThe concept of tensegrity — a mashup of "tensional integrity" — has been used as the structural basis in several high-profile projects, including a large pedestrian bridge in Brisbane, Australia, and stadium roofs, including the Georgia Dome stadium in Atlanta and the Olympic Gymnastics Arena in Seoul, South Korea. Beyond space exploration, these new 4D printed structures might also be used to create shape-changing soft robots, the researchers said. WATCH: Severe burns can heal faster with this 3-D skin printer
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
The Cost Of Going To Space And Why It's So Expensive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This isn’t a simple answer, so grab a drink.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
How Elon Musk May Be A Sociopath
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Not all sociopaths or psychopaths are violent, cruel or evil.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
How To Create A Space War, One Alien Arms Race At A Time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An arms race is coming to popular PC game Elite Dangerous as pilots throughout the Milky Way prepare for the return of the Thargoids. Both assured Newsweek that major changes will come to Elite Dangerous in the game’s next expansion, The Return.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
This ‘space nation’ is launching with a satellite smaller than a shoebox
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You can become a citizen of Asgardia, a nation envisioned by a Russian businessman.
5 Heavenly NASA Eclipse Photos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Solar and lunar eclipses are visually stunning, but they also teach us a lot about the solar system and the universe.
Conservationists: Imperiled Atlantic salmon decline worsens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BANGOR, Maine (AP) — Fewer of North America's Atlantic salmon are making it back to rivers to spawn, which bodes poorly for the future of the imperiled fish, an international conservation group says.
Trump lawyer: President’s tweet about ‘being investigated’ did not confirm probe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In interviews Sunday, attorney Jay Sekulow contradicts the president’s own tweet.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
Retooling the workforce
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Koldo Mentxaka was always considered the “brains” in the family. After working at IBM and later as a computer consultant in his hometown of Bilbao, on Spain’s northern coast, he lost his job in 2013 in the wake of the global financial crisis. After 2-1/2 years of unemployment – and at age 40 – he made a decision.
Science Leader No More? China Challenges US Dominance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The United States still leads the world in scientific research, at least in publishing the most biomedical studies in top-tier journals and spending the most money on research and development (R&D). America's dominance in the scientific world is slowly shrinking, the researchers found, largely because China has invested vast amounts of money in science over the past two decades. In 2015, China's biomedical research teams ranked No. 4 on the top 10 list for the total number of new discoveries published in six top-tier journals, the researchers said.
Coconut oil is not a magical health food after all
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Coconut oil is an all-natural wonder: It's skin moisturizer, hair conditioner, coffee creamer, butter substitute, and delicious on toast. But it's not a magical health food, a group of doctors said. The oil is 82 percent saturated fat, and studies show it raises "bad" cholesterol levels just as much as butter, beef fat, or palm oil, the American Heart Association (AHA) said in a recent advisory. "I just don't know" who is pushing the idea that coconut oil is healthy, Frank Sacks, the report's lead author and a heart disease specialist at Harvard School of Public Health, said in a statement. SEE ALSO: Just one glass of wine per day can raise your breast cancer risk The AHA last week issued a sweeping advisory on saturated fats to clear up the public misperception that they aren't really risky for your health. Sacks and his colleagues said the "tipping point" leading to their report was a well-publicized 2014 study that concluded the amount of dietary and saturated fats you eat has no bearing on your risk of heart disease. Farmers load up coconuts in An Thanh Village, Vietnam.Image: Linh Pham/Getty ImagesThat study stirred much confusion, but it wasn't the only one.  Weight loss studies have pointed to the metabolism-boosting benefits of medium-chain triglyceride, a fat found in coconut oil and a favorite of the Paleo diet. But those trials involved consuming unusually high levels of the fat — more than you'd realistically consume when mixing coconut oil into your diet. For the advisory, published last week in the AHA journal Circulation, scientists pored over hundreds of research papers published since the 1950s.  They found strong evidence that saturated fat raises bad cholesterol. Known as low density lipoprotein, or LDL, it's the main cause of atherosclerosis, which is the hardening and clogging of arteries that leads to heart attacks, strokes, and other cardiovascular diseases. Image: centers for disease control and prevention Researchers also found that replacing saturated fat with healthier oils (such as canola, soybean, peanut, safflower, and sunflower oils) can lower the risk of heart disease. But coconut oil is conspicuously absent from that list of healthy ingredients.  Existing data showed coconut oil raised bad cholesterol in seven out of seven controlled trials. And it actually has more saturated fat than butter (63 percent), beef fat (50 percent), and pork lard (39 percent). "Because coconut oil increases LDL cholesterol ... and has no known offsetting favorable effects, we advise against the use of coconut oil," the AHA said in its recent advisory.  Full disclosure: this reporter loves coconut oil, too.Image: maria gallucci/mashableStill, ditching coconut oil and other fatty foods won't instantly lower your risk of heart disease. A 2015 study found that some people who cut saturated fat out of their diet fill the void with sugar, white flour, and junk foods.  AHA recommends people instead replace saturated fats with unsaturated oils, vegetables, nuts, beans, or whole wheat bread. Perplexingly, deep-fried foods do make the cut. "There’s nothing wrong with deep frying, as long as you deep fry in a nice unsaturated vegetable oil," Sacks said. WATCH: Is a coconut a nut?
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
5 Common Men's Health Problems and How to Fix Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. When we think about the psychological and physical stressors of raising a child, our sympathies are often directed towar...
All hail ggplot2—The code powering all those excellent charts is 10 years old
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On June 10, 2007, the statistician and developer Hadley Wickham officially released ggplot2, a chart-making system for the statistical programming language R. It would alter the course of his life and the future of data visualization. “When I created it, I was hoping that maybe a thousand people use it,” Wickham told Quartz. “At the…
Is it too soon to miss George W. Bush? Not in the age of Trump.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President George W. Bush holds his last news conference in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on Jan. 12, 2009. During an April appearance on ABC News, Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said something that would have sounded impossible to anyone who had followed American politics in the first decade of the 21st century. The Democratic leader in Congress repeated the sentiment in early June on MSNBC, saying that she wished George W. Bush were president.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
From luxury hotels to slums, Haiti puts used soap to good use
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Laure Bottinelli discovered the idea of soap-recycling while spending time in Southeast Asia. Inspired to try something similar in Haiti, she and two associates in January 2016 created the Anacaona company, Haiti's first and only soap-recycling enterprise. "In Haiti, nothing is ever wasted: Poverty is such that everything is recovered, reused in one way or another," said Mai Cardozo Stefanson, part of the management team at Montana, a luxury hotel in Port-au-Prince.
Is SpaceX Undercutting the Competition Even More Than Anyone Thought?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Is SpaceX Undercutting the Competition Even More Than Anyone Thought?
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
Dutch firm aims to deliver first flying car in 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From "The Jetsons" to "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", flying cars have long captured the imagination. While several futuristic projects are under way in different countries, a Dutch design may be the first one sold and soaring into the skies. When the first airplane was invented people already thought 'How can I make that driveable on the road?'," chief marketing officer Markus Hess told AFP.
Find Out Jeff Bezos' Net Worth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He's one of the three richest billionaires in the country.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?