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People Have a Lot of Feelings About What How Your Finances Should Look When You're 35
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Are your finances on track?
Estonia to map DNA of over 10% of population
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A trail-blazer in internet technology, cyber-savvy Estonia is rolling out a high-tech DNA database holding the genetic details of over 150,000 residents to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of chronic disease. The database is intended to find and map genetic variations, and will build on existing genetic records for over 52,000 Estonians collected since the centre opened in 2001.
Taking a page from Amazon playbook, Jeff Bezos says it’s ‘Day One’ for space industry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“Day One” isn’t just for Amazon anymore: Billionaire Jeff Bezos says that first-day feeling of being fired up about a business venture applies to Blue Origin and the commercial space industry as well. Bezos, the founder of Amazon as well as his privately held Blue Origin space venture, made the comment in a newly published interview with Via Satellite’s Mark Holmes, which was conducted during the magazine’s Satellite 2018 conference in March. Here’s how Bezos summarized the message he wanted to get across: “I would be super optimistic about the future. The message would be that I think this is… Read More
Pope Francis Reportedly Told a Gay Man 'God Made You Like This'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
His comments were embraced by the LGBT community
'Clueless' star Alicia Silverstone on trying 63 different outfits for the movie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I remember being so exhausted with the costume fittings," Silverstone said in an interview for "20/20: Lights, Camera, Summer!" "I didn't have any fashion sense at all at that age."
Hawaii's destructive lava flows hit the ocean, making the Big Island bigger
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The history of Hawaii is a tale of lava flowing into the sea.  Bounties of fresh lava poured out of the Kilauea volcano's recently opened fissures this weekend, producing orange molten rivers that flowed downslope to the Pacific Ocean. When they met, the lava chilled into rock while creating plumes of acidic steam.  These lava flows, while devastating for homes in the way of these flows, will gradually add new land to the Big Island, continuing a long geologic history of natural island-building.   "This is the common way in which the island grows laterally," George Bergantz, a volcanologist at the University of Washington, said in an interview. "It's lava flow, on top of lava flow, on top of lava flow." SEE ALSO: Deep beneath the Pacific, another active Hawaiian volcano waits to emerge Not every addition to the Big Island involves an eruption that puts people at risk and engulfs their communities. For decades, Kilauea has experienced continuous lava flows through a vent called Puʻu ʻŌʻō in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, incrementally adding land to the southeast portion of the island.  This continuous flow has added 570 acres of land to Hawaii's Big Island since 1983, according to the U.S. Geological Survey's most recent update. Meanwhile, the lava has also blanketed over 40 square miles of rainforest, communities, and historical sites. #NOAA20 satellite captured the light from the lava glowing through the clouds from Hawaii's #Kilauea's fissure 20 . On May 11th, we shared imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu crater draining prior to the recent eruption. pic.twitter.com/cTjtPqKukF — NOAA Satellites (@NOAASatellites) May 21, 2018 Things changed dramatically in early May, when lava began spewing from a new area on the volcano, engulfing homes and roads. In a separate event, the volcano exhibited rare, explosive activity, sending ash tens of thousands of feet into the sky. In other words, the ash-filled eruptions and massive evacuations are unusual — but lava flows from Kilauea are not. It's also normal for lava to reach the sea in steamy, even explosive meetings of heat and water. Kilauea's lava flows head downslope to the Pacific Ocean on May 19.Image: usgsThe Big Island's new land, however, is far from stable. The young, cooled rock is constantly pounded by waves. And as this new land settles down and sinks, sea water can find its way in through cracks, creating bursts of lava.  "You’re going to be adding land, but it's incredibly unstable," Michael Poland, of the USGS's Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, said in an interview. "Everything about it is unstable."  Prior to the beginning of Kilauea's recent eruption activity, lava regularly entered the ocean and built new land.Image: USGSSometimes, this natural land-building can take a sizable step back — specifically, by collapsing.  "Occasionally you’ll get collapses that eat into the landscape," said Poland. "It's a construction-deconstruction process," said Bergantz. Before collapse A lava delta on the Kilauea volcano, prior to collapse.Image: Usgs  After collapse 90 minutes later, relatively new land on Kilauea collapses into the sea.Image: usgs So, it's wise to stay off this fresh, unsettled earth. Even if new land extends just 10 or 20 feet offshore, the USGS recommends standing at least 330 yards away, as collapses and toxic plumes aren't just possible — they've killed people ignoring signage.  Eventually, the land will stabilize. This requires one common ingredient: more lava flows.  "If you get enough lava coming in, it’ll start growing itself laterally to form a much more solid and coherent set of lava flow benches [or landforms]," said Bergantz.  For now, considerable amounts of fresh lava continues to spatter, fountain, and pour out of recently opened lava fissures, incrementally adding new — though still unstable — land.  "It's just remarkable what's going on there right now," said Bergantz. WATCH: Boeing's 777X wingtips will fold to let it squeeze into narrow airport gates  
Scientists to Hunt for DNA Traces of Loch Ness Monster
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Next month, however, an international team of scientists led by Neil Gemmell from the University of Otago, New Zealand, will conduct an investigation into the waters of the famous loch which could help to settle the mystery once and for all. The scientists will sample the water using so-called environmental DNA (eDNA), which will enable them to identify tiny remnants of genetic material left behind by any life in the loch.
Setback for workers: What fallout as Supreme Court OKs forced arbitration?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In the wake of a #MeToo movement that is pushing corporations to clean up their act, the US Supreme Court threw companies a lifeline. It allowed them to continue including forced-arbitration clauses in their employment contracts. Monday’s ruling means that companies can keep workers from launching class-action lawsuits – or even going to arbitration as a group – over issues from wages and overtime pay to discrimination and sexual harassment.
Trump, his critics, and the basic divide over the FBI
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump has been attacking his own Federal Bureau of Investigation for months. The fundamental assumption behind many of his charges is this: In its actions regarding the Russia probe, the bureau is propelled by political bias against him. Mr. Trump’s anger over an alleged FBI “informant” in his campaign is the latest example of this dynamic.
Giant Chinese Salamander: World's Largest Amphibian Is Heading for Extinction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) is the world’s largest amphibian, weighing in at more than 140 pounds and measuring up to 5.9 feet in length. Despite playing an important role in Chinese culture for centuries—it is thought that the animals even inspired the famous Taoist yin and yang symbol—the salamander has now been all but driven to extinction in the wild, according to a landmark new study published in the journal Current Biology. The animals are under threat from habitat loss and human over-consumption: They are used in traditional Chinese medicine and have also become a highly coveted luxury food item in recent years.
PM May challenges scientists to help transform Britain after Brexit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Britain's prime minister challenged scientists on Monday to help diagnose cancer earlier and create zero-emission cars, trying to reboot an industrial strategy all but eclipsed by Brexit, while acknowledging Britain's reliance on foreign scientists. Theresa May, who is struggling to unite her top ministers over plans to leave the European Union, wants to broaden her agenda to show she is more than a leader charged with overseeing Britain's messy divorce with the bloc. In a speech in northern England, May pressed home her desire for Britain to be a leader in scientific research even after it leaves the bloc in March next year.
The toughest (and weakest) cell phones on the market
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tom's Guide tested all of the major smartphones on the market by dropping them over the course of four rounds from 4 feet and 6 feet onto wood and concrete - and even into a toilet - to see which handset is the toughest. Editor & Chief Mark Spoonauer is here to share some of the results.
Flying Lava From Hawaii Volcano Shatters Man’s Leg
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lava flows have grown more vigorous in past days
Humans account for little next to plants, worms, bugs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists now can estimate how much the different types of life on Earth weigh and humans don't nearly measure up to plants, bacteria or even earthworms
Here's Why Donald Trump Is Criticizing Former CIA Director John Brennan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump harshly criticized former CIA director John Brennan in a series of tweets quoting a guest on "Fox & Friends" just hours before…
RFK's daughter contrasts his 'moral imagination' to Trump's lack of one
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“Peace and justice and compassion towards those who suffer — that’s what the United States should stand for,” Kerry Kennedy said. “Imagine a politician, a serious presidential contender standing up and saying that.”
Launch abort? Trump tries to get his 'Space Force' off the ground, but not everyone is on board
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In a ceremony earlier this month honoring the Army football team, President Trump took a rhetorical detour to the military’s potential future in outer space. “You will be part of the five proud branches of the United States Armed Forces: Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and the Coast Guard,” Trump said. “And we’re actually thinking of a sixth, and that would be the Space Force.
Garry Kasparov: I told you Putin would attack U.S. election — and he will again
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The former Russian chess champion has a message for those who didn’t foresee Moscow’s meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.
Trump’s ‘diplomatic vandalism’ on the Iran nuclear deal, Trump’s nuclear deal move hurts America’s reputation, Putin’s pushy foreign polic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Donald Trump’s torpedoing of the Iran nuclear deal on highly specious and misleading grounds is an act of wanton diplomatic vandalism fraught with dangers...,” writes Simon Tisdall. “Many in Tehran will see the sweeping reimposition of US sanctions as a declaration of war.... This aggressive bid to further isolate Iran appears designed to ultimately enforce regime change.
Incentives for inmates to chose a crime
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
America’s faith in the ability of those in prison to redeem themselves often ebbs and flows based on which political party is in charge of law enforcement. Support of the bill by both Democrats and Republicans may be a result of recent reforms in many states, such as Texas and Georgia, that have helped ex-convicts develop life skills for reintegrating into a community – the kind of reforms that many experts attribute in part to the nation’s lower crime rate in recent decades. Inmates could be assigned to prisons closer to their families.
45+ Picnic Food Ideas You Need to Try
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Jessica Mulroney, Serena Williams And Priyanka Chopra Wow At Royal Wedding Reception
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry reportedly shared a first dance to Whitney Houston's "I Wanna Dance With Somebody" at their royal wedding reception, and they were not the only famous names getting into the groove. Tennis pro Serena Williams, actress Priyanka Chopra and bridal stylist Jessica Mulroney all attended the post-"I do" bash, and changed up their outfits for the occasion at Frogmore House. Williams opted for a bold, floral Maison Valentino gown that was altered slightly from its original Fall 2018 runway debut.
Everyone Made the Same Joke About George and Amal Clooney at the Royal Wedding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
George Clooney and Amal Clooney became a hilarious meme at the 2018 Royal Wedding of Meghan and Prince Harry.
Intel Puts Its Own Spin on Quantum Computing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the wild and wooly world of quantum computing, everything must be taken with a grain of salt. For example, Microsoft’s (MSFT) comment that it will have a production-ready quantum computer in five years’ time—a comment made to this blog in February—is met with a pleasant smile and something of a shrug by James Clarke, the director of quantum hardware for Intel (INTC).
Glaucoma test on horizon to prevent most common cause of blindness 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The most common cause of incurable blindness could be stopped early after scientists discovered the genetic blueprint which predicts who is in danger of developing the condition. Around 480,000 people suffer from glaucoma in England which starts with a loss of peripheral vision and gradually spreads. It is thought to be caused by a build-up of pressure in the eye which compresses the optic nerve. But in the early stages, symptoms are often absent and many people are unaware they have the condition until the damage is already one. Now King’s College London,Moorfields Eye Hospital and Harvard Medical School have discovered the 133 genetic variants that put people at risk of developing the condition. It suggests that a test could created that could find out who is susceptible as early as childhood, so treatment could be given before any damage occurs. Lead author, Dr Pirro Hysi from King’s College, said: ‘Knowing someone’s genetic risk profile might allow us to predict what risk of glaucoma he or she carries so that in the future we can focus scarce health care resources on those most at risk.” Most people do not realise they are suffering from glaucoma until the damage has already been done  Credit: Picasa Co-author Dr Anthony Khawaja from the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, said: “With this new knowledge, we are now more able to predict the risk of an individual developing glaucoma.   “The predictive genetic markers could be measured as early as birth, even though glaucoma develops later in adulthood. ‘These results help us to better understand the previously unknown mechanisms that cause this damaging disease. “By understanding how glaucoma develops we can, in time, get ahead of the curve of the condition and support both those living with the disease and those who may develop it.” To find out which genes were responsible, scientists studied 140,000 people drawn from the UK Biobank and EPIC-Norfolk. Eye pressure readings were taken which were compared with a DNA analysis of each patient to assess how likely it was that they would develop the condition. By comparing the pressure test results with a genetic analysis of the many common, small variations in DNA that contribute a tiny amount to overall eye pressure, the team was able to identify 133 genetic variants in the DNA of those who had high pressure readings, and so were at highest risk of developing the condition. The genetic variations were able to predict whether someone might develop glaucoma with 75 per cent accuracy. Dr. Janey Wiggs, co-author from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School said: “This study demonstrates the enormous power of large datasets allowing detection of these important genetic risk factors. “Glaucoma remains the leading cause of incurable blindness in the world, but the hope is that this important piece of research could help millions by leading to faster and more accurate diagnoses in the future.” The research was published in Nature Genetics. 
Father of Exchange Student Killed in Santa Fe Shooting Wants Gun Reform
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'I want this to become a base on which the people over there can stand and pass a law to deal with this.'
Steven Mnuchin Says U.S. and China Will Put Trade War on Hold
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The treasury secretary said two days of talks produced "meaningful progress"
This Convicted Murderer Admits He's a Rapist. But Says Police Should Apologize for Calling Him a Serial Killer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And now he's demanding an apology from police
Australian state government proposes protecting wild horses
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — An Australian state government has decided to legally protect rather than kill thousands of wild horses, infuriating scientists who argue the feral species is doing severe environmental damage to the country's iconic Snowy Mountains alpine region.
A Royal Album: Harry and Meghan’s Wedding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Time magazine selects the best pictures from Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex's royal wedding 2018.
China launches satellite to explore dark side of moon: Xinhua
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China launched a relay satellite early on Monday designed to establish a communication link between earth and a planned lunar probe that will explore the dark side of the moon, the official Xinhua news agency said. Citing the China National Space Administration, Xinhua said the satellite was launched at 5:28 a.m. (2128 GMT Sunday) on a Long March-4C rocket from the Xichang launch centre in the southwest of the country. "The launch is a key step for China to realise its goal of being the first country to send a probe to soft-land on and rove the far side of the moon," Xinhua quoted Zhang Lihua, manager of the relay satellite project, as saying.
McCain’s legacy: Principles tempered by political necessity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In October, Sen. John McCain told CNN’s Jake Tapper how he hoped Americans would remember him when he’s gone. “He served his country,” McCain said. “And not always right. Made a lot of mistakes. Made a lot of errors. But served his country. And I hope you could add ‘honorably.’”
Trump’s ‘diplomatic vandalism’ on the Iran nuclear deal, Trump’s nuclear deal move hurts America’s reputation, Putin’s pushy foreign polic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Donald Trump’s torpedoing of the Iran nuclear deal on highly specious and misleading grounds is an act of wanton diplomatic vandalism fraught with dangers...,” writes Simon Tisdall. “Many in Tehran will see the sweeping reimposition of US sanctions as a declaration of war.... This aggressive bid to further isolate Iran appears designed to ultimately enforce regime change.
With compassionate outreach, a city cuts its drug overdose rate in half
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Jim Ward and his girlfriend were awash in cash thanks to their regular trips down south, where they would buy thousands of prescription opioid pills from unscrupulous doctors and sell them back home in West Virginia for $220 apiece.
Warming waters hurt Zanzibar's seaweed. But women farmers have a plan.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Seaweed farming in our area is only done by women,” says Mwanaisha Makame, a 20-year veteran of the business, as warm little waves lap at her long, flower-print skirt. Ms. Makame’s family didn’t have money for higher education when she was young, so she went to the ocean to farm. Seaweed farming has enabled thousands of Zanzibari women to earn cash and climb social ladders.
This is what America’s new space shuttles look like
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
US astronauts haven’t had their own ride into orbit since the space shuttle was retired in 2011. Two private companies are racing to replace it and become the first to fly astronauts for NASA. Boeing and SpaceX are being paid billions of dollars to build and operate crewed space capsules that will take humans to…
Loss of marine habitats is threatening the global fishing industry – new research
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seagrass meadows play a significant role in supporting world fishery productivity.
Flat Earthers vs climate change sceptics: why conspiracy theorists keep contradicting each other
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Conspiracy theorists have an à la carte attitude to data and trust, so what can scientists do about it?
Megan Markle's New Royal Webpage Emphasizes Her Work on Women's Empowerment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Duchess of Sussex now has her own webpage on the royal family's website
Brazilian Fishermen Rescue 25 African Migrants Found Adrift at Sea For Weeks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Every year, tens of thousands of people try to reach Europe in smugglers' boats. But such journeys to Brazil are rare
Some people with synaesthesia feel other people's sensations of touch – painful and pleasurable
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Synaesthesia – a rare experience where the senses merge – comes in many different forms.
Drought, armyworms cut Malawi maize crop by 19 pct
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Malawi's maize output declined by 19.4 percent in the 2017/18 farming year to 2.8 million tons due to damage caused by drought and crop-eating armyworms, Agriculture Minister Joseph Mwanamvekha said on Monday. "This (decline) is because of dry spells experienced in some parts of the country and the armyworm invasion," Mwanamvekha told Reuters. Malawi produced 3.5 million tons of maize in the 2016/17 season but banned exports of its staple crop earlier this year and said it was considering restocking its national grain reserves.
Cougar Attacks Mountain Bikers Near Seattle, Killing One and Injuring Another
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The cougar bit one of the cyclists on the head before pouncing on the second, killing him and dragging him away
Man walking home from train station followed by pig
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NORTH RIDGEVILLE, Ohio (AP) — Police in a Cleveland suburb thought they had a drunk on their hands when a man called to report a pig following him home from a train station.
Trump’s ‘diplomatic vandalism’ on the Iran nuclear deal, Trump’s nuclear deal move hurts America’s reputation, Putin’s pushy foreign polic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Donald Trump’s torpedoing of the Iran nuclear deal on highly specious and misleading grounds is an act of wanton diplomatic vandalism fraught with dangers...,” writes Simon Tisdall. “Many in Tehran will see the sweeping reimposition of US sanctions as a declaration of war.... This aggressive bid to further isolate Iran appears designed to ultimately enforce regime change.
The Best, Worst, Weirdest, and Wildest Moments of the Billboard Music Awards 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kelly Clarkson hosted a fun night full of performances by some of the music industry's biggest stars
If You Can Make It to 2050 You May Be Able to Live Forever — Here’s How
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The fountain of youth might be found in a research lab and if you can stick it out for a little longer, you may be able to live forever.
Chef Mario Batali Under Criminal Investigation for Sexual Assault Accusations, Report Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A former staffer says the chef drugged and assaulted her at a New York City establishment
Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro Wins Disputed Election Marked By Voting Irregularities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Maduro's lead challenger said the election lacked legitimacy and called for a new ballot
Voice control: why AI must resist our bad habit of stereotyping human speech
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Amazon, Google and Apple's attempts to understand the tone of human voices can reflect human biases.