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North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
How Will We Make First Contact With Aliens: Doritos, Lights, or Music?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Reaching out to life beyond our planet is a lot messier than you might think.
Men Are Losing Their Jobs Over Sexual Harassment. These Women Are Replacing Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From Christiane Amanpour to Robin Wright
Tremors Detected Near North Korean Nuclear Test Site Likely Aftershocks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The aftershocks could signal damage in the nearby mountainous area
The Christmas Island annual crab migration is coming to Google Street View
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The migration of tens of millions of red crabs across Australia's Christmas Island is a spectacular natural phenomenon, and Google Street View plans to capture it this year as part of their amazing Google Trekker gallery.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
Early humans migrated out of Africa much earlier than we thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The traditional human origin story maintains that modern humans, or homo sapiens, evolved in Africa and then migrated in a single wave to the Asian continent about 60,000 years ago. It’s better known as the “Out of Africa” model. Today, researchers are revising that narrative. According to a study published this week in Science, new…
Excitement Builds Around Gene Therapy Cures For Hemophilia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New therapies are creating excitement for the treatment of a terrible disease.
Learn to Say Astronomy, Constellation, Solar Eclipse, and More in Sign Languages
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The result is a priority list of 47 key astronomical terms they are gathering sign language translations for from 31 languages. "Imagine fingerspelling out 'electromagnetic spectrum,'" Kate Meredith, Director of Education Outreach at Yerkes Observatory in Chicago who works on projects making astronomy more accessible to underserved communities but isn't directly involved in the IAU project, told Newsweek.
The Secret Life of 'Um'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When one person asks another a question, it takes an average of 200 milliseconds for them to respond. This is so fast that we can’t even hear the pause. In fact, it’s faster than our brains actually work. It takes the brain about half a second to retrieve the words to say something, which means that in conversation, one person is gearing up to speak before the other is even finished. By listening to the tone, grammar, and content of another’s speech, we can predict when they’ll be done.
Bill Nye Just Settled the "Best Planet" Debate Once and For All
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Can't argue with the Science Guy.
Officials: Whales, after deadly year, could become extinct
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Officials with the federal government say it's time to consider the possibility that endangered right whales could become extinct unless new steps are taken to protect them.
New Optical Illusion Discovered by Japanese Scientist Is Totally Baffling
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Don't worry, your brain's not broken.
'Firefighting at Christmas' May Be 'New Normal' in California, Governor Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Firefighters were on high alert even before the first blazes
Ancient Egypt: Two Mysterious 3,500
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the southern Egyptian city of Luxor, site of the ancient metropolis of Thebes, two new artifacts have been added to a place that is already crowded with mysteries of Egypt's distant past. The burial sites are located on the western bank of the Nile river, the water source that played such a central role in ancient Egyptian life and culture. The cemetery, or necropolis, in which the tombs are located is a known burial place of top officials from the 18th dynasty, according to the Associated Press.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
'You Don't Need to Feel Alone.' Actress Jana Kramer Opens Up About Her Miscarriage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She was expecting a baby with husband Mike Caussin
What Is Photic Retinopathy: How the Sun Burns Our Eyes During a Solar Eclipse or Any Other Day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Of course, the thing that really sets solar eclipse-induced eye damage apart from other forms is the name—solar retinopathy. Students at the Jennings School District view the solar eclipse with glasses donated by Mastercard on August 21, 2017 in St Louis, Missouri. Photic retinopathy is the more general term for retinal damage caused by light, and it is definitely not just a sun thing.
How France's Most Daring WWII Saboteur Got Behind Enemy Lines
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Read an excerpt from The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France’s Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando
New planetarium seeks to put NJ science center on travel map
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New Jersey's Liberty Science Center in Jersey City is aiming to take visitors into space in what they are billing as the largest planetarium in the Western Hemisphere.
Assistive tech is progressing faster than ever, and these 7 devices prove it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From robotic prosthetics to brainwave-reading hearing aids, assistive technology has progressed in leaps and bounds over the past decade. Here's 7 amazing examples of that trend
Research Unveils New Promising Biofuel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research suggests that young poplar trees could be an economic and fast-growing source of biofuel in the future
Scientists claim humans have peaked, and will never be taller, stronger, or live longer than we do today
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you look at the entire timeline of human existence, we live longer in modern times than we ever have, and we're continually beating world records with physical achievements that set new high bars for human capability. With that in mind, it might be tempting to imagine that humans will just keep getting better and living longer for the foreseeable future, but new research suggests that's simply not the case. Researchers now believe that humans have peaked. According to the new study, which was published in Frontiers in Physiology, the human body is either at or rapidly nearing the absolute limits for its capabilities. Citing what they believe is evidence of a plateau in lifespan, height, endurance, and other human capabilities, the scientists are sounding the alarm that humans, as we exist today, might be as good as we're ever going to get. "These traits no longer increase, despite further continuous nutritional, medical, and scientific progress," Professor Jean-François Toussaint from Paris Descartes University explains. "This suggests that modern societies have allowed our species to reach its limits. We are the first generation to become aware of this." Instead of continually improving, the study's data suggests that we'll simply continue to see more people reaching current maximums of lifespan and physical capabilities. For example, the world records for age won't continue to climb, but the percentage of people who reach that upper limit will grow. The study was based on historical records and trends plotted over many generations, and the numbers don't lie. "This will be one of the biggest challenges of this century as the added pressure from anthropogenic activities will be responsible for damaging effects on human health and the environment," Toussaint says. "The current declines in human capacities we can see today are a sign that environmental changes, including climate, are already contributing to the increasing constraints we now have to consider." Finding cures for some of the diseases that most often cut life short could have a noticeable impact on the overall average lifespan, and advances in nutrition and a greater understanding of human physiology may give people everyday people a physical edge in the future, but the body has limits. Of course, that could all go right out the window if the much-talked-about marriage between man and machine becomes a reality.
Scientists say screens hurt our ability to comprehend the information we read
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ever find yourself reading through a scientific article and struggling to wrap your head around it? It may be the fact that you spend too much time staring at screens throughout the day.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
Bizarre Antarctic Bacteria That Live on Air Alone Could Show Exactly How Alien Life Works
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Certain microbes in Antarctica have been surviving on nothing but atmospheric energy. In 2014, a team of researchers from institutions across Australia and New Zealand collected soil samples from two ice-free sites along the eastern Antarctic coast.
Firefighters 'Seriously Unimpressed' After Spending Hour Freeing Man Who 'Cemented' His Head in Microwave
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'As funny as this sounds, this young man could quite easily have suffocated or have been seriously injured'
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
'She Chose to Treat Them Like Trash.' Woman Pleads Guilty to Hiding Her Dead Babies Under a House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The infants were stuffed in trash bags
'The Breakthrough That We Needed.' Britain and the E.U. Have Agreed on Key Brexit Terms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After a flurry of overnight diplomacy
Start Stargazing With These Discounted Telescopes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's never been cheaper to become an astronomer.
First black astronaut honored on 50th anniversary of death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Air Force Maj. Robert Lawrence Jr. has finally received a long overdue honor.
Potatoes for peace: how the humble tuber stopped conflict in Europe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The humble potato -- drought-resistant, able to thrive in diverse soils, and enjoyed fried, steamed or baked -- brought centuries of relative calm and prosperity to Europe after its introduction in the 16th century, a new study says. The blessings that flowed from this agricultural revolution helped ease the economic and societal pressures that can lead to costly and disastrous conflicts, says the report. The introduction of potatoes and the resultant increase in productivity "dramatically reduced conflict" both within and between states for some two centuries, it says.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
Ancient and Enormous South American Rock Art Mapped for First Time Reveals Mysterious 100
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Panels of rock art in Venezuela—including some of the largest known examples in the world, and some never seen before—have been mapped for the first time. The 2,000-year-old engravings, called petroglyphs, are located on a group of islands within the Atures Rapids, in the Amazonas State of Venezuela. The purpose of the project is to examine the “cultural mosaic” around the Atures Rapids, according to Philip Riris, a member of the project and post-doctoral researcher at University College London Institute of Archaeology.
President Trump and Donald Jr. Received Email Containing Key to Public Wikileaks Documents
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trumps received the email after the Wikileaks files went public, not before
Iraq: War Against Islamic State Group is Over
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Iraq said its war on the IS group is over after over three years of combat
Roy Moore Accuser Says She Wrote Part of Yearbook Inscription
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Beverly Young Nelson admitted to adding notes but stood by her allegation that Moore sexually assaulted her
NASA shared pictures of the California wildfires from space — and the images are unreal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With more than $30 billion worth of Southern California real estate at some level of risk, the images help first responders plan.
'Mississippi Is Ready, Finally, to Tell the Truth.' Inside the State's Historic New Civil Rights Museum
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum's director explains what it means for the first state-sponsored civil rights museum to open in Jackson
The ages people are happiest with their money, their looks, and their life, in one chart
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Research has shown that people report the highest levels of happiness after the age of 55 in three key areas: their financial situation, their physical appearance, and their overall well-being. Meanwhile, in all three areas, people reported the lowest levels of happiness between the ages of 45 and 59, according to data from the Centre for Economic Performance, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and the General Social Survey.
President Trump Greeted by Protests and Boycotts in Mississippi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Activists will protest Trump's celebration of the civil right's movement
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
Sinister sound of Tyrannosaurus Rex heard for first time in 66 million years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The fearsome roar of Tyrannosaurus Rex as portrayed in film has left many a cinema-goer quaking in their seat. But new research suggests the king of the dinosaurs made a far more sinister sound. For a new BBC documentary, naturalist Chris Packham visited Julia Clarke, professor of Vertebrate Palaeontology at the University of Texas, to test out a the theory that dinosaurs actually sounded more like birds and reptiles, than today’s predatory mammals. “The most chilling noises in the natural world today come from predators, the howl of the wolf, the roar of the tiger, but experts now doubt that T-Rex sounded anything like them,” said Packham. Dinosaurs are the ancestors of birds and are closely related to alligators and crocodiles, so Prof Clarke used the sound of the Eurasian bittern, which makes an unearthly booming call, and the vocalisations of Chinese crocodiles to estimate the noise T-Rex would have made. Chris Packham with Tristan the Tyrannosaurus Rex in Berlin at the Naturkundemuseum in Berlin Credit: Gordon Welters  When Professor Clarke scaled up the sound to match the size of the huge dinosaur the call became an ominous low rumble, subtle, yet scary enough to make the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. In fact, the noise is akin to the rhythmic low thud of T-Rex footsteps in Jurassic Park or the sinister base notes which announced the arrival of the great white in Jaws. Prof Clarke said that our aversion to such sounds today, which are often present in horror film soundtracks, may stem from an innate memory of the long-forgotten noises of dangerous predators. “I feel like this sound just induces fear,” she said. “People think you need a roar to be really scary, but that is scariest sound you’ll have ever heard. I don’t know if we have some deep seated adaptive response to low frequency sounds but I would not be surprised. Chris Packham and Professor Julia Clark hear the sound of T-Rex for the first time  Credit: BBC  “Across animals deeper sounds are a pretty true signal of larger body sizes so the kinds of sounds we were listening would correlate with a really big animal. Natural selection to fear these kinds of sounds seems really plausible. “If we look at any of the classic dinosaur movies T-Rex is roaring. The reason we probably thought of this as appropriate is that large carnivores, most of them are mammals and those are sounds that they produce. “But when we think about T-Rex, he is an animal that is most closely related to birds and alligators and crocodiles and those animals make very different kinds of sounds.” Chris Packham goes in search of the real T.Rex in a new documentary for the BBC which airs in January  Credit: Gordon Welters  T-Rex probably did not need to even open its mouth to make the terrifying noise. Among birds and reptilians, closed mouth vocalisation is common. And the rumble may have reached such a deep frequency that it may have been ‘felt’ rather than heard.   The researchers were able to estimate just how deep T-Rex vocalisations got by analysing what the huge dinosaur could hear. Dr Larry Witmer, at Ohio University, took scans of a braincase of a T-Rex fossil, which still contained the outlines of the hearing organs. “We can get information from looking at the structure of the inner ear,” he said. “What that suggests is T-Rex actually had a very sensitive hearing organ which was especially sensitive to low frequencies, potentially frequencies that are even lower than what most of us can hear.” T-Rex probably did not roar like today's carnivores but made a sinister, closed-mouth rumble  Credit: Jurassic Park Such low rumbles would have been able to travel vast distances. Today large mammals such as elephants can ‘talk’ over miles, while whale song has been picked thousands of miles from its source. “It’s such a low frequency that you wouldn’t have just heard it, you would have felt it too,” added Packham. “There is a sort of primal fear that is associated with sounds like that. “And when you think about it, T-Rex didn’t need to roar, it needed to be able to communicate over huge areas. They probably travelled huge distances with migrating animals which they hunted. “This could be the first time for 66 million years that this sound has been heard on Earth. It’s a shot in the dark, but we are using the evidence we’ve got. I think it is the scariest sound I have ever felt.” The Real T.rex with Chris Packham will be broadcast at 9pm on January 2 on BBC Two.
Gay Marriage Will Be Legally Recognized in Australia Starting Dec. 9
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Couples who wed overseas will be legally recognized starting Saturday, while couples who intend to marry must give a calendar-month notice
A Former State Senator Allegedly Took 700 Pounds of Dunkin' Donuts Coffee as a Bribe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He was charged with taking $1 million in bribes
'Vicious and Purposeful Mistake.' Trump Rails Against CNN Over Error
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The report suggested Trump was tipped off about documents damaging to Clinton
Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. recap: 'A Life Spent'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.' recap: 'A Life Spent'