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Saturday, August 19, 2017

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Smileys Portray Low Competence In Work
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
According to the study while individuals who smile in face-to-face communication are perceived as warm and more competent with regards to the first impressions they created,a text-based representation of a smile in computer-mediated communication did not have that same effect.
Tiki denounces use of torches by white nationalists in Charlottesville
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“We do not support their message or the use of our products in this way,” the company that makes the backyard bamboo torches said in a statement.
Trump slams Merck CEO for resigning from White House council after Charlottesville controversy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Ken Frazier, chairman and chief executive officer of Merck speaks, with President Donald Trump at left, during an event to announce a Merck, Pfizer, and Corning joint partnership to make glass containers for medication, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Thursday, July 20, 2017, in Washington. President Trump attacked Kenneth Frazier Monday morning, minutes after the Merck CEO resigned from the President’s Manufacturing Council.
Man falls into 10
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A Philadelphia man who fell into a sinkhole says he was putting traffic cones around it because he was worried about the safety of children playing outside.
Washington's response to Charlottesville attack: three questions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
August is supposed to be quiet in Washington. But sudden violence in Charlottesville, Va., is roiling US politics and confronting officials from the president to vacationing lawmakers with a test of their ability to respond to the nation’s bitter and enduring racial divisions.
The Watch That Almost Destroyed an Entire Industry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Watch nerds love to hate quartz watches, and the Girard-Perregaux Caliber 350 is the grandaddy of them all.
Is North Korea a Threat? Not as Much as Artifical Intelligence, According to Elon Musk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla, speaks during the International Space Station Research and Development Conference at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC, on July 19. The Tesla and SpaceX chief executive has long warned of the dangers of AI and issued his latest warning after a bot from OpenAI defeated some of the world’s best players in in a professional gaming competition.
NASA’s Golden Records Coming Back to Life, 40 Years Later
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Golden records were brought aboard the Voyager space shuttle. Each record contained greetings in 55 languages, music and images - the idea was to give extraterrestrials an idea of life on earth. They are now being recreated as a box set and a book.
More than spectacle: Eclipses create science and so can you
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Next week's stunning solar eclipse in the United States will generate as much science as oohs and aahs
Boris in Union Jack underpants? Musical comedy finds the fun in Brexit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A retelling of Britain's vote to leave the European Union and its dramatic political consequences might perhaps be framed as high drama or extreme farce. On hearing the news that "Leave" has won, Johnson, who in reality surprised many with his decision to campaign to leave the EU and is now Britain's foreign secretary, sings in horror: "Leaving Europe will be a catastrophe/ Overnight we'll bugger the economy." Britons voted to leave the EU in June 2016, but since then a host of unforeseen political consequences, including a snap election in which the Conservative government lost its majority, have mired the country in uncertainty.
Mirenesse Secret Weapon Supreme 24HR Mascara Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter to win a Mirenesse Secret Weapon Supreme 24HR Mascara for super long, full lashes!
Party City Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter to win Football-themed cups from Party City!
Take the Sting Out of Insect Bites
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The best way to beat mosquito bites is, of course, to avoid them in the first place. A good insect repellent, combined with proper clothing and some commonsense steps around your home, can help. ...
Drs. Exclusive: Black Eyed Peas Member Taboo Reveals Cancer Secret
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
In a Doctors’ exclusive, Taboo from the Black Eyed Peas comes forward to reveal a life threatening health issue he’s been battling. The Black Eyes Peas member, whose real name is Jaime Luis Gomez, explains that he broke his tailbone while performing and never properly had it treated. “The first thing I thought about was my kids, my wife, my family and am I going to live,” he tells The Doctors, explaining his official diagnosis was stage 2 testicular cancer.
The Dragon Spacecraft is carrying precious cargo in the form of a supercomputer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Next week, the Dragon Spacecraft from Elon Musk's high-flying company SpaceX will be carrying some very precious cargo. It's a Hewlett Packard Enterprise supercomputer called the Spaceborne Computer.
Eclipse Day Timeline: Exactly What Will Happen on August 21
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From First Contact to Totality, this is your solar eclipse schedule.
Amazon hands out refunds for solar eclipse glasses that lack NASA’s approval
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Amazon says it’s giving customers refunds for solar viewing glasses and filters that aren’t covered by the American Astronomical Society’s list of reputable vendors. That twist sent some of the banned sellers scrambling to defend their products, with the Aug. 21 solar eclipse just a little more than a week away. The brouhaha began a little less than two weeks ago, when the AAS reported that some vendors were selling eclipse glasses that didn’t block enough of the sun’s potentially eye-damaging radiation, and going so far as to print bogus certification labels on the glasses. Experts have issued repeated warnings… Read More
Will Charlottesville mark a tipping point for the United States?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Everyone from the governor of Virginia to his mom and dad were telling Fintan Horan to stay away from this weekend’s Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Va. “You have people coming here who say they want to incite violence, so as someone who lives in Charlottesville – you know, this is my back yard … how can I not [get involved]?” says Mr. Horan, a computer science student at the University of Virginia, who lives near where a man, in a possible act of domestic terrorism, was arrested for allegedly plowing his car into a crowd of people, killing one woman and injuring 19. Horan, who joined a counter-protest Saturday, is far from the only one to have been thrust into the middle of the boldest show of violent white supremacy in the United States in generations.
Witnessing an eclipse is so overwhelming it has created a global community of “addicts”
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Asking an eclipse chaser why they go to such great lengths to spend a minute or two beneath a darkened sky is like asking a person why they bothered to fall in love. Words, they stress, are mere approximations; it’s impossible to actually describe the feeling. But they try anyway: I didn’t have a choice,…
Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After a deadly clash at a protest on Saturday, people across the country came together to mourn and to condemn the violence in Virginia.
Charlottesville mayor largely blames Trump for white supremacist violence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After violence and death at a rally in Charlottesville on Saturday, the city’s mayor pointed the finger at the president and his campaign.
White House pushes back against criticism of Trump’s Charlottesville response
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After the president was blasted for not explicitly condemning the white supremacists involved in Saturday’s attack, the White House released a follow-up statement on Sunday morning.
This Technology Could Make You Rich
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gene editing appears poised to usher in a brave new world for biotech.
The Bees Are Better, But They're Not All Right
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Total population collapse? No. Weaker insects? Yes. Problematic pesticides? Probably.
Could gene
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There's a massive shortage of available organs for transplants. A new international research initiative is using CRISPR gene editing on pigs to make them into possible donors for humans.
President Trump Needs to Go to the Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And then Mars, obviously.
Preparing for the Great American Eclipse of 2017
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People across the continental U.S. will witness a rare and spectacular celestial event on August 21
In the Future, Humans Will Use Brain to Brain Communication and Download Their Memories If Elon Musk Has His Way
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk wants to get inside your head. In April, the Silicon Valley billionaire announced plans to launch Neuralink—a company dedicated to developing a brain-to-machine interface to cure brain ailments like paralysis and memory problems and help people compete with robots when the artificial intelligence revolution makes human brains obsolete. Musk says this will be accomplished by implanting tiny electrodes into the brain—allowing for things like downloading and uploading memory and casual brain-to-brain communication.
Quora: Is Google Scholar Changing Academia?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Quora Questions are part of a partnership between Newsweek and Quora, through which we'll be posting relevant and interesting answers from Quora contributors throughout the week. Google Scholar turned the process of academic career selection into a social media video game. Note that Google didn’t invent the h-index, but it definitely helped to make it almost universally known among researchers.
Republicans — and Democrats — call for Trump to denounce white supremacists after Charlottesville death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Officials from both parties said President Trump’s response to the Charlottesville violence did not go far enough in opposing white supremacists and right wing extremism.
Photographer captures moment car slammed into counterprotesters in Charlottesville. It was his last day on the job.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Photojournalist Ryan M. Kelly’s final assignment was covering a rally. It turned violent, and his images captured part of the story.
Sheriff's office to auction century
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW PHILADELPHIA, Ohio (AP) — A northeast Ohio sheriff's office is auctioning off a nearly century-old machine gun to help pay for new weapons for deputies.
Can you please talk, not text? Parenting the Instagram generation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Jake Lee, a tanned California teenager in baggy shorts and a T-shirt, is lounging on the floor of his parents’ midcentury home. “I’m on social media every waking moment of my life,” he says, with no particular pride. Equidistant between the headquarters of Apple and Facebook, two of the world’s biggest tech companies, the Lee household is something of a petri dish for the way technology has altered American family life.
What 'Seismology' Tells Us About The Sun
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The sun’s core rotates four times faster than its surface. Here’s why that matters.
Bangladesh hopes to rekindle passion to save rare crocodiles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bangladeshi conservationists introduced two rare river-dwelling crocodiles to potential mates Sunday in a last-ditch attempt to save the critically-endangered species from extinction. A 36-year-old female gharial -- a fish-eating crocodile once native to rivers across the Indian subcontinent -- was brought from a zoo in northeast Bangladesh to the capital Dhaka, where it is hoped she will mate with an older male to repopulate the species. Gharials can only breed until the age of 50 and as the small captive population in Bangladesh ages, conservationists decided intervention was needed if the species was to have any chance of survival.
Believe In Science Behind Eclipse? Believe Climate Change Too, Neil deGrasse Tyson Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Neil deGrasse Tyson tweets that if you believe in the upcoming eclipse you should probably also believe in climate change.
Japan GPS satellite launch postponed due to glitch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Japan on Saturday postponed the planned launch of an H-2A rocket tasked to put a geo-positioning satellite into orbit due to possible helium gas leakage, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd (MHI) said. MHI, commissioned by the government to carry the satellite into space, postponed Saturday's launch after detecting a decline in pressure levels inside a tank containing helium gas, which is used to operate valves for cooling rocket engines. The launch of a third geo-positioning satellite is part of Japan's plan to build a local version of the U.S. global positioning system (GPS) aimed to offer location information for autopiloting of cars and possible national security purposes.
Researchers Put Malware Inside DNA and Hacked Lab Machines
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Using altered gene sequencing software, researchers used an unorthodox method to take control of lab computers.
Neptune’s Icy Insides Contain A Mysterious Chemical
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists think they know what’s happening on frozen Neptune, and that could teach them about icy exoplanets as well.
Does Your Friend Love Black Coffee? The Bizarre Ways You Can Spot a Psychopath
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Suspect that someone you know might be a psychopath? Here are seven ways to tell.
The Blue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You might say I’ve been chasing eclipses my whole life—I just haven’t caught one yet. I’ve been an astronomy enthusiast since my youth in the 1970s, the era of the Apollo program. Along with millions of people across the world, I watched Neil Armstrong take that giant leap onto the moon’s surface in July 1969. After watching the first moon landing, I was eager to see the moon block out the sun during the total solar eclipse of March 7, 1970. But as an 8-year-old in Cleveland, Ohio, there was no way for my single mom to take me to the Deep South in the middle of the school year. So I was a forlorn kid that day, standing in the partially eclipsed sunlight, trying unsuccessfully to observe a projected image with a homemade shoebox camera. I was already disappointed when the TV news announcer that evening really burst my bubble. He said, “If you missed today’s total solar eclipse, you’ll have another chance in the year 2017.”
How To Get Rid of Fruit Flies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fruit flies are annoying.
Cameo Nouveau Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter to win Biodegradable Pocket Cutlery by Cameo Nouveau!
Wild Ophelia Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter to win a potato chip chocolate bar from Wild Ophelia!
Chimps Learn To Play Rock
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists taught a bunch of chimps how to play rock-paper-scissors to see if they could play the game better than children.
What Does A Solar Eclipse Look Like?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here’s what you can expect to see during the 2017 total solar eclipse.
One Day Your Tears Will Fuel These Batteries
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists at Fudan University in China have developed new batteries that aim to be replacements for batteries used to power wearables and medical devices. As The Verge reports, these batteries are powered by "saltwater and IV rehydration solutions."
Space station crew to get 3 shots at solar eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The space station's crew will get three opportunities on successive orbits to photograph the Aug. 21 solar eclipse
Washington state utility's nuclear waste shipments suspended
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Officials in Washington state indefinitely suspended a public utility's authority to ship low-level radioactive waste after the utility mislabeled a shipment. The Tri-City Herald reported (http://bit.ly/2vwGFMk ...
Nasa to wake up New Horizons spacecraft for voyage into mysterious Third Zone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nasa is to wake up its New Horizons spacecraft next month following a five month hibernation, ahead of a journey deeper into one of the most mysterious regions of the Solar System. New Horizons, which captured incredible images of Pluto in July 2015, was powered down in April to conserve energy as it travelled through the Kuiper Belt, a vast region of icy debris which encircles the Sun and planets, also known as The Third Zone. On September 11, the spacecraft will awaken for its 16 month journey to MU69, an ancient object which is thought to be one of the early building blocks of the Solar System. The space rock had not even been discovered when the craft launched in 2006 and the flyby will be the most distant in the history of space exploration, a billion miles beyond Pluto, and four billion miles from Earth. Recent observations of MU69 from the Hubble Space Telescope show it is probably two ‘binary’ objects or a pair of space rocks ‘stuck-together’ bodies which are each around 12 miles across. An artist's impression of MU69 Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI/Alex Parker Alan Stern, Principal Investigator for New Horizons at Nasa, said:“We are very likely going to a primordial binary in the Kuiper Belt, a four-billion-year-old relic of Solar System formation and an exotic building block of the small planets of the Kuiper Belt like Pluto. “It may even be a swarm of smaller bodies left from the time when the planets in our solar system formed.   “New exploration awaits us. It promises a scientific bonanza for the flyby.” The first close up image of Pluto, taken by New Horizons Credit: Nasa New Horizons was the fastest spacecraft to ever launch and is partly powered by nuclear energy. When it launched in January 2006 Pluto was still a planet, but just a few months later it was downgraded to a dwarf-planet or ‘plutoid’ and is now known officially as ‘asteroid number 134340’ After studying objects in The Kuiper Belt, the spacecraft will eventually leave the Solar System, a feat only achieved by Voyager so far. And it is carrying the ashes of the scientist who discovered Pluto, Clyde Tombaugh. Tombaugh died on January 17 1997, nine years and two days before New Horizon’s launch, but one of his final requests was for his ashes to be sent into space. Clyde Tombaugh poses with the telescope through which he discovered the Pluto Credit: Pluto Stowaway