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Lyndon B. Johnson: Moral clarity on civil rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Journalist and historian Jonathan Darman, author of “Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America,” spoke to Yahoo News about Lyndon Johnson’s defining moment of presidential leadership: the risky decision to pursue civil-rights legislation over the objections of his fellow Southern Democrats — and his own political advisers.
How Jenifer Lewis Made a Statement in a Sweatshirt on the Emmys 2018 Red Carpet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 'Black-ish' star wore a Nike sweatshirt in support of Colin Kaepernick
A look at how trash ends up in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nobu Okada of Astroscale explains the company's plan to develop a "capture satellite" to retrieve trash in space for disposal on Earth.
Senate to Hold Public Hearing for Brett Kavanaugh and Accuser Christine Blasey Ford
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The announcement came one day after Ford publicly identified herself
Japanese billionaire businessman revealed as SpaceX's first Moon traveler
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Japanese billionaire and online fashion tycoon, Yusaku Maezawa, will be the first man to fly on a monster SpaceX rocket around the Moon as early as 2023, and he plans to bring six to eight artists along. Maezawa, 42, will be the first lunar traveler since the last US Apollo mission in 1972. "Ever since I was a kid, I have loved the Moon," Maezawa said at SpaceX headquarters and rocket factory in Hawthorne, California, in the middle of metropolitan Los Angeles, late Monday.
Elon Musk's SpaceX will send Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and 'eight artists' to the moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Not since the Apollo mission of 1972 has man come close to the surface of the moon but this could soon be about to change if Elon Musk has his way. The Tesla owner has revealed that billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, the founder of one of Japan's largest online clothing retailers, will fly around the moon on SpaceX’s first commercial flight of this kind - a trip expected to take a week and could be tested within the next "two to three years". Mr Maezawa will ride aboard SpaceX’s enormous, reusable Big Falcon Rocket or “Big F------- Rocket” launcher, which Mr Musk hopes will eventually ferry the first human colonists to Mars. Mr Maezawa has bought every seat on the entire rocket so he can invite six to eight artists to join him on the mission. Each must use the trip as inspiration to create a piece of art on their return.   “If Pablo Picasso had been able to see the Moon up close, what kind of paintings would he have drawn? If John Lennon could have seen the curvature of the Earth, what kind of songs would he have written? If they had gone to space, how would the world have looked today?," Mr Maezawa said in a statement.  “People are creative and have a great imagination. We all have the ability to dream dreams that have never been dreamt, to sing songs that have never been sung, to paint that which has never been seen before. I hope that this project will inspire the dreamer within each of us.” Big Falcon: an artist's impression of the rocket that Elon Musk plans to propel his first space tourists towards the Moon Credit: SpaceX “Together with earth's top artists, I will be heading to the moon... just a little earlier than everyone else.” Mr Maeszawa did not say how much he paid for the tickets but Mr Musk said that the development of the BFR would cost an estimated $5 billion (£3.8bn) for the project.  Mr Musk said that it was crucial that SpaceX got the maiden commercial flight right, telling the audience "this is a dangerous mission", joking that SpaceX would "have enough water if things went wrong". Mr Musk shelved a similar project to send two customers into space in 2017, without revealing who the first people to pay for seats were at the time. Both had reportedly paid a "significant deposit" but the project was abandoned amid what Mr Musk described as "so many uncertainties".  Is Elon Musk sleepwalking into a disaster? The tech mogul behind financial payments system PayPal, electric carmaker Tesla, artificial intelligence company Neuralink and tunneling venture the Boring Company, has often said that his primary goal was to create an “interplanetary species” by setting up a colony on Mars by 2030. He hopes to send passengers on a "one-way trip" to Mars on one of his cost-friendly, recyclable Big Falcon Rockets. He will fund this by sending precious cargo like satellites to near-Earth orbit on behalf of governments and media companies. View this post on Instagram #Picasso A post shared by Yusaku Maezawa (@yusaku2020) on Sep 13, 2018 at 9:09am PDT SpaceX’s primary profit spinner involves working with Nasa to send satellites into orbit. Mr Musk was cautious to note ahead of the announcement that “supporting Nasa crewed spaceflight and National Security missions” was its top priority. It is also developing "Starlink" a global, satellite broadband system.  SpaceX is in the process of building the BFR that will take Mr Maezawa into space.  The announcement came on the same day that British diver Vernon Unsworth sued Mr Musk for libel after the tech entrepreneur repeatedly referred to him as being a “paedophile” after Mr Unsworth criticised a tube Musk made to help save 12 Thai boys from a cave after it became flooded. The race is on for competitors in the commercial space sector. Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos owns a similar venture named Blue Origins and Richard Branson has been working on Virgin Galactic for some time. 
Authorities pull globe, not honey pot, from bear cub's head
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BALSAM LAKE, Wis. (AP) — A bear cub in Wisconsin had a Winnie the Pooh moment, but it wasn't a honey pot that got stuck on its head. It was a hard plastic globe.
NASA unveils first science images from TESS probe’s quest to spot alien planets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The first science images from NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite focus on a strip of southern sky that includes the two nearest dwarf galaxies and plenty of potential targets in the probe’s planet search. “In a sea of stars brimming with new worlds, TESS is casting a wide net and will haul in a bounty of promising planets for further study,” Paul Hertz, astrophysics division director at NASA Headquarters, said today in a news release. “This ‘first light’ science image shows the capabilities of TESS’ cameras, and shows that the mission will realize its incredible potential in our search for another… Read More
China's Leading Actress Fan Bingbing Has Vanished. Here’s What to Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fan was last seen on July 1, and she's been silent on social media for months
Brett Kavanaugh Accuser Opens Up About the Alleged Sexual Assault
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kavanaugh denies the allegation
SpaceX Introduces Japanese Billionaire as First Private Passenger to Fly Around the Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX announced Monday that billionaire Japanese entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa will become the aerospace company’s first private passenger on a voyage around the moon, taking another major step in the race to commercialize space travel.
Elon Musk's SpaceX to name first passenger for moon voyage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX, Elon Musk's space transportation company, was set on Monday to name the first private passenger who will take a trip around the moon aboard its forthcoming Big Falcon Rocket spaceship, taking the race to commercialize space travel to new heights. SpaceX said it will name the first passenger to travel to the moon since the United States' Apollo missions ended in 1972 at an event Monday evening at the company's headquarters and rocket factory in the Los Angeles suburb of Hawthorne. In moves typical of his publicity-seeking style, Musk, who is also the billionaire chief executive of electric car maker Tesla Inc (TSLA.O), has already teased a few tantalizing details about the trip and the passenger's identity, but left major questions unanswered.
Trump Imposes $200 Billion in New Tariffs on Chinese Goods
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The administration said it remains open to negotiations with China
Fly Me to the Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX has revealed its first private customer, a Japanese billionaire who wants some of Earth’s top artists to accompany him to the Moon.
Japanese Billionaire Will Fly To The Moon With SpaceX, Elon Musk Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX, Elon Musk's ambitious rocket endeavor, said Monday it had signed a
Flooding From Hurricane Florence Is Overtaking Hog Farms and Coal Ash Dumps
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Officials say several open-air manure pits at hog farms have failed
Donald Trump, Jr. Posts Instagram Apparently Mocking Kavanaugh's Accuser
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'I believe this is a copy for full transparency'
The first science image from NASA’s TESS exoplanet hunter is mind
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's TESS spacecraft — that stands for Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, in case you had somehow forgotten — is an incredibly powerful tool for spotting distant worlds. It was launched back in April, but it took some time to get the satellite up to speed and begin working on actual science objectives. Now, in a demonstration of its power, NASA is showing off the first science image the satellite has captured, and boy is it a beauty. The image is absolutely packed with stars, taking a half hour to soak in the light and produce the collection of pictures you see below. It watches for tiny dips in the brightness of far-away stars to detect planets moving in front of them, which happens to be a great way to prove the existence of planets outside of our own Solar System. It's a surprisingly straightforward way of spotting planets that are otherwise invisible with current technology, but it requires an incredibly sensitive lens to notice the changes in brightness. “In a sea of stars brimming with new worlds, TESS is casting a wide net and will haul in a bounty of promising planets for further study,” NASA's Paul Hertz, astrophysics division director, said in a statement. “This first light science image shows the capabilities of TESS’ cameras, and shows that the mission will realize its incredible potential in our search for another Earth.” This image was taken of the southern hemisphere, but the spacecraft has a lengthy mission that will see it scan all areas of space. TESS will spend a year or so on the southern hemisphere and then work its way to the northern hemisphere, collecting an immense amount of data and relaying it back to scientists on Earth. That data will be combed and, it's expected, will yield countless new exoplanet discoveries.
Trump Administration Slashes the Number of Refugees the U.S. Will Take in 2019
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump administration is cutting the number of refugees allowed into the United States next year to 30,000.
Brett Kavanaugh Says He's Willing to Speak About Woman's Allegation of Sexual Assault
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The claim could jeopardize his nomination to the Supreme Court
1st Private Moon Flight Passenger to Invite Creative Guests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa said Monday that he plans to blast off on the first-ever commercial trip around the moon and will invite six to eight artists, architects, designers and other creative people on the weeklong journey. The SpaceX Big Falcon Rocket is scheduled to make the trip in 2023, Maezawa and company founder Elon Musk announced at an event Monday at its headquarters near Los Angeles. "I wish to create amazing works of art for humankind," Maezawa said.
People Like You More Than You Think, a New Study Suggests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You're probably already making a good first impression
Seattle skyline turns blue this week to celebrate Allen Institute’s 15th birthday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you see a lot of blue lights around Seattle landmarks this week, it’s not in honor of the Seahawks — this time, the color scheme is paying tribute to another one of Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen’s pet projects, the Allen Institute. Hot spots such as CenturyLink Field, home of the Seahawks; and Columbia Tower, Seattle’s tallest building, will be turning on their cool-blue mood lighting to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the institute’s founding in 2003. The work began with the Allen Institute for Brain Science, and continued with the Allen Institute for Cell Science (founded in 2014) and The… Read More
Grizzly's rare aggressive attack kills 1, puzzles officials
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Grizzly bears aren't docile animals, but an especially aggressive attack that killed a hunting guide and injured his client is puzzling wildlife officials.
Neil deGrasse Tyson Reminds Us Why Smoking Weed in Space Is a Bad Idea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But no astronauts get stoned … at least, they're not supposed to. Practically speaking, sparking up a fire in the oxygen-rich environment of a space station could result in hungry balls of flame spreading in every direction that there's fuel to burn. But spontaneous combustion aside, there are other health risks associated with getting high in a demanding microgravity environment — reasons that Neil deGrasse Tyson, the most famous mustache in astrophysics, recently explained in an interview with a tabloid reporter who asked what it would be like to smoke weed in space.
Diver Who Helped With Thai Cave Rescue Sues Elon Musk for Calling Him a 'Pedo'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Mr. Unsworth is not a pedophile. Mr. Unsworth has never engaged in an act of pedophilia"
FEMA Head Says Numbers 'Are All Over the Place' in Hurricane Maria Death Toll Studies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump tweeted this past week that '3000 people did not die' in Maria
Here’s What Elon Musk Is Charging Tourists to Fly Around the Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
See who's the first space tourist to ride SpaceX's BFR.
Trump seized on Iowa student's slaying to push immigration agenda, but will it help the GOP this fall?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The arrest of an undocumented Mexican immigrant in the murder of University of Iowa student Mollie Tibbetts seemed tailor-made for Republican campaigning in the midterms. But realities on-the-ground show a more complex picture.
Man who walked near boiling
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Yellowstone National Park officials have ticketed a man caught on video wandering close to Old Faithful geyser, where he risked burns from the boiling-hot water that erupts every hour or so.
How one North Carolina town stayed dry during Florence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Neighbors J.W. Raburn and Henry Williams are political polar opposites. Mr. Raburn says he may have been the only one in this sound-side hamlet to have voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. Nearby Oriental, New Bern, and large parts of central North Carolina were devastated when up to 40 inches of rain fell, swelling rivers that are expected to crest later this week.
Kavanaugh twist shows rising influence of MeToo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Just one day after the accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, revealed her identity to The Washington Post, Ms. Conway on Monday said she had it straight from President Trump that Professor Ford should be allowed her say – and with dignity. Ford is willing to appear before Congress, and Conway urged the Senate Judiciary Committee to hear her testimony under oath.
'This Is My Home.' North Carolina Residents Struggle With Evacuation Orders
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In areas of North Carolina hit by flooding from Hurricane Florence, residents were told to evacuate, but many didn't want to.
Woman's Liver Problems Tied to Her Turmeric Supplement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Turmeric supplements are popular these days, but for one woman in Arizona, taking a turmeric supplement may have triggered an uncommon liver problem, according to a new report of the case. What's more, the link between the woman's liver problem and her turmeric supplement use wasn't identified by her doctors — but rather by the woman herself, after she consulted the internet. Until the woman brought it up, her doctors weren't aware that she was taking a turmeric supplement, and the case underscores the need for doctors and patients to communicate about the supplements that patients are taking, the report's authors said.
French, UK fishermen agree 'Scallop Wars' truce
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
French fishermen said they had reached an agreement with their British counterparts on Monday over access to scallop-rich waters in the English Channel, after the long-simmering "Scallop Wars" flared into a high-seas confrontation last month. French fishermen have been incensed that British scallop boats are accessing the fertile waters off the Baie de Seine area of Normandy in northwest France, while French boats are only allowed to fish there between October to May in order to protect stocks. Jim Portus, the chief executive of Britain's South Western Fish Producers Organisation, said it was "a compromise".
Remains of forgotten Soviet space shuttle photographed by urban explorer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a dusty hangar on the steppes of Kazakhstan, one of the last remnants of the Cold War space race, the Soviet space shuttle, lies forgotten. The cosmos was a field of fierce competition for the United States and USSR, which constantly sought to one-up each other with new technological breakthroughs and pioneering missions.  Part of that rivalry is still hidden away at the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the starting point for Soviet and Russian space flights before the new Vostochny cosmodrome was built. The first Soviet space shuttle, which made just one unmanned flight, was destroyed in 2002 when the hangar housing it collapsed, but a second shuttle and test mockup are still intact as if frozen in time, the proud achievement of a country that no longer exists. “A steel bird, born to fly among the stars, has been left trapped in a concrete cage,” Andrei Ghilan, a journalist and urban explorer from Moldova, wrote after photographing the space shuttle in its lonely hangar last month. “Engineers and scientists solved a million problems to lift it into the sky. Now nobody needs the product of their intellect.” The cockpit of the shuttle Credit: mediadrumimages/Andrei Ghilan The Soviet shuttle programme began in 1976 after Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev learned that the United States was building the first winged, reusable space shuttle and declared the USSR must have its own. Military chiefs reportedly viewed the US craft as a military technology, calling it a “space bomber”. The shuttle along with a test model Credit: Andrei Ghilan/mediadrumimages When the Soviet shuttle, called the Buran, or “snowstorm,” finally appeared, it looked remarkably similar to its American counterpart, and for good reason: It was built on the basis of US plans gathered by the KGB. Since Nasa's space shuttle programme wasn't classified, the Soviet Union obtained documents on almost all design aspects from US government databases as it built the Buran.  A ruined hangar at Baikonur Credit: Andrei Ghilan/mediadrumimages But the United States was still far ahead when it launched the first space shuttle in 1981. Seven years later, the USSR finally launched the Buran on an unmanned flight, sending it into orbit and landing it remotely.  But the maiden voyage of the Soviet shuttle was also to be its swan song. After the USSR broke up in 1991, the design bureau that had made the Buran resisted reforms and was not included in the new Russian federal space agency, effectively ending the programme before it had ever really gotten off the ground.  A hatch in the side of the shuttle Credit: Andrei Ghilan/mediadrumimages The second Soviet space shuttle, known as the “Burya” or “Ptichka,” was left orphaned at the Baikonur cosmodrome, with only pigeons and a test model to keep it company, until it was rediscovered in 2015.  Meanwhile, a different test model became a tourist attraction in Moscow, sitting on display at Gorky Park for two decades before being moved to the VDNKh park.  Another test model is located at a technology museum in Speyer, Germany. 
Space telescope TESS takes first science image
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Sep. 17 (Notimex).- NASA's TESS space telescope captured the first science image, which shows a large number of stars and other stellar objects in the southern sky, including systems that have exoplanets. The photography taken with the four wide-field cameras of the spacecraft, for a period of 30 minutes on Tuesday, August 7, includes parts of a dozen constellations, from Capricorn to the Painter's Easel. As well as the large and small Magellanic Clouds, the galaxies closest to ours, in addition to the stars, Beta Gruis and R Doradus, reported the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). In the snapshot a small bright point on the Small Magellanic Cloud can be seen, which is the globular cluster NGC 104, also known as Tucanae 47, located in the constellation of the Toucan. "This strip of the southern hemisphere includes more than a dozen stars that we know have planets in transit based on previous studies of terrestrial observatories," said George Ricker, principal investigator of TESS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). TESS has the task of finding planets outside the solar system, which orbit around stars, for that it will observe almost the whole sky, where it will monitor the brightness of more than 200 thousand stars. The information obtained from this planetary search engine will allow the scientific community to develop future studies to assess the capacity to house life. The satellite will spend two years monitoring 26 study areas for 27 days each, where it will cover 85 percent of the sky. Researchers hope that during the first year of work the ship can map 13 areas of the southern sky, and in the second the same amount in the northern sector. The spacecraft will search for the exoplanets through a phenomenon called transit, in which a planet passes in front of its star, generating a periodic and regular fall in the brightness of the star.  NTX/ICB/MAG/BBF
Scientists May Have Found What Makes Batteries Worse Over Time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It could pave the way for a better electric car or home solar power system.
Humans stay in bad relationships because they are inherently forgiving, study suggests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humans are inherently forgiving, which could explain why people stay in bad relationships and jobs, a study by Oxford University, Yale and University College London has found. A new experiment showed that even when a person takes part in an immoral act, people are ready to dismiss their previous misgivings as soon as they behave correctly. Assistant professor Molly Crockett, at Yale University said: "The brain forms social impressions in a way that can enable forgiveness. "Because people sometimes behave badly by accident, we need to be able to update bad impressions that turn out to be mistaken. "Otherwise, we might end relationships prematurely and miss out on the many benefits of social connection." In a series of experiments, more than 1,500 participants observed the choices of two strangers who faced a moral dilemma - whether to inflict painful electric shocks on another person in exchange for money. While the 'good' stranger mostly refused to shock another person for money, the 'bad' stranger tended to maximise their profits despite the painful consequences. Even if strangers act immorally people are likely to forgive them  Credit: Getty The subjects were asked their impressions of the strangers' moral character and how confident they were about those impressions. The participants  rapidly formed positive impressions of the good stranger, but were less confident in condemning the person making the immoral decisions. And when the bad stranger occasionally made a generous choice, subjects' impressions immediately improved - until they witnessed the stranger's next transgression. Prof Crockett added: “We think our findings reveal a basic predisposition towards giving others, even strangers, the benefit of the doubt. “The human mind is built for maintaining social relationships, even when partners sometimes behave badly.” Lead author and doctoral student Jenifer Siegel at Oxford University said: “The ability to accurately form impressions of others' character is crucial for the development and maintenance of healthy relationships. “We have developed new tools for measuring impression formation, which could help improve our understanding of relational dysfunction.” The research was published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour.
Brett Kavanaugh Can’t Be Trusted. We Know Because We Worked as Counsel to Senators When He Was in the Bush White House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There are now two major questions about the judge's truthfulness to Congress
Republican Swing Vote Sen. Susan Collins Says Kavanaugh and Accuser Should Both Testify
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kavanaugh has denied the sexual misconduct claim, calling it 'completely false'
Trump breaks silence on Kavanaugh allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Monday responded to allegations by a woman who says she was sexually assaulted by his Supreme Court nominee.
New Kavanaugh allegations don’t change the fact that it’s all about politics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The accusations of sexual assault against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh raise questions about the responsibility of mature adults for events in the distant past. But the answers will be provided by politics, not moral philosophy.
Why Arabic is flowering in Israel even as it’s officially demoted
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It was advertised as the largest Arabic lesson in the world. On a summer night in a square in central Tel Aviv, several thousand Israelis heeded the call to attend and found themselves repeating a series of Arabic words and phrases. The lesson was convened as a protest against the controversial new Nation-State law, which, among other measures, removed Arabic from the list of official languages in Israel.
Meanwhile in ... Africa, more young people are being drawn to the sport of fencing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Africa, more young people are being drawn to the sport of fencing. The International Fencing Federation (FIE), lured by the potential of large pools of untapped talent on the continent, is upgrading its facilities there, reports CNN. “There’s been a big leap,” Manyane Sefularo, champion fencer and FIE coach, told CNN about African teams, which have seen expansion in Sierra Leone, Uganda, and Nigeria. “We’re on the right track.” In South Africa, there is particular excitement about promising young talent coming from the townships of Soweto and Mamelodi. 
Amazon’s Bezos clicks on homelessness
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The world’s richest man, Jeff Bezos, is shopping for solutions to homelessness. Last week, the founder of Amazon announced a special fund of around $1 billion to reward nonprofits doing “needle-moving work” in assisting young families without a home.
‘Returnships’: how the cousin of internships is about giving back
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When I was growing up, you might have had an internship or two. Internships are a must if you want to show you have business experience and get a job after graduation. An internship is usually for those ages 15 to 25.
What personality type are you? Scientists finally find the four kinds of human
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Since Hippocrates first suggested personality types might exist in the 4th century BC there have been attempts to group people by their character traits. But despite the claims of self-help gurus and pseudo-psychologists, scientists have largely dismissed the idea that humans can be pigeon-holed into a handful of defined dispositions, until now. Researchers at Northwestern University in Illinois sifted through data from more than 1.5 million questionnaire respondents and found at least four distinct clusters of personality types exist: average, reserved, self-centered and role model. Role models were found to score high in conscientiousness and low in neuroticism  Credit: Northwester University  And good news for parents of teenagers. As people mature, their personality types shift with older people growing more conscientious and agreeable than those under 20 years old. The researchers claim the findings are so important they challenge existing wisdom in psychology. “Personality types only existed in self-help literature and did not have a place in scientific journals,” said study author Luis Amaral, the Erastus Otis Haven Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Northwestern Engineering. “Now, we think this will change because of this study.” The concept of personality types is controversial in psychology, with hard scientific proof difficult to find. Previous attempts to define character groups were largely based on small research groups, which could not be replicated. But the researchers decided to take advantage of a new phenomena of people taking online quizzes to try and learn more about their own personality. For the first time scientists have identified four distinct personality types  The new study used answers from four online questionnaires including the BBC Big Personality Test “The thing that is really, really cool is that a study with a dataset this large would not have been possible before the web,” added Dr Amaral. “Previously, maybe researchers would recruit undergraduates on campus, and maybe get a few hundred people. Now, we have all these online resources available, and now data is being shared.” From those datasets, the team plotted the five widely accepted basic personality traits: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness. The four personality tapes After developing new algorithms, four clusters emerged. Average people, who are high in neuroticism and extraversion, while low in openness, Reserved people who are emotionally stable, but not open or neurotic, as well as Role Models and Self-Centered individuals. “The data came back, and they kept coming up with the same four clusters of higher density and at higher densities than you’d expect by chance, and you can show by replication that this is statistically unlikely,”  said co-author William Revelle, professor of psychology in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. “I like data, and I believe these results. People have tried to classify personality types since Hippocrates’ time, but previous scientific literature has found that to be nonsense. “Now, these data show there are higher densities of certain personality types,” said Revelle, who specializes in personality measurement, theory and research.” To be sure the new clusters of types were accurate, the researchers used a notoriously self-centered group - teenaged boys - to validate their findings “We know teen boys behave in self-centered ways,” added Dr Amaral. “If the data were correct and sifted for demographics, they would they turn out to be the biggest cluster of people.” Young males were found to be overrepresented in the Self-Centered group, while females over 15 years old are vastly underrepresented. The research was published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour,
You've Been Pronouncing Chrissy Teigen's Name All Along and She's Sick of Living the Lie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Chrissy Teigen has an announcement about how everyone' been pronouncing her name wrong.
SpaceX to announce private moon flight passenger
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
HAWTHORNE, Calif. (AP) — SpaceX is on the verge of announcing the name of person who would be the first private passenger on a trip around the moon.