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A Florida woman discovered a treasure trove of rare space documents in the trash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Navy veteran accidentally stumbled upon a number of rare documents and images from the height of the space age — in the trash outside of a home in Florida. Former aviation electrician Yvette Quinn discovered the documents several weeks ago, and turned them over to WKMG News 6, concerned about the information left on the curb. The documents contained notes and images from a variety of projects, including early drones, early renders of lunar modules, the space shuttle, and a Martian spacecraft, in addition to items such as a rare Gemini –Titan II press manual.
New Quantum
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Chinese satellite has split pairs of "entangled photons" and transmitted them to separate ground stations 745 miles (1,200 kilometers) apart, smashing the previous distance record for such a feat and opening new possibilities in quantum communication. In quantum physics, when particles interact with each other in certain ways they become "entangled." This essentially means they remain connected even when separated by large distances, so that an action performed on one affects the other. In a new study published online today (June 15) in the journal Science, researchers report the successful distribution of entangled photon pairs to two locations on Earth separated by 747.5 miles (1,203 km).
This Surgeon and Army Pilot Just Became 1 of NASA's Newest Latino Astronauts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People of Earth…we happily introduce you to America's #NewAstronauts! These 12 humans were selected from more than 18,300 applicants, which is more than double the previous record of 8,000 set in 1978.
Blooming corpse flowers draw crowds in Northern California
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Plant lovers in Northern California are getting a rare treat as two corpse flowers bloom for the first time in a decade.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
Here's why NASA keeps postponing its really cool mission to make glowing clouds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For any space fan, rocket launch delays are a part of life. Certain rocket companies (I'm looking at you SpaceX) are even known for calling off launches somewhat unexpectedly at the last minute. And of course, weather can consistently be a problem. Rockets function at the upper level of our understanding of physics and materials sciences, meaning that even a rogue could throw everything off, destroying millions of dollars of hardware.  SEE ALSO: Watch mesmerizing footage of SpaceX's historic rocket landing But NASA really takes the cake in terms of called off, or "scrubbed," launch attempts with this week's delayed sounding rocket, which is carrying a payload that will create colorful, artificial clouds. The space agency has had to reschedule the suborbital sounding rocket launch more than seven times in the last few weeks. NASA has even called off the rocket's expected launch attempt Friday, and it hasn't yet been rescheduled.  Folks on Twitter haven't exactly been happy about the delay either, dropping into NASA's mentions after launch scrubs to tell the space agency how they really feel.  my favorite place on the internet is canceled nasa launch twitter pic.twitter.com/YxsO8vhszf — Jon Bois (@jon_bois) June 14, 2017 Once the mission actually gets off the ground from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, it'll be pretty amazing. Vapor released from the rocket's payload will create red and blue-green artificial auroras in the sky that will likely be seen from New York to Virginia. The whole mission is designed to help scientists learn more about how to study the ways particles move in space. This very cool mission is part of the problem, however.  "For this type of launch the clear skies requirement makes the criteria a little more stringent," NASA spokesman Keith Koehler said via email. "Clear skies are needed for ground cameras to observe the vapor deployment." On top of that, NASA needs winds to be low, the temperature to be right, and boats to be out of the area where the rocket might splash down in the Atlantic Ocean. It's not just clouds that have been an issue for this rocket launch. Rogue boats in the hazard zone, high winds, and other issues have also forced postponements. So, if NASA ever does get this thing off the ground, you can watch it live online directly through Wallops. And for anyone along the eastern seaboard, be sure to look outside and try to spot those sparkly, artificial clouds.  WATCH: SpaceX did something amazing over the weekend
Author lays out all you need to know about August’s total solar eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you’re planning to witness the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, don’t forget the bubbly. That’s one piece of advice from Seattle’s Bryan Brewer, who’s had five encounters with totality in his lifetime and has written extensively about the eclipse experience. The latest edition of his book, “Eclipse: History. Science. Awe,” is designed to prepare spectators for the upcoming total solar eclipse, which will sweep across the U.S. from Oregon to South Carolina. This will be the first coast-to-coast American solar eclipse in 99 years, and virtually all of North America will see at least a partial eclipse. In his book, Brewer tells… Read More
Spider robots made from drinking straws? That's the latest from Harvard
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why are some of Harvard's sharpest minds messing around with drinking straws? Because they're using them to build air-powered, insect-inspired soft robots. This is why the research is so interesting.
Benefits Of Pukhraj Gemstone: 'The Yellow Cosmic Gift' That Can Alter Your Destiny
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
While there exist a vast range of the astrological gemstones, the name of Yellow Sapphire (variably known as Pukhraj in Indian languages) does not need any special mention. Pukhraj or Yellow Sapphire is widely used as an astrological gemstone to treat a vast range of cosmic and karmic influences. Pukhraj is very powerful and effective.
A computer is frantically giving guinea pigs the cutest names ever
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We interrupt your regularly scheduled Saturday to bring you a truckload of adorably named guinea pigs. In one of modern science’s greatest…
Why Megyn Kelly may help spread Alex Jones's lies even if she calls them bullshit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones will appear Sunday night on Megyn Kelly’s primetime television program on NBC. Name a prominent conspiracy theory in the last five years, and you’ll find Jones stoking its flames on the radio and on his Infowars YouTube programs. As Vox’s Julia Belluz has detailed, he’s peddled the junk science of climate change deniers and anti-vaxxers.
Grand theft avocado: 3 arrested in $300K California theft
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Police are calling it grand theft avocado. Southern California authorities say three produce company workers have been arrested in the theft of up to $300,000 worth of avocados. The Ventura County Sheriff's ...
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
Can My Medication Cause Erectile Dysfunction?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. You might assume that erectile dysfunction, or ED, is a normal problem men face as they age. But because men (and women)...
The top 10 games of E3 2017
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The greatest video game show on Earth has ended, but the hype is just heating up. Nearly 70,000 gamers flooded an overpacked Los Angeles Convention Center for three straight days (not counting a few days of fancy media briefings) of digital insanity, and game makers of all shapes and sizes delivered enough gaming goodness to last a lifetime — or at least until the holidays.
It’s summer on Saturn’s moon Titan, but you wouldn’t want to visit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Cassini spacecraft has been hanging out around Saturn and its moons for over a decade and a half now, and it's seen a lot of really awesome sights during its visit. The planet's moon of Titan has gotten its fair share of attention along the way, and a new photograph captured by Cassini shows the hostile world in detail that we're rarely afforded. It may look like a pretty neat place to go sight-seeing, but you definitely wouldn't want to burn any of your vacation time there. Using images and readings from Cassini and other hardware, researchers believe Titan is similar in many ways to Earth shortly after its formation. The moon is rocky and icy, and the surface is thought to get less than one percent as much light from the Sun as we get here on Earth, due largely to the greater distance as well as the clouds and haze that often shroud Titan's surface. At present, the moon's surface is dotted with vast lakes of methane and ethane, oxygen-breathing creatures would find quite unappealing. However, it's been theorized that life could still exist there, having evolved to breath hydrogen rather than oxygen, and exhaling methane instead of carbon dioxide. Far enough down the road, scientists believe that Titan could actually become a great deal like Earth in its present form, once the Sun transitions to a red giant. At that point, Titan could be much warmer than it is today, allowing liquid water to form on its surface and becoming much more habitable. But don't hold your breath, as that's not expected to actually occur for roughly another five billion years.
Demi Moore's Missing Teeth: Can Stress Really Make Teeth Fall Out?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Actress Demi Moore's smile looked a little different recently — she lost her two front teeth, a problem she says was the result of stress. But how does stress cause teeth to fall out?
A discussion about AI's conflicts and challenges
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thirty five years ago having a PhD in computer vision was considered the height of unfashion, as artificial intelligence languished at the bottom of the trough of disillusionment.Back then it could take a day for a computer vision algorithm to process a single image. How times change."The competition for talent at the moment is absolutely...
New Evidence Points to Jupiter as the Solar System's Oldest Planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
According to a new study, the great gas giant likely formed only a million years after the sun, roughly 50 million years before Earth.
Author lays out all you need to know about August’s all
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you’re planning to witness the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, don’t forget the bubbly. That’s one piece of advice from Seattle’s Bryan Brewer, who’s had five encounters with totality in his lifetime and has written extensively about the eclipse experience. The latest edition of his book, “Eclipse: History. Science. Awe,” is designed to prepare spectators for the upcoming total solar eclipse, which will sweep across the U.S. from Oregon to South Carolina. This will be the first coast-to-coast American solar eclipse in 99 years, and virtually all of North America will see at least a partial eclipse. In his book, Brewer tells… Read More
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
Parkinson's May Begin in Gut Before Affecting the Brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Parkinson's disease, which involves the malfunction and death of nerve cells in the brain, may originate in the gut, new research suggests, adding to a growing body of evidence supporting the idea. The new study shows that a protein in nerve cells that becomes corrupted and then forms clumps in the brains of people with Parkinson's can also be found in cells that line the small intestine. The research was done in both mice and human cells.
Air Pollution From Wildfire Smoke A Serious Problem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wildfires pollute the air more than scientists thought with particles that are dangerous to human hearts and lungs as well as the environment.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
The Truth About Supplements for Your Heart
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Walk into any pharmacy or health-food store and you’ll see shelves of dietary supplements that promise to help your heart, such as omega-3, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), and red yeast rice. Proponents cl...
It’s time to explore Uranus and Neptune again — and here's how NASA could do it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A group of researchers from NASA and various US universities have come up with plans to explore two of the least visited planets in our Solar System: Uranus and Neptune. To fix that, researchers released a report this week detailing four different types of missions that could be sent to Uranus and Neptune sometime in the next decade or so. “The curious thing about Uranus and Neptune is that, although they look very similar, something about their interiors is actually quite a bit different,” Jonathan Fortney, a professor at UC Santa Cruz and one of the authors on the report, tells The Verge.
An Arab thinker invented economic theory 400 years before Adam Smith did
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When students study economics they learn, early on, that Adam Smith is the “father of modern economics.” This idea is one of the most basic facts of western economics—but it doesn’t stack up. A recent article in evonomics highlights the overlooked work of 14th century North African scholar Ibn Khaldun, who outlined strikingly similar ideas…
What Can Animal Play Teach Us About Children's Education?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Debate rages over whether it’s better for children to start academic-style learning techniques at a young age or be allowed to learn through their own play. This boosts the evidence that play’s natural function may be to facilitate learning and development. In our study, we compared the amount that different primate species (including humans, chimpanzees and gorillas) play to the size of a part of the brain known as the cortico-cerebellar system.
Will Congress let Mary Klein decide how to die?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Last year, Washington, D.C., became the seventh jurisdiction in the United States to legalize what here was called Death With Dignity.
Readers write: Budget reporting, golf changes, child's viewpoint
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The very useful article on the latest White House budget proposal, the June 5 OneWeek piece “Trump budget reflects GOP values,” is a smart model of the broad perspective and balance so greatly needed in news reporting today. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? Regarding the April 28 article “Why pro golf’s rule changes aren’t so leisurely this time” (CSMonitor.com): It’s great to see genuine common sense (and decency) triumph, and to do so quickly.
Terror response must go beyond policing social media, US Paris accord withdrawal can benefit climate change movement, only Qatar's action can mend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The third fatal terrorist incident in England in three months ... has sparked demands for a more effective response...,” states an editorial. “The government has social media in its sights, blaming it for giving space for extremist ideology to ‘breed’.... Tech giants are facing increasing pressure over patchy policing of violent and hate speech, with European regulatory data showing Twitter has failed to take down most hate-speech posts, while Facebook and YouTube have done better but not well enough. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
ANALYSIS: Rolls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just ahead of the Paris air show, Rolls-Royce today completed a significant step in preparations for its next generation of commercial aircraft engines.
Inbred California Pumas Need Help From Humans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Urban development has isolated a clan of pumas and caused them to become genetically inbred -- and they need humans to save them from dying out.
Are Left
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hand preference is a manifestation of brain function and is therefore related to cognition.
The legacy of Richard Nixon's presidency: Part 11
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nixon spent the rest of his life fighting the release of thousands of hours of his recorded conversations and personal papers.
Boeing, Airbus take dogfight to Paris Air Show
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The aircraft industry descends on Paris Monday for the world's biggest airshow, a prime battleground for bitter rivals Boeing and Airbus, but also a chance for new kids on the block to snap at the heels of the two giants. Single-aisle planes for short and medium distances are the hottest ticket in the world's civil aviation industry, with airline demand for models in the Airbus A320 family giving the European company an edge, for now, over its American opponent which is racing to return in force to the mid-range segment. Boeing, meanwhile, is to showcase the 737 Max 9 model as its anti-Airbus weapon in a market segment where the capacity to squeeze a few more seats into a narrow-body cabin while eking out increased fuel efficiency over greater ranges is key.
Cover
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Senate voted to establish a committee to investigate the alleged political espionage in Nixon's election campaign.
Amazon Charts Future of Food Shopping with Whole Foods Deal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Amazon's plan to acquire Whole Foods conjures new possibilities for how consumers buy food. Think drone deliveries of o...
'Wired' Roads Could Power Electric Cars As You Drive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new wireless power system could help people avoid the inevitable jumbled mess of tangled cords and offer a more efficient way to charge electric vehicles on the go, according to a new study. Researchers at Stanford University adapted a concept from quantum physics to produce a wireless charger that does something other wireless chargers cannot: automatically tune the frequency of the radio wave — the medium that transfers the power — to account for changes in the distance between the charging pad and the device. "The range is perfect for electric cars," Sid Assawaworrarit, a doctoral candidate in electrical engineering at Stanford University, told Live Science.
Air Force Rethinks Military Space Plan After Bezos Rocket Component Blows Up
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Setbacks at Elon Musk's SpaceX and Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin may have led the Air Force to rethink how it is funding next-generation access to space.
Harvard is building air
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why are some of Harvard's sharpest minds messing around with drinking straws? Because they're using them to build air-powered, insect-inspired soft robots. This is why the research is so interesting.
Elon Musk Thinks He Has a Way to Make Colonizing Mars Cheaper
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The CEO of SpaceX says he can drive down the cost of space travel â and he isn't alone in his endeavors.
Michael Phelps' latest challenge: 'Shark Week'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
"Shark Week" has a new star attraction: Michael Phelps.
How close are we to a real Star Trek
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One day doctors could instantly diagnose your illness with a handheld device.
Climate change efforts still 'not nearly enough' to meet Paris targets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new clean energy report has a mixed outlook for the future: Wind and solar power will soar in coming decades, but we'll still be heading toward dangerous levels of global warming.  The big takeaway from Bloomberg New Energy Finance's (BNEF) latest analysis is that, despite the explosive growth we'll see in renewables — thanks to plummeting prices and improving technology — our current efforts simply aren't sufficient to curb greenhouse gas emissions in the long-term. This is true regardless of whether President Donald Trump pulls the United States from the international Paris Agreement on climate change, though certainly it will be even harder to reduce emissions if that happens, said Colleen Regan, a BNEF analyst who contributed to the new report. SEE ALSO: How clean energy is transforming the world, in 5 charts Analysts considered existing energy policies, observed electricity prices, and price projections to forecast how the global electricity sector might look by 2040. It assumes governments and companies will build the "least-cost" power system possible. "We see that wind and solar become some of the least-cost options in the 2020s, and that does lead to a significant amount of wind and solar build," Regan said. Chinese workers install solar panels in Wuhan, China.Image: kevin frayer/Getty ImagesThose two sources alone could account for 48 percent of installed electricity capacity and 34 percent of electricity output worldwide in around two decades — up from today's 12 percent and 5 percent, respectively, the report found. Renewable energy as a whole could attract $7.4 trillion in global investment by 2040. That's about three-fourths of the total $10.2 trillion that will be spent on new power generation capacity. About one-fourth of global greenhouse gas emissions come from burning coal, oil, and natural gas for electricity and heat, making it the biggest single source of emissions. Yet all those developments won't be sufficient to prevent global temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above pre-industrial levels, analysts said, meaning that central goal of the Paris Agreement likely won't be met. Image: NASA GISSThe BNEF report says global emissions from electricity will likely hit their peak in 2026 as governments and companies shift away from coal and toward lower-carbon sources, such as wind and solar power, in step with the promises of the agreement.  After peaking, emissions will decline by 1 percent per year out to 2040. That's in contrast with the International Energy Agency's forecast, which expects emissions to steadily rise for decades to come. Yet this rate of decline "is not nearly enough for the climate," according to the report. The 2-degree target is the line scientists say we can't cross if we're going to avoid catastrophic changes in sea level rise, extreme weather events, precipitation patterns, and other effects. Still, the report doesn't mean the world is locked into these projections, or that the Paris treaty is entirely futile. It just means we'll need to devote far more time and money to fighting climate change than we do today. And despite the monumental task, the world is already making significant progress in shifting toward a lower-carbon energy mix. In its annual report this week, energy giant BP pointed to the rapid rise of solar and wind power and the long-term decline of coal. Solar power generation jumped 29.6 percent, while wind power grew by 15.6 percent, according to BP. Coal production, meanwhile, fell by a "whopping" 6.2 percent. The U.S. hit its own clean energy milestone this spring.  #Wind and #solar in March 2017 accounted for 10% of U.S. #electricity generation for first time https://t.co/DaL3jl7rEw #PV #energy pic.twitter.com/Q5HMkhQhA9 — EIA (@EIAgov) June 14, 2017 For the first time, monthly electricity generation from wind and solar exceeded 10 percent of total U.S. generation, based on March data, the U.S. Energy Information Administration reported. That's up from 7 percent for all of 2016. Globally, carbon emissions have remained essentially flat for the last three years thanks to rising renewable and energy efficiency projects, and to a lesser extent because of sluggish economic growth, BP said. Countries still have a long way to go to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. But even if we're not moving fast enough, we're heading in the right direction, according to these reports. WATCH: The world's largest solar tower is being built in Israel
Health Care Declassified: Behind the Senate’s secrecy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The words on everyone’s lips in Washington in recent weeks have been health care, as congressional Republicans work to craft a bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. Enter Yahoo News’ Health Care Declassified, where we will attempt to take you inside this often complicated debate, dispelling myths and giving you the facts about how Congress will affect your health care coverage. Following in the footsteps of their House colleagues, who passed the Affordable Health Care Act, Republicans in the Senate are carefully guarding the drafting process and expect to offer Americans affected by the law little opportunity to learn what the new bill will mean for their coverage.
The story behind President Trump’s ‘little bit sassy’ Oval Office photo with a queer teacher
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rhode Island teacher Nikos Giannopoulos brought some unique flair to the Oval Office when he met with President and Melania Trump.
How to govern under legal cloud? A one
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s very difficult, because no matter what, you walk into an office to discuss something, and they want to discuss the scandal, even as an ally,” says Patrick Griffin, who ran legislative affairs for former President Bill Clinton from 1994 to 1996. Two decades later, the same advice applies to a Trump White House struggling to enact major legislation amid intensifying FBI and congressional investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and possible collaboration by Trump associates. On Friday, President Trump appeared to confirm that he personally is under investigation, following news reports this week that he faces scrutiny over whether he obstructed justice on the Russia matter.