World News
IN SHORT
Thursday, February 22, 2018

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
FBI Admits It Failed to Investigate Tip About Accused Florida School Shooter in January
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A tipster warned the FBI in January of Nikolas Cruz and the "potential of him conducting a school shooting," a statement said.
On the Battlefield, Ants Treat Each Other's War Wounds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These same ants, a species called Megaponera analis, were observed last year bringing their injured back to the nest, but no one knew what happened to the wounded ants after that, said study leader Erik Frank, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland.
White House insists latest Russia indictments prove 'NO COLLUSION'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The White House declared that the latest charges from the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election proved there was “NO COLLUSION” between President Trump’s campaign and Moscow-tied operatives.
The deserts of Namibia: Life and photography on nature's terms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Veteran photographer Gordon Donovan, Yahoo's Photo Editor, has returned from the huge open spaces of Namibia with some searingly candid images of great cats, pachyderms, zebra and giraffes on their home turf.
As Mueller moves forward, lingering questions about Comey and Clinton
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The challenge facing Special Counsel Robert Mueller in his investigation of President Trump and his associates extends beyond determining whether there was a conspiracy with Russians to meddle in the 2016 election or an attempt to obstruct the FBI’s investigation. In a larger sense, Mr. Mueller must confront the grim prospect that whatever his final conclusions in the Trump-Russia investigation, they will likely be met with suspicion – and possibly rejection – by a significant portion of the country. Rhetoric surrounding the investigation has grown increasingly bitter as members of Congress promote sharply divergent narratives to explain the unfolding confrontation.
The stark message behind Mueller indictment of 13 Russians
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday indicted 13 Russians, and three Russian organizations, with meddling in the 2016 US election. The charges centered on the alleged use of social media to sow political discord, via inserting politically charged messages into the stream of American electronic discourse.
Apple Employees Keep Smacking Into Their New Headquarters' Glass Walls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The "spaceship" building has caused some headaches, to say the least
People Are Sharing the Most Relatable Memes to Explain Why They Didn't Make the Olympics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If only pancake eating were an Olympic sport.
Apple's most recent iOS update deletes Easter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Easter and other major Christian and Jewish holidays have disappeared from Apple's iCal app for iPhone users running iOS 11.2.5. It's unclear if the missing Jewish holidays and lack of a Christian calendar are a software glitch or an oversight on Apple's part.
CDC Estimates This Year's Flu Vaccine Is Only 36 Percent Effective
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But you should still get vaccinated
NASA is going to return an ancient Mars rock to its home planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An incredibly old Martian relic will soon be headed back from the planet where it originated thanks to the Mars 2020 mission. The space agency is planning on taking a piece of the meteorite known as Sayh al Uhaymir (SaU008) and including it in their highly-anticipated rover adventure to the Red Planet. The rock, which was part of a larger meteorite discovery back in 1999, is thought to have originated on Mars. A chunk of the planet is believed to have been blown off into space by an impact, and the debris found its way to Earth. Now it will play a vital role is helping to calibrate the scientific tools on board the all-new rover. "Mars 2020's goal is ambitious: collect samples from the Red Planet's surface that a future mission could potentially return to Earth," NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory explains. "One of the rover's many tools will be a laser designed to illuminate rock features as fine as a human hair." That's great, but in order for the system to work up to its full potential it needs to be calibrated after landing on the Martian surface using some type of hard material. So, in the spirit of the red planet, JPL scientists decided that using an actual piece of Mars from here on Earth would be the perfect test candidate. "We're studying things on such a fine scale that slight misalignments, caused by changes in temperature or even the rover settling into sand, can require us to correct our aim," JPL's Luther Beegle explains. "By studying how the instrument sees a fixed target, we can understand how it will see a piece of the Martian surface." The rock should work perfectly for the test, and NASA sending it to Mars will mark another huge first for the space agency. Never before has material from another planet been returned by humans, and while that might seem like a meaningless statistic, it's still a monumental achievement in the grand scheme of space exploration.
Read Mueller's full indictment against 13 Russians charged with election meddling
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The U.S. Department of Justice announced charges on Friday against 13 Russians and three Russian entities for allegedly carrying out an elaborate plot to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.
After Parkland, a new generation uses its voice against guns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Students who survived the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., speak out for gun control on Facebook and Twitter.
Dozen day care workers say parent's cookies made them high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BANGOR, Maine (AP) — The director of a Maine day care says cookies dropped off by a parent as a Valentine's Day treat left about dozen staff members feeling high.
San Francisco firefighters rescue 2 dogs from cliff
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — It's usually cats in trees that need a firefighter's help but not Friday, when two dogs were rescued by San Francisco firefighters after sliding halfway down a cliff.
After large
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Charitable giving in the United States went up 4 percent last year, a nice jump after near-zero growth the year before, according to the Blackbaud Institute. One reason may be a new trend in giving: With more places suffering mass killing of innocent people, whether in Iraqi cities or in American schools, charities seek to heal individuals and communities of the trauma from such large-scale violence. Humanitarian aid in the form of emotional and spiritual support is as necessary as physical relief and restoration.
How post
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
First to grab headlines was the launching last weekend of an Iranian drone from western Syria into Israel for the first time. Israel shot it down, then lost one of its own F-16 jet fighters – the first such loss in decades – to a Syrian anti-aircraft missile after striking the drone’s home base. The Israeli Air Force retaliated for the downed jet, targeting eight Syrian and four Iranian positions inside Syria, and claiming to destroy half of Syria’s air-defense capacity.
When the Barrier Between Personal Misconduct and Professional Competence Crumbles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Till now, the court of public opinion has been harsher on women than on men, but the rules are now changing thanks to the #MeToo movement.
How to Wish Someone a 'Happy Lunar New Year' in Chinese
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And it’s not just "gong hei fat choy"
Stocks Rise for Maker of AR
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The company's shares closed up 1.49%, netting the company an additional $8.8 million on the day.
Russian cargo ship docks at International Space Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An unmanned Russian cargo ship has docked successfully at the International Space Station, delivering a fresh batch of supplies for the crew
Time is running out for Haitian women and girls in U.S. as refugees
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
For nearly 60,000 Haitians refugees in the U.S., protected status will end on July 22, 2019. But the conditions that drove them out of their country still exist. Women in particular are at risk from endemic sexual exploitation and violence. Here's the story of one of these women.
Is Maryland ready to rid 'Northern scum' from state song?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Maryland lawmakers who support changing the official state song think the time is right to finally wipe "Northern scum," and other pre-Civil War phrases out of it.
More than glitter: How US women pin Nordic medal hopes on teamwork
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Not so long ago, the idea of Americans winning an Olympic medal in Nordic skiing was about as heretical as the thought of a Norwegian team winning the Super Bowl. Or that Norwegian skiers were national celebrities with a team budget 14 times bigger than that of the Americans, who still do their own dishes at training camps and are virtually unknown at home. Now they’re gunning for an Olympic medal, and their best shot is in the next two events: the 4x5 km relay on Saturday, and the team sprint next Wednesday.
SpaceX’s Satellite Broadband Plans Gets Key Endorsement From FCC Chair
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk wants to launch over 4,000 satellites into orbit to support the broadband service.
Why woman says she pleaded guilty in fiance's kayak death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"They said, 'Chance to go away for life, take a plea and get out in December. What do you want to do?'" Angelika Graswald told ABC News' "20/20."
Divided Senate Rejects Immigration Plan to Help 'Dreamers'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A divided Senate rejected a bipartisan plan to help young "Dreamer" immigrants and parcel out money for the wall Trump wants with Mexico
NASA Kepler's K2 Mission Scientists Discover 95 New Planets Beyond Our Solar System
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA’s K2 mission—the current focus of the Kepler spacecraft—has revealed 95 new planets beyond our solar system. An international team of scientists analyzed 275 possible exoplanets. The discovery, published Thursday in the Astronomical Journal, is good news for scientists trying to figure out what planets beyond our solar system might be like.
Roses, Hearts and Colliding Stars: The Best Romantic Space Pictures to Share This Valentine's Day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Newsweek has selected the very best cosmic flowers, hearts and even jewelry to woo your sweetheart with this Valentine’s Day. The Rosette nebula sits some 5,000 light years away from Earth. Forget a bunch of roses—what about 2,500 glowing stars?
The ‘Screaming Mummy’ Was a Murderer Who Killed Himself
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Prince Pentawere, a man who tried (probably successfully) to murder his own father, Pharaoh Ramesses III, and later took his own life after he was put on trial, is now on public display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. No embalming fluid was used, and his body was allowed to naturally mummify, with his mouth agape and his facial muscles strained in order to make it appear as if the mummy were screaming. Eventually, someone placed Pentawere's mummy in a cache of other mummies in a tomb at Deir el-Bahari.
Blackface skit in China's new year gala sparks racism accusations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A skit on China's widely-watched Lunar New Year gala on state television featuring a Chinese actress made up to appear African has provoked accusations of racism online. The actress, Lou Naiming, appeared on stage in colorful garb with her face and arms colored brown, carrying a fruit basket on her head, and accompanied by someone costumed as a monkey. A black woman playing her daughter declares that she wants to study in China but is worried her mother will not agree.
White nose syndrome is killing millions of bats via a contagious fungus – here's how to stop it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ultra-violet (UV) light can destroy a fungus that's devastating the animals in North America.
Bode Miller Apologizes After Facing Backlash for Saying Marriage Is Bad for Female Skiers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Olympic skiing medalist turned commentator said he made an ill-advised attempt at a joke
Suspect Went to Walmart and McDonald's After Killing 17, Police Say: The Latest on the Florida School Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The suspected gunman, a former student, has been taken into custody
3 of 4 kids who've died from flu this year weren't vaccinated, say federal doctors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Of the 63 American children killed by the flu virus so far this season, just 13 had been vaccinated.  Top government doctors — including the Surgeon General, Secretary of Health and Human Services, and acting head of the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) — found this lack of vaccination so alarming that late Thursday afternoon they offered a joint briefing on the matter. "Getting the flu shot is the same kind of sensible precaution as buckling your seatbelt," said Health Secretary Alex Azar. SEE ALSO: We saw this deadly 'Hong Kong' flu coming, but no one could prevent its spread Before today, the effectiveness of this season's vaccine wasn't officially known, but now the CDC says the vaccine is 36 percent effective, overall. "Imagine if you could cut your chances of being in a car crash by 36 percent," said Azar.  The top heads of the U.S. health departments didn't openly state concerns that some Americans might not be vaccinating themselves or their children due to an unfounded wariness about the flu vaccine. They did, however, underscore that the flu shot should not be feared. "The vaccination is safe. Let me say that again — the flu vaccine is safe," said U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams. This #flu season, make sure love is the only thing in the air. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. https://t.co/8Sc7GaIUV6 #ValentinesDay pic.twitter.com/7FvjfbwEDQ — CDC Flu (@CDCFlu) February 14, 2018 To emphasize this point, both Adams and Secretary Azar said their own children had been vaccinated against the flu. Azar also noted that President Trump and all the medical experts on the stage had been vaccinated.  This flu season has been particularly severe. For the last week of confirmed data (Jan. 28 through Feb. 3), the CDC reported the highest rate of hospitalization for flu ever recorded since the current system was implemented in 2005.  "I know it’s been a scary flu season," said acting CDC Director Anne Schuchat, who gave the statistic that three of four children killed by flu had not been vaccinated.  Schuchat said that the levels of people reporting influenza-like Illness, or ILI, are "around" what the U.S. experienced during the H1N1 pandemic in 2009. However, "it doesn’t mean we’re having a pandemic right now," she clarified. A flu pandemic, according to the CDC, involves an outbreak of a new infectious virus. This year, all the strains are known, even expected. But this season's dominant strain, known as H3N2 or the "Hong Kong" flu, is especially virulent because it tends to mutate more than other strains, rendering our vaccines less effective.  Although the flu vaccine in the U.S. is 36% effective overall, Schuchat said it's been only 25 percent effective against H3N2, but over 60 percent effective against H1N1.  "We do continue to recommend getting the vaccine even this late in the season," Schuchat said. Although the vaccine may not stop the flu, it will bolster the body's immune response against the virus, tempering its effects. This can help avoid hospitalization for severe symptoms, or at worst, death.  "This flu season continues to be extremely challenging and intense," said Schuchat. "All indication is that flu activity remains high and is likely to continue for several more weeks." It's not too late to get your shot.  WATCH: Your next flu shot may be replaced with this patch   
5 Places Where People Live the Longest and Healthiest Lives
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These areas are known as Blue Zones
Indian state warns local firms over spread of unauthorised Monsanto GM cotton
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A top Indian cotton-growing state has told two local companies that seeds they sold to farmers may have contained traces of an unapproved GM strain from Monsanto, according to government notices seen by Reuters that warn of action against the firms. U.S. agrochemicals company Monsanto Co told Reuters late last year that local seed companies have attempted to "incorporate unauthorised and unapproved herbicide-tolerant technologies into their seeds" for profit, leading to the proliferation of illegal seeds, according its own internal investigation and that by the southern state of Andhra Pradesh. Indian seed firms deny this.
Politics Threatened to Overshadow the Winter Olympics. The Athletes Wouldn't Let That Happen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The drama of cable news gave way to the joy of the athletes themselves
Cecile Richards: 'Reproductive Justice and Immigrant Justice Are Part of the Same Fight'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Planned Parenthood leader advocates for Dreamers
Steve Bannon Refuses to Answer Some Questions From House Russia Probe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Steve Bannon declined to answer some questions Thursday during a closed-door meeting with the House panel conducting a Russia probe
What to Know About the NSA Shooting at Fort Meade: 3 Injured, Including NSA Officer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Authorities are investigating an apparent shooting that broke out at a National Security Agency checkpoint in Fort Meade, Md.
'I’m F
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"My school is being shot up and I am locked inside"
Police Are Responding to a Shooting at a Florida High School
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The number of wounded is unclear
After Florida, is the tide finally turning on gun control?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
From Governor Rick Scott's suggestion that guns should be kept from the mentally ill to a Florida vigil where chants of "no more guns" erupted, there are signs America may be ready for action.
How to Make Friends as an Adult — and Why It's Important
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It will be worth it for your health and happiness
People Have Believed a Lie About Rabbit Domestication for Decades
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It is often said, in both popular articles and scientific papers, that rabbits were first domesticated by French monks in 600 AD. Back then, Pope Gregory the Great had allegedly decreed that laurices—newborn or fetal rabbits—didn’t count as meat. Christians could therefore eat them during Lent. They became a popular delicacy, and hungry monks started breeding them. Their work transformed the wild, skittish European rabbit into a tame domestic animal that tolerates humans.
Trump Says Classmates Knew Florida Shooting Suspect 'Was a Big Problem' and Should Have Reported Him
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"So many signs that the Florida shooter was mentally disturbed"
Elon Musk's Broadband
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk’s SpaceX moved closer to another orbital frontier as regulators advanced its application for a low-orbit constellation of satellites -- and to join a field of operators from Canada, Norway and ...
The Florida School Shooting Was One of Several This Year. And It’s Only February
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At least 17 people were killed in the Florida school shooting
Amy Schumer Just Got Married. But She Wants to Talk About Gun Control Instead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Schumer addressed the Parkland school shooting on Instagram