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JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Octopuses don’t hang out in posses, or at least that’s what marine biologists thought. Now, however, after spotting a convention of thousands of such cephalopods deep in the seas of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary in California on Oct. 23, scientists might have to rethink this contention. The discovery on the West Coast is…
Apple Made a Great New MacBook. But That's Not What It Wants You to Buy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Is Apple's coolest PC the new iPad Pro?
People Have Really Strong Opinions About Whether Candy Corn Is Gross or Not
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I’d rather take a bite out of a scented candle than eat candy corn"
NASA retires its planet hunter, the Kepler space telescope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Kepler space telescope has run out of fuel and will be retired after a 9-1/2-year mission in which it detected thousands of planets beyond our solar system and boosted the search for worlds that might harbour alien life, NASA said on Tuesday. The telescope laid bare the diversity of planets that reside in our Milky Way galaxy, with findings indicating that distant star systems are populated with billions of planets, and even helped pinpoint the first moon known outside our solar system. The Kepler telescope discovered more than 2,600 of the roughly 3,800 exoplanets - the term for planets outside our solar system - that have been documented in the past two decades.
China's Reversal of a Rhino Horn and Tiger Bones Ban Alarms Conservationists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Activists say the move will further jeopardize already imperiled species
‘They Were the Yin and Yang of Each Other.’ Pittsburgh Says Goodbye to ‘Inseparable’ Brothers Gunned Down at Tree of Life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hundreds of mourners paid their respects to the intellectually disabled men
People were eating chocolate way earlier than scientists previously thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Halloween is just days away, and if you haven't already dug into a big bowl of candy you probably will within the next 72 hours or so. But while you're munching away on that Hershey's bar, spare a thought for the first humans who made it all possible. In a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, researchers reveal new archaeological evidence that suggests cacao, the plant that chocolate is made from, was being farmed far earlier than was previously assumed. The scientists now believe that the plant was being used as a crop as far back as 5,300 years ago, as opposed to 3,900 years ago as had long been believed. The study focused on artifacts from dig sites located in South America that have produced pottery and other items believed to date back as far as 5,300 years. On one piece of ceramic containers, researchers were able to detect traces of a compound found in cacao as well as DNA fragments matching the cacao tree. “This new study shows us that people in the upper reaches of the Amazon basin, extending up into the foothills of the Andes in southeastern Ecuador, were harvesting and consuming cacao that appears to be a close relative of the type of cacao later used in Mexico—and they were doing this 1,500 years earlier,” Michael Blake, co-author of the study and professor with the University of British Columbia, said in a statement. “They were also doing so using elaborate pottery that pre-dates the pottery found in Central America and Mexico. This suggests that the use of cacao, probably as a drink, was something that caught on and very likely spread northwards by farmers growing cacao in what is now Colombia and eventually Panama and other parts of Central America and southern Mexico.” It's kind of wild to think that the plant that ultimately made Halloween (and so many other occasions) so tasty was being consumed in one way or another as far back as 5,000+ years ago, but that seems to be what history is telling us.
About 1,000 brooding octopuses found off California coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MONTEREY, Calif. (AP) — Scientists exploring the sea floor off the coast of central California for deep-water coral and sponges instead found an unprecedented sight: Hundreds of octopuses tucked between rocks with their tentacles inverted and covering groups of white eggs — a posture that is common among brooding females.
6 days until the midterm elections: Where things stand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Central American migrant caravan is an issue in states far from the U.S. border with Mexico, and Florida is poised to return voting rights to convicted felons.
Economy depends on environment, WWF warns Brazil's Bolsonaro
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brasília (AFP) - If Brazil's far-right President-elect Jair Bolsonaro wants to make good on his promise to reboot the economy, he should stop his attacks on the environment, according to the World Wildlife Fund. The former army captain, who won the giant Latin American country's election Sunday, will merge the agriculture and environment ministries, an adviser confirmed Tuesday -- infuriating environmentalists, who warn the latter will be neutered by business interests. Bolsonaro, who is backed by the powerful agro-industry lobby, has vowed not to let the environment get in the way of kick-starting a flagging economy.
'Super coral' scientist dies in Hawaii at age 56
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
HONOLULU (AP) — Pioneering coral reef scientist Ruth Gates, who dedicated much of her career to saving the world's fragile and deteriorating underwater reef ecosystems, has died. She was 56.
Neil Armstrong's huge souvenir collection to be auctioned
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New York (AFP) - Talk about a pack rat: thousands of things that Neil Armstrong saved over the course of a career that saw him become the first man to walk on the moon will be auctioned off this week.
Brazil's Bolsonaro gets to work on hardline agenda
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brazil's far-right President-elect Jair Bolsonaro started rolling out key points in his hardline agenda Tuesday, including a move to merge the agriculture and environment ministries that activists warned would imperil the Amazon rainforest. The former army captain huddled with his inner circle at the home of a wealthy backer in Rio de Janeiro to start forming what advisor Gustavo Bebianno called "a combat vanguard" for the new administration. The protesters marched in the evening with a banner reading "Dictatorship, never again" -- a reference to Bolsonaro's outspoken admiration for the brutal military regime that ruled Brazil from 1964 to 1985.
Joe Kennedy praises Republican in close House race, but endorses Democrat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rep. Joe Kennedy III picks an odd time to praise Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, and the campaign of her Democratic challenger, Carolyn Long, issues a response.
RISE UP: CELEBRATING YOUNG LEADER ACTIVISTS – Reyna Montoya, age 27
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
From the civil rights movement to the Vietnam War protests and the fight for women’s rights, the youth of America have been at the forefront of leading and advocating for social change, and the young people of today are no different. In a new series titled RISE UP: Celebrating Young Leader Activists, Yahoo News profiles five up-and-coming leaders from the Gen Z and millennial generations, with our second installment featuring 27-year-old Reyna Montoya of Gilbert, Az. In 2003, when Reyna Montoya was 13 years old, her family fled their homeland of Mexico for the safety and security of the United States.
Steve King's terrible, horrible, no good, very bad Tuesday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After 16 years of tolerating his outrageous and offensive comments, it appears that the Republican Party has finally reached its limit with Iowa Rep. Steve King.
Pittsburgh comes together to mourn victims, and protesters turn their backs on Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump walk past a memorial as they pay their respects at the Tree of Life Synagogue following last weekend’s shooting in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 30, 2018. – Scores of protesters took to the streets of Pittsburgh to denounce a visit by US President Donald Trump in the wake of a mass shooting at a synagogue that left 11 people dead. PITTSBURGH — As the Jewish community of Squirrel Hill began to bury its dead Tuesday from the massacre in the Tree of Life synagogue Saturday, President Trump paid his respects, in a visit few had requested and many opposed.
Boy Meets World's 'Mr. Feeny' Comes Through Again By Thwarting Home Burglary Attempt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
91-year-old actor William Daniels and his wife are both safe
'Does it Fart?' Authors Drop Book Number Two, 'True or Poo?'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Clearly, there are plenty of odd animal stories that are ripe for cataloging or debunking. The Definitive Field Guide to Filthy Animal Facts and Falsehoods" (Hachette Books, Oct. 23, 2018), they explore a wider range of riveting animal repulsiveness. "We were thinking, 'People really like farts, and people really like gross animal stories.' We kind of realized there was a big appetite for that," she said.
The Scientific Reason Why You Can't Stop Eating Halloween Candy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sugar isn't the only ingredient to blame
More Than 90% of Generation Z Is Stressed Out. And Gun Violence Is Partly To Blame
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
According to a new survey
President Trump Arrives in Pittsburgh to Mixed Feelings as City Mourns After Synagogue Massacre
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump came to pay tribute Tuesday to those touched by the worst instance of anti-Semitic violence in American history, traveling to a city where he faced an uneasy welcome from those grieving.
Hawaii Supreme Court upholds permit for giant telescope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii's Supreme Court upheld a decision to grant a construction permit for an embattled, international giant telescope project planned for a mountain Native Hawaiians consider sacred.
Why Did Donna Strickland Not Have a Wikipedia Page?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This Nobel Prize winning physicist was denied a strong online presence in May.
NASA’s Kepler telescope, identifier of distant Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Since its launch in March 2009, NASA’s Kepler telescope has identified new worlds far, far away. But today, its work comes to an end; NASA announced this afternoon (Oct. 30) that the telescope is out of fuel and will retire. In its nine years of operation, Kepler identified over 2,600 new planets outside our solar…
The Elizabeth Warren DNA debate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Warren released DNA test results that she says reveal she has Native American ancestry and told President Trump to pony up the $1 million charitable donation he promised months ago if she could prove her heritage.
Billionaires fund progressives, fight conspiracies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Billionaire donors to Democratic candidates are finding that their dollars are in high demand, even as many of those same candidates denounce the influence of money in politics. That is the paradox hounding some of the Democrats’ most visible progressive candidates in the 2018 midterms, including Beto O’Rourke, Stacey Abrams and Andrew Gillum.
Justice Kavanaugh declines more than $600,000 raised in GoFundMe campaign
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Citing ethics concerns, Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh declined more than $600,000 donated to aid his family during the firestorm over sexual misconduct allegations that plagued his confirmation.
Remembering the victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue attack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The victims of the deadliest attack on Jews in U.S. history were doctors and dentists, accountants and academics, and retirees and senior citizens who didn’t let age get in their way. All 11 shared a dedication to the Tree of Life synagogue, where they were killed Saturday in a shooting rampage.
Protesters jeer Trump in Pittsburgh
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump was greeted by protesters during his visit Tuesday to Pittsburgh, where he traveled to pay his respects after last weekend’s massacre at the Tree of Life synagogue that left 11 worshipers dead.
Halloween arrives, and Canadians embrace the season wholeheartedly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
New to Toronto, I get asked many questions: about how I find the schools or the public transportation system. “Have you ever experienced Halloween in Toronto?” asked one father in the schoolyard in the still balmy days of September. “Enjoy your first Halloween in Toronto,” said a Spanish journalist when I introduced myself as a newly arrived colleague.
India’s Modi stakes claim to future – and past – with world’s tallest statue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On his small organic farm in Gujarat, the western home state of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Lakhanbhai Musafir flings out his arm in disgust in the direction of the soon-to-be-inaugurated Statue of Unity – billed as the tallest statue in the world. Towering over the Narmada River, the $410 million statue depicts Vallabhbhai Patel, known as Sardar Patel, one of the most important figures in India’s fight for independence from Britain, and an icon of national unity. Twice as tall as the Statue of Liberty, the Statue of Unity will be inaugurated on Oct. 31 opposite the Sardar Sarovar Dam, marking the official launch of Mr. Modi’s Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) 2019 election campaign.
In election run up, voters eye health care as top concern
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Health care definitely needs some work,” she says. “I want the government support,” she says, citing the high costs of medical care. Voters want both low prices and high-quality care, and they show support for a strong government role on health policy, up to a point.
Trump’s rhetorical style again adds scrutiny to power of words
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump’s rhetorical style, under intense scrutiny amid the tragedies and threats of the past week, is nothing new. From the opening moment of his presidential campaign in 2015, Mr. Trump has prided himself on his practice of stirring up hornet’s nests. On Tuesday came another such move – word of a planned executive order targeting “birthright citizenship.” The goal, Trump told Axios, is to end the practice of bestowing US citizenship on anyone born on US soil, regardless of whether their parents are citizens.
New MacBook Air, iPad Pro and More: Everything Apple Just Announced
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Upgraded laptops, tablets and more
Voters Are Upset But Unswayed by Synagogue Shooting and Mail Bombs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Their top issues remain the economy, health care and immigration
Rejoice. The New Apple Emojis Are Here at Last
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Yes, the bagel has cream cheese
NASA will keep trying to contact stalled Mars rover Opportunity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA has changed its mind about how long it will continue to seek contact with an aging robotic vehicle that was blanketed in a dust storm on Mars back in June and has been stalled ever since. Now, the space agency plans to keep trying, rather than abandon efforts some time this month, as officials had said in late August. "After a review of the progress of the listening campaign, NASA will continue its current strategy for attempting to make contact with the Opportunity rover for the foreseeable future," said a statement posted on NASA's website late Monday.
Belgian research could replace USB sticks with data stored in powder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Belgian researchers have developed a way of storing data in powder form, which they hope will replace less environmentally friendly technology such as USB sticks and avert a data storage crisis. Chemistry, biochemistry and computer science boffins at the University of Ghent have invented a chemical process which can store information such as a QR-code or a short text in powder. The scientists were inspired by DNA, which stores genetic information. The data can be read by biochemical analysis which links the powder molecules to a website, map or app. There are two programs used to speed up the process; one which makes sure the analysis takes only seconds and another to translate the info between QR-code and date. Researchers hope to develop the technology further so that it can store as much data as USB sticks, which can carry photos and whole films. But USB sticks or hard drives need large amounts of metals that are environmentally harmful to mine.  Servers to store information can also be large and hugely energy consuming. New solutions were needed to store the “exponentially rising demand” for data storage over the last decade as humans use data for everything from bank accounts to YouTube videos,” said Steven Martens, part of the team of researchers. Amount of data created worldwide each year is accelerating “I never imagined becoming part of an interdisciplinary research project for which I’d have to store sentences and QR codes on molecules, nor did I suspect I’d be working together with the biochemistry and informatics departments,” he said. “The possibility of using DNA has been explored by scientists as an alternative for storing data, but practical limitations have popped up in the process,” he added, “to counter these disadvantages, chemists have been trying in recent years to store data on synthetic sequence-defined macromolecules.” Researchers, who have been working on the technology for the last five years, published details of the technology and their interdisciplinary approach in scientific journal Nature Communications. In March last year, Dutch researchers successfully coded data on a single atom for the first time. 
Caravans Help Migrants Travel Safely. But Recent Attention from Trump Might Change That
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The giant caravan of migrants has turned into a media sensation — and not in a good way. At least that’s how many of the migrants who have been slipping into Mexico see it
China Just Eased a Ban on Rhino and Tiger Parts. Here's How Organized Crime Fuels Illegal Poaching
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Former war photographer Kate Brooks goes inside the illegal wildlife trade
Pickup Truck Kills Three Indiana Kids Boarding Their School Bus, Critically Injures Another
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three children were boarding a school bus when they were hit and killed by a pickup truck in northern Indiana.
Military Mystery Solved: Two Guys Out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Satellite imagery of an experimental military base that was missing from Google Maps for years is now available … but you'll have to go to New York City to see it. Engineer Dhruv Mehrotra, a resident at the technology and art nonprofit Eyebeam, and writer Brendan Byrne leased the swatch of satellite imagery from the company Apollo Mapping for $1,984.50, after noticing that Google Maps hadn't updated an area over the Tonopah Test Range in southwestern Nevada for eight years. The leased imagery can be shown only to people within Mehrotra and Byrne's "company," so the pair hosted an event yesterday (Oct. 25) called "Internal Use Only" to showcase the bird's-eye view of the experimental military installment.
Climate Change Is Scary; ‘Rat Explosion’ Is Scarier
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have shown that the likely 2 degrees of global warming to come this century will be extremely dangerous, but, you know, “2 degrees” is hardly a phrase from nightmares and horror films. As the climate warms, rats in New York, Philadelphia and Boston are breeding faster — and experts warn of a population explosion. Think of 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit.
Want to Be a Bat Hero This Halloween? Don't Visit the Batcave. (Op
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It may sound like a thrilling adventure to visit caves full of hibernating bats — which, just like Batman's Batcave, are largely hidden from the public eye. Limiting public access can also prevent the spread of a deadly fungus that kills bats by causing white-nose syndrome, one of the most devastating diseases that has impacted any mammal species on the planet. When used for hibernation, these locations are called hibernacula.
President Trump Wants to End Birthright Citizenship by Executive Order
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's unclear how he would do so legally
Pittsburgh slaughter unites city's blacks and Jews in shock and grief
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Pittsburgh’s Jewish and black communities go back a long way in mostly amicable coexistence. The deadly attack on the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh brought memories of that shared history to the forefront, as blacks joined their Jewish neighbors in mourning.
In tight Washington House race, Republican gets a boost from a Kennedy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rep. Joe Kennedy III picks an odd time to praise Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, and the campaign of her Democratic challenger, Carolyn Long, issues a response.
Immigrant caravan still far from border, but fear reaches Tennessee, stoked by Senate race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A week before Election Day, immigration appears to be emerging as a flashpoint in Tennessee’s closely watched Senate race, fueled in part by the much-publicized caravan of Central American migrants making its way north through Mexico en route to the U.S. border. Democrat Phil Bredesen released a new television ad Tuesday defending his record on border security amid attacks from Republican Marsha Blackburn, who has seized on the caravan to tout her support for stronger deterrents against illegal immigration, including the construction of President Trump’s proposed border wall and going after so-called sanctuary cities.