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A Woolly Mammoth Bone Washed Up on A Scotland Beach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When a man found a 2-foot long bone while strolling along the beach in Scotland, he knew he had come across something special. “I’d never seen a bone so large before,” Nicholas Coombey, a marine conservation worker, told The Times of London. The National Museum of Scotland later confirmed that the bone is from a woolly mammoth and it is most likely part of the femur.
The U.K. Wanted to Ban Taking Photos Up Women's Skirts. One Lawmaker Shut it Down.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An attempt to make upskirting a criminal offense in the United Kingdom has been blocked by a Conservative party lawmaker.
Flying Spiders: These Arachnid Aviators Can Spin Silk Air Balloons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Crab spiders spin dozens of fine silk fibers into parachutes that let them hitch a ride on even the lightest breeze, scientists have observed.
Parkland School Guard Who Didn't Stop Shooter Had Harassed One of the Victims, Family Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The guard was allegedly suspended for sexually harassing two female students
Steve Scalise 'Back in the Game' a Year After Congressional Baseball Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Congressman got the first out of the game
Why man says he took no contest plea in near
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I know I'm not guilty," Justin Hansen, who's accused of attacking Brittani Marcell with a shovel in 2008, said. "I don't have to believe it. I know I'm not guilty."
Short on staff, the Trump administration turns to a job fair
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump vowed to hire the "best people" but has needed some help finding them.
Research on dogs might shed light on human responses to food: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Researchers in Hungary who found that normal and overweight dogs behaved differently in tasks involving food say the dogs’ responses were similar to what might be expected in normal and overweight humans. The study suggested dogs could be used as models for future research into the causes and psychological impacts of human obesity, the authors of the paper from Budapest's ELTE University said. Researchers put two bowls - one of them holding a good meal, the other empty or containing less attractive food - in front of a series of dogs.
Inspector general on Comey: dissecting an error in judgment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Eleven days before the 2016 presidential election, FBI Director James Comey sent a three-paragraph letter to members of Congress announcing that the FBI was reopening its investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server.  
Amid legal attack on key health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Robin Dake recalls a time when health insurance was financially out of reach for her and her two daughters ​– with the prospect of premiums of about $900 a month.
IQ Scores Are Falling Due to Environmental Factors, Study Finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers found a steady decline in IQ scores over the past few decades
Why the Most Compelling Drama at the World Cup Might Be Off the Field
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just look to the FIFA officials
Why your brain really craves french fries and donuts in particular
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Obviously, you're going to crave french fries and donuts over healthier food options.  But why is it that we sometimes really, really yearn for these two foods in particular over others that aren't so good for us, like candy or cheese? Well, you can probably blame your brain. SEE ALSO: Costco food court items, ranked A study published in Cell Metabolism found that foods combining both fat and carbohydrates are valued higher by our brain's reward system, as opposed to foods containing one energy source. A group of 206 adults were studied, undergoing brain scans as they were shown photos of snacks, which either contained fat, sugar, or a combination of the both. The subjects were then given a limited amount of money to bid on their preferred foods, and were found to be prepared to spend more on those which combined fat and carbohydrates. Researchers say our brains seem to estimate how many calories there are in foods with just fat or carbs, helping to regulate how much we eat. But it's when the two combine where things get tricky. "Our study shows that when both nutrients are combined, the brain seems to overestimate the energetic value of the food," Dana Small, from Yale University, explained online. Our tendency toward these foods could also be linked to the facts that fat and carb combined foods rarely exist in nature. The exception is breast milk, which is handy as babies need to learn how to suckle to survive, Small said. "In the modern food environment that is rife with processed foods high in fat and carbohydrate like donuts, French fries, chocolate bars, and potato chips, this reward potentiation may backfire to promote overeating and obesity," she added. Our ancestors primarily ate mostly woody plants and animal meat, with processed foods only appearing in the last few centuries.  "In nature, foods high in fat and carbohydrate are very rare and tend to have fiber, which slows metabolism," Small said. "By contrast, it is very common for processed foods to have high fat and high carbohydrate loads." Researchers think our brains haven't yet evolved to figure out that we shouldn't be eating these kinds of foods all the time. Maybe we'll get there soon enough. WATCH: These trees have lived for 2,500 years. Now they're suddenly dying
Antarctica's ice sheet is melting 3 times faster than before
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — The melting of Antarctica is accelerating at an alarming rate, with about 3 trillion tons of ice disappearing since 1992, an international team of ice experts said in a new study.
NASA’s Mars Rover goes silent as dust storm ‘bigger than America’ sweeps planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The storm now covers a quarter of the planet
New book details the inside story of Obama's birth certificate and the birth of fake news
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A new book by a former senior adviser to Barack Obama gives an account of the behind-the-scenes the drama surrounding the release of the president’s birth certificate — and the response to the so-called birther movement championed by Donald Trump.
Experts say Trump's Russia policy is at odds with itself
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
At a meeting of the Helsinki Commission, experts said President Trump obfuscates his administration’s policy toward the Kremlin by making pronouncements that contradict the positions of the U.S. intelligence community and diplomatic corps.
'Very unfair!': Trump tweets cap another tumultuous week
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president's tweets on Friday echo a familiar frustration that he's not getting enough credit.
Deputy: Florida man chugged can of beer during DUI stop
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BIG COPPITT KEY, Fla. (AP) — Authorities say a 48-year-old Florida man raised a can of beer and chugged it after a sheriff's deputy stopped him on suspicion of drunk driving.
Mortuary must pay widow $50K for 'coerced' cremation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GREAT FALLS, Mont. (AP) — A Montana mortuary business must pay a woman $50,000 after her husband was cremated against his wishes.
As Colombians head to polls, peace is still a work in progress
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Outside a camp for former members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), Wilfran Martinez runs a couple of organic farms, bursting with emerald green banana trees. Recently his farm, which is a transitional program for demobilized FARC members, signed a contract to sell its tomatoes, peppers, and other crops to 22 local schools. “We wouldn't be surprised if the next government breaks some of the promises that have been made to us,” Martinez says.
Paul Manafort goes to jail: Three questions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson said she had “struggled” with the decision to imprison Manafort. Close observers of Manafort’s legal struggle have seen signs that his pre-trial status might include a cell. Manafort also seemed aggressive in pushing the edges of his freedoms.
Why Doing Nothing Is One of the Most Important Things You Can Do
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And not just by taking paid vacation time
After the Summit, North Korea Shows Trump in a Striking New Light
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's a far cry from the "dotard" label the regime slapped on him last year
Scott Pruitt Is Fighting a Growing List of Scandals by Going to the Heartland
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is on a publicity tour, but you wouldn't know about it unless you live in a select few heartland states
McDonald's is ditching plastic straws in the UK and Ireland
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The days of sipping your milkshake through a plastic straw at McDonald's are almost over — at least in the UK and Ireland. The fast food giant announced on Thursday that they'll be making the switch to paper straws in September this year. SEE ALSO: These people are giving up plastic for Lent and it's all because of 'Blue Planet II' The decision comes in the wake of the UK government announcing plans to ban the sale of plastic straws, and other single-use plastic items, as part of an effort to reduce waste and help the environment. “Reflecting the broader public debate, our customers told us they wanted to see a move on straws but to do so without compromising their overall experience when visiting our restaurants," said McDonald's UK and Ireland CEO Paul Pomroy. "Over the past few months we’ve been working closely with supplier partners to find a solution that works both for our customers, and that the supply is there given the size of our business. "The Government’s ambitious plans, combined with strong customer opinion, has helped to accelerate the move away from plastic and I’m proud that we’ve been able to play our part in helping to achieve this societal change.” The full switch to paper straws will only be taking place in the UK and Ireland for now, but McDonald's confirmed testing of alternatives has already begun in Belgium, and will begin later this year in the US, France, Sweden and Norway. The restaurant is also planning to test making straws available on request only in countries like Malaysia. WATCH: 3 ways you can improve your recycling routine
Chicago airport plan is 1 of many Musk dream projects
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A newly announced project by billionaire innovator Elon Musk for a tunnel transit system that would carry travelers to and from Chicago O'Hare International Airport at up to 150 mph (241 kph) is just another project on a growing list of Musk dream projects. Arguably Musk's boldest or most far-fetched project, depending on who you ask, is one to send manned missions to Mars. According to the SpaceX website, the "aspirational goal is to send our first cargo mission to Mars in 2022." The first unmanned Mars mission would seek to confirm the presence of water and identify other resources that could help sustain human life.
Boy Killed, His Brother and Mom in Critical Condition After Denver Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
His brother and mom were in critical condition
Stephen Hawking's voice is being sent to a black hole light
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stephen Hawking's voice is speeding through space.  The famed cosmologist, who passed away in March at the age of 76, always dreamed of flying to space, and now, his voice is on a journey through the cosmos. Greek composer Vangelis, best known for composing the theme for the film Chariots of Fire, created an original score that reportedly spans six and a half minutes and features Hawking’s own voice halfway through.  SEE ALSO: Time travelers are invited to Stephen Hawking's memorial service That piece of music was sent out from a satellite dish in central Spain today as Hawking was laid to rest in a ceremony at Westminster Abbey. “This is a beautiful and symbolic gesture that creates a link between our father's presence on this planet, his wish to go into space, and his explorations of the universe in his mind," Hawking's daughter Lucy said in a statement. So, where exactly will Hawking's voice travel?  The somber piece of music is now on a journey to a black hole — named 1A 0620-00 — located 3,500 light-years away.  The poetic gesture is fitting when considered in the context of Hawking's work. The cosmologist transformed our understanding of how black holes work, effectively reimagining how the objects function and interact with the rest of the universe.  "It is fascinating and at the same time moving to imagine that Stephen Hawking’s voice together with the music by Vangelis will reach the black hole in about 3500 years, where it will be frozen in by the event horizon," Günther Hasinger, the European Space Agency's director of science, said in the statement. This is the memorial stone which will be placed on top of #StephenHawking's grave. Incised in the stone is Hawking’s most famous equation describing the entropy of a black hole. pic.twitter.com/ClBhsXucVm — Westminster Abbey (@wabbey) June 15, 2018 Hawking was laid to rest between Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton at Westminster Abbey.  As per Hawking's wishes, one of his most famous formulas — detailing the entropy of a black hole — is engraved on his tombstone. The service included readings from some of the scientist’s closest friends, like actor Benedict Cumberbatch, who played the physicist in a BBC biopic, astronaut Tim Peake, cosmologist Martin Rees, and Nobel Prize winner Kip Thorne.  WATCH: 'I'm not afraid of death, but I'm in no hurry to die.': some of Stephen Hawking's most inspirational quotes.
Kim Jong Un Is Showing the World Just How Much Power He Has
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When Donald Trump met Kim Jong Un in Singapore, it gave him a degree of legitimacy his father and grandfather never achieved
Emmanuel Macron Ordered a Really Fancy Set of China and People Are Angry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He's facing criticism for his spending habits again
A Better Flu Shot May Be On the Horizon. Here's Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some people have better responses to the flu than others
Woman undergoes hypnosis to try to recall memories from brutal shovel attack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brittani Marcell survived a nearly fatal attack in 2008, when she was hit with a shovel in her Albuquerque, New Mexico home.
Virginia GOPers worry Senate nominee Corey Stewart could drag down House members
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The morning after Corey Stewart’s victory in the Republican U.S. Senate primary in Virginia, party officials assessed how their candidate might affect House races in November. They didn’t like what they saw.
Trump clashes with reporters over false claim about separating children at border
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Friday repeatedly and falsely defended his administration’s policy of separating families at the border by blaming Democrats.
Trump on Kim Jong Un: 'His people sit up at attention. I want my people to do the same.'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president on Friday expressed admiration for the way Kim Jong Un is treated by North Koreans.
Hectic morning on the White House lawn: Trump speaks, and so do the facts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump took questions from reporters Friday morning on the White House lawn, covering a number of topics on which his comments have at times strayed from the truth. Here are some of his remarks, annotated and checked for accuracy.
Unfiltered: ‘[Uber and Lyft] are buying their way into monopolization at the expense of everybody else.’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Last month, yellow-cab driver and family man Yu Mein “Kenny” Chow tragically took his own life by throwing himself into the East River at 86th Street in New York City, just feet away from Mayor Bill de Blasio’s residence at Gracie Mansion. Chow was the fifth cabdriver within five months to take his own life. There was Danilo Corporan Castillo, who jumped off a roof in Harlem in December, a suicide note later found in his pocket scrawled on the back of a Taxi & Limousine Commission summons.
Signs seeking return of heirloom: 'My mother will kill me'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MEDFORD, Mass. (AP) — A recent college graduate desperate to recover a family heirloom mistakenly left curbside when he moved out of his apartment is plastering his neighborhood with signs warning, "My mother will kill me."
Trudeau in Europe? Leftist governments find footing in Spain and Portugal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Spain has seen its fair share of headlines recently, but they have almost always fed the narrative of “fragile southern Europe.”
Jamie Foxx 'Emphatically Denies' Allegation of Sexual Assault from 2002
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jamie Foxx is the latest celebrity to be accused of sexual misconduct, but he says the allegation is “absurd”
Cambodia Is Putting an Australian Filmmaker on Trial for Espionage. His Family Says He's Innocent
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
James Ricketson, 69, faces 10 years in prison
'There was a future': Past Hawaii eruptions provide lessons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
HONOLULU (AP) — Lava pouring out of a Hawaii volcano burned down Mary Dressler's home and her town 28 years ago. Now, watching creeping lobes of molten rock slowly wipe out entire neighborhoods over the past month, she has been transported back to those losses.
Clapper: 'We had a suspect' in Kremlin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
U.S. intelligence officials last year identified a “suspect” who served as the “cut-out” for Russian intelligence to funnel thousands of DNC emails and documents to WikiLeaks, according to former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.
Czech president torches underpants, stunt stuns journalists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PRAGUE (AP) — A fiery stunt by the Czech president has really stunned journalists this time.
Fat dogs teach humans new tricks about obesity: Hungarian study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Fat dogs have a lot in common with overweight humans, including an interest in top quality food and an unwillingness to settle for second best, Hungarian scientists have found. The study suggested dogs could be used as models for future research into the causes and psychological impacts of human obesity, the authors of the paper from Budapest's ELTE University said. Researchers put two bowls - one of them holding a good meal, the other empty or containing less attractive food - in front of a series of dogs.
President Trump Approves Tariffs on Up to $55 Billion of Chinese Imports
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China has targeted $50 billion in U.S. products for potential retaliation
‘Jurassic World Evolution’s’ Fun Starts When Disaster Strikes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Frontier Development has been on a hot streak the past few years. “Planet Coaster” reinvigorated the amusement park sim genre, and “Elite Dangerous” continues to give starship captains a gorgeous sandbox to play in. The studio’s latest, “Jurassic World Evolution” is an amusement park of a different kind, throwing temperamental dinos and corporate politics into […]
Why This Flag Day Is a Reminder That the Meaning of American Patriotism Is More Complicated Than You Might Think
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Flag Day 2018 marks the 75th anniversary of a landmark Supreme Court decision about whether patriotic gestures could be mandatory
Canadian team reports success in transplanting hepatitis C organs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A long-running shortage in donor organs has pushed doctors to find ways to use those with hepatitis C, an infection that is increasingly common in the United States due to the opioid crisis, and which can be cured with medicine. Some US hospitals, particularly in Boston, have already transplanted infected donor organs into people without hepatitis C. These patients are swiftly treated with drugs to eliminate the virus. In Toronto, Canada, another team of doctors on Thursday announced early results from a trial using a different technique, involving 10 people who received lung transplants from donors with hepatitis C.