World News
IN SHORT
Saturday, August 19, 2017

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
Science Says: Trump team garbles climate science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his cabinet often avoid talking about the science of climate change, but when pressed what they have said clashes with established mainstream science, data and peer-reviewed studies and reports.
Newsweek Exclusive: North Korean Missile Claims Are ‘a Hoax’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As President Donald Trump escalates his war of words against North Korea and its leader, Kim Jong Un, a team of independent rocket experts has asserted that the two rockets the rogue regime launched in July and described as intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) are incapable of delivering a nuclear payload to the continental United States, and probably not even to Anchorage, Alaska. Massachusetts Institute of Technology rocket expert Ted Postol and two German experts, Markus Schiller and Robert Schmucker of Schmucker Technologie, published their findings Friday in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, in a paper they titled “North Korea’s ‘Not Quite’ ICBM Can’t Hit the Lower 48 States.” Newsweek saw an early version of the paper.
White House renovations unfold while Trump stays at golf resort
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Workers began a $3.4 million project to fix up the White House last week, according to the New York Times. They're expected to improve the air-conditioning system, which the General Services Administration has said is "well past its life cycle and will fail in the near future without intervention," as well as repaint and put in new cables.
Trump warns N. Korea it would 'regret' threatening U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Friday warned that North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un would “regret it fast” if he made any threats against the United States.
Is Donald Trump funny? Are you kidding?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president’s spokespeople are frequently tasked with cleaning up outrageous statements, and recasting them as jokes is a clever way to shift the burden from Trump’s intention to the listener’s interpretation.
Even on vacation, Trump sows confusion about his foreign policy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It’s been a week of walk backs from the White House after President Trump took questions from reporters at his golf club in New Jersey about sensitive foreign policy issues.
Woman charged with faking cancer, keeping donations from New York towns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A 38-year-old Orlando woman who pretended to have terminal cancer and accepted donations when she lived in New York's Westchester County several years ago was arrested on Friday and charged with fraud, U.S. prosecutors said. Vedoutie Hoobraj, 38, used the name Shivonie Deokaran while perpetrating the scam from about October 2014 through at least March 2016, federal prosecutors said in a statement. Cancer patients often lose their hair during treatment.
When presidents talk tough
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When US presidents talk tough to foreign leaders, does it work? This question arises, of course, due to President Trump’s strong rhetoric this week about North Korea and its developing nuclear program. First Mr. Trump vowed to rain “fire and fury” on North Korea if it threatened the US.
ANOVA Apart: How to Tell If Your Firm Averages are Actually Significant
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ANOVA can take averages and variance from factors and tease out insights that contribute to accurate and well-founded practice management decisions.
The heartbreaking story of the flying mathematicians of World War I
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On the trail of the men of Britain's Royal Aircraft Factory, who gave their lives to help create the world's first air force.
Scientists are Getting Closer To Using Pig Organs For Human Transplants
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Using the genome editing technology CRISPR, researchers have developed piglets they think one day could harbor human organs.
Trump declares opioid epidemic a national emergency: What it means
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump has informally declared a national emergency for the opioid epidemic.
Art exhibit expressly for canine critics debuts in NYC
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — You won't find any pictures of dogs playing poker at DoGUMENTA.
Not OK? Sculpture of hand gesture moved over gang worries
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — A sculpture showing a hand making the OK sign in New Jersey is being relocated because some people fear it too closely resembles a gang symbol.
In 'liberated' Mosul, ISIS still imperils the path to city's revival
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The first sign Ghaith Ali had that Islamic State militants were still active in “liberated” western Mosul was a mysterious square object on the floor of a house he entered to make it ready for returning families. “Our mission was to clear houses before civilians come back, to say ‘Your house is good,’” says Ali, a short-haired young man with a thin mustache and slight build, speaking in an Erbil hospital for war victims run by the Italian agency Emergency.
'Girlfriends' Guide to Divorce' Just Released a Season 4 Promo and It's Really Juicy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Find out what the lady-bosses have been up to in this exclusive trailer for season 4 of 'GG2D'.
Siggi's Blueberry Cardamom Smoothie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Skyr is an Icelandic style of yogurt that's thick and high in protein. Watch the video to learn how to make a post-workout smoothie using fresh fruit and skyr yogurt.
12 Bob Hairstyles We're Loving Right Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
These Female Artists Are On A Mission to Photograph 1,000 Butts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Watch the video to learn how these artists are finding and sharing self-love through pictures of bums.
Local company creates parts for NASA's Orion spacecraft launch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's a contribution of astronomical proportions! NASA's Orion spacecraft will launch astronauts beyond the moon in just a few years, and one South El Monte company is helping them get there.
Carl Sagan saw today’s ‘demon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He was a celebrated astronomer, cosmologist, astrophysicist, astrobiologist, TV narrator and best-selling author.
Video games can either grow or shrink part of your brain, depending on how you play
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you’ve ever played a first-person shooter video game, at some point you’ve probably had to remember how to get from one place within the game to another. Perhaps you tend to think spatially, and plotted your path by judging where your destination was in relation to landmarks and objects. Or maybe you’re more methodical,…
Trump declares U.S. 'locked and loaded' in new North Korea threat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
"Hopefully Kim Jong Un will find another path!" tweeted President Trump in his latest swipe at North Korea. He also warned that Pyongyang should not “act unwisely.”
Guam shrugs off North Korea threat – taking it in stride
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
With all the sabre-rattling of North Korea the people of this tiny U.S. Pacific territory seem to be taking things in their stride.
Scaramucci offers Hader tips after 'SNL' skewering
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former “SNL” star Bill Hader appeared as Scaramucci on the “Weekend Update: Summer Edition” spinoff Thursday, and the Mooch thought he needed more hairspray.
Strange circular object with steel legs baffles beachgoers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WESTERLY, R.I. (AP) — Rhode Island beachgoers are puzzled and concerned about a mysterious object lodged about 10 feet underwater just off Westerly's East Beach.
Video shows car's 7
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Police in Austin have released surveillance video showing a car plunging seven stories from a downtown parking garage and striking another vehicle as it lands in an alley.
Retirement? No thanks. In 'graying' Japan, these women are just getting started
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In this sleepy, mountainous city, 85-year-old Yoshiko Zakoji starts her day with exercises before cooking rice and simmering vegetables for pre-ordered boxed lunches – as she has done for more than a decade. “I need to keep myself fit to continue my business,” says Ms. Zakoji, who owns a shop in Iida, located 110 miles west of Tokyo.
This is the No. 1 trait of great leaders, says Wharton's top professor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“Success is very rarely a goal for them,” says Adam Grant.
Trump declares U.S. ‘locked and loaded’ in new North Korea threat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
"Hopefully Kim Jong Un will find another path!" tweeted President Trump in his latest swipe at North Korea. He also warned that Pyongyang should not “act unwisely.”
Scientists on research vessel spot rare whale in Bering Sea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Federal researchers studying critically endangered North Pacific right whales sometimes go years without finding their subjects. Over the weekend they got lucky. A research vessel in the Bering Sea photographed ...
The lessons Trump's 'Red Team' needs to learn about passing tax reform
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
White House senior adviser Jared Kushner and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin leave the Rose Garden, July 25, 2017. Remember the Republican Party’s crusade to repeal Obamacare? You know, the one that featured prominently in pretty much every GOP campaign ad between 2010 and 2016 — and then consumed the whole of President Trump’s legislative agenda for first seven months of the year before collapsing in chaos right before lawmakers left town for August recess?
Downward dog meet jumping goat: Goats invade yoga classes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BURLINGTON, Wis. (AP) — Downward dog meets jumping goat.
Margaritaville Hollywood Beach Resort, Hollywood, FL Getaway Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win a four-day, three-night stay for two at the Margaritaville Hollywood Beach Resort in Hollywood, FL!
Wilson Women's Golf Clubs Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win these Wilson Staff Women's D300 Irons!
Bed Bath and Beyond Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter to win NFL grilling spatulas from Bed Bath and Beyond!
UncommonGoods Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter to win an UncommonGoods Ticket Stub Diary!
Extremely rare 13 million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A group of scientists have found what may be the most intact fossilized primate skull ever discovered.
Total Solar Eclipse In 1097 Included Solar Eruptions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The sun was very active during the total solar eclipse of 1097, so early civilizations got to see solar eruptions during the astronomical event.
Diet drinks and food actually trigger weight gain and diabetes, says new study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Diet drinks or foods may actually promote weight gain and trigger diabetes because the brain misreads the number of calories present and reduces metabolism, a new study suggests. Researchers at Yale University in the US discovered that the body stops burning energy from food if there is a ‘mismatch’ between food sweetness and calories. In nature, sweetness signals energy and the greater the sweetness the more calories are available, so the brain has evolved to expect the two to come together. When they do not, the brain can become confused, thinking there are fewer calories to burn. This research should be enough to convince you that artificial ingredients, whether they be in food or drink, can screw up your systemTam Fry, National Obesity Forum The scientists say it could help explain previous studies that have suggested that artificial sweeteners can increase blood sugar levels and possibly trigger diabetes. “A calorie is not a calorie,” said senior author Dana Small, Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. “The assumption that more calories trigger greater metabolic and brain response is wrong. Calories are only half of the equation; sweet taste perception is the other half. “Our bodies evolved to efficiently use the energy sources available in nature. Our modern food environment is characterized by energy sources our bodies have never seen before. “When sweet taste and energy are not matched less energy is metabolized and weaker, or inaccurate, signals are sent to the brain.  Either one of these effects may affect metabolic health.” The brain needs sweetness to start burning calories  Credit: Anthony Devlin PA  For the new study, scientists scanned the brains of 15 people when they were drinking diet drinks, and compared them to regular beverages. They also monitored how much energy was burned by the body.   They found when there was a ‘mismatch’ between sweetness and calories - as is often the case with diet drinks or foods because they are not as sugary - the calories fail to trigger the body’s metabolism. Reward circuits in the brain also did not register that calories had been consumed, which could lead to eating more. Commenting on the paper, Dominic Dwyer, Professor of Psychology at Cardiff University, said: “What the paper does imply, correctly in my view, is that mismatches between calories and sweetness interfere with metabolism of calories in a way that could have negative impact on weight gain, diabetes, heart disease etc. but that determining the link between the unprocessed calories and metabolic health needs future work. “The most important implication is namely the fate of calories consumed in the mismatch conditions. “These are not efficiently metabolised at the time of ingestion and thus processed later and/or stored either of which could drive weight gain and interfere with metabolism.” Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum, added: "This research should be enough to convince you that artificial ingredients, whether they be in food or drink, can screw up your system even though they may sound healthy.  "They may be free of calories but not of consequences and diabetes is only one of them. " Experts said if people were worried they should stick to drinking water  Credit: Dominic Lipinski PA  However other British experts were more skeptical about the findings and warned people to stick to drinking water if they were concerned about artificially sweetened drinks. Naveed Sattar, Professor of Metabolic Medicine at Glasgow University, said: “There is currently no strong evidence that diet drinks are necessarily bad for you whereas there is stronger and consistent evidence for sugar sweetened drinks being linked to higher diabetes risk.    “Overall, my advice to people drinking sugar-rich drinks would be to replace with water but that if this is not possible, diet drinks are still a better choice to prevent tooth decay.   “Whether diet drinks also help weight loss or other benefits is uncertain and requires proper long term trials which are currently lacking.” Tom Sanders, Professor emeritus of Nutrition and Dietetics, at King's College London, added: “The statement that a calorie is not a calorie is gobbledegook. Calories are a measure of the energy value of food. The remark is as stupid as saying a pound of feathers is lighter than a pound of lead. “The claim is not supported by the observational evidence on people who are long-term consumers of artificial sweeteners.   “Furthermore, an analysis of trials of replacing sugar sweetened drinks with artificially flavoured drinks show that there is some weight loss. Weight gain is certainly is not caused by drinking artificial sweeteners.” The research was published in the journal Current Biology.
Should You Sign Up Your Teen for a College Health Insurance Plan?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If you’re preparing to send your child off to college soon, you’re probably focused on squeezing in some last-minute family time and picking up all the necessary dorm gear. Here’s one other thing...
Testing Physics At The Galactic Center
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A study of stars orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way tests gravitational physics, as well as Einstein’s theory of general relativity.
Revealed: How to beat a chimpanzee at rock, paper, scissors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s late. You’re alone and hungry in the jungle with only a chimpanzee, one banana and your wits to get you through the night. But, fear not, scientists have found the perfect parlour game to play with a primate to win your dinner: rock, paper scissors. Japanese primatologists have proven that chimps understand and can play the game. However they have a fatal achilles heel. The apes take far longer to grasp that scissors can beat paper, than to understand the other winning combinations. Could you win? So selecting paper should ensure the banana is safe, even if the chimp demands a rematch. Previously scientists have found that chimpanzees can make tools, have distinct personalities and even communicate through a rudimentary language of sounds and gestures. But it is the first time they have shown that they are as capable of grasping the complex patterns to comprehend a game like rock, paper, scissors, which takes enhanced mental capacity. In fact, they have the same mental agility as a four year old child, scientists have concluded. In fact, they have the same mental agility as a four year old child, scientists have concluded. Lead author Jie Gao, of the Primate Research Institute at Kyoto University in Japan, said: “The present study aimed to investigate whether chimpanzees could learn a transverse pattern by being trained in the rules of the ‘rock, paper, scissors’ game. “The chimpanzees’ performance was similar to that of four-year-old children. The primary difference between the chimpanzees and children in the present study was the method of learning. “Children changed their choice immediately after they made a wrong one, whereas the chimpanzees would often take multiple sessions to correct themselves.” In the popular game the hand signal for ‘paper’ always beats ‘rock’, while ‘rock’ trumps ‘scissors’, and ‘scissors’ defeats ‘paper’. Could you beat a chimp? Seven chimpanzees of different ages and sexes living in Kyoto University’s Primate Research Institute awere took part in the experiment. They sat in a booth housing a computer-based touchscreen and were trained to choose the winning hand signal when they saw it on screen. When the chimpanzees made the correct choice in a trial, a piece of apple was provided via a feeder in conjunction with a chime sound. When the wrong stimulus was chosen, an error buzzer sounded, and no food was provided. The food reward was delivered through a feeder to a food tray placed at the bottom of the display. The findings show that chimpanzees can learn the circular pattern at the heart of the game. However, it took them an average of 14 sessions to learn the third scissors-paper pair than it did the others, which they picked up in between one and three sessions. The team then also taught the game to 38 preschool children to compare the learning process of chimpanzees with that of humans aged three to six. The children had little difficulty grasping the game, and on average did so within five sessions.  Researchers say their ability is similar to that of a four year old human child.   The research was published in Primates, the official journal of the Japan Monkey Centre.
Amy Purdy's New Health Scare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Snowboarder and “Dancing with the Stars” runner-up Amy Purdy has already conquered one major health scare and she’s come to The Doctors to open up about her recent potentially deadly condition. At 19, Amy contracted a serious case of bacterial meningitis, where she was given a less than 2% chance of surviving. Just weeks ago, Amy landed in the hospital following a grueling workout.
Are Uber Drivers Stalking Customers Like Beyoncé?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Is Uber keeping track of your whereabouts even when you’re not using the app? The company’s former forensic investigator claimed during testimony in his age discrimination lawsuit against the company that employees have abused an internal tool, dubbed “God View,” to allegedly track the movement of ex-boyfriends and ex-girlfriends, high profile politicians even celebrities like Beyoncé. In order to cut down on possible issues with apps that use tracking, The Doctors recommend turning off the tracking feature on your phone after using the app, and letting a friend or loved one know where you’re going and your estimated time of arrival.
Younger, Wrinkle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Cosmetic surgeon Dr. Alexander Rivkin joins The Doctors to test out Volbella, which aims to give patients more youthful looking lips that are smoother and wrinkle-free without dramatically increasing their size.
Molly Sims' Fertility Journey
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Molly Sims welcomed her third child earlier this month and weeks before giving birth, the model and actress joined The Doctors to open up about her fertility journey and having a baby at 43. Molly and her fertility specialist Dr. Shahin Ghadir, from the Southern California Reproductive Center, join the show to share how she planned out making sure she could eventually have children, something she embarked on at the age of 37 when she was single. “You have to think ahead, you have to think ahead about freezing your eggs, about freezing embryos,” he explains.
Could Virtual Reality Ease Women's Labor Pains?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
One woman wore a virtual reality headset during labor transporting her to a tropical location while she was pushing. Could this be the future of giving birth? ER physician Dr. Travis Stork asks pregnant model and actress Molly Sims if she considered virtual reality for her birth.
Can You Spot Any Shapes in the Martian Clouds?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Too bad they aren't a little puffier.