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Mike Pompeo Says He Won't Put a Timeline on North Korea Denuclearization
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pompeo's comments sharply contrast with those of a senior U.S. defense official
Healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson backs brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A sleep tech startup that makes headbands which promise users a better night’s sleep by “stimulating” their brains has raised £26m (€31m), in a funding round led by healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson’s venture arm. Dreem, which has offices in Paris and San Francisco, will use the Series B financing to fine tune its headsets and develop its sleep technology by hiring top talent in neuroscience, chasing a market that its founder, Huge Mercier, claims could be around 30pc of the population. Mercier dreamt up with the idea for the headbands in 2014, while studying engineering at École Polytechnique in Paris. After developing a fascination with sleep, Mercier worked with neuroscientists and found that stimulating the brain may enhance deep sleep and help people get to sleep quicker using EEG. Although a tentative area of scientific research, Mercier gained the backing of billionaire French entrepreneur Xavier Niel, French insurance leaders MAIF and entrepreneur and biotech investor Dr. Laurent Alexandre, a renowned advocate of “transhumanism”, a movement focused on merging humanity and technology. Mercier used the cash to hire a team and create a consumer-friendly headset that worked on par with electroencephalogram (EEG) equipment typically found in a laboratory equipment. The company has grown from two co-founders to 70 members of staff, with $22 million in funding to date. The headband monitors sleep activity and sends sound to the wearers' head, which it claims aids sleep Dreem has already sold “thousands” of headbands and began shipping the product, costing €500, in February, Mercier said. “Understanding and improving sleep is one of the most important technological, scientific and societal undertakings of our time," Mercier told the Telegraph. While admitting the headband was not a "magic solution" he said it offered a positive alternative to sleeping pills and hoped the funding would accelerate more research into the area. Dreem will create a rich pool of anonymised data from its users which could be used to help scientists understand sleep patterns. The information could be particularly lucrative for Johnson & Johnson, which manufactures personal health and medical devices and has already invested in a baby sleep app, Rest. 
#MeToo Has Implicated 414 High
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
190 were fired or left their jobs
Astronauts rocketing into space at 18,000 mph look incredibly chill about it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Blasting into space at nearly 18,000 mph seems unnerving. But three space station-bound astronauts appeared profoundly tranquil as they sped through Earth's atmosphere on June 6. On Monday morning, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Alexander Gerst tweeted out a video shot inside the Soyuz spacecraft as he and two astronauts launched to the International Space Station. They traveled over 1,000 miles in under 10 minutes.  SEE ALSO: A woman sued NASA to keep a vial of moon dust. She might have made a huge mistake. The three astronauts hunched over their controls in a cramped crew capsule. You can see it all in the video below: Gerst, the flight engineer, is seated to the right. In the middle is Roscosmos commander Sergei Prokopyev, and on the left is NASA's Serena Auñón-Chancellor. The three astronauts appear mostly expressionless as they ride through the launch on the Soyuz rocket.  Besides their years of training, their calm is almost certainly aided by the rocket itself, which has flown mostly successful missions since its inception in the 1960s. There have been no deaths associated with either a Soyuz rocket or the Soyuz spacecraft since 1971, and these early deaths were due to accidents during the spacecraft's re-entry back to Earth — not during the launch.  Accompanying the three astronauts in the frame are a couple of stuffed animals. In the latter half of the video the toys begin to float, demonstrating when the spacecraft has entered the weightlessness of space.  Both NASA and ESA astronauts regularly hitch rides to the space station aboard 164-foot tall Soyuz rockets, as Russia's Roscosmos is currently the only space agency — public or private — with an operating spaceship capable of carrying astronauts to the station, some 250 miles above Earth. The Soyuz spacecraft, separated from the Soyuz rocket.Image: nasaBut both SpaceX and Boeing have developed crew capsules that will take future astronauts to the space station as early as 2019, assuming they meet safety requirements. NASA astronauts are already training in Boeing's Dreamliner and SpaceX's Dragon capsules in preparation for these launches.  Unlike the Soyuz rocket, the SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets are reusable. They'll return to Earth after launching astronauts into space rather than having to be completely rebuilt. The idea is to make space exploration, and visits to present and future space stations, considerably cheaper.  WATCH: NASA is attempting to fly a helicopter on Mars for the first time
California Governor Declares State of Emergency as Wildfires Force Thousands to Flee
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The fire has forced 3,000 residents from their homes and destroyed 22 buildings
Prince William Arrives in Israel for Historic Royal Visit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's the first-ever official visit of a member of the British royal family
Former President George H.W. Bush Gets a Service Dog Named 'Sully'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Former President George H.W. Bush is welcoming a new member of the family: a yellow Labrador retriever who'll be his first service dog
Studies Identify Key Genes for Intelligence, Depression, ADHD, and Autism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Studies Identify Key Genes for Intelligence, Depression, ADHD, and Autism
Here's How Jimmy Fallon Responded to President Trump's 'Be a Man' Insult
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The president targeted the late night comedian on Twitter over the weekend
BHP, Vale agree to settle one Samarco suit, second delayed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mining giants BHP and Vale, co-owners of Samarco, Tuesday reached agreement with Brazilian public authorities to settle a 20 billion real (US$5.3 billion) civil suit over a mine collapse that left 19 people dead. The companies also established a framework to progress a second 155 billion real claim brought by federal prosecutors in the next two years, Australia's BHP said in a statement. It left 19 people dead in one of the South American nation's worst environmental disasters.
FDR's granddaughter on immigration: Our country did not learn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The country hasn’t learned from history, says Anne Eleanor Roosevelt, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s granddaughter, who calls current immigration policies, like the internment of Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor, “inconsistent with who we are as a country.”
Kangaroo stops play during Australian women's soccer match
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The Australian soccer team competing at the World Cup is called the Socceroos. But a different kind of soccer-roo has dominated a pitch for half an hour in Canberra during a women's match.
Mexican party rapped for wraps in tortilla election row
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Struggling to catch up with the longtime front-runner, the two chasing parties in Mexico's presidential election have become embroiled in a spat over wrapping used to sell tortillas, the popular flatbread made for tacos. In an "extraordinary urgent session," Mexico's electoral authority ordered the center-right National Action Party (PAN) to stop wrapping tortillas with campaign slogans after the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) called foul. A thin, unleavened bread usually made of corn, tortillas are ubiquitous in Mexico, which will elect a record number of candidates, including the president, on July 1.
Hundreds of birds stricken after Rotterdam oil spill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Animal rescue workers on Monday were frantically cleaning hundreds of birds after an oil spill in the Rotterdam harbour at the weekend, when an oil tanker hit a jetty dumping some 200 tonnes of bunker fuel. "We are currently hard at work cleaning hundreds of birds, including swans," said Anneke Heinecke of the Dutch water management agency Rijkswaterstaat.
Men's Testosterone Levels Vary Depending on Where They Live, say Scientists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Where you grow up can shape testosterone levels for the rest of your life.
Why Businesses Can Deny You Service for Some Reasons — And Not Others
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A restaurant asked Sarah Huckabee Sanders to leave. Experts explain why that's legal
Police Say He Cut Off His Pregnant Wife's Arm. He Was Caught Before He Could Swim to Canada
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Yong Lu had a lifejacket with him when he was arrested
Here's the Best Time to See This Year's Strawberry Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Most of us will have to forego bedtime for any celestial viewing.
Leading Israeli liberal praises Kushner’s unfinished, still
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Jared Kushner’s Mideast peace plan is expected to be released in the near future, but one leading Israeli liberal already likes it.
Trump's attack on due process is the latest deviation from presidential norms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president's latest assault on U.S. norms strikes at one of the pillars of American democracy.
FDR’s granddaughter on immigration: Our country did not learn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The country hasn’t learned from history, says Anne Eleanor Roosevelt, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s granddaughter, who calls current immigration policies, like the internment of Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor, “inconsistent with who we are as a country.”
'Space kingdom' seeks citizens for life beyond Earth very soon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
VIENNA (Reuters) - Feel like the world is going to the dogs? Want to get away from it all? Here's a solution: become a citizen of the nation of Asgardia and hope it makes good on its promise to colonize the moon. Asgardia was founded just 20 months ago, and it already has about 200,000 citizens, a constitution and an elected parliament. It has a leader, Igor Ashurbeyli, who was inaugurated on Monday. It also has grandiose ambitions. It wants to build up a population of 150 million within 10 years. ...
Giant tech
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — A giant egg-shaped sculpture that drew complaints from officials in a Silicon Valley city is moving to Harvard University.
Omaha zoo finds escaped parrot scared by Goodyear blimp
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A macaw that flew away from Omaha's zoo after apparently being spooked by the Goodyear blimp has been found in a nearby neighborhood.
Trump and truth: Why the media are losing the battle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For three years, since the day he glided down the escalator at Trump Tower to announce his presidential bid, Donald Trump has confounded the mainstream media. “First, he injects the inaccuracy into the body politic,” says Perry.
Supreme Court ruling has 'huge' implications for voting rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In a decision split along ideological lines, the United States Supreme Court Monday overturned almost entirely a lower court ruling that had invalidated several political districts in Texas for harming the voting power of racial minorities. Today’s decision on racial gerrymandering in Texas veers from that pattern, experts say. Less than two years away from a new round of redistricting, it could have significant implications for voting rights lawsuits.
37 American Habits That Visitors Find Confusing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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12 Fresh Tomato Recipes to Make All Summer Long
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Jesus, Genghis Khan and Joan of Arc Are Just Some of the Major Figures That Could Be Cut From AP World History Classes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some educators are outraged as the class could now begin in the year 1450
New head of 'space nation' aims for the stars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It sounds appealing given the state of politics on Earth: a plan to launch a utopian "space nation" with the aim of transcending earthly divisions. At a lavish ceremony in Vienna's Hofburg Palace on Monday, some 200 attendees inaugurated Russian scientist and businessman Igor Ashurbeyli as the first "head of nation" of Asgardia, named after a realm in Norse mythology. Ashurbeyli has been the driving force behind the concept, announcing the creation of Asgardia two years ago.
What Erdogan’s Election Victory Means For Turkey’s Future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The election cements Erdogan as the strongman of Turkey, which sits at a crucial crossroads between Europe, Russia and the Middle East.
New book highlights relationship between teens, social media
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Emily Giffin's 'All We Ever Wanted' is a fictional story of how social media can change real life relationships.
Two Military Bases in Texas Set to House Thousands of Migrants
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Defense Department has been directed to build short-term detention camps on two U.S. military bases in Texas.
We Took a Ride With Saudi Arabia's First Women Taxi Drivers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After the ban on women drivers was lifted on June 24, companies like Uber and Careem are putting women in the driver's seat
Fire Captain Killed, 2 Wounded in Shooting at California Retirement Home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Firefighters were searching the building after an alarm when shots were fired
The Latest: Buzz Aldrin faces evaluations this week
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Court-appointed mental-health experts will evaluate the competency of Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin this week as two of his three children try to become his guardians, claiming he suffers from memory loss and confusion
Civility alert: Can’t we all just get along, or even get dinner?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A year ago the EPA chief was mocked for trying to avoid hostile confrontations by flying first class. But the breakdown in civility that began during the 2016 campaign with chants of “Lock her up” has accelerated recently.
'Be careful what you wish for Max!' Trump warns Waters over call for public confrontations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Monday lashed out at Rep. Maxine Waters after the California Democrat urged protesters to publicly confront members of his administration over its controversial policies.
Melting ICE? A handful of Democrats turn up the heat.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency continues to draw criticism for its arrest of immigrants, the idea of abolishing the agency entirely is starting to gather momentum among Democrats.
How immigration fuels an axis of nationalism across the West
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The battle over the immigration issue in America has masked what could prove a more fundamental change internationally: the emergence of a new axis including political leaders across the Atlantic who, like President Trump, have placed an angry mix of nationalism and populism at the heart of their message. It is happening in Poland, Hungary, Austria, as well as with Italy’s newly installed populist coalition and Turkish strongman Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who was given a path to virtually unchallenged power by his latest election victory Sunday. The anti-immigrant nationalists in France, under the banner of Marine Le Pen, were dealt a blow last year by the election of President Emmanuel Macron.
Is love a winning message for Ethiopia?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As Africa’s second most populous country and its fastest growing economy, Ethiopia is extraordinary in many ways. It weaves together 80 ethnic groups as well as Christians and Muslims. On a continent with the world’s youngest population, the median age of Ethiopia’s 102 million people is 18.
Former Trump Aide Apologizes for Racist Remark on Fox and Friends
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
David Bossie told a black pundit "you're out of your cotton-picking mind"
World Food Prize goes to an economist and a doctor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The World Food Prize will be awarded this year to two men who have dedicated their careers to improving the availability of nutritious food for pregnant women and children in an effort to reduce the effects of malnutrition in developing countries.
Buzz Aldrin sues children, alleging misuse of his finances
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin is suing two of his children and a former business manager, accusing them of misusing his credit cards, transferring money from an account and slandering him by saying he has dementia.
Father Shot and Killed While Camping With His 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Not a second goes by that we aren’t grappling with the senselessness of this crime'
Why the Neanderthals may have been more sophisticated hunters than we thought – new study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Neanderthals used spears as hunting weapons by throwing or thrusting, according to a new study.
Florida AG Pam Bondi says she won't be bullied after being confronted at Mr. Rogers movie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi said on Monday she refuses to be bullied by protesters like those who confronted her at a screening of the Mister Rogers documentary over the weekend for her support of President Trump.
Scientists have finally come up with a solution for the world's most annoying household sound
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It haunts you when you're trying to eat your dinner in peace. It disturbs you when you're trying to watch TV. It even keeps you awake in the wee small hours.  SEE ALSO: Scientists just named a newly discovered water beetle after Leonardo DiCaprio It's the insufferable, interminable drip-drip-dripping of a leaky tap. Well, scientists at the University of Cambridge have finally figured out what's causing what is almost certainly the world's most infuriating sound. Not only that, these clever clogs have also come up with a solution that could bring peace to all households.  "A lot of work has been done on the physical mechanics of a dripping tap, but not very much has been done on the sound," Dr Anurag Agarwal — from Cambridge’s Department of Engineering, who led the research — said in a statement. "But thanks to modern video and audio technology, we can finally find out exactly where the sound is coming from, which may help us to stop it."  The idea for conducting the research didn't actually burst forth from a leaky tap, however. It was actually a leaky roof dripping into a bucket that inspired the research.  Agarwal first decided to delve into this predicament after visiting a friend who had a leak in their roof. "While I was being kept awake by the sound of water falling into a bucket placed underneath the leak, I started thinking about this problem," says Agarwal. "The next day I discussed it with my friend and another visiting academic, and we were all surprised that no one had actually answered the question of what causes the sound." Using an ultra-high-speed camera, a microphone, and hydrophone, Agarwal recorded water droplets falling into a tank of water.  Per the research, the "fluid mechanics of a water droplet hitting a liquid surface" are pretty well established. Basically, when a droplet hits the surface, it prompts the "formation of a cavity which quickly recoils due to the surface tension of the liquid." This then creates a "rising column of liquid." Due to the speed with which the cavity recoils after the droplet hits the surface, a small air bubble gets "trapped underwater."    Previous research has suggested that the "plink" sound could be caused by a number of things, like the impact of the droplet on the surface, the "resonance of the cavity," or the "underwater sound field propagating though the water surface." But, until now, no research has confirmed what the source is "experimentally."  Interestingly, Cambridge researches found that all three of these previously suggested sources are "all effectively silent."  The source of the sound is, in actual fact, the trapped air bubble.  So, how precisely do we put a stop to this truly repulsive noise?  Well, researchers found that by changing the "surface tension of the surface" by adding washing-up liquid, the sound can be stopped. You might get through an awful lot of Fairy Liquid, but at least you'll get some sleep. Either that or you could call a plumber.  WATCH: Gravity-defying machine looks like magic — but there’s a scientific answer
Are These 3 Red
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Is continued success in the cards for these biotech stocks?
MPs vote on expanding London's Heathrow airport
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
British MPs are set Monday to approve plans to build a third runway at London Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, after decades of debate. Prime Minister Theresa May's government agreed to the £14 billion (15.9 billion euros, $18.5 billion) plan earlier this month, saying it would provide a major boost to the economy. The House of Commons is expected to back the expansion despite opposition from many MPs from London and south-east England, where residents fear the extra pollution and noise from an increase in flights.