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Sen. Susan Collins Announces She Will Not Run for Governor of Maine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She will remain in the Senate to help play "a key role"
Striking images reveal wineries devastated by wildfires
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Remarkable photos reveal how badly California's wineries have been damaged in wildfires that have burned tens of thousands of acres of wine country since Sunday. SEE ALSO: How California's firestorm spread so mind-bogglingly fast: From 'Diablo' winds to climate trends Paradise Ridge Winery in Santa Rosa, California is just one of the dozens of wineries that was ravaged by the massive fires.  In the midst of the blaze, a large plastic wine container melted, releasing a boiling pool of wine, according to SF Gate. "I saw a pool of wine, and it was flowing lightly down the hill, and as I got close to it, I noticed that it was bubbling," photographer Josh Edelson told the news outlet. "At first, I didn't understand it, but then it dawned on me that the ground was hot, and the wine was boiling with all that stuff smoldering around it." Edelson captured pictures of the haunting scene at Paradise Ridge on Tuesday. A pool of wine boils beneath debris from the fire at Paradise Ridge Winery.Image: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images A melted wine container leaks wine onto the ground at Paradise Ridge Winery.Image: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images Charred fermentation tanks drip wine at a destroyed Paradise Ridge Winery in Santa Rosa.Image: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty ImagesParadise Ridge Winery owner Sonia Byck-Barwick told CNN the property is completely burned, and all of the grapes they had picked for the season have been lost. Byck-Barwick said she hopes to keep the business alive in the face of destruction by using a small building on the property as a tasting room for visitors.  Many other wineries have experienced varying degrees of damage, and at least a dozen have been completely destroyed, according to The Mercury Times.  Wine grapes are destroyed by the Tubbs Fire on October 11, 2017 in Kenwood, California.Image: EZRA SHAW/Getty Images The gutted remains of Paradise Ridge winery. #sonomafire #wine. Owner says he will rebuild. pic.twitter.com/ubhofqQAIC — Bill Swindell (@BillSwindell) October 9, 2017 Signorelli winery is gone pic.twitter.com/rOHpqGNMn2 — Karin Oconnell (@KarinO39) October 9, 2017 A mother hen and her (well-camouflaged) chicks scratch and peck for food in the burned earth at a Calistoga-area winery. pic.twitter.com/E441QZgENt — Trevor Hughes (@TrevorHughes) October 11, 2017 Melted wine bottles are among the remains of the Signorello Estate Winery in Napa, California.Image: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty ImagesFans of the wineries expressed their concern on Twitter.  This is where @aprilolanoff and I got married. I hope everyone is safe. https://t.co/ViJB7u5ejN — drew olanoff (@yoda) October 9, 2017 My wife & I were married there just a few weeks ago. That's extremely sad news. Such a happy, beautiful place. — Derek Gathright (@derek) October 9, 2017 The fires in Northern California have destroyed at least 5,700 homes and businesses, and have displaced 90,000 people as of Friday afternoon, according to the Associated Press. At least 35 people have died, making these fires the deadliest and most destructive in the state's history.  The two deadliest fires — the Tubbs and Atlas fires in Napa and Sonoma Counties — moved quickly through wine country due to strong winds, making it difficult for firefighters to contain them.  WATCH: California wildfire victims returning to their destroyed homes is absolutely heart-wrenching
Carbon Dioxide Injected Into Rocks for Safe Storage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists say these greenhouse-gas-sucking machines may be the only hope against global warming.
President Trump Had a Busy Week. Catch Up With What Mattered in 5 Minutes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From Iran to Obamacare, here's what mattered
'It's a Disaster.' 20 People Killed as Truck Bomb Detonates in Somalia's Capital
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The explosion appeared to target a hotel on a busy road in Hodan district
Man wounded in shooting during fight in Tombstone saloon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TOMBSTONE, Ariz. (AP) — Arizona authorities say a saloon shooting in the Old West town of Tombstone put one man in the hospital with a leg wound and another in jail.
Almost 300 marine species hitched a ride on tsunami debris from Japan to the US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Marine sea slugs found on a Japanese vessel that washed ashore in Oregon in 2015. On the morning of June 5th, 2012, John Chapman drove up to Agate Beach in Newport, Oregon, to take a look at a massive, 188-ton dock that had washed ashore during a storm. A tag revealed that the dock was from Misawa, Japan, a city that was hit by the mega tsunami that struck the area in 2011.
Eight Weird, Spindle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Athanasia Tsatsi of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Germany, and colleagues published their findings in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. The findings also suggest prolate rotators probably formed about 10 billion years ago, very early on in the history of the universe.
Jason Momoa Has Apologized for His Game of Thrones Rape Joke
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He's sorry for the "truly tasteless comment"
Game of Thrones Actor Says Security for the Final Season Is the Tightest Yet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Producers are taking no chances with leaks, according to Nikolaj Coster-Waldau
One giant leap for Wall Street: the risk and opportunity of investing in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Investors are boldly going where no traders have gone before.
How Medieval Fake News Brought Down the Knights Templar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If there were ever such a thing as a post-truth era, it began 710 years ago, at dawn on Friday, Oct. 13, 1307, in the kingdom of France.
Scientists Capture Carbon Dioxide and Inject It Into Rocks for Permanent Storage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Updated | Scientists have discovered a way to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere to inject safely into rocks for long-term storage. This possible solution to global warming is taking shape at a plant in Hellisheidi, Iceland, reports Chemical & Engineering News. The company explains in a press release that the carbon dioxide is then mixed with water, mingles with basaltic bedrock in the ground and turns into minerals for long-lasting storage.
Russian cargo ship launched to International Space Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An unmanned Russian cargo ship has been launched to take supplies to the six astronauts aboard the International Space Station
Man arrested after trying to light cigarette with nozzle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Police in North Dakota have arrested a man for possession of drugs after first spotting him attempting to light a cigarette with the nozzle of a gas pump.
Delta's App Just Got a New Feature That Travelers Will Love
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's definitely worth updating for
NASA’s carbon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Readings from NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 have confirmed that the El Niño weather pattern of 2015-2016 was behind the biggest annual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels in millennia. The OCO-2 satellite, launched in 2014, is designed to provide a detailed picture of how carbon is exchanged between air, land and sea. OCO-2 data showed that 2015’s El Niño weather, created by warmer waters in the central and eastern Pacific Ocean, led to hotter conditions in tropical regions of South America, Africa and Indonesia. In South America, drought stressed out vegetation so much that less carbon dioxide was converted through… Read More
Jane Fonda Says She Is 'Ashamed' of Her Silence on Weinstein Allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Oscar-winning actress said she knew of sexual harassment allegations against disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein
President Trump Tells Democrats to ‘Call Me’ to Fix Obamacare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After he gutted vital insurance subsidies on Thursday
U.S. experts doubt EPA curbs on Monsanto, BASF herbicides will halt crop damage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK/CHICAGO (Reuters) - U.S. weed specialists doubted on Friday that new federal restrictions on the use of a controversial weed killer, sold by Monsanto Co and BASF, will prevent recurrences next year of crop damage linked to the chemical. The impact of the rules limiting sprayings of dicamba herbicides, announced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), may affect Monsanto's biggest-ever biotech seed launch - soybeans engineered to resist the chemical. The EPA's new limits focus on the application issues and do not address volatilization, herbicide experts and farmers said.
Watch Live: President Trump Announces His Plans for the Iran Nuclear Deal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump's speech is expected to outline specific faults he finds in the pact
'We're just existing': What it was like to survive the deadly Northern California wildfires
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Luana Cobb and her son Dan were asleep when a wildfire blew into Coddingtown Mobile Estates in Santa Rosa, California, early Monday morning.  SEE ALSO: How to help survivors of the devastating Northern California wildfires Luana, 83, awoke to the sound of cars honking and people shouting. She went outside and heard neighbors screaming to get out. Soon, she says, a fireball struck a nearby palm tree. It rained fiery debris onto her shed, which spun embers onto the frame of her house.  All that's left of Coddingtown Mobile Estates in Santa Rosa, California.Image: rebecca ruiz / mashableThe mobile home was gone within minutes. Luana and Dan, 60, watched from the street in shock as it collapsed onto itself, flames melting and twisting the metal and steel in its path. The fire ripped through more than a dozen mobile homes and tore across the street, setting an ammunition shop ablaze. Luana and Dan were suddenly survivors and evacuees, carrying only what they each had time to grab: medication, checkbook, and wallet for Dan, and an insurance policy and purse for Luana.   "We’re just existing," says Luana, who is sitting at a cafeteria table at the Finley Community Center in Santa Rosa, a city about an hour north of San Francisco. She and Dan have been sleeping at this Red Cross shelter since Monday. "You’re kind of like in a state of ... what's going to happen next?" she says. "I didn’t think at 83 I would ever end up like this."  The Cobbs are among an estimated 50,000 residents who were mandatorily evacuated or fled their homes since fires in Sonoma and Napa counties began raging Sunday evening. The blazes have killed at least 35 people, burned more than 100,000 acres, and destroyed thousands of homes and businesses. Hundreds are still reported missing. It is one of the worst wildfire disasters in California's history and containing the flames has been painstakingly slow because of difficult weather conditions like low humidity and high winds.  Luana and Dan have contacted their insurance company, but don't know when an adjustor can visit their property. On Thursday afternoon, police officers stood guard near the warped, still-warm remains of Coddingtown Mobile Estates.  The remains of Coddingtown Mobile Estates on October 12, 2017.Image: rebecca ruiz / mashable"I know I’m in shock because I wake up in the morning and think, 'Oh gee, I’m going to go do this,'" Luana says. "And I got up this morning and said, 'My god, I don’t have a dish, I don’t have a spoon, a fork, or a knife. I don’t have my comb, and my pills are all there.'" Many evacuees don't yet know what happened to their homes. As they wait for news, they seek refuge in temporary shelters — and each other. Here are some of their stories, as told to us on Thursday, which have been lightly edited and condensed:  Ana Maria Villanueva, 69  — Fled with her husband early Monday morning and is waiting to see how her home fares as firefighters try to contain two nearby fires.  I felt somebody at the door knocking and I tell my husband, "There’s somebody at the door." He says, "No, it couldn’t be." I looked through the window and saw the neighbor with a flashlight going to his car, coming inside, going to his car, so I said something is going on.  31 total fatalities confirmed due to 4 fires that started on Sunday. Many remain unaccounted for. Our thoughts are with their loved ones. pic.twitter.com/kPOLSPkPLL — CAL FIRE PIO (@CALFIRE_PIO) October 13, 2017 I came out and he said, "I was knocking on your door but you didn’t answer." And I said, 'We couldn’t hear what was going on." He said, "There’s a fire, we have to leave." So we left to Safeway, to the parking lot, because they said you have to be in an open space.  After a few days, I am OK, but the impact was so great that I couldn’t believe what was going on. And I thought I was sensing a fire nearby — that’s it. I didn’t have a notion about how big it is. We are OK, but we don’t know what’s going to be happening in a few days.  We are in the hands of the wind. We don’t know what route it will take.  People concentrate on the big news, but the big news is discovering the awareness of friendship, compassion, caring. The volunteers here are awesome. They’re well-organized for disaster. They have all kinds of services, a section for older people, medical assistance ... the doctors check on you, they ask, "Are you OK? What do you need?" There is food 24 hours a day. I lived in Peru in an earthquake in '66, but it was a real disaster .... it was chaos. Here you feel more secure. The support of friends and family who call you — they give you strength to keep going. The phone is a big help. Being able to be connected is the most important thing. It feeds your spirit.  Colin, 41 — Left his home on Tuesday and doesn't know what happened to it.  I'm, uh, surreal, delirious. Surreal doesn't really cover it. I'm surreal and hedonic. Do you know that term? I'm missing parts of my personality. I'm losing track of them. It's maybe a little extreme, but I'm not sleeping well at all.   [Mine] was a slower [evacuation] process. I got a chance to fill my car. So I had a very luxurious departure compared to some. I've heard a lot of stories about getting out just in time. I was sitting next to a guy in breakfast today and I asked how he was and he told me. He's having a hard time holding it together with his house standing and all his neighbors' [houses] not. I believe the person that woke him up lost their house and saved his life.  A man rides a bicycle with his dog in front of homes destroyed by fires in Santa Rosa.Image: AP/REX/ShutterstockWhole thing is so amazing ... how it's just hard for us to see the sense in it. You always want to look for some reason, but ... we put our houses there. They were explaining the fire as, the way it came over the range, the Mayacamas Range, which creates our wine region here — the experts were explaining the way the fire moved over that range in the analogy of a dam overflowing.  Once it tasted a little fresh oxygen coming off of our coast, it literally pulled it through all the ravines and all the canyons. And it pulled it down into the Santa Rosa Plain. And it was behaving like liquid, a lot of the eyewitnesses were saying. It was just getting shot down there. And they'd never seen anything like it. So it's really frightening. It puts a haunted kind of feeling into an area [where] I used to feel very comfortable and very at peace. It feels like there is an evil kind of there now.  I did watch Annadel State Park burn, and that was very traumatic because I spent my childhood [there] and up till now hiking that park along with all the others. These used to be kind of sanctuaries for me, the outdoors, you know.  And then of course the neighborhoods that resemble people's livelihoods and people's everything are turned to dirt. And anyways it just gets you in touch with spirituality — in a very very hard, serious testing way and it brings you down to earth.  I think what we've witnessed here in this community is exactly how vulnerable we are.  Isaiah Wisdom, 48 — Returned to his intact home Friday after being under an evacuation order.  We knew something was going on. The wind chimes were blowing so hard I had to go take them down. And when I took them down, it was about 1 [a.m.]. There was so much smoke. I looked it up and it said there’s a fire in Calistoga. That’s 20 miles from here. Within an hour we were just getting nervous, and then we get the alerts on the phones that we had to evacuate.  This aerial photo provided by the California Highway Patrol shows some of hundreds of homes destroyed in Santa Rosa.Image: AP/REX/ShutterstockIt wasn’t until the evacuation came in and my neighbor knocked on the door and I looked over and you could see the flames and smoke. I’ve had a lot friends and students who lost their houses. One couple ... they didn’t even have time to drive out. They just went out on foot. They lost everything. We stopped trying to keep track of who lost their homes. We just want to make sure everyone’s safe.  There’s open fields all around here so it just takes the wrong gust of wind. Everything is smoldering still. When I went home today to check on the neighbor’s cats and feed them, check on the house and the freezer, the wind was picking up and I was waving my fist in the air, [saying,] "No, don’t do this!" Let’s go the other direction, away from town. I came here as a volunteer. I can’t go home, I can’t go to work. There’s nothing for me to do, so I just decided, OK, I’ll come here. This morning one of the first things we heard on the radio was it would be nice if musicians showed up at evacuation centers. I like this style of music. It’s uplifting, it’s fun to play, it’s fast. It can be exciting.  I think when we have disasters like this people remember their true selves, which is that human beings are actually pretty good. My friends have a creamery. The fire was coming over and the call comes out, "Hey, we need to move sheep." So I showed up there. We moved 80 head on Tuesday and we moved the rest of the rams the next day. So everyone comes together in our farming communities. And just if somebody needs something — like the radio today. I can’t go to work. I can’t go to class. There’s too much smoke. There’s no power. The schools are closed. But hey, it would be nice to have some music. I can do that, that’s easy.  Batel, 19, and Lorenzo, 21 — A couple who left their home early Monday morning and are still waiting to hear what happened.  Batel: [Officials] don't let us back there to see anything. I didn't feel good about it. He [Lorenzo] swears the fire just missed everything around the house. It's gone to me. I've really been trying to get around that. The only thing you could do is keep a good mindset and feed off the community. They've been helping out a lot.  The fire was like right next to us, so we absolutely had to evacuate. At least we felt like we had to absolutely evacuate. It was three o'clock in the morning when we were alerted. Most of the urgency came from our neighbors, because actually our news portal didn't prepare us for this at all. We didn't know. The black student union at my school spread the news to me and helped me get a clue about what was happening. Other than that, what got me out of the house at all was my neighbors at three o'clock in the morning knocking on my door, saying, "You gotta get outta here." Lorenzo: You can do what you can do. There's nothing really more you can do but keep moving forward. It's just another day that you have to endure. Rather than being negative, which is only going to stress you out — it's not going to help the situation — just try to be positive. We've done some things over here trying to help other people. Do whatever we can.  When you come inside [the shelter] you can help as a volunteer. I actually helped a lady bring clothes — she got a bunch of clothes [from Salvation Army] — and I walked with her to her car with a bag of stuff and she was just telling me about her experience and herself. She actually lost her home. It was early in the morning. She had two pit bulls that were not necessarily people-friendly and she had to take them to the car and go, because she woke up and she opened the blinds and the fire was everywhere. Batel: Me and my mom, when we came down the hill from my house, we literally watched the fire engulf the whole side of Piner [Road]. And you know that it just blew up right in front of us. We were going around trying to get our loved ones ... and like I said, the black student union really came through. A lot of people were communicating — texting, Facebooking, Snapchatting. We were all finding shelters for each other. So from here I think ... what we're really going to try to do is stick together as a community and really help out. If you are coping with the effects of a natural disaster, you can get help and resources from the Call the Disaster Distress Helpline at 1-800-985-5990 or by texting the number 66746. Spanish speakers can call 1-800-985-5990 and press "2" or text "hablanos" to 66746. If you want to help, find resources here . WATCH: A police officer recorded this dash footage as he drove through the California wildfire
Freed Hostage Says Haqqani Kidnappers Killed His Infant Daughter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He also said they raped his wife
Technology to help get in the Halloween mood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kurt the 'CyberGuy' demonstrates gadgets.
What Would Happen If Yellowstone Erupted
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Everybody take a deep, deep breath.
Thousands of penguin chicks starve in Antarctica
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mass starvation has wiped out thousands of penguin chicks in Antarctica, with unusually thick sea ice forcing their parents to forage further for food in what conservationists Friday called a "catastrophic breeding failure". French scientists, supported by WWF, have been studying a colony of 18,000 pairs of Adelie penguins in East Antarctica since 2010 and discovered only two chicks survived the most recent breeding season in early 2017. Yan Ropert-Coudert, senior penguin scientist at Dumont D’Urville research station, adjacent to the colony, said the region was impacted by environmental changes linked to the breakup of the Mertz glacier.
Las Vegas Sheriff Is 'Absolutely Offended' At Suggestion Cops Bungled Shooting Response
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The hotel disputed authorities' new information about when the shooting began
President Trump Could Decertify the Iran Nuclear Deal. That Could Massively Backfire
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump is expected to decertify the 2015 international agreement that limits Iran’s nuclear program this week.
The 1 Thing You Could Have in Common With a Serial Killer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ever wondered what motivates someone to commit the most heinous of crimes? We found a few traits that unite them -- and you may have them too.
Northern Michigan University offers marijuana degree
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MARQUETTE, Mich. (AP) — A university in Michigan is offering an unusual degree — in marijuana.
New breakthrough could allow people to ‘turbocharge’ their brains using electrodes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It sounds like the stuff of science fiction: people applying electrodes to their heads to ‘turbocharge’ their brain power
Hidden Upside
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A mysterious world of upside-down canyons crisscrosses the underbelly of Antarctica's ice shelves. Now, research finds that some of these crevasses may contribute to both the thinning of the shelves and sea-level rise. A single canyon in the Dotson ice shelf in West Antarctica is responsible for dumping 4.4 billion short tons (4 billion metric tons) of freshwater into the Southern Ocean, according to Noel Gourmelen, a remote-sensing researcher at The University of Edinburgh.
Readers write: Reader appreciation for Ruth Walker, Cassini coverage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Reader appreciation for Ruth Walker
Russia launches European atmosphere monitoring satellite
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MOSCOW (AP) — Russia successfully launched a satellite into orbit Friday that will monitor Europe's atmosphere, helping to study air pollution.
Kate Beckinsale Says Harvey Weinstein 'Couldn't Remember if He Had Assaulted Me'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"He couldn't remember if he had assaulted me or not"
How a Quarter of Cow DNA Came From Reptiles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Imagine if a word in a book—say, bubble—had the ability to magically copy itself, and paste those copies elsewhere in the text. Eventually, you might bubble end up bubble bubble with bubble bubble bubble sentences bubble bubble bubble bubble like these.
President Trump Is Chipping Away at Obamacare. Here's What He's Doing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It's a backdoor way of undermining the Affordable Care Act"
Japan zoo mourns death of love
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An elderly penguin who shot to fame in Japan after falling in love with a cardboard cut-out of a cartoon character has died, at the ripe old age of 21. Officials at Tobu zoo in Saitama, north of Tokyo, said Grape passed away after a brief illness with the object of his desire right by his side. Earlier this year, the Humboldt penguin became smitten with a cut-out of Hululu -- a character from the Japanese anime "Kemono Friends" -- after being dumped by his former mate, a female called Midori.
President Trump Takes Aim at Obama's Legacy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Morning Must Reads: October 13
The Internet Can't Agree on What Color These Sneakers Are and It's Freaking Everyone Out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The internet can't decide if these shoes are teal and gray or pink and white, bringing back memories of the Dress debacle.
California’s Wildfires Are Only Getting Worse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Deadly blazes are breaking out across California--and getting worse every year
Tens of Thousands of Jelly Creatures Wash Up on Beach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It is not the first time that these animals and their relatives have turned up on beaches.
Robert Mueller's Team Just Interviewed Trump's Former Chief of Staff Reince Priebus
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As part of the ongoing Russia probe
Las Vegas Hotel Didn't Call Police Until After Gunman Opened Fire: Official
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Even though there was a shooting before the slaughter began
President Trump Put the Fate of the Iran Nuclear Deal in Congress' Hands
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump sought out a third path Friday as he opted not to re-certify Iran’s compliance with the 2015 nuclear accord.
When the Commander in Chief Disrespects His Commanders
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ret. Adm. Stavridis writes: "The senior military must avoid the politics of the moment"
'We Want to Become a State.' Puerto Rico's Sole Representative in Congress Speaks Out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"If we were treated as a state, we’d be receiving more help"
Arrest Made in Manhunt for Killer of 7
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Aaron Lawson was wanted on warrants for three counts of murder
'We're Saying Merry Christmas Again!' Trump Praises 'Judeo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We're saying Merry Christmas again!"
'Welcome to Key West' sign found 300 miles away a month after Hurricane Irma
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just about a month after Hurricane Irma blew through Florida, everyone will know Key West is "Paradise USA" once again. The iconic "Welcome to Key West" sign was found 300 miles away from its home on Thursday in Fort Meyers Beach, according to the Miami Herald.  SEE ALSO: Hemingway's six-toed cats may have eight lives after Hurricane Irma The friendly greeting to the popular vacation destination off U.S. Route 1 went missing in the midst of the storm, which made landfall in the Florida Keys on Sept.10.  WINK News reports that an unidentified couple dropped it off at the Key West Express docking station on Thursday morning. Crew members at the dock loaded it onto a boat to ship it back home. The famous “Welcome to Key West” sign went missing after Hurricane Irma. It’s just been found! Dropped off @KeyWestExpress this morning pic.twitter.com/TNOrWkoefk — John Trierweiler (@JohnTrierweiler) October 12, 2017 In the meantime, locals have made do with a hand-painted sign welcoming visitors to "Paradise." Original Key west sign found in Fort Myers yesterday is back home! The temporary still hangs in its place welcoming people to “Paradise USA” pic.twitter.com/15XTCs3ZDD — John Trierweiler (@JohnTrierweiler) October 13, 2017 Hurricane Irma hit Florida as a large Category 4 storm. It was so wide and powerful that both the east and west coasts of the state experienced hurricane-force winds (with a peak gust of 142 miles per hour), as well as coastal flooding, and heavy rain. It was one of the strongest storms to ever hit Florida's southwest coast.  WATCH: This is how hurricanes are named