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McGill University Partners with Xebec to Develop Power
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Xebec Adsorption Inc. (TSXV: XBC) (“Xebec”), a global provider of clean energy solutions announced today that it will co-develop a prototype reactor to produce Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) using a Power-to-Gas (P2G) process with McGill University.  This process combines electricity generated from renewable sources with carbon dioxide (CO2) generated from waste. The project is being funded by Xebec as the Industrial sponsor and by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) through a Collaborative Research and Development grant of $360,000 over a period of three years.
3 Reported Dead After Mass Shooting at Rite Aid Distribution Center in Maryland
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three people have been reported dead after a mass shooting at a distribution center in Maryland, police said.
Trump Delays Releasing Russia Probe Documents After U.S. Allies Raised Concerns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Earlier this week, Trump had ordered the documents declassified
New evidence of political bias at Google?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Internal Google emails reveal employees discussing manipulating search results after Trump's travel ban; insight from Peter Schweizer, producer of 'The Creepy Line.'
Teacher suspended after being reported for kissing a student in classroom: Part 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elizabeth Thomas says she was teased by students and teachers after Tad Cummins was suspended from her school.
Supermassive Black Hole Spotted Sucking in Gas at a Third of Light Speed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Chaotic accretion makes for really fast black holes.
Student's Essay Snafu Is Really One for the Books
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was "a series of unfortunate events"
Something huge nearly hit our galaxy and set millions of stars ‘rippling like a pond’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A galaxy brushed against ours
More than 500 Sexual Assaults Happen in a Single Year at Some Military Installations: Report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A newly released Pentagon study revealed that many military sexual assaults occur at a relatively small number of bases and naval ships.
Robot jellyfish could be used to patrol fragile coral reefs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Could schools of robotic jellyfish soon be patrolling the world’s oceans, monitoring fragile environments such as coral reefs? A team of United States researchers certainly thinks so.
Japan space rovers lowered to asteroid to collect data
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TOKYO (AP) — A Japanese spacecraft released two small rovers on an asteroid on Friday in a mission that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system.
Pet Store Puppies Are Linked to Drug
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Not so cute
Japan space probe drops hopping rovers towards asteroid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Japanese space probe Friday released a pair of exploring rovers towards an egg-shaped asteroid to collect mineral samples that may shed light on the origin of the solar system. The "Hayabusa2" probe jettisoned the round, cookie tin-shaped robots toward the Ryugu astroid, according to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). If the mission is successful, the rovers will conduct the world's first moving, robotic observation of an asteroid surface.
President Trump’s Tweets Show Why Most Sex Assault Victims Never File Police Reports, Advocates Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Victims are worried about whether or not they will be believed"
1.3 Billion People Live in Poverty, a New U.N. Report Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A survey of 104 countries comprising 5.5 billion people that looked at health, education and living standards has found that some 1.3 billion people are living in poverty — including 662 million children.
'We Do Not Support This Conduct.' PayPal Joins the Growing Number of Sites to Ban InfoWars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'We do not support this conduct'
Trump Has Wanted to Fire Rosenstein for Months. Has He Just Been Given a Reason?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The deputy attorney general reportedly suggested secretly recording the President
Significant Digits For Friday, Sept. 21, 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the numbers tucked inside the news. 13 to 21 years longer Large life insurance company John Hancock will begin underwriting only “interactive policies” — those tied to health data harvested from wearable devices and smartphones. Holders of such policies live 13 to 21 years longer than other […]
Airline Passengers Suffered Bleeding Ears and Headaches After Pilots 'Forgot' to Pressurize Cabin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Several passengers were taken to the hospital
Scientists baffled by neutron star giving off strange light and cannot explain it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's a never-before-seen finding by NASA
Suge Knight Agrees to Serve 28 Years in Prison Over Fatal Hit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The former rap mogul has agreed to serve 28 years in prison
Morning Joe's Mika Brzezinski On Women’s Empowerment Post #MeToo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Morning Joe co-host on updating a women’s empowerment book in the #MeToo era and why women don’t need to be liked
Japan’s Hayabusa 2 probe drops off rovers at an asteroid and snaps a shadowy selfie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Japan’s Hayabusa 2 probe began the climactic phase of its mission overnight by sending out its first two rovers as it hovered less than 200 feet over an half-mile-wide asteroid, more than 180 million miles from Earth. During the drop-off, the 18-foot-wide spacecraft even took a picture of its own shadow, spread out on the asteroid Ryugu’s rocky surface like a black-and-white copy of the Canadian flag. The release of Hayabusa 2’s MINERVA-II-1 rovers occurred at 9:06 p.m. PT Thursday, mission controllers at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency reported in a tweet. Hayabusa 2 dipped as low as 55 meters… Read More
Uh oh, there might be something wrong with NASA’s Curiosity rover now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's rover situation on Mars is, well, complicated. The aging Opportunity rover was swallowed up by the planet-wide dust storm that covered Mars earlier this summer and hasn't woken back up since. The rover's extended mission is currently in limbo while NASA waits to see if it still has some life left in it, so all eyes have been on the newer Curiosity rover as it continues to explore the Martian surface. Now, in a new update by the Curiosity team, it seems the last working robot is coming down with a case of... something. It seems Curiosity is refusing to send back the vital scientific data that it has been gathering, and NASA isn't sure what's wrong. "Over the past few days, engineers here at JPL have been working to address an issue on Curiosity that is preventing it from sending much of the science and engineering data stored in its memory," the Curiosity team explains. "The rover remains in its normal mode and is otherwise healthy and responsive." The rover isn't totally silent, however, and is still relaying certain status information, just not the science data it has stored locally. This strange set of circumstances is leaving Curiosity's engineers scratching their heads. "Besides transmitting data recorded in its memory, the rover can transmit 'real-time' data when it links to a relay orbiter or Deep Space Network antenna," the team writes. "These real-time data are transmitting normally, and include various details about the rover's status. Engineers are expanding the details the rover transmits in these real-time data to better diagnose the issue." Opportunity — that's the one that's currently sleeping off its dust storm hangover — has far surpassed its original mission timeline. Originally intended to last just 90 days on Mars, it has managed to push on for well over a decade. Curiosity is much newer, having landed on the planet in mid 2012, and it's done some fantastic work thus far. Its primary mission stretched for roughly two years, and it has been continuing its work ever since. Whatever is wrong with Curiosity we'll be keeping our fingers crossed that it gets resolved in short order.
Trump Directly Attacks Kavanaugh Accuser By Name
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He said if the attacks were as "bad" as she says, she would have filed charges
U.S. Passports Can't Be Denied Over Refusal to Select a Gender, a Judge Has Ruled
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Advocates hope the ruling leads to greater gender choice on federal documents
Social media saves lives in Syria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The new smartphone and computer app Sentry acts as an early warning alert system using data from human observers and remote sensors to warn of Assad regime attacks.
President Trump Suggested Spain Build Its Own Border Wall Across the Sahara
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump claimed the desert “can’t be bigger than our border with Mexico”
When a Hurricane Hits, Having Dementia Adds an Extra Challenge — And Even More Risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Families are struggling to protect their loved ones
New sustainable plan to mitigate climate change involves… a hot dog cooker?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Chemists have demonstrated a new, energy-efficient method of pulling carbon dioxide directly from the air. The secret ingredients? An air humidifier and a solar-powered hot dog cooker.
Study of puzzling fossils confirms they came from an animal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've confirmed that puzzling fossils from more than 500 million years ago are traces of an animal.
Robocall plague grows to 50 percent of total calls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Are more phone spams coming in 2019? Kurt 'the CyberGuy' Knutsson gives his take on Facebook's election war room.
Japan's Space Agency Is About to Land Bouncing Rovers on an Asteroid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The rovers are a redemption story for a plan that went awry a decade ago.
Four Republican Senators Who Voted on Clarence Thomas's Confirmation Will Vote on Kavanaugh's
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Four Republican Senators Who Voted on Clarence Thomas's Confirmation Will Vote on Kavanaugh's
India probes death of 12 endangered lions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Indian authorities Friday ordered a probe into the deaths of a dozen endangered wild Asiatic lions, half of them cubs, over the last 10 days, officials said. One lioness died after preying on a poisoned boar while eight others lions died of an infection in the lungs and liver. Gujarat officials have sent the lions' carcasses to a veterinary hospital for further analysis into the cause of infection.
Paul Allen’s Stratolaunch Systems lays out a roadmap for hypersonic rocket planes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stratolaunch Systems, the aerospace company created by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, says it’s exploring the development of a series of rocket planes that would serve as a testbed for hypersonic flight. Stephen Corda, Stratolaunch’s senior technical fellow for hypersonics, presented the concept this week at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies conference in Orlando, Fla. If Stratolaunch follows through on the concept, the company could use the world’s largest airplane as a launch platform for an uncrewed aerospace plane that travels at more than 10 times the speed of sound, or… Read More
Early Voting Begins as Midterms Season Enters Its Final Phase
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Early voting in Minnesota and South Dakota begins Friday, with voters in every corner of the U.S. to soon follow.
A North Carolina Power Plant Dam Has Been Breached by Florence Floodwaters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's possible that coal ash from an adjacent dump is flowing into the Cape Fear River
It Took 3 Years for Scotland Yard to Conclude Foxes Were Behind an Alleged Cat Killing Spree in London
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Foxes, not a serial killer, are behind an alleged cat killing spree of 400 animals in London, police say. Advocates aren't sure
Singapore Airlines bans lion bones in cargo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Singapore Airlines said Friday it has stopped accepting lion bones for cargo after the carrier was singled out in a report for transporting the animal parts from South Africa. Campaigners have long called for a ban on the controversial trade in big cat bones, which are sought after for medicine and jewellery in Southeast Asia. Singapore Airlines was the sole carrier importing lion bones from South Africa to Southeast Asia last year, according to a report released in July by the non-profit EMS Foundation and animal rights group Ban Animal Trading.
'We Are at an Impasse.' Britain's Theresa May Plays Chicken with E.U. Leaders Over Brexit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.K. prime minister Theresa May will stand by the Brexit plan rejected by 27 European leaders, putting the U.K. into a deadlock over Brexit
Complete list of every full moon in 2018, including September's Harvest Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Keep your eyes on the skies later this month for September's full moon, which is dubbed the Harvest Moon. The first blue moon of the year was a spectacular sight, dubbed the 'super blue blood moon'. Falling on January 31, it was the product of three different phenomena: it was a supermoon, a blue moon and a blood moon. While many said it was the first to be seen in 152 years, other contested the fact, leading to a division among scientists. Stargazers were also treated to two full moons in March: as well as the first full moon on the night of March 1, we saw another full moon on March 31. As it was the second full moon of the month, it was a blue moon – the second of 2018. July saw the longest total eclipse of the 21st century, lasting from 8.49pm to 10.13pm in London. Making the phenomenon even more spectacular, Mars was at its closest point to Earth since 2003, meaning the Red Planet was close to maximum brightness.  As if that was not enough, sky-watchers were also able to see Jupiter in the south-west and had a chance of catching the International Space Station (ISS) sailing overhead. The blood moon: a rare lunar eclipse, in pictures The moon is the largest and brightest object in our night sky and has enchanted and inspired mankind for centuries. Blue moons are a rare breed, but full moons can be admired every month. Here is everything you need to know about Earth's only natural satellite, from all its different names to how it was formed. How often does a full moon occur? A full moon occurs every 29.5 days and is when the Moon is completely illuminated by the Sun's rays. It occurs when Earth is directly aligned between the Sun and the Moon.  Super blue blood moon, in pictures Why do full moons have names? The early Native Americans didn't record time using months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Instead tribes gave each full moon a nickname to keep track of the seasons and lunar months. Most of the names relate to an activity or an event that took place at the time in each location. However, it wasn't a uniform system and tribes tended to name and count moons differently. Some, for example, counted four seasons a year while others counted five. Others defined a year as 12 moons, while others said there were 13. Colonial Americans adopted some of the moon names and applied them to their own calendar system which is why they're still in existence today, according to the Farmer’s Almanac. January: Wolf Moon This moon was named because villagers used to hear packs of wolves howling in hunger around this time of the year. Its other name is the Old Moon. This January there are two Wolf Moons - and stargazers will be in for a treat as both will be supermoons. When two moons occur in one month, the second is called a blue moon. While blue moons typically occur only once every two to three years, this year we will be treated to two moons - the second appearing at the end of March. The night following the first full moon of the month saw the Quadrantid meteor shower light up the skies. When? January 2 and January 31 February: Snow Moon Snow moon is named after the white stuff because historically it's always been the snowiest month in America. It's also traditionally referred to as the Hunger Moon, because hunting was very difficult in snowy conditions.  However this year there won't be a Snow Moon - with a full moon occurring at the end of January and another at the beginning of March, we won't see one light up the skies during the year's shortest month. When? There will be no full moon this month The full Snow Moon appears red above London's Albert bridge and Battersea Bridge in 2012 Credit: Anthony Devlin March: Worm Moon As temperatures warm, earthworm casts begin to appear and birds begin finding food. It's also known as Sap Moon, Crow Moon and Lenten Moon. There will be two moons this March, one at the start of the month and one at the end. As in January, the second moon of the month is called a blue moon. The second moon of the month is important because it is used to fix the date of Easter, which is always the Sunday after the first full moon following the spring equinox. This year, that moon appears on Saturday March 31, which means Easter Sunday falls the day after, on April 1. When? March 1 and 31 April: Pink Moon April's full moon is known as the Pink Moon, but don't be fooled into thinking it will turn pink. It's actually named after pink wildflowers, which appear in the US and Canada in early spring.  This moon is also known as Egg Moon, due to spring egg-laying season. Some coastal tribes referred to it as Fish Moon because it appeared at the same time as the shad swimming upstream.  When? April 30 A couple watch the Pink Moon rise beside Hartshead Pike on April 29, 2018 in Manchester, England Credit: Anthony Devlin May: Flower Moon Spring has officially sprung by the time May arrives, and flowers and colourful blooms dot the landscape. This moon is also known as Corn Planting Moon, as crops are sown in time for harvest, or Bright Moon because this full moon is known to be one of the brightest. Some people refer to it as Milk Moon. When? May 29 Night sky June: Strawberry Moon This moon is named after the beginning of the strawberry picking season. It's other names are Rose Moon, Hot Moon, or Hay Moon as hay is typically harvested around now. This moon appears in the same month as the summer solstice, the longest day of the year (June 21) in which we can enjoy approximately 17 hours of daylight. When? June 28 July: Thunder Moon Named due to the prevalence of summer thunder storms. It's sometimes referred to as the Full Buck Moon because at this time of the year a buck's antlers are fully grown.  When? July 27 August: Sturgeon Moon Tribes in North America typically caught Sturgeon during this month, but also it is when grain and corn were gathered so is also referred to as Grain Moon.  This moon appears in the same month as the Perseid meteor shower, which peaked on August 12. When? August 26 Perseids meteor shower 2018 - in pictures September: Harvest Moon The Harvest Moon is the name given to the first full moon that takes place closest to the Autumn equinox, which this year will come on September 25. The Harvest Moon arrived late last year, on October 5 - it normally rises in September. It was during September that most of the crops were harvested ahead of the autumn and this moon would give light to farmers so they could carry on working longer in the evening. Some tribes also called it the Barley Moon, the Full Corn Moon or Fruit Moon.  When?September 25 October: Hunter's Moon As people planned ahead for the cold months ahead, the October moon came to signify the ideal time for hunting game, which were becoming fatter from eating falling grains. This moon is also known as the travel moon and the dying grass moon. When? October 24 November: Frost Moon The first of the winter frosts historically begin to take their toll around now and winter begins to bite, leading to this month's moon moniker. It is also known as the Beaver Moon. When? November 23 December: Cold Moon Nights are long and dark and winter's grip tightens, hence this Moon's name. With Christmas just a few weeks away, it's also referred to as Moon before Yule and Long Nights Moon. When? December 22 Clouds clear to allow a view of the final full moon of the year, a so-called 'Cold Moon' on December 13 2016 in Cornwall. Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images Once in a blue moon Does this well-known phrase have anything to do with the moon? Well, yes it does. We use it to refer to something happening very rarely and a blue moon is a rare occurrence. It's the name given to a second full moon that occurs in a single calendar month and this typically occurs only once every two to three years. There's lots of other moons, too: Full moon: We all know what these are. They come around every month and light up the night at night. Harvest moon: The full moon closest to the autumn equinox. Black moon: Most experts agree that this refers to the second new moon in a calendar month. The last black moon was at the start of October 2016 and the next one is expected in 2019. Blue moon: A phenomenon that occurs when there is a second full moon in one calendar month. Joe Rao from space.com explains: "A second full moon in a single calendar month is sometimes called a blue moon. A black moon is supposedly the flip side of a blue moon; the second new moon in a single calendar month." Supermoon is seen behind the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, in May 2012. Credit: AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano The infrequent nature of this lunar event led to the phrase "once in a blue moon" to signify a rare occurrence. It does not actually mean the moon will be blue. Blood moon: Also known as a supermoon lunar eclipse. It's when the shadow of Earth casts a reddish glow on the moon, the result of a rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year.  There was one in the UK in September 2015, and before that in 1982 but the next one won't be until 2033.  Strawberry moon: A rare event when there's a full moon on the same day as the summer solstice. It happened in June 2016 for the first time since 1967 when 17 hours of sunlight gave way to a bright moonlit sky. Despite the name, the moon does appear pink or red. The romantic label was coined by the Algonquin tribes of North America who believed June’s full moon signalled the beginning of the strawberry picking season. What is a supermoon? Ever looked up at the night sky to see a full moon so close you could almost touch it? Well you've probably spotted a supermoon. The impressive sight happens when a full moon is at the point in its orbit that brings it closest to Earth. To us Earth-lings, it appears 30 per cent brighter and 14 per cent bigger to the naked eye.  How a supermoon is generated Supermoon is not an astrological term though. It's scientific name is actually Perigee Full Moon, but supermoon is more catchy and is used by the media to describe our celestial neighbour when it gets up close. Astrologer Richard Nolle first came up with the term supermoon and he defined it as "… a new or full moon which occurs with the moon at or near (within 90 per cent of) its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit", according to earthsky.org. How many supermoons are there in 2018? There are two full moon supermoons this year, both of which took place in the first month of the year. The first appeared on January 2 and the second appeared on January 31. As it was the second moon of the month, the latter moon was also known as a blue moon. There will also be two new moon supermoons in 2018: one on July 13 and another on August 11. Unfortunately, stargazers were unable to see these moons as new moons are generally obscured by the light of the sun. Last year we were lucky enough to have four supermoons. The first three - April 26, May 25, June 24 - were new moons.  The fourth supermoon of 2017 appeared on December 3 and was a full moon supermoon. This will be a full moon supermoon. In fact, it's the first of three full moon supermoons in a row.  Supermoon rises over Auckland, New Zealand in August 2014. Credit: Simon Runting/REX What do I look for? Head outside at sunset when the moon is closest to the horizon and marvel at its size. As well as being closer and brighter, the moon (clouds permitting) should also look orange and red in colour. Why? Well, as moonlight passes through the thicker section of the atmosphere, light particles at the red end of the spectrum don't scatter as easily as light at the blue end of the spectrum. So when the moon looks red, you're just looking at red light that wasn't scattered. As the moon gets higher in the sky, it returns to its normal white/yellow colour.  Will the tides be larger? Yes. When full or new moons are especially close to Earth, it leads to higher tides. Tides are governed by the gravitational pull of the moon and, to a lesser extent, the sun. Because the sun and moon go through different alignments, this affects the size of the tides. Tell me more about the moon The moon is 4.6 billion years old and was formed between 30-50 million years after the solar system. It is smaller than Earth - about the same size as Pluto in fact. Its surface area is less than the surface area of Asia - about 14.6 million square miles according to space.com Gravity on the moon is only 1/6 of that found on Earth. The moon is not round, but is egg-shaped with the large end pointed towards Earth. It would take 135 days to drive by car to the moon at 70 mph (or nine years to walk). The moon has "moonquakes" caused by the gravitational pull of Earth. Experts believe the moon has a molten core, just like Earth.  How was the Moon formed? How the Moon was formed Man on the Moon Only 12 people have ever walked on the moon and they were all American men, including (most famously) Neil Armstrong who was the first in 1969 on the Apollo II mission.  The last time mankind sent someone to the moon was in 1972 when Gene Cernan visited on the Apollo 17 mission. Although Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, Buzz Aldrin was the first man to urinate there. While millions watched the moon landing on live television, Aldrin was forced to go in a tube fitted inside his space suit. Buzz Aldrin Jr. beside the U.S. flag after man reaches the Moon for the first time during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969.  Credit: AP When the astronauts took off their helmets after their moonwalk, they noticed a strong smell, which Armstrong described as “wet ashes in a fireplace” and Aldrin as “spent gunpowder”. It was the smell of moon-dust brought in on their boots. The mineral, armalcolite, discovered during the first moon landing and later found at various locations on Earth, was named after the three Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil ARMstrong, Buzz ALdrin and Michael COLlins. An estimated 600 million people watched the Apollo 11 landing live on television, a world record until 750 million people watched the wedding of the Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981. One of President Nixon’s speechwriters had prepared an address entitled: “In Event of Moon Disaster”. It began: “Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay to rest in peace.” If the launch from the Moon had failed, Houston was to close down communications and leave Armstrong and Aldrin to their death.  How the Daily Telegraph reported Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon in 1969
Vietnam's President Tran Dai Quang Is Dead at 61 Following a Serious Illness
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang, the country’s second in command after the Communist party’s leader, died Friday of a serious illness, the government said. He was 61.
At Least 5 People, Including 3 Infants, Stabbed at Overnight Day Care Center
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A motive for the stabbings hasn't been determined
Tossed net captures space junk in orbit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A tossed net has managed to capture space junk in a demonstration of ways to clean up debris in orbit.
Airline Passengers Suffered Bleeding Ears and Headaches After Pilots 'Forgot' to Pressurize Cabin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pilots on a flight from Mumbai to Jaipur, India reportedly “forgot” to regulate cabin pressure on a Boeing 737.
Questions raised about US museum's Abraham Lincoln hat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It has been a question plaguing the museum dedicated to one of America's greatest presidents: Is the hat real? The hat in question is of the stovepipe variety that adorned the head of Abraham Lincoln -- recognized for his fashion sense and lauded for ending slavery. The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Illinois had displayed the chocolate brown, beaver fur hat as one that had in fact been on the 16th US president's head.
Despite some progress, Alzheimer's fight falling flat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's a devastating disease driving a dementia epidemic ruining tens of millions of lives, but with no new medical treatment since the turn of the century the fight against Alzheimer's is foundering. Despite decades of research and hundreds of millions of dollars, the precise cause of the neurodegenerative disease -- which leaves victims suffering from memory loss, disorientation and behavioural problems -- remains poorly understood. "It's a bit like solving a jigsaw puzzle without knowing what the end result needs to look like," said Pierre Tariot, director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix, Arizona.
Delhi's last elephants await marching orders
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The mighty Heera marched through a crowded slum chewing bamboo, oblivious that freedom from life as one of Delhi's last six elephants at work in the polluted city could be just around the corner. After years of pressure from activists who accuse the animals' owners of flouting wildlife regulations by keeping them in a city, authorities have ordered the seizure of the elephants. Fifty years ago the Indian capital housed more than 200 elephants, covered in garlands and carrying grooms to weddings, or being sought by the faithful for blessings at temples.