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Grand Jury Slams Penn State for 'Rampant and Pervasive' Fraternity Hazing After Tim Piazza's Death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"No fraternity’s existence is worth more than the life of Tim Piazza"
Immigration Groups Push Congress to Protect Dreamers Before the End of the Year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Immigration advocacy groups are pressuring Congress to protect immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children before the year ends.
Young computer experts exploited video game for mayhem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The hackers were targeting the server hosts that provide protection against botnet attacks for 'Minecraft' players, hoping then to provide such protection themselves and make millions; James Rosen has the story for 'Special Report.'
A Man Accused of Driving into a Crowd of Protestors Faces a First
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Aug. 12 attack in Charlottesville left 32-year-old Heather Heyer dead and dozens injured
Eighth planet found in faraway solar system, matching ours
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An 8th planet has been found in a faraway solar system, matching ours in numbers
Fuller House Actor John Stamos to Be a First
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The "Fuller House" actor says he's been "practicing for a long time”
Facebook Will Now Let You Mute Your Most Annoying Friends for 30 Days
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Your friends won't get a notification about it, either
MU69: NASA New Horizon's Furthest Ever Destination Could be Hiding a Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The next stop for NASA’s New Horizons probe, a spacecraft on a mission to explore areas of space not yet seen by astronomers, may be hiding a mysterious mini “moonlet.” Strange signals from distant body MU69 alerted astronomers to the small moon. New Horizon has chalked up quite a few achievements since its launch in 2006. Earlier this year, NASA released a video of Pluto's surface captured by the New Horizons flyby.
Massive Great White Shark, Mary Lee, Tracked For Five Years, Goes Silent
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In September 2012, researchers put a tracking device on a 3,456-pound great white shark and named her Mary Lee. Probably not, says Chris Fischer, who leads ocean research expeditions and was part of the team that caught and tagged her. Mary Lee when she was first captured and tagged on a research vessel.
What science says about why we get déjà vu
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's the sense of familiarity that feels misplaced because you know you haven't experienced the same thing before. For no apparent reason, you feel like you're reliving a past experience. It's called déjà vu, which is French for "already seen," and it happens to an estimated 70% of the population, according to How Stuff Works, with people aged between 15 and 25 years old experiencing it most.
SpaceX 1st: Recycled rocket soars with recycled capsule
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX racked up another first on Friday, launching a recycled rocket with a recycled capsule on a grocery run for NASA. The unmanned Falcon rocket blasted off with a just-in-time-for-Christmas delivery ...
Google discovers new planet which proves Solar System is not unique 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google has previously discovered lost tribes, missing ships and even an forgotten forest. But now it has also found two entire planets. The technology giant used one its algorithms to sift through thousands of signals sent back to Earth by Nasa’s Kepler space telescope. One of the new planets was found hiding in the Kepler-90 star system, which is around 2,200 light years away from Earth. The discovery is important because it takes the number of planets in the star system up to eight, the same as our own Solar System. It is the first time that any system has been found to have as many planets ours. Andrew Vanderburg, astronomer and Nasa Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow at The University of Texas, Austin, said:  "The Kepler-90 star system is like a mini version of our solar system. You have small planets inside and big planets outside, but everything is scrunched in much closer. The Kepler-90 star system has eight planets, like our own  Credit: Nasa “For the first time we know for sure the Solar System is not the sole record holder for the number of planets. “Maybe there are systems out here with so many planets they make ours sound ordinary. It’s very possible that Kepler-90 has even more planets we might not even know about. “There is a lot of unexplored real estate in Kepler-90 system and it would almost be surprising if there were not more planets in the system.” The new planet Kepler-90i is about 30 per cent larger than Earth and very hot Credit: Nasa  The planet Kepler-90i, is a small rocky planet, which orbits so close to its star that the surface temperature is a ‘scorchingly hot’ 800F (426C). It orbits its own sun once every 14 days. The Google team applied a neural network to scan weak signals discovered by the Kepler exoplanet-hunting telescope which had been missed by humans. Kepler has already discovered more than 2,500 exoplanets and 1,000 more which are suspected. The telescope spent four years scanning 150,000 stars looking for dips in their brightness which might suggest an orbiting planet was passing in front. The Kepler space telescope  Credit: Nasa Although the observation mission ended in 2013, the spacecraft recorded so much data during its four year mission that scientists expect will be crunching the data for many years to come. Christopher Shallue, senior software engineer at Google AI in Mountain View, California, who made the discovery, said the algorithm was so simple that it only took two hours to train to spot exoplanets. Test of the neural network correctly identified true planets and false positives 96 percent of the time. They have promised to release all of the code so that amateurs can train computers to hunt for their own exoplanets. “Machine learning will become increasingly important for keeping pace with all this data and will help us make more discoveries than ever before,” said Mr Shallue. “This is really exciting discovery and a successful proof of concept in using neural networks to find planets even in challenging situations where signals are very weak. “We plan to search all 150,000 stars, we hope using our technique we will be able to find lots of planets including planets like Earth.” Previously Trappist-1 was found to have the most planets outside of our own Solar System Credit: Nasa  Before the new discovery, Trappist-1 was the star system with the most planets, with seven. Paul Hertz, Astrophysics Division director at NASA Headquarters in Washington, said: “When we launched Kepler in 2009 we didn’t know if planets were common or rare. We now know every star in the night sky has a family of planets orbiting it. “The archive Kepler data is a treasure trove of information which will bring many more discoveries. Today’s announcement is one such discovery. “It shows what happens when new scientific methods are applied to archival data.” Jessie Dotson, Kepler’s project scientist at Nasa’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley, added: "These results demonstrate the enduring value of Kepler’s mission. “New ways of looking at the data – such as this early-stage research to apply machine learning algorithms – promises to continue to yield significant advances in our understanding of planetary systems around other stars. I’m sure there are more firsts in the data waiting for people to find them.”  
'Star Wars:' Could Lightsabers Really Take Down the Dark Side?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Read the original article. With the latest film in the Star Wars saga, The Last Jedi, hitting cinemas this week, it got me thinking about lightsabers —the iconic weapon of Jedi and Sith alike. As I’ve previously shown, real-life lightsabers would theoretically be possible, though horrendously impractical and somewhat beyond our current technological capabilities.
Here's what Elon Musk has to say about Donald Trump’s plan to send Americans to the moon and Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The SpaceX boss publicly supported the president’s most recent space announcement.
Climate change experts emitted 30,000 tonnes of CO2 flying to conference, NASA expert says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More than 25,000 scientists flew to New Orleans
U.S. Prosecutors Are Rushing to Cash In on a Drug
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The bitcoin cache was worth less than $500,000 a year ago, but has exploded in value to about $8.5 million
The Trump Administration Wants to Block H
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Department of Homeland Security announced its rollback of an Obama-era policy on Thursday
From Quadrantid to Geminid: The meteor showers to watch out for next year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Every year our skies are lit up by returning meteor showers, from Lyrids to Perseids, Orionids to Geminids. If the weather conditions are in our favour and the moon isn't too bright, there's a chance to see the shooting stars in action. Last night skies around the world were lit up with the Geminids meteor shower, which was at its peak between 2am and 3am. A little #Geminid. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. 2319UT 13 December 2017. #StormHour#ThePhotoHour#Geminidmeteorshower#Geminidspic.twitter.com/KZ1ff7VoQ0— David Blanchflower BSc (@DavidBflower) December 14, 2017 Caught this Geminid meteor from our rear deck in Easter Ross, Scotland. #Geminids#Geminid#geminidmeteorshower#Geminids2017#meteorshower#meteor@BBCBreaking@bbcweather@BBCScotWeatherpic.twitter.com/6hz5sf06CS— Graham Collins (@GrahamCollinsUK) December 14, 2017 Captured this bright Geminid Meteor over Barnet UK on my GoPro 4 in nightlapse mode 10sec continuous exposures#Geminids#Geminidmeteorshowerpic.twitter.com/bqyZ7IaeV8— Mike Constantine (@Moonpans) December 14, 2017 If you missed out on the excitement last night, have no fear: the next meteor shower is only a matter of weeks away. Here is our guide to the must-see meteor showers for next year, as well as where to set up camp to spot them. When is the next meteor shower? The Quadrantids will be the first major meteor shower of 2018, taking place on January 3. Coming just a day after the first full moon - and supermoon - of the year, the viewing conditions for the shower might be hindered by the moon's powerful glare, making it slightly more difficult to spot the flashes in the night sky. The shower has a sharp peak, which means the shower usually only lasts a few hours. The optimum time to catch the shower this time will be after midnight and before dawn, when between 10 and 60 meteors will be shooting per hour. First spotted in 1825 by the Italian astronomer Antonio Brucalassi, astronomers suspect the shower originates from the comet C/1490 Y1, which was first observed 500 years ago by Japanese, Chinese and Korean astronomers. Why is it called Quadrantid? The Quadrantids appear to radiate from the extinct constellation Quadrans Muralis, which is now part of the Boötes constellation and not far from the Big Dipper. Because of the constellation's position in the sky, the shower is often impossible to see in the Southern Hemisphere - however there is a chance of spotting it up to 51 degrees south latitude. The best spots to see the display are in countries with high northern latitudes, like Norway, Sweden, Canada and Finland. What is a meteor shower? Meteors are sometimes called shooting stars, although they actually have nothing to do with stars. A meteor shower occurs when Earth passes through the debris stream occupying the orbit of a comet - or, in simpler terms, when a number of meteors flash across the sky from roughly the same point. Perspective makes meteor showers appear to emanate from a single point in the sky known as the shower radiant. A typical meteor results from a particle the size of a grain of sand vaporising in Earth’s atmosphere when it enters at 134,000mph. If you're lucky you could see up to 100 meteors or 'shooting stars' every hour on December 13/14. Credit: PETE LAWRENCE Something larger than a grape will produce a fireball and this is often accompanied by a persistent afterglow known as a meteor train. This is a column of ionised gas slowly fading from view as it loses energy. Meteor, meteorid or meteroite? A meteor is a meteoroid – or a particle broken off an asteroid or comet orbiting the Sun – that burns up as it enters the Earth's atmosphere creating the effect of a "shooting star". Meteoroids that reach the Earth's surface without disintegrating are called meteorites. Meteors are mostly pieces of comet dust and ice no larger than a grain of rice. Meteorites are principally rocks broken off asteroids in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and can weigh as much as 60 tonnes. They can be "stony", made up of minerals rich in silicon and oxygen, "iron", consisting mainly of iron and nickel, or "stony-iron", a combination of the two. The Geminids meteor shower in Vladivostok, Russia in December 2017 Credit: Yuri Smityuk Scientists think about 1,000 tons to more than 10,000 tons of material from meteors falls on Earth each day, but it's mostly dust-like grains, according to Nasa, and they pose no threat to Earth. There are only two incidents recorded where people reported being injured by a meteorite, including one in 1954 when a woman was bruised by a meteorite weighing eight pounds after it fell through her roof.  The best stargazing spots in the UK A dark night is best for a meteor shower, after midnight and before dawn.  Head somewhere away from the bright lights - into more rural areas if you can - and be prepared to wait a good hour if you want the best chance of seeing a shower. Look for a wide, open viewing area - perhaps a national park or large field on the side of a road - and make sure you concentrate your gaze towards the east. Meteor showers are unpredictable though, so prepare for the fact you might not see much. Choose a dark location away from stray lights and give yourself at least 20 minutes in total darkness to properly dark adapt.  Stars in the Milky Way over Kielder Forest Credit: Owen Humphreys Britain has some wonderful stargazing locations, including three "Dark Sky Reserves" (Snowdonia, Brecon Beacons and Exmoor national parks) and Europe's largest "Dark Sky Park" (Northumberland National Park and the adjoining Kielder Water and Forest Park). Galloway Forest Park: Galloway is a couple of hours from Glasgow and an hour from Carlisle. The park's most popular spot for stargazing is Loch Trool. Exmoor and around: Exmoor was granted International Dark-Sky Reserve status by the International Dark-Sky Association in 2011. Light pollution is managed to make the area more appealing to amateur astronomers. Romney Marsh: Night once provided cover for smugglers known as Owlers, but today Romney Marsh offers celestial bounty, arching over a landscape adorned with the spires of ancient churches. Kielder: Kielder Forest is officially the darkest place in England – 250 square miles of wooded beauty where Northumberland brushes against Scotland. It has its own fabulous, modern, wood-clad observatory on the slopes of Black Fell above Kielder Water. North York Moors: As well as stunning night skies, the North York Moors boast historic market towns such as Helmsley and Pickering, plus appealing coastal spots, including Scarborough and Whitby. best stargazing locations The other meteor showers to look out for next year The Lyrid meteor shower The annual Lyrid meteor shower takes places annually between April 16 and April 25. In 2018, it will peak on the morning of April 22, with the greatest number of meteors falling during the few hours before dawn. With no moon, stargazers might be able to see between 10 and 20 Lyrid meteors per hour at the shower's peak.  Lyrid meteors are typically as bright as the stars in the Big Dipper, but some are much more intense, even brighter than Venus, the brightest object in the night sky after the moon. Called "Lyrid fireballs", these cast shadows for a split second and leave behind smokey debris trails that linger for minutes. Tim Peake space pictures What causes the Lyrid meteor shower? The ionised gas in the meteors' trail burns up as it enters the Earth's atmosphere, creates the glow which can be seen streaking across the night sky.  The shower occurs as the Earth passes through the dust left over from Comet Thatcher (C/186 G1), which makes a full orbit of the sun once every 415 years (which is why there are no photographs of it). Flakes of comet dust, most no bigger than grains of sand, strike Earth's atmosphere traveling 49 km/s (110,000 mph) and disintegrate as streaks of light. Comet Thatcher last visited the inner solar system in 1861 - before the widespread use of photography  - and isn’t expected to return until the year 2276. How did the Lyrids get its name? The shower radiates out from the direction of the star Vega, the brightest light in the constellation Lyra the Harp, from which it takes its name. Vega is a brilliant blue-white star about three times wider than our Sun and 25 light years away. The Lyrids radiating from the vicinity of the blue star Lyra Credit: earthsky.org You might remember Vega being mentioned in Carl Sagan's movie Contact - it was the source of alien radio transmissions to Earth. When were the Lyrids first observed and recorded? The earliest sightings of the Lyrid meteor shower go back 2,700 years and are among the oldest of known meteor showers. In the year 687 BC the ancient Chinese observed the meteors and recorded them in the ancient Zuo Zhan chronicles saying:  "On the 4th month in the summer in the year of xīn-mǎo (of year 7 of King Zhuang of Lu), at night, (the sky is so bright that some) fixed stars become invisible (because of the meteor shower); at midnight, stars fell like rain. That era of Chinese history corresponds with what is now called the Spring and Autumn Period (about 771 to 476 BC).  Tradition associates this period with the Chinese teacher and philosopher Confucius, one of the first to espouse the principle: “Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself.”   American observers saw an outburst of nearly 100 Lyrid meteors per hour in 1982. Around 100 meteors per hour were seen in Greece in 1922 and from Japan in 1945. The Perseid meteor shower The Perseids appear to originate from within the star constellation Perseus, hence the shower's name. The shower occurs when Earth passes through the debris stream occupying the orbit of the comet Swift-Tuttle. The wonderfully named comet is the largest object known to repeatedly pass Earth (it's 16 miles wide). It orbits the sun ever 133 years and each time it passes through the inner solar system it warms up, releasing fresh comet material into its orbital stream. The last time it was closest to the sun was in December 1992. It will be back again in July 2126.  Perseid meteor radiant When can I see the Perseid meteor shower? The window for the next Perseid meteor shower is from July 17 to August 24 2018. Stargazers stand a chance of seeing the shower at any point in this window, however the peak will occur around on August 13.  The best time to take a look at the sky will be from about 1am BST in the Northern Hemisphere until the onset of dawn twilight. Peak rates of 150-200 meteors per hour were recorded in 2016, but typical rates are about 80 meteors an hour streaking across the night sky, each leaving a trail.   To see it, look at a height approximately two-thirds up the sky in any direction. If you want a recommendation, east through south offers some great background constellations in the early hours during August. Look for the shower's "radiant" from the north-east corner of Perseus. The Orionid meteor shower The Orionid meteors appear every year, with showers producing around 20 meteors every hour. The shower is active throughout October until November 7, but the best time to see it will be on October 20 between midnight and dawn, when the sky is darkest and the shower will be at its brightest. Tom Kerss, an astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich said:"If you can brave the cold, make a plan to stay out and enjoy the thrill of seeing tiny flecks of Halley's Comet disintegrate at hypersonic speeds above your head." He advises finding a secluded spot and allowing the eyes to adjust to the darkness. Orionid meteors streak across the sky over Kula town of Manisa, Turkey on October 21, 2017 Credit:  Anadolu Agency Mr Kerss said: "There's no advantage to using binoculars or a telescope, your eyes are the best tool available for spotting meteors, so relax and gaze up at the sky, and eventually your patience will be rewarded. "Meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, though if you have to pick a direction, you might fare slightly better looking east." The meteoroids from Halley's Comet strike Earth's atmosphere at a speed of 148,000mph, (238,000kph) burning up in streaking flashes of light that can be seen with the naked eye. Orionid meteors are known for their speed and brilliance, so if you persevere there's a good chance you'll see several bright 'shooting stars' zipping across the sky. The Orionid Meteor Shower is one of two meteor showers created by debris from Halley's Comet - the other is the Eta Aquarids, which occurs in May. Unfortunately, Halley's Comet itself has not been visible from Earth since 1986. Why is it called Orionid? It's named Orionid because it appears to radiate from the constellation Orion. Orion is one of the brightest and best known constellations and contains two of the 10 brightest stars in the sky Rigel and Betelgeuse, as well as the famous Orion's Belt.  Orion's Belt is made up of three bright stars quite close together almost in a straight line, and is about 1,500 light years from us on Earth.  Orion has been known since ancient times and is also referred to as Hunter thanks to Greek mythology. He is often seen in star maps facing Taurus, the bull. The Geminid meteor shower The Geminids are an annual meteor shower caused by the 3200 Phaethon asteroid. Its orbit brings it very close to the sun, causing its surface material to crumble and break off. The Earth passes through this space debris every December, which burns up as hits our atmosphere. These are the meteors visible in our sky. The Geminids were first observed relatively recently, in 1862, compared with the Perseids (36AD) and the Leonids (902AD). The meteor shower appears to come from a point in the constellation Gemini, hence its name. When can it be seen? The next Geminid meteor shower can be seen from around December 4th to 17th, with peak activity from about 10pm on December 13th and into the early hours of the 14th.  Sightings are possible around the world, but there's good news for Britons: the shower favours observers in the Northern Hemisphere over those in the Southern. If you're lucky you could see up to 100 meteors or 'shooting stars' every hour. You can spot the meteors anywhere, but they will appear to come from the Gemini constellation. During December, it begins the evening in the east and moves across the sky to the west during the night. Find Orion's Belt - three bright stars positioned in a row - and then look above it and a little to the left. They will appear as streaks of light, and will sometimes arrive in bursts of two or three. They vary in colour, depending on their composition. An average of 120 meteors an hour - or two a minute - can be expected, or more during the 2am peak.
Watch Blue Origin's 'Mannequin Skywalker' ride into space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Behold one of history's greatest partnerships: Man and mannequin, working together so that both may be joined in eternal embrace beyond the stars. SEE ALSO: Blue Origin shares a preview of its giant New Glenn rocket Earlier this week, we excitedly shared video of a successful rocket launch by Jeff Bezo's spaceflight company Blue Origin. In that video, the company offers a peek at Blue Origin's launch site as it sent its suborbital New Shepard rocket and capsule, which included a test dummy nicknamed "Mannequin Skywalker," to the edge of space. The rocket reached 322,032 feet above Earth's surface before successfully returning to terra firma but now — BUT NOW! — we have video from inside the capsule showing Mannequin Skywalker's trip in full.  The video gives us all a good idea of what it'll feel like when people make the trip. That is, if you don't consider Mannequin Skywalker a person (which is fair). But have you been to the edge of space?  Didn't think so.
‘Nobody On the Republican Side Is a Winner.’ GOP in Blame Game After Roy Moore's Loss
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some say it's Steve Bannon's fault, while others blame Mitch McConnell. Either way, the defeat exposes the rifts within the Republican Party
SpaceX launches first used rocket for NASA mission
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CNBC's Morgan Brennan reports on SpaceX's first launch of its reused Falcon-9 rocket for a NASA mission.
These are the Top 10 Questions You Asked Google in 2017. We Answered Them.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"What is covfefe?"
Air Force Academy Is Downplaying Number of Sexual Assaults, Former Official Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She said the school made her a scapegoat
'Worst Case I've Ever Seen.' Mother Convicted of Murder After 16
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The teen weighed only 85 pounds when she died
California Is One Step Closer to Recreational Pot Sales
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The state will allow people 21 and older to legally possess up to an ounce of cannabis and grow six marijuana plants at home
Get a dummy’s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What will people experience when they rocket to the edge of space on the New Shepard suborbital spaceship that’s currently being tested by Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin venture? An 11-minute video, recorded inside the crew capsule during this week’s test flight in West Texas, gives you a pretty good idea. You can even watch the flight’s effect on a test subject — in this case, an instrumented crash-test dummy nicknamed “Mannequin Skywalker.” (For those who have been on another planet for the past 20 years, that name’s a tribute to Anakin Skywalker, a central character in the “Star Wars” saga.) One of… Read More
Russia: Man Caught With 30 Million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russian authorities have seized what they believe to be fossilized remains of a prehistoric shark from a smuggler headed for the Chinese border, customs services said. The customs service announced  that a search in the luggage of a Chinese citizen who attempted to cross the border into his homeland turned up the artifacts, which he failed to declare. A university in Russia’s Primorye region later released a statement saying the 24 teeth belonged to sea predator Otodus obliguus, who lived some 30 million years ago.
Scientists solve speed surprise in stratospheric stunt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists say they've figured out why an Austrian who became the first skydiver to break the speed of sound fell faster than the drag of his body should have allowed
Missouri issues first fines over misuse of farm chemical in 2016
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Tom Polansek CHICAGO (Reuters) - Missouri has issued its first fines over the misuse of a farm chemical in 2016 that went on to be linked in different formulations to widespread U.S. crop damage this year, the state said on Thursday. Authorities fined eight people a total of $145,125 for improperly spraying the chemical known as dicamba, used to kill weeds, in what Missouri called "the first wave of civil penalties issued to applicators," according to a statement. The delay between sprayings last year and the state's action shows how a long process of investigating many complaints about dicamba use is straining resources in farm states.
'All the Hard Work Was Worth It.' Watch This 16
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ayrton Little's friends burst into celebration with him
Two Journalists Have Been Arrested in Myanmar, Sparking Outcry Over a Widening Press Crackdown
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The reporters had been working on stories about a military crackdown on the Rohingya Muslim minority in Rahkine State
David Attenborough Warns: Sixth Mass Extinction Is Imminent
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The beloved Planet Earth narrator isn't optimistic.
Drones, volcanoes and the 'computerisation' of the Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Robots, like drones, are filtering the natural world through algorithms and turning the world into data.
Democrats Want Doug Jones in the Senate Now. Here's Why That's Not Going to Happen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Democrats won big with Doug Jones' victory in Alabama Tuesday. Now, they are fighting to have him seated as soon as possible
Ancient Peruvian Culture That Inca Empire Claimed It Destroyed 500 Years Ago Resisted and Persisted, New DNA Evidence Shows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the late 1400s, the Inca Empire conquered the indigenous Peruvians of the Chachapoyas region and gained the power to spread the version of history they saw fit. Now, an international team of researchers has found genetic evidence that says otherwise. Today, descendants of the besieged Chachapoyas inhabitants retain distinct pockets of genetic diversity, proving that their ancestors were successful in resisting assimilation into the Empire.
Geminid meteor shower could be the year's best, scientists say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Skywatchers are in for a dazzling show tonight. The annual Geminid meteor shower that will streak across the night sky will be one of the best of the year.
From Alien Skulls to Bears: Weird Things People Think They’ve Found on Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Eagle-eyed Mars fans think they've found some crazy stuff in NASA's photos.
PBS Suspends Tavis Smiley's Show After Sexual Misconduct Investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Smiley denied any misconduct and said that he intends to "fight back"
One Possible, Surprising Victim of Net Neutrality Repeal? Health Care
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One Possible, Surprising Victim of Net Neutrality Repeal? Health Care
Monster Sharks: Four Fierce Giants That Rival Greenland's Ancient Beast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sharks have been making headlines recently after a 2016 report of a Greenland shark that was around 512 years old resurfaced this week. In November, a dinosaur-era frilled shark was on our minds. Here are just a few of the most terrifying examples of sharks from across time.
2 Police Officers Shot in the Chest Were Saved by Bulletproof Vests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The police were engaged in a standoff
Trump Promised a 'Giant Tax Cut for Christmas.' It May Come Even Earlier
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It looks like lawmakers will meet President Trump's holiday deadline of passing the Republican Tax Reform plan and Democrats are not happy.
FCC Votes Down Obama
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Federal Communications Commission has voted on party lines to undo sweeping Obama-era "net neutrality" rules that guaranteed equal access to internet
A Kentucky Lawmaker Who Was Facing Sexual Assault Allegations Kills Himself
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting published an account from a woman saying Johnson sexually assaulted her in the basement of his home in 2013
San Francisco SPCA deploys robot security guard
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 5-foot tall, 300-lb robot called K9 uses cameras, laser 3D mapping, GPS, microphones and license plate recognition software.
This Is When the FCC Net Neutrality Vote is Happening — and How You Can Watch It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The landmark Federal Communications Commission (FCC) vote on net neutrality is taking place from 10.30 a.m. E.T. today
11 Congolese Fighters Have Been Jailed for Life For Raping Dozens of Children
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A spiritual adviser reportedly told the men raping infants would give them supernatural powers
Rex Tillerson Wants Talks With North Korea. The White House Isn't So Sure
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tillerson's proposal to start talks has been contradicted by the White House
Brain cells develop more mutations as we age
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Will Boggs MD (Reuters Health) - Brain cells - neurons - develop gene mutations over the course of a lifetime, contributing to normal aging and potentially presenting a target for treatments that stave off dementia and other types of cognitive decline, researchers say. The team developed a way to sequence the genomes of individual neurons, which allowed them to see what changes are normal and also what happens in specific brain diseases. "The work is at a very early stage,” senior study author Dr. Christopher A. Walsh from Harvard Medical School in Boston told Reuters Health by email.