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What has changed since Anita Hill? Female senators who were there weigh in
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On a weekend in October of 1991, more than 20 million American households watched as Anita Hill testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee that Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her. In her testimony, Ms. Hill, a law professor, described numerous instances of Mr. Thomas using inappropriate sexual language and making unwanted overtures when she worked for him at the Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in the 1980s. Thomas denied any wrongdoing and famously described the proceedings as a “high-tech lynching.” In the end, the Senate voted 52-48 to confirm him.
In trial for eco
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The long-awaited criminal trial for the murder of environmental activist Berta Cáceres sputtered to a halt before it could begin this week, underscoring the prevalence of violence against environmental defenders and widespread impunity across Latin America. Here in one of the world’s most dangerous places for environmental defenders, their murders rarely result in anyone being held accountable, observers say. The appeals could delay the case for days – or possibly months – but Cáceres’ family say it is the only way to ensure true justice for the victim and her accused killers.
The freedom driving North Korea to the table
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Just a year ago, the world was tracking how much North Korea might be a threat as it tested new missiles and nuclear weapons. President Trump even promised “fire and fury” if the United States were attacked. A possible shift in Mr. Kim’s thinking may be visible during this week’s visit of Moon Jae-in, South Korea’s president, to Pyongyang – their third summit.
With nowhere to run, Idlib residents reach for life, but prepare to fight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The sight of his three-year-old twins pains Ibrahim, but he thanks God they are both alive.
No whispering, just horses and city kids, learning on a farm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Jacqui is a draft horse with hoofs the size of dinner plates. “Great job, Matthew,” says Dale Perkins, who’s holding Jacqui’s lead line and giving gentle instruction to the young rider. Mr. Perkins is president of City to Saddle, a riding program that allows inner-city children to experience what it’s like to work on a farm and to interact with one of its largest animals: horses.
With no verdict, how survivors of child sex abuse find own sense of justice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Brown was among a number of survivors of childhood sexual abuse by religious figures who shared their stories with Monitor. Each of them, in their own way, described what true justice would look like for them. In Part One, Michael Norris, a chemical engineer in Houston, described how he became one of the very few who was able to confront his abuser in a court of law and see the priest who abused him convicted and sent to prison. Such institutional processes are essential forms of justice, Brown says.
How one North Carolina town stayed dry during Florence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Neighbors J.W. Raburn and Henry Williams are political polar opposites. Mr. Raburn says he may have been the only one in this sound-side hamlet to have voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. Nearby Oriental, New Bern, and large parts of central North Carolina were devastated when up to 40 inches of rain fell, swelling rivers that are expected to crest later this week.
Kavanaugh twist shows rising influence of MeToo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Just one day after the accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, revealed her identity to The Washington Post, Ms. Conway on Monday said she had it straight from President Trump that Professor Ford should be allowed her say – and with dignity. Ford is willing to appear before Congress, and Conway urged the Senate Judiciary Committee to hear her testimony under oath.
Why Arabic is flowering in Israel even as it’s officially demoted
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It was advertised as the largest Arabic lesson in the world. On a summer night in a square in central Tel Aviv, several thousand Israelis heeded the call to attend and found themselves repeating a series of Arabic words and phrases. The lesson was convened as a protest against the controversial new Nation-State law, which, among other measures, removed Arabic from the list of official languages in Israel.
Meanwhile in ... Africa, more young people are being drawn to the sport of fencing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Africa, more young people are being drawn to the sport of fencing. The International Fencing Federation (FIE), lured by the potential of large pools of untapped talent on the continent, is upgrading its facilities there, reports CNN. “There’s been a big leap,” Manyane Sefularo, champion fencer and FIE coach, told CNN about African teams, which have seen expansion in Sierra Leone, Uganda, and Nigeria. “We’re on the right track.” In South Africa, there is particular excitement about promising young talent coming from the townships of Soweto and Mamelodi. 
Amazon’s Bezos clicks on homelessness
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The world’s richest man, Jeff Bezos, is shopping for solutions to homelessness. Last week, the founder of Amazon announced a special fund of around $1 billion to reward nonprofits doing “needle-moving work” in assisting young families without a home.
‘Returnships’: how the cousin of internships is about giving back
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When I was growing up, you might have had an internship or two. Internships are a must if you want to show you have business experience and get a job after graduation. An internship is usually for those ages 15 to 25.
Canada needs to make a statement about Aung San Suu Kyi, Question easy loans from China, Working mothers are assets, not liabilities, Tourism bump is
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“But the real outrage is that ... the slaughter ... continues unabated.... [T]his ethnic cleansing is taking place in a country whose elected civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is a Nobel Peace Prize winner and one of only six people to have been made an honorary citizen of Canada. “The new government of Malaysia, led by Mahathir Mohamad, has started a movement that the current Jamaican Government ... should view prudently...,” writes Carol Archer. “[T]he 93-year-old Mohamad was voted into office with a mandate to reduce the country’s debt[,] a good portion of which is owed to Chinese companies and government.
Readers write: Buryatia coverage, book search, wildfire precautions, science at home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
My sons and I spent two months in Mongolia on a bicycle tour in 1998. It is not easy to find current, accurate information on this area, so I am delighted the Monitor undertook this series. Recommended: Sochi, Soviets, and czars: How much do you know about Russia?
Canada needs to make a statement about Aung San Suu Kyi, Question easy loans from China, Working mothers are assets, not liabilities, Tourism bump is
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“But the real outrage is that ... the slaughter ... continues unabated.... [T]his ethnic cleansing is taking place in a country whose elected civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is a Nobel Peace Prize winner and one of only six people to have been made an honorary citizen of Canada. “The new government of Malaysia, led by Mahathir Mohamad, has started a movement that the current Jamaican Government ... should view prudently...,” writes Carol Archer. “[T]he 93-year-old Mohamad was voted into office with a mandate to reduce the country’s debt[,] a good portion of which is owed to Chinese companies and government.
Canada needs to make a statement about Aung San Suu Kyi, Question easy loans from China, Working mothers are assets, not liabilities, Tourism bump is
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“But the real outrage is that ... the slaughter ... continues unabated.... [T]his ethnic cleansing is taking place in a country whose elected civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is a Nobel Peace Prize winner and one of only six people to have been made an honorary citizen of Canada. “The new government of Malaysia, led by Mahathir Mohamad, has started a movement that the current Jamaican Government ... should view prudently...,” writes Carol Archer. “[T]he 93-year-old Mohamad was voted into office with a mandate to reduce the country’s debt[,] a good portion of which is owed to Chinese companies and government.
Canada needs to make a statement about Aung San Suu Kyi, Question easy loans from China, Working mothers are assets, not liabilities, Tourism bump is
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“But the real outrage is that ... the slaughter ... continues unabated.... [T]his ethnic cleansing is taking place in a country whose elected civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is a Nobel Peace Prize winner and one of only six people to have been made an honorary citizen of Canada. “The new government of Malaysia, led by Mahathir Mohamad, has started a movement that the current Jamaican Government ... should view prudently...,” writes Carol Archer. “[T]he 93-year-old Mohamad was voted into office with a mandate to reduce the country’s debt[,] a good portion of which is owed to Chinese companies and government.
Canada needs to make a statement about Aung San Suu Kyi, Question easy loans from China, Working mothers are assets, not liabilities, Tourism bump is
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“But the real outrage is that ... the slaughter ... continues unabated.... [T]his ethnic cleansing is taking place in a country whose elected civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is a Nobel Peace Prize winner and one of only six people to have been made an honorary citizen of Canada. “The new government of Malaysia, led by Mahathir Mohamad, has started a movement that the current Jamaican Government ... should view prudently...,” writes Carol Archer. “[T]he 93-year-old Mohamad was voted into office with a mandate to reduce the country’s debt[,] a good portion of which is owed to Chinese companies and government.
Canada needs to make a statement about Aung San Suu Kyi, Question easy loans from China, Working mothers are assets, not liabilities, Tourism bump is
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“But the real outrage is that ... the slaughter ... continues unabated.... [T]his ethnic cleansing is taking place in a country whose elected civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is a Nobel Peace Prize winner and one of only six people to have been made an honorary citizen of Canada. “The new government of Malaysia, led by Mahathir Mohamad, has started a movement that the current Jamaican Government ... should view prudently...,” writes Carol Archer. “[T]he 93-year-old Mohamad was voted into office with a mandate to reduce the country’s debt[,] a good portion of which is owed to Chinese companies and government.
Syria’s next battle: the jockeying for influence by outside powers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Only two grisly questions remain in Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s fight against his civil war rivals: how long before the last major armed resistance, in the northwestern province of Idlib, is crushed; and how many of the estimated three million civilians there will escape.
A golden lesson from the 2008 financial crisis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Ten years ago on Sept. 15, the financial firm Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy, triggering the worst global recession in decades. Largely unnoticed on this 10th anniversary, however, is the fact that it also awakened an improved culture of prudence in many financial firms as well as other companies. While financial crises are hardly new, the job of “risk manager” was invented only about two decades ago.
In Jordan, 'house of safety' offers hope and freedom to at
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Dar Amneh, literally the “house of safety,” is a unique joint project by civil society groups and the Jordanian government to help women at the risk of violence from their own families build new lives. In Jordan, some two dozen women are killed each year in so-called “honor” crimes, when a family member murders a female relative to clear the family name of a perceived stigma, such as pregnancy out of wedlock or purported promiscuity.
Putin's war games send signal to West, but Russia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The exercises, kicked off this week by Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping at a summit in Vladivostok, have led some Russian commentators to suggest hopefully – echoed, fearfully, by some in the West – that the two giants might be edging toward a full-blown military alliance. The war games include Chinese troops working with Russians, and a small contingent of Mongolians, in a multi-nation war scenario.
For the child victims of priests, what would real justice look like?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
There are crimes, like the sexual abuse of children, from which many turn away – using language like “unspeakable,” “unimaginable,” or even “inhuman.”  Even survivors create their mental shields from the crimes they endured.  “This form of abuse is really completely and utterly spiritually annihilating,” says Christa Brown, a survivor of abuse at the hands of a Baptist minister decades ago, and an author who now lives in Colorado. “As a survivor, the biggest, most important part of justice is to be heard, and to be believed,” says Michael Norris, a chemical engineer and manager in Houston, who was abused by a Roman Catholic priest while attending summer camp when he was 10.
Amid trade fight, Canada returns to its roots in opposition to US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As President Trump threatens the “ruination” of Canada in renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadians are not only surprised, but angered. Old complexes about the Canadian-American relationship, one that has been among the most peaceful in the world for two bordering countries, are resurfacing.
South Sudan's midwives, boosted by aid, wonder how long donors will deliver
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It was July 9, 2011, and just outside the walls of the maternity ward at the largest public hospital in the city, a country was being born. As Dr. Alice Pityia scrambled through her rounds, the wails of the newest citizens of the world’s newest country mixed with the cheers of the crowd outside. Salva Kiir, offered another, after the man who had been their president for all of 20 minutes.
The best way to curb illegal migration
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Of all the migrants apprehended along the Southwest border of the United States so far this year, some 43,000 – the largest share – have come from Guatemala. As recent events in Guatemala show, the mass exodus from the Central American country will end only when the people there can elect a government that reflects their values, enabling the kind of trust and integrity that can prevent corruption and violence. In recent years, Guatemala seemed to be heading down that path.
In Albania, new Turkish mosque stirs old resentments
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With its four minarets towering over the Albanian parliament next door, no visitor can miss the Great Mosque of Tirana. When completed in 2019, the hulking new central mosque will be the biggest in the Balkans, with enough room for 5,000 worshipers. Not all Albanians are happy about that – including many Muslims, who make up an estimated 60 percent of the population.
Why good economic numbers aren’t giving Trump a boost in the polls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The second is the unemployment rate for August. Both are evidence of a really, really strong economy – though they’re not as historically unique as President Trump sometimes boasts. The former is the percentage of Americans who approve of the job Mr. Trump is doing, according to an average of major polls at time of writing.
The FDA’s crackdown on teen vaping
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A hallmark of the modern era is the length to which societies will go to protect their most innocent – children. On Sept. 12, for example, the Food and Drug Administration launched its largest coordinated enforcement action in the agency’s history, aimed at the marketing and selling of e-cigarettes to teenagers. The FDA cited an “epidemic” rise in teen vaping over the past year, especially in the most popular brand, Juul, which entices young people with candylike flavors while delivering a strong dose of nicotine.
US defunding of Palestinian refugee agency creates crisis for Jordan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Although never great with numbers, Ahmed Ibrahim says every day he sees the impact of a budget deficit on his home. Because of staff shortages at the local UNRWA health clinic, Mr. Ibrahim must now wait up to six hours to see a nurse for his chronic cough – often times he is only seen for a total of three minutes. Trash in front of his home and across the camp has been piling up since March, when UNRWA, the UN relief agency administering to Palestinian refugees, was forced to lay off most of its part-time street cleaners and sanitation workers following an initial round of US funding cuts.
All the president’s seatmates: two days with Trump on Air Force One
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Anticipation was high as we boarded Air Force One last Thursday for a two-day trip with President Trump to Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. What would Mr. Trump say to us, the reporters traveling with him – and hanging on his every word? The president didn’t have to say anything.
He wants ‘eat your veggies’ to be a good experience for restaurant customers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Mr. Muir slips out to take a few calls and greets an employee who brought her newborn baby, all over the chatter of 20 or so meeting participants. The enterprise, he notes, also supports regional agriculture by sourcing locally, and it gives people an opportunity to learn about the consequences of personal food choices.
The GOP's narrow path to holding the House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Monitor Breakfast host Linda Feldmann was on the road with President Trump last week, so I had the pleasure of filling in for her as the moderator for our guest, Rep. Steve Stivers of Ohio, on Sept. 7. As chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), he’s tasked with making sure his party holds on to its majority in the House come November. As the Monitor’s correspondent on Capitol Hill, I was eager to hear the congressman’s strategy for winning, especially given that independent analysts are increasingly confident of Democratic chances to take over the lower chamber.
Frat houses refine the purpose of brotherhood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At college fraternities across the United States and Canada, the true meaning of brotherhood has just been clarified. After several high-profile deaths from heavy drinking at parties or initiation rites, the major association representing fraternities announced Sept. 4 that it will no longer allow frat houses to serve hard liquor at chapter facilities and events. “At their core, fraternities are about brotherhood, personal development, and providing a community of support.
Challenge to US sovereignty? In polls public accepts constraints on power
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
National security adviser John Bolton’s vigorous defense Monday of national sovereignty in the face of what he views as globalism run amok was enthusiastically received by his immediate audience, the Washington-based Federalist Society. Ambassador Bolton, the White House’s über nationalist and defender of American hard power, directed warning shots against the International Criminal Court and its purported plans to take up alleged US war crimes in Afghanistan and in third-country “black sites.” Underlying his remarks was what he called President Trump’s reassertion of national sovereignty after years of erosion at the behest of President Obama and other internationalists. “This administration will fight back to protect American constitutionalism, our sovereignty, and our citizens,” Bolton said.
Indian Ocean islands' decolonization dispute gets day in international court
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In the memories of the elders, passed down over bowls of coconut and octopus stew in the shacks of the Mauritian capital, Port Louis, the Chagos Islands were paradise.
Amid debate on prison reform, rising voices from the inside
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Debate over criminal justice reform in the United States in recent years has tackled everything from the death penalty to bail reform to restoring voting rights after a prisoner has completed their sentence. Over the past three weeks, prisoners in more than a dozen states have tried to change that. Hunger strikes took place from California, Washington, and Texas.
Indian territory again? An old Oklahoma murder case spotlights tribal sovereignty
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This lonely roadside ditch is where Mr. Jacobs died one night in August 1999 after being stabbed and beaten by Patrick Murphy. Murphy’s appeal took a while, as capital cases do, and his defenders tried to stay the verdict on grounds of mental incompetency as well as faulty trial procedures and execution protocols in Oklahoma. Murphy is Native American, a member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the fourth-largest tribe in the United States.
A bold bid in the Middle East to rewrite the diplomatic rulebook
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Full details of the Trump administration’s Middle East peace policy have yet to be announced, but its driving principle is not in doubt: that because past administrations haven’t delivered Israeli-Palestinian peace, it’s time to rewrite the diplomatic rulebook. Leading the effort, Mr. Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, has targeted the main obstacles as Palestinian demands for sovereignty over the eastern half of Jerusalem, including the Old City, and a “right of return” for the roughly 5 million descendants of refugees from the first Arab-Israeli war in 1948. Since Israel holds the land on which a Palestinian state would be established, recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital was seen as an important carrot in a negotiating process sure to require compromise on both sides.
In China, a great leap in corporate governance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On Monday, China’s wealthiest individual, Jack Ma of tech giant Alibaba, announced his successor at the company he founded 19 years ago. Notably, in a country where 70 to 80 percent of private enterprises are still family run, Mr. Ma did not name a family member.
Finland used the swastika before the Nazis. Why do they still?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When guests, particularly foreigners, enter the soaring hangar of the Finnish Air Force Museum and find themselves confronted by a menagerie of aircraft adorned with swastikas, they are often taken aback. “We hasten to explain to visitors, our swastika has nothing to do with the Nazi swastika,” says Kai Mecklin, museum director and a former pilot in the Finnish Air Force (FAF).
Readers write: Beacon of hope, change for Supreme Court?, locals’ stories
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recommended: Think you know Latin America? Take our geography quiz. Regarding the July 10 Monitor Daily editorial, “The big question for Trump’s Supreme Court nominee”: Unfortunately, Supreme Court appointments are moving further away from independent decisionmakers and more to ideologues whose minds seem to be made up in advance and who use their legal abilities to support preconceived positions.
Myanmar genocide needs international response, US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Daily Star / Dhaka, Bangladesh
Despite signs of trouble, GOP has a road map for winning in November
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As Election Day nears, it’s looking better and better for Democrats to take over the House. It may be an uphill battle for Republicans, but Rep. Steve Stivers (R) of Ohio feels “pretty good” about his party’s ability to hold the majority, he told reporters at a Monitor Breakfast on Friday. As chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee, he’s charged with winning the House for the GOP.
The truth about South African ‘land seizures’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The government of South Africa is dealing with a challenging problem: Its unemployment rate is at 27 percent (the United States unemployment rate is 3.9 percent) and rising. The stability and prosperity of that country, a democracy whose economy provides a vital anchor for Africa, a continent of 1.2 billion people, is at stake. Cyril Ramaphosa, the president of South Africa (previously a successful businessman), is weighing the possibility of changing the nation’s Constitution to allow the government to take private agricultural land in certain cases.
Amid warnings of Idlib massacre, a last try at diplomacy in Syria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The possibility that Syria's Idlib province would provide the setting for a tragic coda to the humanitarian catastrophe of the country’s seven-year civil war seemed enhanced Friday after a last-ditch summit meeting in Tehran of the main outside powers. Fresh Russian and Syrian airstrikes on Idlib were reported Friday morning. UN Syria mediator Staffan de Mistura said there were “all the ingredients for a perfect storm,” Reuters reported.
For West, Aung San Suu Kyi’s silence complicates response to Rohingya crisis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Three years ago, the world cheered as Nobel Peace Prize winner and democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi swept elections in Myanmar, promising a new dawn after half a century of military dictatorship. The applause has quickly died, however, supplanted by dismay at signs that Western governments’ faith in the new regime was misplaced, and by uncertainty about how to treat the authorities in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. Last week, a United Nations mission investigating the army operation that forced nearly 700,000 minority Muslim Rohingya to flee the country over the past year called for Myanmar’s military leaders to be prosecuted for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes.
Supreme Court hearings are broken, both parties say. How they can be fixed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Backlash to Louis Brandeis’ nomination – fueled in part by his Jewish faith, scholars say – led the Senate to hold its first ever public confirmation hearing for a high court nominee in 1916. Justice Brandeis himself wasn’t required to speak, but the precedent had been set. In 1939, Felix Frankfurter became the first nominee to testify at his own confirmation hearing.
White House 'resistance': act of protection, or unadvisable 'soft coup'?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The op-ed article by an unnamed Trump staffer asserted that a loose team of “unsung heroes” who believe Mr. Trump to be dangerously unstable are secretly working to block the president’s “worst inclinations.” Combined with revelations from Bob Woodward’s upcoming book on the administration, “Fear,” an extraordinary portrait is emerging of a president hemmed in by his own handlers, unaware when some of his orders are ignored, changed, or delayed. After all, Trump faced the voters and was elected president under the rules established by the US Constitution.