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When ‘culture clash’ gets in the way
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This fall marked the 25th anniversary of a famous lecture by Samuel Huntington. The late Harvard University professor predicted that world events would revolve around a “clash” of cultures and religions, or “civilizations,” rather than ideas. The problem with this theory and its bold categories – other than distilling trends down to a phrase like “clash of civilizations” – is that there are too many exceptions.
Why did Broward destroy 2016 ballots? Sanders ally seeks US probe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A South Florida law professor, running to unseat Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, is calling for a federal investigation into the destruction of all ballots cast in the August 2016 Democratic primary in Broward County. The challenger, Tim Canova, has made repeated public records requests and filed a lawsuit seeking access to paper ballots cast in his unsuccessful race last year against the former Democratic National Committee chair in Florida’s 23rd congressional district. Over the past year, the Broward supervisor of elections, Dr. Brenda Snipes, has taken no action on Mr. Canova’s requests to examine the ballots, and she has urged a judge to throw Canova’s lawsuit out.
Columbus Circle without Columbus? New York's statue debate hits Italian
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Joseph Guagliardo was a street kid growing up in Red Hook in Brooklyn, the statue of Christopher Columbus at the southwest corner of Central Park in Manhattan made him swell with pride. “My grandmother had three pictures hanging on a great big wall her entire life: the pope, Jesus, and Columbus,” says Mr. Guagliardo, who heads The National Council of Columbia Associations, a Brooklyn-based coalition of Italian-American civic groups from around the United States that continue to see the explorer as an icon of American resilience.
Trump’s tax plan: Why many middle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Republican leaders promised tax reform would streamline things so much that 9 out of 10 Americans could file their taxes on a postcard. Recommended: What does the federal government do with your money? From policy analysts to journalists, many have criticized President Trump’s tax bill as hurtful to middle-class Americans, and a betrayal of his populist campaign promises – particularly since tax cuts for individuals are set to expire after 2025.
In Malaysia, religious concerns stall child
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“There might be pressures from the outside, but this is where you have to be strong,” says Saira, not her real name, about resisting the unlikely marriage proposal. Lobbyists pressuring the government to criminalize child marriage “were getting quite a lot of momentum” at one stage, says Tham Hui Ying, vice president of Malaysia’s Association of Women Lawyers. It’s religious,” so politicians are “not going to push to outright ban child marriage,” she says.
In Romania, royal funeral prompts regrets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Outside the monumental former royal palace that looms over the main square of Bucharest, mourners have been laying flowers for days in tribute to a long-deposed and exiled king whom few of them ever knew. Crowds are waiting hours to pay their respects to King Michael I of Romania, one of the last two surviving World War II European heads of state.
Kremlin's four
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In just under four hours Mr. Putin answered scores of questions, some of them quite minute and detailed, about domestic and foreign policy. It’s a familiar format for Russians, who see Putin onstage taking questions twice a year: once in a meet-the-media presser like today, and once in a marathon electronic town hall spectacle in which he interfaces with people around the country. Recommended: Sochi, Soviets, and czars: How much do you know about Russia? Opinion surveys suggest that he will walk to victory in presidential polls slated for March – not much of a cliffhanger, since he faces no serious opponent – and be duly ensconced in the Kremlin for another six-year term.
Jerusalem, etc.: How US global leadership has changed under Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The scene at the United Nations Security Council last week was reminiscent of the run-up to the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, when the international community balked at President George W. Bush’s “with us or against us” message to the world body concerning the coming war. This time the impetus for the emergency Security Council meeting was President Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel – a move in opposition to decades of US-backed council resolutions on the holy city’s status – and neither friend nor foe of the United States was having anything to do with it. Recommended: What do you know about Donald Trump?
Does US need special counsel to probe special counsel Mueller?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Taking their cue from President Trump, some congressional Republicans are intensifying charges that special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the 2016 presidential election is suspect because it is laced with pro-Democratic political bias. At one point Rep. Steve Chabot (R) of Ohio suggested that investigators on the Russia probe might as well wear uniforms.
Graceless: Women warned off politics in Zimbabwe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
During his 37 years as Zimbabwe’s prime minister and president, Robert Mugabe ordered the massacre of thousands of political opponents, ran the country’s economy into the ground, and instilled a culture of political violence and paranoia that will likely long outlast him. “Robert Gabriel Mugabe’s legacy, though it was being chipped at in the end, was not being tainted by his own hand,” declared the state-owned Herald newspaper the day after Mr. Mugabe’s resignation.
What Doug Jones's win means for Democrats
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Doug Jones, the Democratic lawyer who snatched a historic Senate win in Alabama on Tuesday, is a man of high ideals. In 1977, when he was still in law school, the young Alabamian skipped contracts class with a friend to watch then-Alabama Attorney General Bill Baxley prosecute the first trial of the 1963 bombing of the 16th St. Baptist Church in Birmingham. Mr. Baxley faced a defense lawyer who was the son of a Birmingham city mayor – two titans going at it.
People once at odds don’t try to even the score
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
After he declared victory over Islamic State (ISIS) on Dec. 9, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi made an important promise. Mr. Abadi is now the latest world leader searching for national reconciliation and a healing of social wounds after the end of an armed conflict or the collapse of an authoritarian regime. In the West African nation of Gambia, a new president, Adama Barrow, plans to set up a truth commission to shed light on the human rights abuses committed during the two-decade rule of his dictatorial predecessor, Yahya Jammeh.
US cities dedicate resources to international negotiations on migrants and refugees
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
More than a dozen US cities have requested a role in global talks on responding to ever-larger waves of people on the move, days after President Trump exited the process. The cities, led by New York and including Chicago, Washington, and Atlanta, hope to take part in negotiations to agree the first international compacts on migration and refugees, due to be adopted by the end of next year. Last week, they joined more than 130 cities around the world seeking formal entry to the two sets of negotiations scheduled to start in February.
Brexit: Could Britain change its mind?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Britain’s exit from the bloc. British Prime Minister Theresa May may be breathing a sigh of relief that London last week overcame the first major hurdle in its negotiating marathon – a deal on the practical aspects of the divorce. In a show of what the press has dubbed “Bregret,” more voters now think Britain was the wrong choice to leave the EU than still think it was the right decision – 47 percent to 42 percent, according to a YouGov poll.
TPS: What it is and how it's changing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is determining the future residency of more than 300,000 Central Americans and Haitians who have been in the United States under the Temporary Protected Status program. Q: WHAT IS TPS? TPS is meant to provide short-term protection from deportation for people who can’t return to their home country because of natural disasters, civil unrest, or health crises.
In Alabama election, a state wrestles with its identity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Loyal supporters of controversial Republican candidate Roy Moore have expressed pride in his unbending, court-defying stand for faith in God, traditional marriage, and the unborn, and his railing against the GOP establishment and “fake news.” It’s the kind of rabble-rousing, nose-thumbing rebelliousness for which Alabama has long been famous. “Alabama’s always had a fiercely independent streak,” explains GOP pollster and consultant Whit Ayres. “George Wallace came from Alabama, and stood in the schoolhouse door to tell the federal government to get lost,” says Mr. Ayres, referring to the Democratic governor of Alabama who opposed integration in the turbulent 1960s, when the state was ground zero for the civil rights movement.
What foiled New York subway attack says about lone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When New York officials gathered outside the Port Authority in Manhattan on Monday to discuss the failed subway bombing a few hours earlier, they expressed a city’s collective sense of relief. On a packed subway system that serves more than 5.6 million riders, its cars and platforms teeming with shoulder-to-shoulder commuters every workday, many New Yorkers have long been aware of the havoc a single explosion could wreak. “Let’s be clear, as New Yorkers, our lives revolve around the subways,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio on Monday.
These 'Star Wars' fans combine dressing up with doing good
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Dozens of members of the “Star Wars” fan groups – the 501st Legion and the Rebel Legion – headed out in the rain dressed as characters ranging from Princess Leia Organa to Stormtroopers to the malevolent Darth Vader himself. Recommended: Could you survive the Star Wars universe? Both the 501st Legion, which represents the dark side of the “Star Wars” universe, and the Rebel Legion, which represents the good guys, have charity and giving back as central aims.
French rock star played on American persona
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Until last week, most Americans had no idea who Johnny Hallyday was and probably could not have cared less – but the feelings were anything but mutual. “Johnny belonged to you, to the public, to France,” President Emmanuel Macron – who, at 39, is well below the average age of most Hallyday fans – told the crowd. Recommended: More than Bastille, Bonaparte, and brie: Test your knowledge of France with our quiz!
Jerusalem: Exhausted and adrift, Palestinians offer muted response to Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When President Trump officially recognized the city of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital last week, with no mention of Palestinian claims to it, critics said it was like tossing a hand grenade into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and warned it would light the Palestinian street on fire. Thousands of Palestinians have indeed taken to the streets to demonstrate, sparking a predictable round of clashes with Israeli security forces that to date have left two protesters killed in Gaza and dozens more Palestinians wounded. A few rockets were fired into southern Israel from Hamas-ruled Gaza as well, eliciting Israeli return fire.
Why GOP faces challenge selling tax cuts to younger voters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Millennials are a key demographic for politicians. They are the biggest group of taxpayers, home buyers, and – soon – voters.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
Readers write: Seeing the other side, more Lebanon coverage, investigation recap, uranium story presentation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? Regarding the Nov. 6 Monitor Daily article “Lebanese departure shows Saudi response to Iran’s rising role”: Please continue covering Lebanon. Regarding the Nov. 13 Monitor Daily article “Mueller investigation: what we’ve learned, and what comes next”: This article summarized weeks of speculation, opinion, and partisan reporting.
North Korea’s Kim will not be intimidated, To get a read on North Korea, watch the US, not China, Why Pope Francis didn’t say ‘Rohingya,’ Can
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“North Korea continued its defiance of the international community with the test of yet another ballistic missile [Nov. 29],” states an editorial. “In response to this latest outrage, concerned governments continue to try to muster a concerted effort to constrain North Korean behavior.... Still, flaws in the strategy to do so remain unfixed and must be remedied.... The challenge is for the U.S. and partners like Japan to articulate a diplomatic settlement that Pyongyang can support.
Taiwan lets go a symbol of ancient days
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On Dec. 6, lawmakers in Taiwan voted to rid the island of a prominent symbol of the country’s past. The law, coming 30 years after Taiwan moved toward democracy, shows how far a people will go to free themselves from a cultural legacy that may hinder progress in individual rights and equality before the law. Chiang’s harsh rule of Taiwan was based on Confucian-style autocracy, or a belief that only a natural social hierarchy with a strong ruler can bring stability.
After many days in court, travel ban nearing final resolution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump’s efforts to restrict entry to the United States for citizens from eight countries came a few steps closer to a final resolution this week. Two federal appeals courts heard arguments on whether the latest version of the travel ban, which would effect 150 million mostly-Muslim people, should be allowed to go ahead. The week began with the Supreme Court allowing Mr. Trump’s latest proclamation – the third iteration of the travel ban – to go into effect pending the decisions from the two appeals courts.
How Congress's inaction has left children's health program on life support
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Dakota Flores sees a future for her children that she never had. Most of CHIP’s funding is federal, so if Congress doesn’t reauthorize funding by the end of the year, the program will start shuttering in early 2018.
Yemen: Why death of ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With the killing of deposed dictator Ali Abdullah Saleh, the warring sides in Yemen have lost their main exit strategy and interlocuter, with experts warning that the parties must be brought to the negotiation table before the conflict spirals further out of control. Days before his death, Mr. Saleh, who ruled Yemen for more than three decades, appeared to offer Saudi leaders and their allies a glimmer of hope that they could wind down their costly and much criticized war in Yemen without looking defeated in front of their publics. Mr. Saleh indicated on Dec. 2 that he was formally breaking ties with the Iran-supported, Shiite Houthi rebels with whom he had most recently been allied, and instead was ready for dialogue with the Saudi-led coalition.
Skirball fire underscores calls for collaborative wildfire management
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On the morning of Dec. 6, Laura Lenk woke to the sound of sirens. As fire trucks whizzed by early that morning, Ms. Lenk thought there must have been an accident on the nearby 405 freeway. Recommended: Climate change: Is your opinion informed by science?
Massachusetts justice system wrestles with how to define 'adult'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Massachusetts could be the first state to view 18-year-olds as juveniles in the criminal justice system. A sweeping criminal justice reform package that would, among other things, raise the age of criminal majority to 19 – meaning that 18-year-olds would be treated as juveniles for most crimes – recently passed in the state Senate. The proposal follows on the heels of widespread reform across the country to raise the age to 18. Ten years ago, 13 states – including Massachusetts – didn't consider 17-year-olds to be juveniles when they were arrested.
In Trump era, US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When a report came out Sunday claiming that President Trump's first official visit to Britain had finally been scheduled for late February, it didn't take long for the backlash to come. Within minutes of The Sunday Times article putting a date – Feb. 26 to 27 – to the controversial visit, activists vowed to organize the biggest protest in British history to greet Mr. Trump. Thousands of Britons – many still angry about Trump’s retweeting last week of anti-Muslim videos published by Britain First, an extreme far-right group – have already pledged to attend, despite the lack of official confirmation of the date.
Franken resignation shows Democrats' line in the sand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Sen. Al Franken (D) of Minnesota’s decision to resign his seat – announced Thursday from the floor of a somber, almost funereal Senate chamber – reflects just how quickly, and comprehensively, his party is moving to stake out an uncompromising position on the issue of sexual misconduct. Calling himself a champion of women, Senator Franken said flatly that some of the allegations against him “are simply not true” and that others he “remembers very differently.” He insisted that as a senator, he has done nothing to bring dishonor on the institution. Franken’s decision follows that of Rep. John Conyers (D) of Michigan, who announced his retirement on Tuesday, in the wake of a series of sexual harassment allegations involving staffers.
Beijing gives migrant workers their marching orders
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For the past five years, Ms. Peng has worked as a cleaner in a Beijing office block. Beijing is no different. Over the past four decades, millions of migrants have flocked here from poor rural China in the hope of finding a better life.